17 Burst results for "Dr Halina"

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Coming up mayo clinic. Qna when there's a cancer diagnosis. It's actually a diagnosis family. It's not just for the patient because the cascading effects affect so many people today on mayo clinic. Qna we'll look at what caregivers can expect when a family member is diagnosed with cancer advice on how to best care for a loved one and how caregivers can navigate this difficult time. It's managing communication with families and friends about what's been going on how things are going and that's a lot of work. It's a lot of work to kind of keep up with those things. It can be overwhelming. It can be stressful. It can be burdensome. But i think some people also find a lot of joy in it to welcome everyone to mayo clinic a. I'm dr halina gazelle when someone we love has cancer. We may find ourselves in the role of a caregiver. Cancer caregivers can be partners. Family members or friends. They are rarely trained for the job of caregiving but they often become indispensable taking on tasks like administering medications helping with side effects communicating with the cancer care team and so much more joining us to discuss this today is dr joan griffin. A phd researcher in healthcare delivery at mayo clinic. Welcome to the program. Joan thank you. I'm so happy to be here. Thanks for inviting me. Well i am very excited to learn about this topic. Today i practice both pain and palliative medicine and certainly. I think that what we talk about today will help me take better care of my patients as well and understand some of their their issues. Can you tell me joan. What how do you define a cancer caregiver. Yeah you know. It's it's uh a deceptively simple question and a very complicated and answer in it. All kind of depends on who you are and what lens. You're looking at this from so as a researcher. I tend to think of this and pretty specific terms i tend to think of family caregiving as a personal services that somebody who provides personal services are support to allow someone to meet their physical mental emotional needs and allows them to function at a at an optimal level that provides them comfort allows them to be capable in their in their abilities to do things and keep them safe and so i think that cancer caregiving is difference then dementia caregiving different than stroke caregiving But the the definition issue is really interesting because in my conversations with providers and the research that i've done with with providers they often have a different definition of caregiving and caregivers often have a different definition of what caregiving is and. I'm sure you've seen this in your practice to where people say. I'm not a carry. Ram just their spouse. Or i'm not a caregiver i'm just the daughter and they don't really sort of engage and and Take on this this title..

mayo clinic cancer dr halina gazelle dr joan griffin Joan joan dementia
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Coming up on mayo clinic in day you know. Today's stressful on kind of rapidly. Changing work environments. I think just taking that little bit of time to tell someone. Hey i really appreciate the work that you're doing really goes a long way. I think in sort of humanizing what we've been used to for many years that we really lost in the last year and a half with the pandemic working from home during the pandemic has ushered in a whole new set of challenges to balancing work time and family time. Today we look at tips to bring some normalcy to life can can be as easy as taking a walk stepping outside and doing a fifteen minute walk around the block around a couple of blocks just for that mental and physical break before they transition into families and i think that's a really good idea for the body and welcome everyone to mayo clinic. Dr halina gonzaga. The covert nineteen pandemic has forced us to readjusted many ways including shifting to remote work for many individuals. Working from home office has many benefits. But it also comes with quite a few challenges with me today to discuss this. Or occupational medicine specialist. Dr laura breer and chair of the division of preventative occupational and aerospace medicine. Doctor clayton cole. Thanks for being here. today. I'm delighted to have you both here and clay before we start. Would you tell me and our listeners. What do occupational medicine aerospace medicine had to do with each other sure. So occupational medicine is one of these sub specialties of the american board of preventive medicine. Aerospace medicine is all another. One of those sub specialties. As well and so in our division we have specialized programs for a variety of individuals employed across a variety of occupations and that includes those in safety-sensitive jobs like healthcare providers are physician health.

mayo clinic Dr halina gonzaga Dr laura breer division of preventative occup clayton cole american board of preventive m
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Coming up on mail clinic. Qna the vast majority of sarcomas happened for reasons. We just don't understand and it is a continued area of interest because the more we know about what causes cancer. The better we can be treating it. Sarcoma is the general term for a broad group of cancers that beginning the bones and in the soft tissue with more than seventy types of sarcomas. The correct diagnosis is key. For the best treatment. And management of these cancers tween now diagnosing sarcoma can be very challenging and there have been studies that have shown that over forty percent of diagnoses are changed when they're reviewed by sarcoma theologist. So that specialty care really starts at the time of diagnosis. Welcome everyone to mayo clinic. Dr halina gonzaga sarcoma is general term for a broad group of cancers. The begin in the bones and in the software connective tissues in the body. Sarcomas that began in the bones or call bone cancer and sarcoma that forms in the tissues including muscle. Fat blood vessels nerves. Tendons in the lining of joints is called soft tissue sarcoma here to discuss the the various sarcomas and their management with us is dr britney. Scientists medical oncologist at mayo clinic. Thanks for being here today. Britney thanks so much for having me. Well i love to learn something new every day and sarcomas or not something that i know very much about and i know that it is sarcoma and so what a good time for us to learn a little something. Absolutely tell me a little bit about what s sarcoma. And how common are they. Well you're not alone in feeling like you don't know much about sarcomas. These are rare. Cancers and in adults sarcomas comprise less than one percent of new cancers diagnosed every year. So most people never hear about sarcoma. And we're so grateful to have sarcoma awareness month to try and bring more education to the population about this rare tumor sarcomas as you mentioned can happen in what we call the connective tissues of the body or the things that hold us together..

sarcoma Cancers Dr halina gonzaga sarcoma mayo clinic dr britney bone cancer Britney
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Coming up on mayo clinic. Qna we are entering the most dangerous phase of the pandemic for unvaccinated people. We are already seeing the warning signs of that. The people who are in are the people who are unvaccinated. The people who are getting disease severe enough to go into the hospital are the unvaccinated if you have travel plans this fourth of july. Listen up dr greg. Poland explains the risks and has some tips for those who have had the shot. And those who haven't if you're going to a location where immunization rates are low and community burden or numbers of cases are high. You're going into a dangerous zone. And you had better be immunized or take really strict precautions of masking and distancing and to some degree hand sanitization. Welcome everyone to mayo clinic. I'm dr halina gazelle fca. Were recording this podcast and monday. June the twenty eight twenty twenty one. The fourth of july is almost upon us. It's next weekend and for many families. This will mean gathering together for a summer celebration which of those celebrations look like in the time of covid particularly for those who are not vaccinated yet. Well here to discuss this with us. Today as dr greg poland infectious disease expert a vaccine expert and virologist. Thanks for being here greg. Of course good morning. How wonderful to.

dr greg mayo clinic dr halina gazelle Poland dr greg poland greg
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Coming up on mayo clinic. Qna but it's trying to maintain function in daily life and maintain as much independence as possible. Alzheimer's disease is a devastating illness. That can impact the lives of those diagnosed and their loved once recently. The fda granted approval of a new alzheimer's drug to fight this illness. Our experts weigh in on the effectiveness of the new drug. I believe that part of the fda's response here was. This is a fatal disease. People will progress. They will die from this disorder and we do not have anything else right now to offer them. Welcome everyone to mayo clinic. Qa i'm dr jake strands sitting in for dr halina gazelle com earlier this week. The food and drug administration approved edge. Map to treat. Alzheimer's disease can add targets amyloid plaques in the brain that are believed to be an essential component of alzheimer's disease but six million people in the united states thirty million people worldwide are currently living with alzheimer's disease a progressive brain disorder. That is the most common cause of dementia. What does this mean for alzheimer's patients here to discuss mayo clinic neurologist and director of mayo clinics alzheimer's disease research center dr ronald petersen and male clinic neurologist. David not men. Let's start with dr peterson. Can you just tell us a little bit about what this drug is designed to do to help. Patients with alzheimer's disease sure j. So as you can imagine is a monoclonal antibody that is designed to be infused into the mud strain get into the brain and remove amyloid plaques from the brain to the defining features of alzheimer's disease or the presence of amyloid plaques towel based tangles. This drug is designed to get the amyloid plaque out of the rain or at least reduce the amount of amyloid in the brain that. That's really helpful. I i think. I imagine a lot of patients when it first heard. The news of there was a new treatment for alzheimer's may have been envisioning pill. There's mother pills that are used for for alzheimer's symptoms at some may be aware of you mentioned this infusion What is it. Look like. For a patient as they as they might be a available for a treatment regimen. What does that mean for their treatment. Course so he from patients were to receive this drug he or she would come in to a medical facility. Have an intravenous line put in the arm and then sit there in the chair while the drug is infused for about an hour and then watch for a little while and then dismissed so it does require infusion usually at a medical standard occasionally there are these home infusion services so conceivably it could be done at home but generally in a medical center to monitor it for safety. That's really helpful. And i think maybe just turning a little bit to some of the newsreel. Recently 'cause i know imagine there's a lot of questions that you all been fielding lots of questions you know this subject to a pretty intense debate i i work with a lot of patients who have already asked to some of my colleagues questions. I have family members who have alzheimer's disease they're calling with questions. Maybe dr not meant. I could ask you..

David united states thirty million people mayo clinics six million people first mayo clinic about an hour dr earlier this week dr ronald petersen Alzheimer dr jake strands peterson alzheimer's halina gazelle com alzheimer of patients questions
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome everyone to mayo clinic. Qna dr halina gonzaga. Thanks for joining me today. Three d. printing has come a long way in recent years and it is the process of making a solid object out of a digital computer file at male clinic three d. printing is used in many areas both clinical and surgical for instance. It can help a surgeon plan surgery by producing model ahead of time here to share with us about this today and teach us. Something is dr jonathon. Morris is a neuro radiologist here at mayo. Thanks for being with us. j. I know that you run the three d. printing lab here at mail. And how widely is this used in medicine at mayo clinic so we've been three d. printing at mayo clinic for about sixteen years now i persons are in two thousand one a back at the nih and over that time period we basically have spread to where we're involved in every searchable south specialty at mayo clinic. So we incorporate Many of our surgeons into the planning process of these and we use radiographic data to make patient specific either anatomic model for complex surgery or we use them to make a patient specific osteotomy guides which are three hundred objects that we screw on bone or soft tissue on that only at patient guide saws to the right place at the right angle. So we've spread far foreign wide since we started. And i think it's because of all the use case scenarios we've been able to prove that is impact speech. Gator mayo clinic. Now we also do things for research in education but were predominantly clinical service or centralized added manufacturing. Which is another word for three d. printing hub at mayo clinic based in the hospital. So we're not in a department. That's off campus. Where not vendor where five flights above the operating room and surges clinicians. Come on rounds home. During the day with real problems that we saw and then we do. Every step of manufacturing in the hospital up into us to start allies will medical devices..

mayo clinic Qna dr halina gonzaga dr jonathon mayo Morris nih Gator mayo clinic
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome everyone to Mayo Clinic Q&A. I'm dr. Halina gazelka. Thanks for joining us today as most of America prepares to fall back daylight savings time. We gain an extra hour of sleep. Does that sound wonderful? Well, you think it would be a good thing. But how do these time changes affect our bodies are overall patterns and our sleep Health here to discuss this today is dr. Lewis Grand a sleep medicine specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Thanks for being with us doctor crime. My pleasure of good to see you. Well good to see you too and sleep is one of my favorite topics. So I'm excited to discuss that with you today. Can you talk about how daylight savings time and even the change in just an hour or two a different parts of the Year affect us? Well, it's an important question and most people I think suspect because it's just an hour healthier really mad. But the reality is that it does matter studies done on different continents show that the rate of motor vehicle accidents increases for the week after off the clocks change in many different parts of the world. So it's not something that we should simply dismiss and discount tell us about the circadian clock or biological clock how it works in life and what it means to us. Well, the human brain has a clock function. It's controlled by a number of rather intricate molecular mechanisms and it is about a twenty-four-hour cycle humans do best if our schedule is consistent and we go to bed at the same time and get up at the same time each night after day because that's when our clock is really optimized. However, sometimes the community clock changes and we have to play catch-up. So what how long facts can either losing or gaining extra sleep have on us no sleep is one of those things where it's extraordinarily beneficial to the brain to the cardiovascular system to the ability to fight off infections to the body's immune response a change even so little as an hour could affect a person's ability to concentrate the attention to detail and as I said earlier, we know that people have more difficulty staying out of trouble while driving after we change the cause which suggests that with that one hour of sleep is something that makes a difference and the Autumn one place is fall back we get an extra hour of sleep but it also is darker than earlier in the evening was that have any ill effects on us humans are expecting to be awake when it's light outside and for people who live near the equator that is more or less the case, but People who live at higher altitudes higher latitudes. It's a different scenario where tilt of the Earth the day maybe quite a bit shorter than in terms of some exposure and light and in that case we use modern technology to augment natural light with artificial light. My suggestion would be if a person had difficulty in the dark to try your best when you first wake up to turn on the lights and be in a bright place and replace what natural Sunshine isn't able to do up North were always talking about this having longer longer nights and shorter days during the winter and we sort of countdown toward it. Do you have any tips that for people who do struggle with the extra dark and turns of sleep and mood I suppose you know one thing is to try to use artificial light sources, which may be in the form of an overhead light. It may be a marriage. Upgrade light where person actually deliberately obtains our light box and sits in front of it. It also could be the light from one's electronic device that doesn't have as much research to support it. But it's something that may play a role for a person who's having trouble getting started in the morning, but other things are important as well to get exercise that can really help signal to the body. It's time to get going in the morning and to live as healthy a lifestyle as possible. So it's not just about light. There are other kind of lifestyle. Is that play into this is as well. I was fascinated by what you said earlier about sleep health because I've even read things in the literature and you know, I don't know how well studied these are that that even with the can be affected by the poor sleeper lack of sleep and that that may play a part in the development of dementia even sleep Health sounds like a very important thing off. I'm wondering if you could give us some tips on how we can improve our sleep hygiene if we struggle with it. Well, my first comment would be don't shortchange yourself on sleep. I do think one reason may be like savings times six people hard as many people are already working with a minimum of sleep and they can't afford to lose any more. It can be very tempting to be productive way into the evening and also get up early in order to start doing things the next day really do what you can to protect their time to sleep with your brain and your heart really benefits and getting adequate sleep. If you have a consistent schedule that helps I don't consume caffeinating happening Products off to bed time that may cause you to have poor quality sleep at night where you aren't aware, but you're having many brief Awakenings that take a toll on the birth. Ability to get a good night's sleep physical exercise matters having regular meals, but not a heavy meal right before bedtime being very careful about a pack a rich meal a spicy meal that may promote heartburn and GI difficulties while you sleep so they're quite a few lifestyle actions that can really improve sleep or if ignored for some sleep. I was interested in what you said earlier about how we do well with a schedule probably part of our circadian rhythm or biologic clock phone number when I was a child if it got past 9 p.m. And we had visitors my dad would go put his pajamas on as a clue to them that it was time for them to go home so he could go to bed. I would taking it quite that far, but I do feel a schedule for people who have more difficulty following a schedule. There are some sleep aids and I'm thinking of melatonin which I believe affects your biological clock. What time? Think about the use of that melatonin is something the brain makes that as we age the brain does not make as much and so it is one thing that is quite commonly rep as a supplement to boost the brain's own melatonin to try to have a more regular schedule, you know, as always be careful about the amount but it's generally felt to Be an Effective and fairly safe way to try and keep your sleep-wake schedule more regular. Well, thank you so much. You're crying for being here today. And this is a great topic as sleep is important to all of us are thanks to Mayo Clinic sleep specialist doctor Louis crying for being here today and speaking with us about daylight savings time and sleep hygiene. I hope that you learn something along with me today. Thanks for being here. We wish you a great day and good sleep Mayo Clinic Q&A is a production of the Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get And subscribe to your favorite podcast. Asks to see a list of all Mayo Clinic podcasts visit News Network. Mayoclinic.org, then click on podcasts. We hope you'll offer a review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo. Thanks for listening and be well..

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic News Network melatonin Mayo dr. Halina gazelka America Arizona dr. Lewis Grand physical exercise heartburn doctor Louis
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Dr Halina Gonzaga will recording this broadcast on August the twenty four, th twenty twenty. You're with us again today we have Dr Greg Poland are virologist and infectious disease expert from Mayo Clinic. And today I'm really looking forward to this greg because we're going to be answering some questions from our listeners. It's great. Yes. Should be fun to find out what people want to know about. Our first question is about hand sanitizer for there's been a lot in the news about us on this. One of our listeners states that they have seen some issues with hand sanitizers that have been discussed. In the news, how do you know if one a safe? What's wrong with the ones that are out there that we're supposed to avoid and how do we know which ones they are? First of all, it might be worth saying that the best thing we can do for hand sanitation is washing with soap and water. The hand rubs or hand liquid hand sanitizers are a second best they were but they don't work well when your hands are soiled with visible dirt or have mucus on them. So it is a second best nonetheless when you're out and about you don't really have a choice. So you WanNa do is you want to select a hand sanitizer with at least sixty, ideally seventy percent ethyl alcohol, and you do not want to hand sanitizer that has methyl alcohol. Methyl alcohol is a Taxon and should not be used unfortunately what unethical Producers are doing in order to meet the demand and sell their product for hand sanitizer using methyl alcohol, which is very cheap the other thing that can fool you is that it can say ethyl alcohol. And rarely says more than that. You do not WANNA product that lists one pro panel alcohol that is also a toxin. So how would the average consumer know that you've pick up your phone? You can go to the FDA website put in the product number and boom it will tell you whether this is an approved or unapproved hand sanitizer. The other thing I want to comment on is too old hand sanitizers that do not have ethyl alcohol and they have very a winsome names herbal green. You know things like that. Those are ineffective and should not be used I'm finally why the prohibition about methyl alcohol as I mentioned, it's toxin and to unfortunate things happen. One is that little children could use enough of it to experience some symptoms of methanol poisoning but the other really unfortunate one and it seems hard to believe. But hand sanitizer is not infrequently used as an alcohol ingestion substitute among alcoholics and. When that happens that can be disastrous. I've worked enough years in emergency rooms to see what methanol poisoning can do. It can completely ruin your liver. It can cause profound CNS central nervous system side effects. So it is truly a toxin and should be avoided greg do hand sanitizers ever expire now that's a great question, and in fact, all products they do expire over time generally speaking. The ethanol based hand sanitizers have about a three year window and the reason for a why it has a three year window is that the alcohol content decreases over time and you know we've mentioned many times that we wanted a hand rubbed it has sixty to seventy percent alcohol content. Once it falls below sixty percent, it begins to lose its effectiveness. So the expiration is based on that. About three year time window I have one other question that I'd like to throw in I have seen that many of the large distilleries in the United States have volunteered to close down the production limited so that they could make hand sanitizer can people make their own hand sanitizer in their home and does the alcohol that they may have in their liquor cabinets have anything to do with it. Again, you know don't want a complete drink alcohol with hand sanitizer but you know commendable has been an and we've seen it here at Mayo Clinic of people volunteering companies volunteering to provide us with some of the ingredients that you need for a safe and effective and sanitizer, and as I say that's that's to be commended. I think the issue involves the idea that could you make your own and you can go on the Internet, FDA and others do have a recipe. In fact has a recipe for how to make your own. Hand sanitizer with ethyl alcohol kind would be in rubbing alcohol that you can buy and you can safely make your own because it. It has been a problem. Let's face it to to buy a hand sanitizer and unfortunately a number of producers have. Tripled and quadrupled the price of it. So definitely, you can do that again far better is wash your hands with soap and water. So when the liquor companies are making hand sanitizer, they're changing type of alcohol they used to reduce it will no. They're actually using an ethanol which is appropriate. They are not using methods alcohol Greg. The next listener would like to know about plastic face shields. So you know We were all told that we should be wearing masks in many communities and states have instituted. Some are regulation around wearing masks and Thera- people who are wearing the plastic face shields along with masks but also people who are just wearing the plastic facial themselves. Thinking the bats protective is just wearing the face shields acceptable or does one need to parrot with a mass and In my opinion, the face shield alone is inadequate compared to the face shield plus mass. So at Mayo Clinic is you know we are wearing when we're with patients were wearing a mask and Faye shield or some kind of eye protection the problem with a face shield and we're talking about it as it's one entity obscene many different types and therein lies the problem. But the problem with a face shield is that you still have air you're breathing in that air has to come from around or under knee the face shield. Now it's value is in reducing exposure to the larger droplets, somebody coughs or sneeze. You actually have a physical barrier for the large droplets and you have your mask underneath for the smaller and the aerosolize droplets. If. There was somebody who for some valid reason could not wear a mask. A inched yield would be better than nothing for example, but is a face shield alone of the same efficacy as face mask. The data does not support that CDC does not recommend that. So I would say, no at this point that's very helpful in this this listener indicated that there had an issue with asthma was having difficulty wearing face masks or was exempt from doing so in there are few. Individuals who have disorders where they cannot wear face masks. But in that case, one of the facials covers the mouth. I wouldn't. I wouldn't be surprised to lean it if in the evolution of face shields that we get to a point, for example, where we have a fait, she'll that goes to the ears and then goes below the Chin with cloth. That would that would in essence act as a kind of mask so that even though air is being breathed through, it would nonetheless. Filter in some in some way that there are other difficulties associated with it. Some people get headaches the thing I don't like about it and and I wear it is it is not an. You know it's a very curved piece of plastic usually and it's not optically clear it the store it's like having spectacles on were the lenses aren't quite right in distorts your vision a little bit and you know for for you and I in the medical setting having clear visions important. There's a lot of ingenuity out bear Cocaine, and I hear some things waiting to be developed there when you describe types of facials mass zone interesting to see what we see the next number of months. I say I think we could probably get there but the current administration of a shields right now I think are not sufficient, but we may get there all Gregg. The next listener wants to now if someone is exposed to cove it and they know that they have been how long do they need to self isolate and? What if they are living with other people, how do they protect those individuals and the the answer? So little bit complicated because as we've learned more the sciences changed and therefore the recommendations have been updated to reflect that. So I'll try to break it down to kind of three clear categories. Number One if you've been exposed to somebody with Kobe, you need to self quarantine for fourteen days after your last exposure. If you had exposure to somebody you went into quarantine and then got exposed again you start the clack over fourteen days. One of the things that's changed is will what about travel particularly international travel? The CDC dropped the requirement for fourteen days of. Quarantine so and then just refers to local state or community rules while respecting masking physical distancing, etc.. Now, this is the tougher one in some ways after you have recovered from then. Okay. So you've had co bid and you you. It's now been ten days or more since your symptoms have appeared, you have no fever end those symptoms are improving. You don't have to quarantine after that ten day.

Dr Greg Poland Mayo Clinic methanol poisoning FDA CDC Dr Halina Gonzaga twenty twenty United States Faye shield Kobe Cocaine asthma Gregg
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome everyone to Mayoclinic. I'm Dr Halina Gazelle FCA we're. GonNa take a little break from covid today to tell you about some new research in the world of medicine. When people seek emergency care for shortness of breath that can be difficult to ascertain the cause for that you research from the Mayo. Clinic found the using an electrocardiogram enhanced by artificial intelligence is better than standard blood tests at determining shortness of breath is caused by heart failure here to discuss this is the lead author of the study and chief fellow and cardiovascular medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida doctor Demi ID dating swallow. Sorry if I mispronounced your name Dr, Demi thank you for joining us today. Thank you for having me. Well, first of all, for consumer audience, could you explain to us what heart failure is and How common is it? Short. So heart failure is the condition in which the buddy is unable to comp adequate blood to meet the body's demands, and usually this goes untreated. It can lead to progressive worsening heart pump function multiple symptoms in late stages and organ failure. It affects about five million Americans currently and is also responsible for more than one million hospital admissions. Every year is also the number. One reason for hospital admissions amongst Medicare patients is difficulty breathing or feeling short of breath, a hallmark of heart failure. Yes it is. It's actually one of the more common symptoms that we see with heart failure. Typically what would happen when someone went to the emergency room or to their physician and there was concern about heart failure? Are there are certain tests that you would usually do? Yes. So your physician will conducted careful history and a physical examination in addition to this may need additional tests to confirm the diagnosis or rule out other potential diagnosis tests that typically considered in the setting of suspected heart failing issued g also known as an electrocardiogram blood test, an example of which is the BNP and some sort of chest imaging either a chest x ray was CD skin and with covid nineteen. I said, we're going to talk about it today but we are. Difficulty breathing we've all heard can be One of the manifestations of covid nineteen infection. So how would you know if a patient came to see you whether they had proven nineteen or if you needed to be concerned about heart failure that is a great question I think that it makes this study even more relevant given the ongoing kind. So shortness of breath is commonly Koby nineteen as it is with heart failure. Usually you'll physician would obtain a history in addition to fiscal examination to try and differentiate between these two conditions but sometimes business. In as we progress read diseases as well. So having an additional tests that can provide more information to the managing physician is essential to being able to tell apart this to invasions. Can you tell us just a little bit about this study that you're that used dynamic publishing Why was Don in? What did you find out? Yes, I would love to sell the reason for the studies we wanted to evaluate the effects off an artificial intelligence enabled SCG in an acute setting to differentiate between patients coming in with cardiac this function will tell us the shorter breath. So we evaluate at a total of one, thousand, six, hundred and six patients came into the emergency room at all male clinic sites and the healthcare systems as well with difficulty breathing as their primary complaints. What we found out was that the artificial. Intelligence enabled the. was able to identify patients with cardiac significant cardiac dysfunction, much better than anti preemptive with an eight zero point eight, nine compared to zero point eight zero essentially outperforming BNP, which is currently the standard of care tests that would use an an acute care setting. That's really interesting about artificial intelligence. We're hearing so much about that now about how it might be used in medicine, but I'm wondering. Can't the cardiologists or the physician just look at the C. G. and these same things So, even though the CG is recommended as one of the tests that you would get in a patient suspected heart feel it is not specific for Hartfield if it's normal, it can make you suspect and on the line cardiac yet no Malecki but still cannot give you an idea what the heart function is. The ideal test without is an Echocardiogram, which is an ultrasound. That tells you how walk Heart Com function is and in order to get this task, it typically requires skilled personnel. The also required that the.

BNP Demi covid Dr Halina Gazelle Mayo Mayoclinic Mayo Clinic Medicare Florida Hartfield Koby C. G. SCG
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic? Thanks for joining us. Today. Dr Halina Gonzaga, and we are filming this segment on August Attempts Twenty Twenty Well today it's time for another update on Cova Nineteen in here with us as always is our Cova nineteen star after Greg Poland. ROLLINS and infectious disease experts at Mayo Clinic thanks for being with us today to Poland my pleasure on I'm in my research office today instead of my home study so. I just wanted to start with question today I've heard the term by royal shedding used frequently and I'm wondering if you can explain what that is fairly audience, you know what happens is that we get infected by the respiratory route and we have these viral receptors that liner respiratory route that's how it infects ourselves. That's an ongoing process, and while that's happening, people can speak cough you know what whatever and that virus be shed and expelled out, which is how the next person or percents get infected. that usually doesn't go on for more than a couple of weeks or at best. But for some people, it looks like they are shedding virus longer. Now, the tough part here is we don't actually culture the virus so I can't tell you that they're shedding virus. What I can say is that the genetic components of the virus is what we test or and that's what we're actually detecting. So we have to be a little careful when people say well, I'm shutting the virus for months. We don't have any proof of that. At this point we just know that they test positive for those genetic components. So that could be old disintegrated virus, for example. So universal precautions. Good handwashing lutely happiness what we know about asymmetric covid nineteen cases and why they occur. I know you're always good for a little update on the Medical Literature Utah will you know this is this something that we're really keeping a close eye on you know I, it's apparent that when you look at the whole population, the majority of infections are ase symptomatic or pre-symptomatic. Most of them will go one to develop symptoms for younger robust people. They may not even realize it unless you bury closely questioned them. You know I, did feel kind of. fluish over the weekend is what they'll say are I I had a headache and normally I don't have headaches or lost my sense of smell or whatever whatever it would be. It's the it's the older people and by older I mean thirty forty et Cetera that start having more symptoms past fifty they're the ones that start getting severe disease and hospitalization and death, but it can happen to any age person and I think that's been one of the difficulties in people understanding the seriousness of this just because you're a symptomatic doesn't mean it's a benign disease it can be and does do cellular damage to you. It can affect your brain. Your heart your lungs virtually every Oregon and you may not know that and you have the potential of spreading to other people who may have more severe disease. So you know I think ultimately what it takes to know is testing at a level that we don't currently do. So the ideal thing would be to take a large group of people and test them very regularly. Now that's being done for example and professional athletes, but I'm talking about in older people and working people who are not as heavily sequestered from others, and those are the sorts of studies that need to be done to determine how long are we seeing people Infected and and how long from the Time of infection to. A symptomatic to pre-symptoms. To symptomatic in different age groups is it's a parroted does vary by by age underlying medical condition what you said about the difference in how it might affect one individual versus another reminds me a little bit of like the common cold or upper respiratory infection. During the winter I'll be certain members of the household that we're all passing the same bug around but I may have it for seven days and you know my husband only for. Twelve or vice versa will you know it's interesting that you say that because like Corona virus influenza viruses, something that tends to affect males more severely in fact, in general, that's true for respiratory pathogens that while the While women actually latest studies show that women actually acquire the infection more often but men are the ones that are more often having severe illness, hospitalization and death. In fact, the mortality rate about seventy percent higher compared to women. I'm the other thing that I'm certain. We're going to see because it's been true in every vaccine that I've tested is that women will develop better antibody responses than men. my my wife is suggested reason, but it's not a scientific one. So. What is the latest Scrag Greg about the possibility of reinfection and our people now getting cove at a second time you know that's a that's a really tough question. You're you're asking the ones that are right on the cusp of our current knowledge I. Think I will come out saying this reinfection is going to happen whether it has happened so far is unsure re so when you look At antibody levels the half life for Kobe nineteen antibodies is right at about seventy days. So by seventy days, half the antibody level has has been lost. That's pretty typical for for most every virus. So that's not too surprising. What is surprising is that that exponential decline appears to continue for some time before levelling out what we don't know is what level of antibody keeps you protected. Once, we understand what's called a correlate of protection like that. It'll make vaccine development and following the science of this easier right now even after somebody recovers from Cova, I, tell them I don't know that you're protected and I don't know for how long. So at some point people likely will have a low enough antibody level if that's the marker that they could get reinfected now we're hearing case reports already in the popular media even in. The medical literature of somebody who you know had symptoms was infected all the testing showed they had covid nineteen symptoms resolved they got better test turn negative, and then the test positive again well, did they get exposed and we happened to test them on that day or is this evidence of a reinfection? Honestly, we don't know yet and that's something that's going to have to wait for kind of these longitudinal long studies that we were talking about. Earlier. Right now, all the effort is going into understanding the.

Cova headache Twenty Twenty Well Mayo Clinic Poland Dr Halina Gonzaga Greg Poland ROLLINS Medical Literature Utah Oregon Kobe
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Qna It's made six. And I'm Dr Halina Gazelle. Thanks to a unique combination of clinical practice education and research. Mayo Clinic is uniquely suited to respond rapidly to medical crises including the cove nineteen one example of this is our research task force which has been formed to oversee clinical trials related to in nineteen re privilege today to have Dr Andrew Badly with us. Dr Badly is an infectious disease. Expert here at Mayo Clinic. And he said chair of the Cova. Nineteen Research Taskforce. Welcome DR badly morning. Thanks for being with us today. We so appreciate it. I know that you're very busy because I've had a chance to talk to you a little bit. About how many trials and that are going on and it's just amazing to me. We're we've been inundated with wonderful scientific insight and expertise proposals. We're we're working hard to respond to all bus. It's wonderful. Can you tell us a little bit about the research Task Force in? Why did mayoclinic decide to form a task force? And how do you organize yourself well? So it's a little over eight weeks ago. Received the call one warning from Dr Fru. Doctor Gore's Zine research as immediate oversee this task force and I was honored with the imitations had rapidly. Junk on the way and initially. We were reactive. We had a large number of proposals that we should do trial against the average research and so very quickly. We belly was working at all.

Mayo Clinic Dr Andrew Badly Dr Halina Gazelle Research Taskforce Dr Fru Cova Doctor Gore
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Qna It's made six. And I'm Dr Halina Gazelle. Thanks to a unique combination of clinical practice education and research. Mayo Clinic is uniquely suited to respond rapidly to medical crises including the cove nineteen one example of this is our research task force which has been formed to oversee clinical trials related to in nineteen re privilege today to have Dr Andrew Badly with us. Dr Badly is an infectious disease. Expert here at Mayo Clinic. And he said chair of the Cova. Nineteen Research Taskforce. Welcome DR badly morning. Thanks for being with us today. We so appreciate it. I know that you're very busy because I've had a chance to talk to you a little bit. About how many trials and that are going on and it's just amazing to me. We're we've been inundated with wonderful scientific insight and expertise proposals. We're we're working hard to respond to all bus. That's wonderful. Can you tell us a little bit about the research Task Force in? Why did mayoclinic decide to form a task force? And how do you organize yourself well? So it's a little over eight weeks ago. Received the call one warning from Dr Fru. Doctor Gore's Zine research as immediate oversee this task force and I was honored with the imitations had rapidly. Junk on the way and initially. We were reactive. We had a large number of proposals that we should do trial again. See Average research and so very quickly. We belly was working at all.

Mayo Clinic Dr Andrew Badly Dr Halina Gazelle Research Taskforce Dr Fru Cova Doctor Gore
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Renee. I'm Dr Halina. Gazelle Tova. Nineteen was first identified late last year. With a cluster of pneumonia cases caused by new corona virus. We now understand quite a bit more about cove in nineteen and it's a major impacts on the respiratory tract and the lungs here to discuss respiratory management in critical care as well as recovery from Cohen. Nineteen is Dr Dan. Dietrich who is an anesthesiologist in critical care specialist at the Mayo Clinic? Welcome Dr Drip. Good afternoon thanks for inviting me. You know it's especially fun for me to have you here. Dan Because you helped train me when I was a resident. And now they're letting me interview you so that's kind of fun because please thank you for being here so Jan help us to understand what happens when someone comes into the hospital and we hear so much about people being hospitalized but they can't have their family members in what happens to them after they disappear into the hospital or kind of care to people get for Kovac Nineteen and who might provide that to them. These patients will present with a primary respiratory problem so they may be at home for a while and feel at some point. I need to go in. So the emergency department will likely be the first point of contact you know since we don't have a rapid test for this disease like I e e result back in minutes For the virus responsible for covert nineteen really has tall task of sorting out. Who has this disease or who hasn't another disease process? So it's a very mixed picture upfront. Until we get more information in the disease takes a dozen a dozen we can recognize so at that point if a patient needs ice you care. They'll be transferred to the ICU. That best matches their needs. Kind of wood would be our standard procedures now at some point if it is determined that a patient does have a cove nineteen or at some point during their hospitals Does develop a cove in nineteen. Then we would transfer them to a single ICU. where the training and clinical care has been aligned specifically to the treatment up to disease process. When we're listening in the news. We hear so much about the various roles. People who take care of our patients cove in nineteen and it seems that the physicians and the nurses both receive a lot of praise. But I know that in hospital there are so many other groups working with our patients. Tell me a little bit about that. And what is the respiratory therapists as you point out? There's many frontline clinicians involved in the care but I think respiratory therapy of the therapist that do that are are some of the unsung heroes. Unrecognized Heroes and as I mentioned before the Kovic Nineteen Disease Process Heavily impacts the respiratory system and the respiratory therapists. That's their specific Training that they go through for schooling so their expertise Really starts back in the emergency department. They determine the need in level of oxygen support If the patient does deteriorate in the require breathing tube placement they're the ones that are helping other procedural stew that they are the ones who really manage the mechanical ventilator to the goal set out by the providers and they really make sure that That the patient is getting the right level of oxygen. In redoing therapies that are protected to the lungs usually the respiratory therapists of the first ones. Who make the WHO get a sense of this? Patient has recovered in doesn't need mechanical ventilator and and when the patients are long recovery pathway the respiratory therapists are the actual ones. They're doing a lot of the rehabilitation so really the respiratory therapist provides a role from really at the time of presentation. All the way through their discharge no one I was an anesthesia residency at some of the respiratory therapists who worked in the intensive care units We're really amazing and very helpful and teaching me how to manage patients great. Thank you for sharing that. We talked about the changes in the respiratory system. Can you tell us a little bit more about what happens in the lungs respiratory system of a patient with Kobe? Nineteen makes them need to be on a ventilator? Sure you know the the understanding of this process of how this disease is affecting the lungs and the body is is evolving and and every week a it seems that what was stated as a goal. Previous week is now totally the opposite so are as we gain more knowledge of this disease. We're GONNA we'll continue to fine tune our understanding of it. But you know I. I try to simplify things myself. to neither is really kind of two parts to this. There is an acute acute infection stage and this is really where the virus is causing the damage as well as as the damage that the body is doing kind of fighting this disease. There's collateral damage is the the long is certainly that At type of an Oregon you know later on as we get past that acute phase you know the body it gets control of the virus but there can be fibrosis or scarring of the lungs. Which which you know can cripple the lungs long-term and that's you know that's really kind of a scary thing differently. Just the mechanical ventilator itself can cause injury by Hollywood provides air and you know we it male are actually very good at preventing this type and as mentioned before this is where a respiratory therapist had become very good at mitigating this problem. They're you know making sure that the type of mechanical ventilation it's just what we need. No more and were providing very safe levels ventilation bet that many of our listeners and viewers have never heard so much about mechanical ventilators as they have in the news lately with the Concern for shortage that we wouldn't have enough to provide for patients. Who Need Them? Can you tell us a little bit about? How does the mechanical later workout as a patient get hooked up to one? And what is that? What are the most common uses for them? Typically when we're not having ovid nineteen pandemic so there are many types of mechanical ventilators out there in some ways. It's kind of like cars. There's just many different types and largely. These differences are in the software that the machines have there's different modes which again represents kind of different ways of Represent different types of software there but now at the end of the day you know without getting into a lot of the details the mechanical ventilators. Really move air in an article lungs you know they can do this different ways pressures volumes of air but again. It's just air moving in and out of logs and really the longs function from respiratory standpoint. That's for oxygen and carbon. Dioxide are exchanged. That's the lungs. Do again you can think when you move air into the lungs. That's you're introducing oxygen. And when air is removed from the long Removes the carbon dioxide. What these machines do again. There's problems with the lungs. That's what the disease causes these. These misleads machines support the lungs through these processes and really buy them time for the body to heal. We have enough mechanical ventilators at Mayo to take care of the patients that we have that we might see. Andy worry that. We're going to run short. This is a question were asked daily almost and by our staff as well as state officials and and federal officials and with the current models that we're looking at now at the time of this podcast. The answer is yes very easy. Yes don't early on. It was predicted that we would have a lot more patients that needed mechanical ventilation in. We were very actively preparing for this type of scenario. I don't think we work many of us three to four weeks streak preparing for this and a lot of that. Effort was spent planning on using mechanical ventilators. That are not normally used in an issue such as transport ventilators machines that you're acquainted with anesthesia. Machines We spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to make this happen anesthesia machines in particular need different connections than a normal ICU. Ventilator to work in a nice environment but you know our again respiratory therapists and others. You know figured out a way to do this. It goes even beyond that capability you know. Having to monitor are doing. Are we going to have enough oxygen? To run the ventilators it goes into even that our respiratory therapist worth while on top of that and we at one point figured out. You don't in order to to fill an ice with all mechanical ventilators. We have to make sure that there is enough oxygen that could get from the storage takeoff back up to the up to the ICU. So I you know again. This is all the activity was spent a making sure we could deliver care That That we need to and we felt very confident that we could do that. What do you think about when you're planning for this is just amazing Whether or not someone needs assistance with their breathing. What other kinds of care might require in either the hospital or in the intensive care unit of their hospitalized with Cova Mateen so while this disease is primarily directed at the lungs there? There are many other organ systems affected. Simply when you get critically ill are goes outside of even the Cova disease and and really the ice. You team doesn't the clinicians are there again. Nurses Respiratory Therapists. They're trained to anticipate an offer support to all these other bodily systems. So you know we. We have patients sedated to to maintain level of comfort Cova also affects the heart so monitoring hard to make insured continues to function properly. Let vessels dilate so you may have to add a blood pressure medicines. The kidneys may May. I have some dysfunctions again. Making sure that if dialysis all of these things is what the ice. Ut really tried to anticipate and head off if you can and if not please support the patient through this on giving the chance for the body to Directed attention to healing Dan. I'm an extra question here on you but it's just something that people might be curious about. We've heard so much about have been over. One hundred thousand deaths from Kobe. Nineteen when someone does die of the disease what is it that they die of respiratory failure? That's a tricky question. Because every patient is different so in depending on what levels of organ system dysfunction they have that would be what they succumb from so again in this disease primarily would be a respiratory respiratory problems. The function of the long deteriorates. So much that it just can't Exchan- is that carbon dioxide for oxygen and it needs and that has very a Alitalia's effects on the body hall so that's primarily the main problem but if a patient is on the breathing machine for a number of a number of weeks certainly secondary infections could take place that could affect Oregon so so I it. It really is patient specific to the problems off that their body may be facie. Sure that makes sense. All of us are so appreciative of the work. That you and colleagues like you nurses respiratory therapists sets are doing right on the front lines in the intensive care units and it was in the hospital to care for patients. What do we? What are we doing at Mayo? Clinic to protect Our employees and our workers from Being exposed to Cova nineteen or having the potential to.

respiratory tract Nurses Respiratory Therapists Cova Mayo Dr Dan Oregon Mayo Clinic pneumonia Gazelle Tova Dr Drip Kovac Dietrich Cohen Renee. Dr Halina Kobe Cova Mateen Hollywood
"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Rene Dr Halina Gesellschaft Tova. Nineteen was first identified late last year. With a cluster of pneumonia cases caused by new corona virus. We now understand quite a bit more about cove in nineteen and it's a major impacts on the respiratory tract and the lungs here to discuss respiratory management in critical care as well as recovery from Cohen. Nineteen is Dr Dan. Dietrich who is an anesthesiologist in critical care specialist at the Mayo Clinic? Welcome Dr Drip. Good afternoon thanks for inviting me. You know it's especially fun for me to have you here. Dan Because you helped train me when I was a resident. And now they're letting me interview you so that's kind of fun because please thank you for being here so Jan help us to understand what happens when someone comes into the hospital and we hear so much about people being hospitalized but they can't have their family members in what happens to them after they disappear into the hospital or kind of care to people get for Kovac Nineteen and who might provide that to them. These patients will present with a primary respiratory problem so they may be at home for a while and feel at some point. I need to go in. So the emergency department will likely be the first point of contact you know since we don't have a rapid test for this disease like I e e result back in minutes For the virus responsible for covert nineteen really has tall task of sorting out. Who has this disease or who hasn't another disease process? So it's a very mixed picture upfront. Until we get more information in the disease takes a dozen a dozen we can recognize so at that point if a patient needs ice you care. They'll be transferred to the ICU. That best matches their needs kind of wood would be our standard procedures now at some point if it is determined that a patient does have a covert nineteen or at some point during their hospitals Does develop a cove in nineteen. Then we would transfer them to a single ICU. where the training and clinical care has been aligned. Uh specifically to the treatment upped disease process. When we're listening in the news we hear so much about the various roles. People who take care of our patients cove in nineteen and it seems that the physicians and the nurses both receive a lot of praise. But I know that in hospital there are so many other groups working with our patients. Tell me a little bit about that. And what is the respiratory therapists as you point out? There's many frontline clinicians involved in the care but I think respiratory therapy of the therapist that do that are are some of the unsung heroes. Unrecognized Heroes and as I mentioned before the Kovic Nineteen Disease Process Heavily impacts the respiratory system and the respiratory therapists. That's their specific Training that they go through for schooling so their expertise Really starts back in the emergency department. They determine the need in level of oxygen support If the patient does deteriorate in the require breathing tube placement they're the ones that are helping other procedural stew that they are the ones who really manage the mechanical ventilator to the goal set out by the providers and they really make sure that That the patient is getting the right level of oxygen. In redoing therapies that are protected to the lungs usually the respiratory therapists of the first ones. Who make the WHO get a sense of this? Patient has recovered in doesn't need mechanical ventilator and and when the patients are long recovery pathway the respiratory therapists are the actual ones. They're doing a lot of the rehabilitation so really the respiratory therapist provides a role from really at the time of presentation. All the way through their discharge no one I was an anesthesia residency at some of the respiratory therapists who worked in the intensive care units We're really amazing. And and very helpful and teaching me how to manage patients great. Thank you for sharing that. We talked about the changes in the respiratory system. Can you tell us a little bit more about what happens in the lungs respiratory system of a patient with Kobe? Nineteen makes them need to be on a ventilator? Sure you know the the understanding of this process of how this disease is affecting the lungs and the body is is evolving and and every week a it seems that what was stated as a goal. Previous week is now totally the opposite so are as we gain more knowledge of this disease. We're GONNA we'll continue to fine tune our understanding of it. But you know I. I try to simplify things myself and I to me. There's really kind of two parts to this. There is an acute an acute infection stage and this is really where the virus is causing the damage as well as as damaged. The of the body is doing kind of fighting this disease. There's collateral damage is the the long is certainly that At type of Oregon you know later on as we get past that acute phase you know the body it gets control of the virus but there can be fibrosis or scarring of the lungs. Which which you know can cripple the lungs long-term and that's you know that's really kind of a scary thing differently. Just the mechanical ventilator itself can cause injury by Hollywood provides air and you know we it male are actually very good at preventing this type and as mentioned before this is where a respiratory therapist had become very good at mitigating this problem. They're you know making sure that the type of mechanical ventilation it's just what we need. No more and were providing very safe levels of ventilation bet that many of our listeners and viewers have never heard so much about mechanical ventilators as they have in the news lately with the Concern for shortage that we wouldn't have enough to provide for patients. Who Need Them? Can you tell us a little bit about? How does the mechanical later workout as a patient get hooked up to one? And what is that? What are the most common uses for them? Typically when we're not having ovid nineteen pandemic so there are many types of mechanical ventilators out there in some ways. It's kind of like cards. There's just many different types and largely. These differences are in the software that the machines have there's different modes which again represented kind of different ways of Represent different types of software there but now at the end of the day you know without getting into a lot of the details the mechanical ventilators. Really move air in an article lungs you know they can do this different ways with pressures volumes of air but again it's just air moving in and out of logs and really the longs function from respiratory standpoint. That's for oxygen and carbon. Dioxide are exchanged. That's the lungs do and you can. You can think when you move air into the lungs. That's you're introducing oxygen. And when air is removed from the long Removes the carbon dioxide. What these machines do again. There's problems with the lungs. That's what the disease causes these. These misleads machines support the lungs through these processes and really buy them time for the body to heal. We have enough mechanical ventilators at Mayo to take care of the patients that we have that we might see. Andy worry that. We're going to run short. This is a question were asked daily almost and by our staff as well as state officials and and federal officials and you know with the current models that we're looking at now at the time of this podcast. The answer is yes very easy. Yes don't early on. It was predicted that we would have a lot more patients that needed mechanical ventilation in. We were very actively preparing for this type of scenario. I don't think we were many of us. Three to four weeks streak preparing for this and a lot of that effort was spent planning on using mechanical ventilators. That are not normally used in an issue such as transport ventilators machines that you're well acquainted with anesthesia machines We spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to make this happen anesthesia machines in particular need different connections than a normal ICU. Ventilator to work in a nice environment but you know our again respiratory therapists and others. You know figured out a way to do this. It goes even beyond that capability. You know having to monitor our do we? Are we going to have enough oxygen to run the ventilators it goes into even that our respiratory therapist worth while on top of that and we at one point figured out? You don't in order to to fill an ice with all mechanical ventilators. We have to make sure that there is enough oxygen. That could get from the storage tank back up to the up to the ICU. So I you know again. This is all the activity was spent a making sure we could deliver care That That we need and we felt very confident that we could do that. What do you think about when you're planning for this is just amazing Whether or not someone needs assistance with their breathing. What other kinds of care might require in either the hospital or in the intensive care unit of their hospitalized with Cova Mateen so while this disease is primarily directed at the lungs there? There are many other organ systems affected. Simply when you get critically ill are goes outside of even the Cova disease and and really the ice. You team doesn't the clinicians are there again. Nurses Respiratory Therapists. They're trained to anticipate an offer support to all these other bodily systems. So you know we. We have patients sedated to to maintain level of comfort Coveted also affects the heart so monitoring hard to make insured continues to function properly. Let vessels can dilate so you may have to add Blood pressure medicines. The kidneys may May. I have some dysfunctions again. Making sure that if dialysis all of these things is what the ice. Ut really tried to anticipate and head off if you can and if not please support the patient through this giving the chance for the body to Directed attention to healing Dan. I'm an extra question here on you but it's just something that people might be curious about. We've heard so much about there've been over one hundred thousand deaths from Kobe. Nineteen when someone does die of the disease what is it that they die of respiratory failure? Now that's a tricky question. Because every patient is different so in depending on what levels of organ system dysfunction they have that would be what they succumb from so again in this disease primarily would be a respiratory respiratory problems. The function of the long deteriorates. So much that it just can't Exchan- is that carbon dioxide for oxygen and it needs and that has very a Alitalia's effects on the body hall so that's primarily the main problem but if a patient is on the breathing machine for a number of a number of weeks certainly secondary infections could take place that could affect Oregon so so I it. It really is patient specific to the problems off that their body may be facie. Sure that makes sense. All of us are so appreciative of the work. That you and colleagues like you nurses respiratory therapists sets are doing right on the front lines in the intensive care units and it was in the hospital to care for patients. What do we? What are we doing at Mayo? Clinic to protect Our employees and our workers from Being exposed to Cova nineteen or having the potential to.

respiratory tract Nurses Respiratory Therapists Mayo Clinic Mayo Cova Dr Dan Oregon Rene Dr Halina Gesellschaft To pneumonia Dr Drip Kovac Dietrich Cohen Kobe Hollywood Cova Mateen Exchan Andy
"dr halina" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

15:11 min | 3 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Join us fascinating view from the ground about what actually happens when local citizens anywhere in the world. Take back their power their voice their economic presence and decision making in their own communities. I know nobody better to hold conversation about these topics with that our guest this hour, Dr Helaine, I call her Dr Elena Norberg Hajja the doctor at all Elena. Thank you. I actually vanden my PHD Chung scale in language. The only place in the world could actually decide for my faces. And I thought it's wasted time. So call you doctor Dr Halina on everything. So the last time we were together we talked a little bit about your own experience in foreign nations who've been subject to western values in corporate capitalism. And then what happened during the course of your experience, and maybe you can kind of recap that we always have new listeners. And I think it gives us a good serve subtext to how you came at this work from such a deep involvement. Thank you. Yeah. Probably started earlier than I did last time because I realized that hard in my take on of having had the experience of living in many, different coaches and speaking many languages and Paul about was growing up in Sweden, you know, socialist country and then also living in America later on. I live in France Germany in. Australia I've traveled extensively in Mexico. Italy say, and I learned in the language in in those places I become fascinated in trying to understand different views in different cultures. And then in nine hundred seventy five I was invited to go out as part of a film team to this remote traditional high on the tobacco plateau, Coa dock and also Tibet that was part of the one that had not been Cullen is d- and this ancient traditional Kutch is really reinforced and crystallized other observations that I have particularly comparing America to Europe. But even within Europe, I had found that in more in less developed pots of of Europe, it was more family. There was more community that was more respectful farming. It was a deep connection to the land and the resources and a strong community and in the high and dusty lies places in cluding, my native clean people so cut off Belichick evade been shifted through the modern global economy that was brought in their much good intention off to the second. World War was fought in genetic way ringing in modern industrial agriculture, which you know, came from the toxic chemicals that have been used for the weapons applied in the mand. But even really well intention people became convinced. It's efficient large Mona cultural cultural production was going to make life easier genuinely progressive so they brought in a country where people were replace machinery talks chemical. And then people shoved into high rise living in ever few cities. So that started a throws his of mega been -sation and mega industrialization of cuts, and I realize that even in its heyday swayed was really a place with people cutoff lonely, and isolated and this is reinforced after I had made in agok in ancient self reliant Clinton, be Sakorn Amies coaches with people would threes, the healthiest and the happiest of any people I have ever encountered and coming back to Sweden and try to. Hey, wait a minute. What are we doing? I realize in the mid seventies already that in all all the dwellings in Stockholm in base apartments and houses one puzzles leaving a low and there was such clear signs of depression alcohol. Lissome suicide, and I was trying to say, wait initially connected life that you know, that in fact, logical research, they've found even if you have a goldfish or something of a line in you have to be happy, and the is this really clear pattern with more connected to the plums the animals to the life around them and really importantly connected to each other that much happening. Not so, yeah, I had already when I was young I reflected on the fact that in the sixties ticks in America were that the average child growing up had to move about seven times was the parents who moving to jobs for the economy that was already becoming less stable, and I compared that you know, at that time that. Probably the reason we had a bitch more community in Sweden and in Austria had studied at university and Italy insane. I found you know, Pippa had much strongly sense of identity that with much less troubled. They there was this violence was next depression list, psychological problems. I talking too long. No, no, no, no. I think to have the whole picture is is really essential. Because. You know, when we think about how fast everything is going now, and everything is connected and all the multitasking, which is really sort of a subversion of the mind. So that the mind can't do very much deep, and yes, maybe you can get things done, but they're not necessarily being done in a in a deep sense from heart and mind, but you notice, and you talk about this is that when this global corporatism comes in brings in factory or brings a new goods or brings in the TV and brings in the computer, and then brings in the values of the west that it is such a destructive effect on the local economies on the sanctity of traditions on the welfare of the people from there as you point out from their ability to grow and keep their own food. And that's really one of the things you all are working on to make sure we have sovereignty over our food. It's a thing. That's I've always cared. Most about. But the effect of this global ization is not just about making money and making products this computerized Inter-nationality while there's some beautiful things that can come from it. There's some very destructive things. We're already seeing happened to the just the general community as community. Yeah. And I would say that again, postal my perspective to lead that tobacco is one. That is very read these days in order to see them talking about people would have to back to read books and even one hundred years ago when people had an experience of an encounter deeply in an ongoing way of coachee where people not been colonized difficulties days, if you go to the sort of technical village in India, China, not most Africa, did you see type of public T you seeing people who through colored sation. Or two modern development, which is another form of enslavement through debt. Major disruptions all the time. The modern economy have to remember from the beginning has been focused on the swing. Selker lines did in the theory is comparative advantage, which really suited Bloedel trade is back in the seventies and sixteen hundred who would destroy self reliant communities and order to push them onto huge monocultures to provide for the west. You know, they grow it in cotton plantations to Kofi mining and in Europe Pygmalion, close pushed off the land to become cheap labor in the factories. So in order to really get clarity on tradition pasta. And so we really do have to go really only look at places that had not yet been enslaved in that way. So I do want to say that when you also see in those faces as I didn't have and baton and to some extent and bum or. Then the role of technology you're seeing completed from picture because once you have colonized people have thousands of people from giant cotton Ponte Shen when them technology, of course, excite Kogas, people standing bent over the whole day doing the same thing some kind of mechanical, and so you place that with machinery and everybody says, oh, yeah. That's programs. They haven't compared it with a way of producing food. If you've lied charge their land resources, they have a whole range of different activities different products. And by the way in small diversified farms years much, higher method other important, quite we should talk about. Now. What's happened is that we don't go back. Go back Ogle rapidly. Full to the localization moment, we come see so kidding white. Technology is more the problem than it is an advantage. We have to actions. That win conducive bodies date and do like, you know, farming as part of a community group doing different things every day even within the same day. They're different activities. They are finding that fall more enjoyable than sitting in front of the computer day, they're finding the bodies actually need and not only experiencing that. But there's more and more medical research. Nab it's telling us. I don't know if you've heard this saying don't do computer within twenty minutes get up every twenty minutes and move, otherwise, you, you know, you're going to be talking about a bad back about all kinds of croplands pressure also things anyway, I would argue that today waking up in a holistic way to the role of technology in the global economy. And really, you know, I will it's about waking up to the road of the global climbing. Once you sit from a healthy baseline, healthy more community deep in gauge to the natural world. More productive ways of growing food building houses, providing basic needs including medical cat. If we look at the role of technology on this from the holistic point of view, we will see that the internet has been a tool that has Vaseli strengthen global corporations that are really are decimating jobs social cohesion of environment as an accelerating rate. Using those tools we win came down to the Brussels. They seduced kid blue in the sixties and seventies wanted more community wanted more connection to the land. They told oh now so the information age new going to be able to sit in your village head all that beauty of nature have community, and you'll be to be, you know, job knitting for raw for the computer. Whether the promises of the information society had knocked worked. All around. People are general patterns, people are working hard FOSS to just stay in place. And I'm insane placing of aid mortgage have some kind of educational opportunities. So the children have some kind of health care to do that people working harder longer than Abba. So I'm really really came that we try to encourage a deep and broad look at this. And look at it from the point of view Walker me do to get what can we do when we changed to a we it's impossible for anyone imagine icon to living that my computer and more visiting my mobile phone. We have all been made dependent on these tools and have picks you said, well, you know, you just stop using those is absolutely ridiculous. We need to make use of those tools, and as you're doing self. Having rated program to start join discussion, and I hope rapidly wake up to the fact that we concept rate the Paul technology, particularly over the last thirty forty years with the cough of corporate power. Pose a big money in big science. In other words, almost all the money has gone into off favors not just giant corporations that ultimately the military industrial complex in a way that it's extremely destructive. And of no question about it. Yeah. I mean, we do have to take a break. But it's really true when we look at the and some people like to call it the corporate military industrial complex. It's rather extrordinary invasion of idea. In fact, it became an acceptable restraint in the military became the the st-. Strategy for healthcare. It's okay. Do this do that to the body? You know, thirty percent dive at the other seventy one. So it's like an acceptable risk. Let's bomb the village to save a few huts. It's same kind of sickness of domination and exploitation and ultimately ruination. The rest of the program. We're gonna look out with our guests. Helena Norberg Hodge from this wonderful organization called local futures. And you must go to their website..

Europe Sweden America Dr Elena Norberg Hajja Italy Dr Halina Dr Helaine Stockholm Australia Helena Norberg Hodge France cough Kofi mining Pippa Paul cluding Vaseli
"dr halina" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on KOMO

"Exciting time. We have a lot of new people. Here we go with thirty four pitchers in the room today. I look at the roster eighteen I've never had mariner jerseys uncle flew position players do later this week the first spring game on the twenty first against the as and they'll meet the as in the regular season opener, openers two games over in Japan. Toward the latter stages of March. So it is really an interesting situation going on with the ams with all the players that have been shipped out a bunch shipping in some down in the minors trying to rebuild that farm system. Very interesting time for the ball club, six o'clock tonight. So fifty minutes from now, it's the husky coaches show delayed a today by the weather, so all things UD basketball with head coach is Mike Hopkins and Jody Wynn six to seven right here on KOMO news. If you're an NFL fan, I know we have few in this town known as twelve. You might want to be checking out the NFL combine coming up March first through the fourth. Well, ABC's going to present a two hour special on March second from the combine Indianapolis it'll be a night featuring drills by quarterbacks and wide receivers and among the quarterbacks taking part former husky Jake Browning, we'll have more sports coming your way in thirty minutes. A Senate hearing earlier today featured a different look at a killer. As komo's Brian Calvert reports, it was a chance to see a different side of a demonize drug as he opened the hearings. Senator Lamar Alexander the chair of the Senate health committee told those attending quote, we want to make sure that as we deal with the opioid crisis. We consider everyone who's in pain all the theory that every action has an unintended consequence. We wanna make sure that as we deal with the opioid crisis. We keep in mind. Those Americans who are hurting in other words before you pass laws to prohibit opioid production and use these drugs exist because they are helping some people Dr. Halina gazelle. I worry that we've gotten ahead of ourselves with wanting to restrict opiates a lot of people are now a lot of providers are now scared to perfect to provide opioids to patients they've been prescribing them too for many years, and perhaps rightly so countless deaths have been tied to opioid use..

NFL KOMO Senator Lamar Alexander komo Senate health committee Senate Japan Jake Browning basketball Mike Hopkins Indianapolis Brian Calvert Jody Wynn ABC thirty minutes fifty minutes two hour
"dr halina" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"dr halina" Discussed on KOMO

"They're going to be presenting a two hour special on March second from Indianapolis that'll feature drills by quarterbacks and wide receivers in one of the quarterbacks that will be on hand for that. Combine former husky Jake Browning and Mariners pitchers and catchers on the field the day in Peoria for their first spring, workout sunshine, but by Aaron Jonas standards a bit chilly upper forty s and low fifty s we'll. Take it. We'll take it right now. Currently we have thighs I mentioned thirty seven degrees that breakdown moments ago from Shannon on our weather. We'll have more sports coming your way in thirty minutes. Komo news time three eleven a Senate hearing earlier today featured a different look at a killer. As komo's Brian Calvert reports, it was a chance to see a different side of demonize drug as he opened the hearings. Senator Lamar Alexander the chair of the Senate health committee told those attending quote, we want to make sure that as we deal with the opioid crisis. We consider everyone who's in pain on the theory that every action has an unintended consequence. We wanna make sure that as we deal with the opioid crisis that we keep in mind. Those Americans who are hurting in other words before you pass laws to prohibit opioid production and use these drugs exist because they are helping some people Dr Halina gazelle, why worry that we've gotten ahead of ourselves with wanting to restrict opioids. A lot of people are now a lot of providers are now scared to provide opioids to patients they've been prescribing them too for many years, and perhaps rightly so countless deaths have been tied to opioid use and abuse we and other groups have heard from fouls of chronic pain. Patients who've been forcibly tapered off their medications or drop from care completely by their doctors. This is inhumane and morally reprehensible, Cindy Steinberg is director of the US pain foundation medical students, receive an average of nine hours of pain management training in four years. Veterenarians? Get eighty seven hours your pet is getting better pain management often than people. Do I have a list of about twelve different laboratories currently working towards new opioids Dr Andrew coops as well. It's hard to say, whether the hearing was more focused on not demonizing opioids that may be helping in pain management or finding better alternatives to opioid. He made sure he addressed a possible elephant in the room. We really should look at the potential of.

Komo komo Senator Lamar Alexander Jake Browning Senate health committee Dr Andrew coops Indianapolis Aaron Jonas Senate Mariners Cindy Steinberg Brian Calvert Peoria Shannon US director thirty seven degrees eighty seven hours thirty minutes four years