5 Burst results for "Dr Heather Osman"

"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

"Continues our conversation on gird continues without their Heather, Osman and Shannon. Oh, Kelly Dr Austin again, thanks so much for coming down. And joining us, and we're talking gird, you've explained it. It's a reflexive acid from your stomach up into yourself guess, creating sometimes symptoms in your chest. What are the symptoms might you have? So all depends on the severity. So certainly a burning sensation in the chest or throat, some people will feel tightness in the chest. Some people will actually have nausea. Well, hang on here. So you're talking about burning and tightness in the chest. I guess my question is because I'm thinking of all the physicians that have come on and talked talked about heart situations. And I think particularly men often we'll be having a heart attack. And I go I'm not going in because I just got heartburn, right? Yes. And that happens with women too. So this can be a mimicry. And it sometimes it can be hard to sort out in these symptoms. I mean, you talked about maybe after late meal or acidic food or fatty foods. I is there any other time where these symptoms when you're having those. I mean, you need to get in and see a physician or call. Absolutely. So I think if this is something that's new for you. And especially, you know, if you're older or you have other sort of medical conditions, and you're having news chest pain. I would not recommend writing off as reflects. Okay. I think that would be reasons to be seen, and certainly if you're having other symptoms things like shortness of breath. Sweating you're getting numbness in your arms and legs. That's I think you need to be looking at other things besides just reflects. Okay. So if it is reflects in you're going to diagnose it probably mostly by history and physical, and what the patient is describing how do you treat it probably the easiest things are making some lifestyle modifications. Okay. So if you are overweight or you have had some weight gain, certainly weight loss would probably help with that dietary. Modifications and kind of excluding or limiting some of the foods. We talked about earlier those spicy fatty foods things like that can help not eating late in the evening. So kind of limiting your food intake, you know, in the hour or two before you go to bed some people find that just raising the head of their bed, even like four to six inches can help gravity help you out. Okay. If those things aren't enough there are medications. So if this happens to you every once in a while, you have more reflux instead of a diagnosis of GERD even things like TOMS enroll aids are appropriate. If you having it more often there are other medications, and those are there's a class of medication called H, two blockers. So those are sort of Rene dean, which is Zantac which you can buy most local stores, and then you can get prescriptions or even over the counter a class of medications called P P is which are proton pump inhibitors those medications are essentially decreasing the output of acid in the stomach the p p is are. So they make the stomach con. Tents less acidic in decrease in that acidity. I mean, there's that interfere with any candidate gestion, and these people might their knees Queloz or consequences of those. Of course, there are all medication right? There was and so talking to your doctor about side effects, and especially I think there's some new data coming out about sort of chronic use of this class of medications called PP is there may be some issues with that specifically related to some vitamin deficiencies and things like that. So those are important to talk to your provider about if you're going to be prescribed, and especially if you're going to be on it for years, some people will have these symptoms five or ten years, and then you need to be talking to your physician because you need screening, and you should also be aware of some of the side effects of those medications. Unfortunately, we're out of time, but you provided us great information on gird. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. It's been a pleasure. Thanks to Dr Heather Osman. More information at everettclinic dot com. GERD GERD, and there are over the counter medications, you.

GERD Dr Heather Osman Kelly Dr Austin heartburn Rene dean reflux six inches ten years
"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

"I guess, Dr Heather Austin primary care physician at the clinic at smoky point GERD, gird is a form of well, basically, I've had it. It's kind of a heartburn issue or a SAFA Geel issue. Is that boy that's pretty good, Tom? That's zek. What biz Curtis gastro esophageal reflux disorder? It's acid reflux that we're all gonna experience at one time or another. So we're going to talk about that today. All right, if you're experiencing something like that. Here's what you need to know with Dr Heather, Osman and Shannon. Oh, kelly. Doctor Osman, welcome. How are you doing? I'm doing wonderful. It's good to be here today. Well, it's good to have you here today because we're talking about GERD, and before we get into that tell us about your practice your training your interest. I mean the day in the life of Dr Austin? Yeah. Absolutely. So I work with the Everett clinic. I am located up at their smoky point location just north of Everett. I've just been there about a year. So I'm one of their fairly new providers up there, the north end, I love it. So I grew up in the south end. So now, I'm a nor sound person. That's correct. Yeah. We're going to medical school. I went to school at the university of Washington. Okay. All right. That's okay. That's great program, and you didn't undergrad there, and then medical school there. So my is a little bit more twisting than that. So I did three years at central and then got my undergraduate degree from the university of Washington, but didn't do all four years there and medical school at university Washington for the whole time, and then what about any advanced training in the areas of interest. Absolutely. Well at the university of Washington, I did not do any advanced training. But my residency was in the United States navy, and I served eight years with them just got out last year. And then the Everett clinic is my first job back here in the Pacific northwest. Well, okay. First of all, I mean, welcome back in welcome in the north end. And then lastly, thank you so much. For your service. You know, what a great sacrifice that you that you folks making being a navy doctor. What's that like, it's a pretty amazing experience? I had a great time with that job. It was a really good experience. For me. I got great training with the navy and you'll never work with a better group of people. So it was really a privilege. Okay. Let's talk about gird. Tell us what it is. So gird stands for gastro esophageal reflects disease, but it's much easier to say gird, obviously, so what's going on there? Basically, it is a more chronic and complicated reflects so almost everybody gets a episode of heartburn. Most of us are familiar with what that feels like and sometimes can be associated with overindulgence, but gird is a little bit more chronic than that. So we sort of think people that are having symptoms more than a couple times a week that might be a sign of gird. And let's talk anatomically gird. If you're having gird anatomically what's going on. I mean, let's discuss the fact that, you know, your digestive system particular stuff. Mc is various city, and maybe getting a little bit of that anatomical physiological standpoint of why we have asked that reflects up into our throat in his office. So are gastrointestinal system is if you think about it and simplistic terms kind of big tube, right? So food and certainly needs to be broken down by the acids in our stomach and GERD really is reflecting when that acidic contact comes back up into the office. And so we don't have a lot of pain receptors in the stomach, but in our office, we certainly do. And so we'll feel that is a lot of pain and pressure in the chest. And sometimes people can actually get some sow excuse me sore throat from that, and you get a sore throat, and you get a little bit horse snus. A lot of say in the morning symptoms a little bit more pronounced, maybe I would say probably more classically would be in the evening. So you're having later meals, you go to lay flat and some of that contents from your stomach is gonna come up into your SAFA guests, and that tends to be more common time that we will get it and windy most people start seeing this as far as presentation goes. So it can happen to anybody at any time. It probably is more common as we get older. If you have had things like recent weight gain that can sometimes make it worse as well. There's certainly a huge component of diet that plays into that. So there are definitely foods that we know can kind of make reflux symptoms worse. And those are things we're thinking sorta acidic foods, spicy foods really fatty foods for some people caffeine or red wine or even chocolates can make this worse in normally in a normal situation that acid in the stomach that's digesting that food doesn't reflect back up because you have. I've a sphinx there or a restrictor basically, that's usually when its function it keeps that acid in the stomach, correct? Yeah. And so that's the case for most of us all of us probably have a little bit of reflux. But most.

GERD university of Washington Everett clinic navy heartburn Mc Dr Heather Austin Doctor Osman reflux Everett Tom Dr Austin Dr Heather caffeine Pacific northwest kelly university Washington eight years three years
"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

"The mother of a college basketball player who took her own life is suing. What are the biggest sororities in the country? We get more from ABC's. Janai Norman, hit a lawsuit filed this week Felicia hankins alleges her daughter Jordan hankins a nineteen year old sophomore at Northwestern University who was subjected to physical abuse, including paddling verbal abuse mental abuse financial exploitation, sleep deprivation. Items being thrown in dumped on her and other forms of hazing intended to humiliate and demean her while pledging the alpha Kappa alpha sorority in the fall of twenty sixteen Jordan was found dead in her dorm room in January twenty seventeen and the lawsuit. Hankins claims that her daughter told members of the sorority that the hazing was triggering her PTSD causing severe, anxiety, and depression, and that she was having suicidal thoughts. Her family's attorney telling ABC news Jordan was seeking to join an organization she believed was dedicated to sisterhood and personal and professional development. Instead, we lead to that aka failed to take action to stop the abuse resulting in hankins taking her own life and overnight. The sorority issued a statement saying it is deeply saddened by the death of our sister. Jordan and episode has a zero tolerance policy for hazing. But still that fairly says sorority didn't do anything to stop it in this case ABC's today. No one time for lifebeat now with komo's marina Rockinger in partnership with I r g physical enhanced therapy. Indigestion and burning maybe you occasionally suffer from acid reflex. But if it's happening a bit more frequently and causing you a lot of misery. It could be gastro esophageal reflux disease or GERD primary care physician, Dr Heather Osman from the Everett clinic explains the difference. Basically, it is a more, chronic and complicated reflex. So almost everybody gets an episode heartburn. Most of us are familiar with what that feels like and sometimes can be associated with overindulgence, but gird is a little bit more chronic than that. So we sort of think people that are having symptoms more than a couple times a week that might be a sign of gird..

Jordan hankins Hankins Felicia hankins ABC basketball Janai Norman Indigestion PTSD Northwestern University GERD marina Rockinger Dr Heather Osman depression komo Everett clinic attorney nineteen year
"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

"It's a northwest lifestyle weekend on KOMO news. I are health talk continues our conversation on gird continues without their Heather, Osman and Shannon. Oh, Kelly docked Austin again. Thank you so much for coming down. And joining us, and we're talking gird, you've explained it. It's a reflexive acid from your stomach up into your SAFA guests creating sometimes symptoms in your chest. What are the symptoms might you have? So all that depends on the severity. So certainly a burning sensation in the chest or throat, some people will feel tightness in the chest. Some people will actually have nausea. Well, hang on here. So you're talking about burning and tightness in the chest. I guess my question is because I'm thinking of all the physicians that have come on and talk to talked about heart situations. Yup. I think particularly men often we'll be having a heart attack. And I go I'm not going in because I just got heartburn, right? Yes. And that happens with women too. So this can be a Mimika. And it sometimes it can be hard to sort out are these symptoms. I mean, you talked about maybe after late meal or acidic food or fatty foods. I is there any other time where the symptoms when you're having those. I mean, you need to get in and see a physician or call. Absolutely. So I think if this is something that's new for you. And especially, you know, if you're older or you have other sort of medical conditions, and you're having news chest pain. I would not recommend writing that off as reflex. Okay. I think that would be reasons to be seen, and certainly if you're having other symptoms things like shortness of breath. Sweating you're getting numbness in your arms and legs. That's I think you need to be looking at other things besides just reflects smokey. So if it is reflects in you're going to diagnose it probably mostly by history and physical, and and what the patient is describing how do you treat it probably the easiest things are making some lifestyle modifications. Okay. So if you are overweight or you have had some weight gain, certainly weight loss would probably help with that dietary. Modifications and kind of excluding or limiting some of the foods. We talked about earlier those spicy fatty foods things like that can help not eating late in the evening. So kind of limiting your food intake, you know, in the hour or two before you go to bed some people find that just raising the head of their bed, even like four to six inches can help gravity help you out. Okay. If those things aren't enough there are medications. So if this happens to you every once in a while, you have more reflux instead of a diagnosis of GERD even things like TOMS enroll Rolaids are appropriate. If you having it more often there are other medications, and those are there's a class of medication called H, two blockers. So those are sort of the Rene dean, which is Zantac which you can buy in most local stores, and then you can get prescriptions or even over the counter a class of medications called P is which are proton pump inhibitors and those medications are essentially decreasing the output of acid in the stomach the p p is are. So they make the stomach. Contents less acidic in decreasing that acidity. I mean, there's that interfere with any kind of digestion, these people might their knees Queloz consequences of those. Of course, there are all medication right figured there was Yup. And so talking to your doctor about side effects, and especially I think there's some new data coming out about sort of chronic use of this class of medications called p P is there may be some issues with that specifically related to some vitamin deficiencies and things like that. So those are important to talk to your provider about if you're going to be prescribed, and especially if you're going to be on it for years, some people will have these symptoms five or ten years, and then you need to be talking to your physician because you need screening, and you should also be aware of some of the side effects of those medications. Unfortunately, we're out of time, but you provided us great information on gird. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. It's been a pleasure. All right. Thanks to Dr Heather Osman. More information at everettclinic dot com. GARD GERD, and there are over the counter medications, you take.

Dr Heather Osman GERD KOMO heartburn Kelly Austin Mimika Rene dean reflux six inches ten years
"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr heather osman" Discussed on KOMO

"Lifestyle weekend on KOMO news. This is geez. Health talk to Tom hutler and Cheryl Kelly. All right. We're back to the I guess Dr Heather Austin primary care physician at the ever clinic at smoky point GERD, gird is a form of well, basically, I've had it. It's kind of a heartburn issue or esophageal issue, isn't it? Boy, that's pretty good, Tom. That's exactly what it is Curtis gastro esophageal reflux disorder. It's acid reflux that we're all gonna experience at one time or another. So we're gonna talk about that today. All right, if you're experiencing something like that. Here's what you need to know with Dr Heather, Osman and Shannon. Oh, kelly. Dr Osman, welcome. How are you doing? I'm doing wonderful. It's good to be here today. Well, it's good to have you here today because we're talking about GERD, and before we get into that tell us about your practice your training. Kennedy your interest. I mean the day in the life of Dr Austin? Yeah. Absolutely. So I work with the Everett clinic, I'm located up at their smoky point location, just north of Everett. I've just been there about a year. So I'm one of their fairly new providers. Up there. North end. I love it. So I grew up in the south end. So now I met nor sound person northern now. That's correct. Yeah. Where'd you go to medical school? I went to school at the university of Washington. Okay. All right. That's okay. That's a great program, and you there and then medical school there. So my story is a little bit more twisting than that. So I did three years at central and then got my undergraduate degree from the university of Washington, but didn't do all four years there and medical school at university washing correct for the whole time. And then what about any advanced training in the areas of interest? Absolutely. Well at the university of Washington, I did not do any advanced training. But my residency was in the United States navy, and I served eight years with them just got out last year. And then the Everett clinic is my first job back here in the Pacific northwest. Well, okay. First of all, I mean, welcome back and welcome in the north end. And then lastly, thank you so much for your service. You know, wh what a great sacrifice that you that. You folks. Make mean, a navy doctor. What's that? Like, it's a pretty amazing experience. I had a great time with that job. It was a really good experience. For me. I got great training with the navy and you'll never work with a better group of people. So it was really a privilege. Okay. Let's talk about gird tells what it is so girds stands for gastro esophageal reflux disease, but it's much easier to say gird, obviously, so what's going on there. Basically, it is a more, chronic and complicated reflux. So almost everybody gets an episode heartburn. Most of us are familiar with what that feels like and sometimes can be associated with overindulgence, but gird is a little bit more chronic than that. So we sort of think people that are having symptoms more than a couple times a week that might be a sign of gird. And let's talk anatomically gird. If you're having gird anatomically what's going on. I mean, let's discuss the fact that, you know, your digestive system, particularly stomach is various city, and maybe getting a little bit of that anatomical physiological standpoint of why we have acid reflexes up into our. Throat in a office. So the gastrointestinal system is if you think on it in simplistic terms, kind of a big tube, right and swallow your food and certainly needs to be broken down by the acids in our stomach and GERD really is reflecting when that acidic contact comes back up into the office. And so we don't have a lot of pain receptors in the stomach, but in our Asaf against we certainly do. And so we'll feel that as a lot of pain and pressure in the chest. And sometimes people can actually get some sow excuse me sore throat from that, and you can get a sore throat, and you can get a little bit of hoarseness. Will say in the morning symptoms. A little more pronounced, maybe I would say probably more classically would be in the evening. So you're having later meals, you go to lay flat and some of that content from your stomach is gonna come up into your Asaf against and that tends to be a more common time that we will get it and do most people start seeing this as far as presentation goes. So it can happen to anybody at any time. It probably is more common as we get older. If you have had things like recent weight gain that can sometimes make it worse as well. There's certainly a huge component of diet that plays into that. So there are definitely foods that we know can kind of make reflux symptoms worse. And those are things we're thinking sorta acidic foods, spicy foods really fatty foods for some people caffeine or red wine or even chocolates can make this worse. And normally in a normal situation that acid in the stomach that's digesting that food doesn't reflux back up because you have. A senior there or a restrictor, basically. That's usually when it's functioning it keeps that acid in the stomach, correct. Yeah. And so that's the case for most of us all of us probably have a little bit of reflux. But most of us probably don't feel that other.

GERD university of Washington Everett clinic Cheryl Kelly Asaf Tom hutler reflux Dr Osman Dr Heather Austin KOMO heartburn Dr Austin navy Curtis Dr Heather Everett United States hoarseness Pacific northwest caffeine