17 Burst results for "Dr H H. Holmes"

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

07:02 min | Last week

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Oh well me moment dad. It could be another baby actually. She caught it tied up for something because they keep saying they could be a baby one. They've got one. I guess their kids out there. That are like that though like i need. You need to up these numbers. I need more of me that's disgusting. That's you tell that could shut up just fucking around and he gets this bracelet stuck on his arm and the band does the egos. It's an oculus has shoot i. This is straight up. Got a video projector. Like there's no other way to describe it because the special effects just make it look like an actual digital projection. Which what are we even doing. Maybe it glows and his eyes glow. It's magic and you don't project it you to see it in the minds. yes or he knows. Oh i know where to go blah blah blah. It's just like man this movie fellas. If you ever needed a reason to get snapped. John hannah's just fucking in my house. Get out of your john hannah. That's a thing where i feel like the adventure that they were in cairo wrapped up. You know a few days before. They told john hannah would john. Hannah's been house sitting watering the plants. Fucking laying his see all over the property. Because he's he's got this woman back here and you know this is not the first encounter. He's had this house while they both way i i. I assume there's a room upstairs with all the dead. Prostitutes frowned upon. He's been here. Hey babe your brother take on our sheets again also a lot of blood in here. That's a fucking dr h h holmes. Murder house. I think he's killing again the joke because he's like his intro thing like eight. It's been like a half hour. And i am seen him and i'm like hey maybe does need to be in this one. I wasn't holding my breath for john. Hannah's areas someone in the audience. Clapping maybe that little kid is like oh my god mommy fan john hannah libya elizabeth hanna his older sister his things like oh last time when i beat the mummy by myself whatever agar a stor cowardice funnier. Yeah he's john. Why did i find a severed wrist under my pillow. Just the wrist. I don't know how it's a choke risk. I must have beaten all funny But like and then the league. Because here's the thing though. He's he's running around boasting about leg. I defeated the mummy. And whatever it did make me think is this like is the adventure of the first movie like known publicly like was hitting the peppers in london. Mum's the word cheese on this one well england covered in sand at some point like so. Hey what the fuck happened there. Is that the first movie i forget. Some disobeyed did you watch the first. And that's why i was confused. I don't think that happens. We'll do something happened. In england or no or i guess they're all in egypt. Well they're in london for a fashion because like that's how you're introduced to to even jonathan. God she's working at the museum and whatnot and then she takes off to find brennan fraser. Who's like in a prison. Sure for some reason. I don't remember that. Yeah i would though. I had the fucking pipe wrapped around my finger dom all for that but now there's a siege on rick o'connell's castle here pretty pretty decent action scene. I will say i do love that. People are able to get into the house and walk around for a while. The someone's like who are you. Why are you here. I mean there's like half chasing nuts you know you're not locking all those doors. You really should be you. Should at the bathrooms make sure the bathrooms we keep on that shit. I know electricity new and all. Oh and if you have electricity throughout your house. I mean you're already spending money there Yeah but so. This is mr hall. Says is this dude. Yes and he's running with his guys here and their whole thing is they are trying to resurrect imhotep. These are the dude. Still the the What's the word of looking for here. The disciples imhotep. Emotion has already been sort of resurrected in the previous scene. They in the desert found is a hell. The scarabs eat. All those dudes scarab kill totally. I wish like we could get a little more violent with this. Really see some. Do we get the. Cgi looks pretty bad when they're supposed to be in the body in their pop and through the skin kind of yet it's not great pukes out which is kind of one is pretty. That was clearly a note from the first one when they had exit audience surveys. We love the scarab. Say yes desert. Fantastic also that. Marta more of her. Marta from fucking arrest development. We just want dab student. The bucket divorced dad contingent. We would like more of her please. Yeah one guy was like an agency gifted cat fight like you know it sir. Absolutely we were looking for ideas. I got to tell you that scene that works. that's just out of nowhere. Just great filmmaking. Hey man i know what. I'm signing on one. Signed on to watch the mummy returns. We also though You know in. In tall with this mr hafez is a outta whale. Aki a. j. i know richard. I wanted to try one. He's playing locked. Nah florida. he's he's the heavy. I i love when he pops up and stuff. These fucking great. He was great obviously on is. He's one long this. Oh he quit is to do this. That's what that's how he's like. All right albie now. Maybe a mistake or no. Well i mean then. He eventually made his way to lost when she was on for several seasons and he just the one season he does he killer croc yes was right. Yeah yeah we'll we'll we'll they raid the house looking for this rick because you need the fucking bracelet has to be involved gonna thought you'd i mean it gets so money here. Yeah about because they kidnap they kidnap. Ev i yes and she gets taken away kidnapped out of out of this fight scene. He's kidnapped then they've then that's right the resurrecting the mummy in some other chamber here and they're going to burn her alive which is kind of fun. I like that..

john hannah dr h h holmes elizabeth hanna Hannah john John hannah brennan fraser rick o'connell mr hall cairo england london libya Marta egypt jonathan mr hafez Aki albie richard
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

07:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

"Once again for america's favorite show the radio adventures dr fluid brought to you by the floyd dot com featuring special guest stars stan freberg as sherlock holmes in our last episode. We'd learned that. Donna floyd dr. Steve had made a literature jump into a classic. Sherlock holmes story where darkened floyd had been cast in the role of sherlock holmes. Trusted assistant dr watson. And dr steve had been cast in the role of classic literature. I real super villain professor moriarty. We now find. Dr floyd sherlock holmes and deep discussion as they walk along a small path in switzerland heading up to reichenbach falls. I just wished you'd return to london watson. What with word that. The police have rounded up all of moriarty's gang but the professor himself has eluded capture. Things will no doubt get extremely dangerous now moriarty will stop at nothing to get his revenge. There is no danger to great. That will persuade me to leave your shade. holmes. Well could. I convince you to stop holding my hand. Oh i'm afraid of heights. Just ask dr. Floyd and sherlock holmes reached the rock outcropping overlooking reichenbach falls. A messenger runs up the path behind them. Dr watson message for the manager of the hotel you stayed in last night. One of the other guests has taken neil in this nor the doctor around the manager. Ask that you. Please return immediately to see to hook care washington. You cannot deny that request. You must return to the hotel at once homes. I just promised to remain by your side. No matter what watson. how long have we known each other. We met in junior high school game. We know elementary my dear watson. Ooh that was a bad one the point. Is you know me well enough to know that i can take care of myself. And she posed by order you to return to the hotel at once. And i don't want any more of your rumblings of mutiny. Did you hear me watson. Oh sorry i was just waiting for a sound q. sound q. Forget it. I shall go to the hotel in return it once. Floyd reese back down the hill and as he does he turns and looks over his shoulder at the path the vegan spot sherlock holmes near the top of the falls while he can't quite see the great detective as the rock. Outcropping is hidden from view. He does see sinister looking figure creeping up the path towards the top. I wonder who that sinister looking figure. Creeping up the path towards the top could be. Wait am i. Remember the details of this story now. This is the one called sherlock holmes in the adventure of the final problem in the message about the sick hotel. Guest is a fake moriarty. Sent that message to get watch the leave home alone on the cliff show. He could confront him one on one. I gotta get back up there. Because i remember how their story ends. And if i don't make it in time it's not going to be good for sherlock holmes. Dr steve starts. Floyd dashes back up. The way he came. Let us cut to the top of the cliff above the phones. Where we find sherlock holmes coming face-to-face with his arch nemesis. Who also happens to be. Dr floyd's arch nemesis. Why hello this. Sherlock holmes moriarty. I knew you'd be here. Let me guess. You knew that. I'd be up here. Because when i visited you in your office the other day you saw that i had a spec mud on my shoe and that mud wasn't particularly brown. That can only be due to the unique mineral. Makeup of the mud found here at reichenbach falls. So you cleverly deduce tonight ben out the previously looking for places to ambush you know. I knew you'd be here because you book your travel through my brother microsoft except that it is time to finish this once and for all yards. I couldn't agree more. I agree with your agreement that it is agreed that we both agreed that. Don't start that again. Look let's just hurry up and get this fight over with. I have plans to invade russia later this afternoon. Funny i thought that was just a figure of speech. How's that nothing. Let's begin but i must warn you. Mario party that. I am well practiced in the martial art of barrett. Sue and i must one you homes that i have a black belt in screaming and running away when i'm about to lose So it begins don cherry. Take that out hickey. What whoa look out. Nice one low fat and that careful. We're getting awfully close to the edge of the cliff there. What's wrong then. Don't you like the show with a cliffhanger. Not when it's me us hanging over the edge of the cliff until foes struggle with punches other precipice. It is at this exact moment that lloyd rounds the last band in the path just time to witness a shadowy form disappear over the edge of the cliff or no. I'm wait a minute. Perhaps there's one. Small jan smith quickly reaches into the pocket of his coat and pushes the button on the translate to our remote controlled. There was a loud bang in a blinding clash of light environment. Floyd vanishes leaving only the cliff at rickenbach falls behind who was the shadowy form that toppled over the edge of that cliff. What did dr floyd hope to accomplish by pushing the button on the translate to a remote control. And just how many times mr narrator yes. I'm from the village. Green preservation society. Later find out next time on the radio. Adventures of dr flowing episode. Never seven ten of the radio. Adventures of dr flowing. Start stan freberg. As sherlock holmes be sure to pick up stanford's history of united states of america volumes one and two to hear the album that helped inspire the radio adventures of dr floyd. This episode also featured a special cameo appearance by june foray music for this episode by jodi white sides. Www dot jody. White sides dot com. This episode was written by grant pachuco. And based on the stories of sherlock holmes by sir arthur conan doyle leaves the voice mail and area code eight eight three three two three zero five three visit the brand new radio adventures of dr floyd store at www dot dr floyd dot com slash store. This episode was recorded. At dr floyd studios in beautiful downtown burbank. California episode number seven ten of the radio. Adventures of dr floyd is copyright two thousand eight dr floyd industries. All rights reserved. Hey radio adventures of dr floyd fans one look cool for back to school. Then you need the brand new official radio. Adventures of dr floyd t-shirt available exclusively at the dr floyd online store at www dot. Dr roy dot com the radio adventures of dr floyd t-shirt features a brand new drawing of the cast of the show on the front and our catchphrase and website on the back. This shirt is one hundred percent cotton and comes in sizes for both kids and adults go to www dot. Dr floyd dot com right now to get your brand new radio. Adventures of dr floyd t-shirt hurry. Though quantities are limited in this initial run the brand new radio. Adventures of dr floyd t-shirt available only at www dot d. o. C. t. o. R. f. l. o. y. dot.

sherlock holmes reichenbach falls moriarty watson dr floyd stan freberg Donna floyd dr watson dr steve Dr floyd sherlock holmes Dr watson Floyd Floyd reese Dr floyd Dr steve Sherlock holmes moriarty Sherlock holmes floyd united states of america holmes
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on ABC Radio MELBOURNE

ABC Radio MELBOURNE

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on ABC Radio MELBOURNE

"They're looking up at you. Or if you're on the freeway, you look up. You're dwarfed by the huge jumbo jet almost on top of you. As it passes the freeway. The name of the freeway that snakes around Sydney Airport is, of course. General Holmes. Dr. Never caused me a moment's thought. Really. Until a book William Holmes, the soldiers general, written by Jeffrey Travis arrived on my desk and now all will be revealed. I think so. Jeffrey Travis. Welcome to the program. I think we're all dying, then. Well, I certainly am dying to know who was William Holmes General William Holmes. General Holmes, Dr. General William Holmes was Sydney boy who was born in Victoria Barracks. The son of non commissioned officer grew up and he joined the public service at 16 by 24. He was the chief clerk of the water board by 32. He was the chief executive of the Water board, and he built a lot of the water supply that Lad Sydney to grow from 150,000 people to about 800,000 people like what will the up in opinion scheme that with a damned than a peon in the corner on the cataract in the Avon Rivers? And I dug a canal tunnel in the canal. It takes it to Prospect Reservoir and then from Prospect Reservoir. It went down another canal and into the city. They built that between eight and 78 1988. He actually had joined the public service and building it in 18 78. Was he an engineer? Now? He was just a really bright lead. He was a clock so he became the chief Clark in the water board started when the chance came, was finished. They started the water board. He applied for the job is Chief clack and after six or eight years in that position, he became the truth. Executive of it, What's called the secretary. That was his day job, which he held to the day he died, But his love of life, his enjoyment or his hobby was being in the militia and being in the army. And when he was about 39, the Boer War broke out. He volunteered to go. He took nine months leave of absence from the water board. Anyway. Diver is a sort of a company commander, basically in charge of about 100 men and had nine months fighting the boars in the start of the bull war, and he really turned out to be a very, very good soldier in the militia. He became a commander of one of the regiment's there and he brought back with him. His experience in the bull war, which was accurate rifle fire was absolutely the most important thing for soldier and he made his regiment the best shooting regiment in the militia. When war broke out in 1914. They formed the first four brigades of the I R a F. I also got requested by the imperial government to send a force up to capture all the German positions in New Guinea and all the islands to the north of Australia. Right up across the equator. General Holmes got asked to leave that and it was 1500 men. And in the Australian navy. I went up there, and within a month side occupied all of that territory. That territory is massive. It's bigger than that the size of the whole of Australia and he only had 1500 men, but he was clever enough to take on the Germans that rebel to get the governor there to surrender all of those positions and that saved a lot of trouble. And the great thing about that was from Australia's perspective was Australia had unoccupied those German positions. The Japanese who are allies at that stage would have come down and they would have Occupied them, which would have given them a huge stepping stone to invite astride a 25 years later, so it was a really vital strategic role, But he was disappointed that he hadn't been given one of the brigades in the in the area. For that we're going to Europe. He didn't really want to go up into malarial and disease and in unglamorous fighting. There was a bit of fighting. The first Australians were killed and you get it, But you know what? We had six deaths. In this little one battle could be the Packer. But anyway, he came back and I would in starting the fist for guide and the 6th and 7th. He was given the fifth Brigade and that went over to join the other divisions, which royally in Egypt and they didn't come forward on to Gallipoli until the middle of August. Just after the August offensives with things like the neck where all those poor men were shot. The fifth Brigade was the first one that went there and immediately I think Holmes had an impact because she's big thing was to go around the perimeters of the over the position everywhere and to go and talk to the men. What do you need? What should you do if you're attacked? Have you got enough ammunition, Heavy gun, Not food. Have you not got enough water? A lot of the other generals who never bring in battle never did that. Some of them never went to the front line that some of them never went upside of Quinn's post in the whole time. They were there, but he did as a result that made an impact and at the very end off the Gallipoli when I decided to evacuate one of the general's got sick We don't know whether he was sick or whether he just didn't want to be around for the evacuation will are expected to lose 40% of the force. So Holmes was given the temporary.

Jeffrey Travis New Guinea Avon Rivers Boer War 40% Quinn Prospect Reservoir Sydney Airport William Holmes 150,000 people nine months 32 Europe six deaths Egypt 1500 men Australia 18 78 24 6th
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:24 min | 9 months ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The fame manners you're hospitalized. I'm Layla Mohamad lie from the K. If I 24 hour news room, former L. A Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda has been hospitalized in Orange County. The Dodgers tweeted that Lasorda is in the ICU and is resting comfortably. Lasorda managed the Dodgers in the eighties when they won two World Series championships. He is 93 years old L. A county sheriff's deputies have shot and killed a man who, they say pointed a gun at them on the outskirts of Inglewood. That shooting happened shortly before two this morning at South Van Ness Avenue and van which street But he's recalled about a man standing in the street and pointing a gun in a passing car. They say they ordered the man to drop the gun, and that's when he turned and pointed it at them. Deputies say that's when he was shot news brought to you by direct buyers calm. The U. S. Is topping 11 million cases of covert 19 a million new infections and Jess the past week. ABC is. Trevor also says that the city of El Paso, Texas, has become the epicenter of the Corona virus outbreak with case is continuing to rise. It has been a nightmare. Let's just be honest. Business owner Laura Rayborn is one of the many who have lost family members in El Paso. She's tourney between safety and her livelihood, cautiously re opening her salon after a state appeals court overturned the county judge. Is lockdown order. There's a lot of people in the hospital, and this is not a victory. Washington Governor Jay Inslee has announced new restrictions for the state where Cove it 19 1st showed up. Endsley says the state is in a more dangerous position than back in March, when it all started. Average daily cases in our state have doubled just in the last two weeks. You cannot go on like this. We have to get this under control or medical system will soon be overwhelmed. Some of the restrictions going into effect in Washington this week, including into indoor dining and shops, will have to reduce their indoor capacity to 25% bars, Gyms, movie theaters, bowling alleys and museums will close. Health officials say The increase in covert 19 cases is alarming if we don't basically take The important steps like stop swapping error with are our neighbors, our friends, our colleagues. We're going to see these numbers grow substantially. Dr Michael Ulster, Holmes said. The country is in a dangerous period, he says it's the most dangerous since the Spanish flu just over 100 years ago, Poster home is a member of Joe Biden's Cove. It 19 Advisory board. President Trump has admitted Joe Biden won the election in a tweet, however, Trump tweeted this morning that Biden won because the election was rigged. Joe Biden's chief of staff, says he is pleased with President Trump's tweet. I accepted as a further confirmation of the reality that Joe Biden won the election. Plane said Trump's tweet is further confirmation that Biden was indeed chosen by the American people, he says Trump's Twitter feed does not determine whether biting this president or not. The number one ranked golfer in the world has won this year's Masters tournament and his first green jacket, Dustin Johnson says growing up near Augusta National and participating in his first masters back in 2009 has made this year's tournament the one he really wanted to win. There was something that Did you push yourself for you? You know, that's why I work so hard It is to be in this position and you know, finally have have the dream come true is I think that's why you see all that emotion. Johnson said that 72 hole scoring record of 20 under the lowest score two part in the history of the Masters at Augusta National. Let's head to work zone in Montebello on the 60. That's on the 60 eastbound.

Joe Biden Dodgers Tommy Lasorda President Trump El Paso Dustin Johnson Washington Orange County Layla Mohamad Cove Laura Rayborn ABC Augusta National Governor Jay Inslee Jess Endsley Montebello Texas
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

06:18 min | 9 months ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"I'm sorry. Yeah right there. When it goes. Now. This was going on and and and and the students on campus would go. And come. So point, Phil where throughout the day you'll hear it like this. This is how you hear it. Hello. Your head. Are you right? I mean you're not hearing things. So that's it well, Dr Barnes I mean, no no. So and his barn for the nine hundred times I'm sorry Doctor Barn Yeah. So that's it. So you think I've gone around the bend. You think I'm as crackers crackers basically they come all cracked up on what you think. When you're hearing things like you you're hearing ooh, that's how that's exactly what I'm hearing because it's coming from the students lounge it's coming from the teachers. Dining hall is coming from the rooms is coming from off campus place. They all see Dr Barn, the guy who made an asset of himself hunting vampires until they didn't exist and I said to a guy suck it out of my neck and he pulls his pick out. You'RE GONNA have to get over that anger and bitterness and I know that don't need for you actually on it. All right but you have to get over that anger bitterness because. You did the right thing. You said there are no vampires and now you're trying to tell people. Yes and now I'm trying to tell people and they look at you like Oh really they'll stretch their head go fancy that. saw the whole thing is just like. What are they doing? Are they booked me for a lecture? And they'll pay me. But what do they do they sit there staring at me going wow. When did you figured out what Sherlock and by the way I have to tell you fill it? I'm sorry but I have to consider legal action on your facebook page. Someone took out an ad Dr Arthur or excuse me, Dr. Sherlock Holmes Tonight on the Phil Hendrie show. Did you see that? They took out an ad on his facebook page. You can take anti. facebook. Well it must have been on the fan page. Yes. What about pages we got? We've got three facebook pages. All right. Well, one of them. tonight Dr Arnn. Docking what was it a? What was that tonight? Dr Dates? No Tonight Dr. Sherlock Holmes bonds figures out. There's no such thing is on. Tonight Dr Arthur Sherlock Holmes Barnes figures out this slow no such thing as them. So the humiliation heaped upon humiliation. The insults is he on insult? Okay did you do that? Did you hear that I did yeah, we heard it. What are you GonNa? Tell me that's one of your students. No the grew is the doors closed. You didn't do that. WHO's Dutch Dutch is one of my students gonNA, ask you for the last time. Did you go? Ooh, did you do that I did? Yeah. Why because I I? have some laughs. I was trying to have some laughs. Yeah. Then three. Bucks Get Outta here Dr Barn I said nobody gets to assault anybody on this show. It's happened whether the guests it's happened to other times there was a prohibition or I will call the police. Get outta here is. You hit that man. So what you're not allowed to do that man or call the cops who knows how absolute get out of here, touch. I just want to apologize. Come on and it's okay. Sit down. and Go do it again. Sorry. I. You know what? I'm saying Dr That's against the law. So I I know but I'm my nerves a rugged. All, right I'M GONNA kick. I'M GONNA go. There is those what an asshole man. Hey. If you see him suck is going on I have no idea. Better be able to win I WANNA, see as soon elbows. Asses and elbows. That's right. No don't have. That that was one of my students that was. Finds out yeah. He did it on purpose he just took off running. So this is the humiliation. Wait a minute. Is this boy a. here's what is your student advisors he's a student system I had yeah. If only worked for a week. He's what he did that he went. ooh whatever that was did you did you see them? Ran Down the street you see him. You're tell him on for him. Better yet, when you see him, tell him to hide system coming. Close the doorway. Close the door. Right. There feel very glad that happened. So that's harassment that's been going on harassment. It's been going on for quite some time but you're gonNA have to tell ministration that this is going on because this is a this is a threat that could turn more serious by all the do right now is this glue. But I told you, you know I'm being book for these lectures now and they they book through the Columbia Speakers Series so that when I go out for these lectures. Dr Arthur barn tonight on the non-existence Vampires people are sitting there and they organize these groups and they come in and they're scratching their heads and saying things like No kidding. Oh, I didn't a did you know that honey and I just go. You know thanks very much. I collect by materials and walked down the hall and then maybe one will run after being no seriously Dr, we're just kidding around. there. Okay. So I'll turn out go back I'll continue to lecture and next thing you know his some smart ass with his is Chen going no vampires next you're gonNa tell me there's no such thing as imps. And I said what he said imps I m PS imps. And so I know that he was trying to insult me. So I went I. What is an IMP? Back class that that's what Herman is and pointing at the guy was giving me shit never mind. Stories. Kind of involved it. Really. Beside the point but. The point is you're being harassed at the school being harassed at school and..

facebook Dr Barn Dr Arthur Sherlock Holmes Barn Dr. Sherlock Holmes Phil Hendrie Dr Arthur barn Dr Barnes Dr Arthur Dr Arnn Dr Dates Sherlock Dining hall harassment Chen Herman assault
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Y'All a we need to talk about the Georgia I. It took a big twist. I WanNa wait on that though. Oh though I'm GonNa make educated guesses on. I think I know who the nominee is largely because of of president trump and Doug Collins And what they've done and I I love give me some Doug Collins but I I think his team around him. They've played their hands badly before. I get to that though. I WANNA discuss impeachment mint and in the closing of all minds Is I I want to play you a very long clip This is this is four four minutes and forty seconds Forty one seconds. If I'm precise of we'll heard will hurt is a republican congressman from South Texas. His the district has rapidly become democratic. He won his re election by two hundred votes. He was in the intelligence community he he does not like president trump. President trump does not like him. They have gone after each other on twitter on multiple occasions The president thought that will hurt had had lost in November and was Giddy at the thought of. We'll heard losing They're they're not big fans of each other so if there is a Republican Republican who the Democrats should be able to persuade to move forward with impeachment. It should be someone like will heard and and yet will heard. Does it support impeachment. And he's coming under attack from Democrats and people who hate the president Including some Republicans eight the president. He's coming under attack for being a partisan hack When this guy he's leaving he has nothing to lose in the people who have become so dogmatic in their insistence that that orange man bad must go Easy they they're attacking will heard who is a natural ally for them. Ironically the president's supporters are also attacking will heard. They're attacking we'll heard because he had the audacity ready to say. The president did something wrong and that the president's foreign policies misguided this is a man caught in the middle of from two sides who hate his guts right now because he's unwilling unwilling to move to their positions because he thinks he's right and and I suspect will hurt is right on this. I want to play you. What will heard things about about impeachment right now? We we need to engage in the Field Hill testimony. She was pretty damaging for the president but not nearly damaging enough and she and David Holmes testified in the impeachment hearings. Yesterday was the last day of public impeachment testimony they did not scuttle The event they did not scuttle impeachment. They they did not cost the president his job with their testimony. You've got members of the media guys you got to do more than this but before we get any of that. I want you to listen to will hurt again congressman from Texas Willard. Thank Dr Hill Mr Holmes for your years of service to this country and I appreciate you all being here today throughout this process. I have said that I want to learn the facts so we can get to the truth. So why are we here because of two things that occurred during the president's July twenty fifth phone call along with Ukrainian Presidents Alinsky. The use of the phrase. Do us a favor. Though in reference to the two thousand sixteen presidential election and the mention of the word Biden I believe both statements were inappropriate misguided foreign policy. And it's certainly not how the executive current or in the future should handle such a call over the course of these hearings. The American people have learned about a series of events that in my view have undermined our national security and undercut Ukraine and a key partner on the frontlines against Russian aggression we've heard of. US officials carrying uncoordinated confusing and conflicting messages created doubt in uncertainty and cave at a time when a new reformist administration has just taken office and was ready to fight corruption and work with US advance.

President trump Doug Collins David Holmes twitter Georgia US Ukraine South Texas Biden Texas
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:06 min | 2 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We would love your help with tomorrow's program about prisons specifically the ultra high security facilities known as supermax prisons. Some of the nation's nastiest convicts will spend the rest of their lives there, including Joaquin Guzman. The drug kingpin known as El Chapo, what should we do with our most dangerous criminals? Leave us a voicemail. Eight five five two three six one a one. A also we would love to hear from you. If you've worked at a supermax prison, if you've had loved ones who are incarcerated there, if you've been an attorney to convict held there, or perhaps if you've done time there yourself, tell us your story. Eight five five two three six one a one. A you could also use our app won a vox pop to send us a radio. Polity audio file and to keep up to date on future, topics. We'll share some of you. Your stories tomorrow on one A. Back now to our conversation with Brian sweet tech, author of the new book, skeleton, keys, the secret life of bone. We got quite a few messages from you about your experiences, dealing with human bones, including on a medical level. Here's what one listener left in our inbox. Hi, my name is Shawn Dell and in medical school. I worked in lab. And so not only do we have to go through cutting through tissue. I think my favorite part. Now, I know something about the crash speaking of the anatomy, let me get back to that tweet that I just read from Tyler Tyler wrote, I separated my shoulder in a bike crash twenty years ago, the bones still do their jobs, but without the specific architecture of muscles tendons in veins, there are cliques and pressures and muscles that have had to compensate. It's a reminder of how amazing and specific our skeletons are Brian this is a real basic question. But could you just give us a clearer sense of what our bones do for our body? Yes, they hold up the framework of the rest of it. But they do it in a very intricate way. And they do more than that. Yeah. I mean, there are aspects of bone that affect just about every part of our lives. So the story preceding you're our conversation and had to do with bone marrow. The fact that our bones contain marrow that create our blood cells. The fact that bone is incredibly responsive and can heal itself and much of the same way that our bones initially grow from the time that we're in the womb through adulthood, and. Old age. It's this system where bone is always being laid down. It's always being eaten up. It's always changing those responding to our environment. It protects us to protect internal organs are ribs wrap around in our heart and lungs, and so many other vital pieces. So is really multifunctional tissue. That's much more dynamic than I think a lot of people understand. With regards to our anatomy Collin tweeted, what's going on with our tail bones, Brian what about the tailbone? Well, those are you know, this vestige of our evolutionary past. Yeah. They're just kind of along for the ride at this point. They provide you know, perhaps some anchor points for some muscles and soft tissues along with the other bones of our our hips in our in our lower backs. But it's really just this wonderful little clue that you know, millions and millions of years ago. Our ancestors had tales. So I like this little tidbit of our deep past that still there. Amanda tweeted, why do we treat bones more cavalierly than dead bodies? I think because part of the culture in which we've you bones up they become collectors items because if you look at it, human stolen, really take a minute to look at it. There is a lot of personality there, even if you don't see the the eiser or the soft tissues or anything that would make it a full face. There's still so much personality there, I think that we've kind of gotten used to not questioning the fact that you know. You know, these are people that are remains of of people that there's been a mentality of the dead have no rights for hundreds of years. I'm really just starting to change that now I had a conversation with a friend of mine who wanted to obtain human skeleton as an artistic reference, and we had a conversation very similar to what you and I have been talking about at the end of it. She said, you know, it's kind of funny that I give more thought to the treatment of the chickens who laid the eggs that I get from the grocery store, then the fact that you know, I want to buy what you know, is is a person. So I think a lot of this is just we haven't been investigating our own views and questioning ourselves about do we have a right to collect own human remains. And I think that's something that's really just bubbling up and is going to continue for some time. Well, and also, I think we should just be clear is that a bone doesn't look like the person that belong to you know. I mean, if you saw me dead in a coffin, you would recognize it as me if you saw my skeleton leader. Out on a table in a cadaver lab, you'd have no way to tell who it is. It's almost like it allows a certain disconnection from the humanity of whoever was there isn't distance. There's some disconnection although on the other hand some of this depends on expertise. I was at an event in Washington DC where anthropoid friend of mine who I've never met before. Who knew me from Twitter came up and said, oh, yeah. I recognize you by the shape of your skull. So sometimes it's. That we're willing to go have some Pearl Magnin had or what? I haven't had the twenty three and me tests done yet to see how much on the NFL. I've got probably got some being of western European descent. But that's the wonderful. Western European descent has some I'm just wondering if you would like a caveman. I haven't been called beetle Browde yet. But I'll circle back if I do. Matt tweeted, Dr h h Holmes sold the bones of his victims to medical schools. What's that about you know, that story? Yeah. I think that is if I recall incorrectly that this was a murderess fellow who operated in Chicago during the time of the world's fair. And yeah, he killed a number of people. And then sold the remains, and that's gets back into the bone trade that, you know, a fair number of skeletons or human remains that you might find for sale through various outlets came from medical schools, either closed or the accession some of their collections or some of what they used to teach with. And that's a question that's worth asking that you if you are interested or looking into buying human remains number one. I don't thinks particularly ethical to to do. But if you ask those questions like who was this person where did this come from? What's the history? So often, these pieces are not only denuded of their Fleischer denude of their history where we have no idea where they came from with regards to that, Jim. Sent cintas an Email little graphic kind of specific nothing gruesome, but just fair. Warning. Jim emailed a human skeleton from a doctor's office was offered at an auction. Recently, it came complete with a documented back story that the bones belonged to a murdered Parisian prostitutes. And indeed it was possible to see the knife marks on her sternum the bones sold for two hundred dollars. It was legal. But it did not seem right? Pat tweeted regarding indigenous bones, what about geronimo's skull at the Yale skull-and-bone society. Brian descendants of Geronimo sued the society about a decade ago. I believe saying that they basically robbed his grave in the early twentieth century. Yeah. Yeah. Familiar with that particular case, but there are a number of famous skeletons in various museums or medical school colleges that they're still question of like should these bones be repatriated or returned who was this person? Can we identify them, and what were their their wishes on another example that's been in? The news relatively recently is the skeleton of someone who is famous for for some time. Call the Irish giant Charles Byrne, who you know, he had a physiological condition that gave him your larger stature and famously. He kind of could hear the the scalpel is being sharpened. Yeah. As he felt his life was ending any made specific wishes to be buried at sea in a lead coffin. So his body wouldn't be stolen put on display, and that is exactly what happened that the Royal College of surgeons or what became the Royal College of surgeons in England obtained his remains until recently is on display. There's been. Some murmurings that he may eventually get his final wish and a final burial. But especially with skeletons, and remains that are centuries old or considered historic or have certain medical value. There's often pushback from the scientific or medical community saying, well, we can learn from from these things are now there's a historical gloss to the outside of this that makes the bones something more than just that one person's life, and there's this constant back and forth that we really have yet to resolve speaking of that history. We should definitely mention Richard the third the former king of England he was reburied in an official religious ceremony in twenty fifteen more than five hundred years after he died. Here's a bit of that eulogy from the ceremony. It was written by Scottish poet named Carol. Ann Duffy and read by Benedict Cumberbatch who has played the famous king and is his distant descendant bones scripted in light upon code soil. A human braille my skull. Scott by crown emptied of.

Brian Joaquin Guzman Jim El Chapo Royal College of surgeons attorney geronimo England Tyler Tyler Shawn Dell Twitter cintas Washington Chicago Pearl Magnin Collin Amanda Carol Scott
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on 1A

"And at the end of it. She said, you know, it's kind of funny that I give more thought to you know, the treatment of the chickens who laid the eggs that I get from the grocery store than the fact that you know, I want to buy. What you know is is a person. So I think a lot of this is just we haven't been investigating our own views and questioning ourselves about, you know, do we have a right to collect own human remains? And I think you know, that's something that's really just bubbling up is going to continue for some time. Well, and also, I think we should just be clear that a bone doesn't look like the person that belong to you know. I mean, if you saw me, you know, dead in a coffin, you would recognize it as me if you saw my skeleton laid out on a table in a cadaver lab, you'd have no way to tell who it is. It's almost like it allows a certain disconnection from the humanity of whoever was there is some distance through some disconnection. Although on the other hand some of this depends on expertise. I was at an event in Washington DC, where anthropologists friend of mine who had never met before who knew me from Twitter came up and said, I recognize you by the shape of your skull. So sometimes it's. That we're willing to go have some Pearl Magnin had or what? I haven't had the twenty three and tests done yet to see how much Neanderthal I've got probably got some being of, you know, western European descent, but that's the wonderful everyone. Western European descent has some I'm just wondering if you if you look like a caveman, I haven't been called beetle Browde yet. But I'll circle back if I do. Matt tweeted, Dr h h Holmes sold the bones of his victims to medical schools. What's that about you know, that story? Yeah. I think that is if I recall incorrectly that this was basically a murderous fellow who operated in Chicago during the time of the world's fair. And yeah, he, you know, killed a number of people, and then sold the remains, and that's gets back into the bone trade that, you know, fair number of skeletons or human remains that you might find for sale through various outlets came from a medical schools either closed or the accession some of their collections or some of what they used to teach with. And that's a question that's worth asking that. If you are, you know, interested or looking into, you know, buying human remains number one. I don't think it's particularly ethical to do. But if you are doing that like ask those questions like who was person where did this come from? What's the history so often, you know, these? Pieces are not only denuded of their Fleischer denuded of their history. We have no idea where they came from with regards to that Jim sentence in Email little graphic kind of specific nothing gruesome, but just fair. Warning Jim emailed a human skeleton from a doctor's office was offered at an auction. Recently, it came complete with a documented back story that the bones belonged to a murdered Parisian prostitute. And indeed it was possible to see the knife marks on her sternum the bone sold for two hundred dollars. It was legal. But it did not seem right? Pat tweeted regarding indigenous bones, what about geronimo's skull at the Yale skull-and-bone society. Brian descendants of geronimo's sued the society about a decade ago. I believe saying that they basically robbed his grave in the early twentieth century. I'm not as familiar with that particular case, but there are a number of famous skeletons, you know, in various museums or medical school colleges that, you know, they're still question of like should these bones be repatriated or returned? Who was this person? Can we identify them? And what were their their wishes though? Another example, that's been, you know, the news relatively recently is the skeleton of someone who is famous for some time called the Irish giant Charles Byrne, who you know, he had a physiological condition that gave him a larger stature and famously. He kind of could hear the the scalpel being sharpened as he felt his life was ending and he made specific wishes to be buried at sea in a lead coffin..

Charles Byrne geronimo Pearl Magnin Jim Yale skull-and-bone society Twitter Washington Chicago Matt Fleischer Pat Brian two hundred dollars
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Basically there's something going on that so atrocious and so bad when people see it they commit suicide. It drives them to suicide. So basically drives everybody to try to survive with blindfolds on. Yeah. What do you look at takes user that what you're looking at takes the form of your worst fears and you're done young. You're gone. That is dicey. And I'm excited because I hope it doesn't end like that the quiet place movie. I watched that with the kids I thought that was going to be absolutely fantabulous. But it wasn't as terribles awful. The rotten tomatoes actually given that a see what are they given that the sixty eight percent. I bet. Certified fresh get certified fresh rotten tomatoes. I go by because it's an aggregate of different reviews and speaking of which. Rotten tomatoes. The new Sherlock Holmes movie. If your homes in Watson. Yes. This is a will Ferrell flick. So basically the stars of stepbrothers are now playing Dr Watson Sherlock, Holmes. Before I came in today, the rotten tomatoes aggregate score ready for this zero. It is that bad of a movie it has jumped up though, it's a juggernaut this one a juggernaut six. It has gotten a six not certified fresh. It has gotten a six vice is guiding obviously vice is sixty four so it's okay. It's not really, you know jumping out there. But here's the deal though, there have been movies, and and I'm calling shenanigans on the Holmes and Watson went I'm calling shenanigans. And here's what I'm doing. Because it was conversation. I was having rob hunter a few weeks ago. We're on rotten tomatoes looking up different movies. And there were some that had like ones into that were moderate flex there. Okay. We don't want anything. Great. You know, like the last drastic part movies. Like, okay. If you if you want to go, and if you wanna watch a popcorn movie, that's it like the Meg. Don movie, I enjoyed it. I watched the dang thing twice like if you're rages. Go be entertaining watching movies stop being a snob about shelf and just watch a movie and be entertained. We'll wealfare funny, man. So I don't understand how zero could be an aggregate score of reviews across the land is it as it opened on Christmas day in the previews before it opened up. It had that you had to get some laugh at it one or two it's got it's got a naked gun feel to it. And so what we find out is a lot of these reviews are and I'm not gonna say Russian box because every stop blaming Russia for everything. Their butts. These are just these these are things are going in vote in review in voting review and just do without hundreds of times over they do it either take down a movie or hyper movie. So when I said, the the conversation I got into with rob hunter, b basically became what in the world with the world of everybody calling something that they don't agree with fake news. And every time something goes wrong or doesn't go someone's way, they blame it on Russia's or Russians were they say that they were hacked. And then you can't even go see a movie entrust what you're looking at online because you don't know if it's a these are real human beings that are reviewing them. It ain't going to yelp in the like and all of that. We're in a world where you have to go in verified that the person that's reviewing it is actually a verified reviewer. And then what made them verify, you know, just what do you believe? And how do you believe that? So here's my my movie going at vice for you this holiday season as more movies are going to be released top box office right now is aquaman. Mary Poppins returns. Bumblebee Spiderman into the spiders, which I heard was a fantastic animated movie. I didn't know what was going to be animated. But it's a fantastic animated movie. The grinches garbage. The mule. I don't even know what that is. Ralph breaks the that. I'm excited to see that with the kids in Mary Queen of Scots. What is with these period pieces? I don't get anyway. Mulas the Clint Eastwood movie where he's running drugs. Oh, that's what I want to see that. Oh, good. Yeah. I didn't know that was called the mule. Everyone heard that right. Okay. Good. You weren't just talking. Sometimes. I don't know if those are the voices in my head or not losses. What it is. Okay. Yes. So Clint Eastwood so definitely want to go see that movie. And it's got sixty four percent. But an animated flick is at ninety seven and in bumblebees at ninety three. So it gives me a little bit of hope. But for the most part. Here's my advice. Did simple just see a movie that you think hey that might be good and just suspend disbelief grab some popcorn be entertained. Stop being snobby about it. Just go have some fun. You know, I think meals a true story is fantastic based on a true story. Okay. So that's cool. And there's an in Bumblebee is definitely a true story and aquaman true story. I wanted. Here's the deal. Okay. So, but but definitely check out the trailers and see if it's your baggage aquaman. I was excited about because I actually liked the Justice league. I thought it was a good movie. There are people Pooh poohing on that all day long any roster. You like it. He okay. Didn't like it. Okay. I thought it was a decent show maybe because wonder woman's in its everybody can pound sand. All right. So he was kind. He was kind of a bad. And I was like, okay. I wanna go see the movie I saw the trailer. I I don't think you can take me kicking and screaming to this movie. I mean, it took just the the trailer looks like a seven minute trailer took like eight different terms and with big red aliens and stuff like that. What lasers are shooting. Come on. I mean, I know we're dealing with people who talk underwater and mermen and all that. But I mean do come on. I draw a line at lasers, I guess. But I love that man, Holmes and Watson zero zero I you have to call shenanigans on that I bring that up and I'm going to check out that bird box. I think this weekend. Yeah. I'm I'm, but I'm kind of scared to watch the scary movie. 'cause I hope this is the one that gets me back in the game. Yeah. Good scary movies out there a university. A university is claiming that asking a woman out on a date, violates something I'll tell you what that is after we get look at east side west side, traffic, here's leap out. Yeah. We got a crash, Mike. It's all one zero one westbound.

Sherlock Holmes Dr Watson Sherlock aquaman Clint Eastwood rob hunter Russia Watson yelp Justice league Ferrell Mary Poppins Mary Queen Ralph Mike sixty eight percent sixty four percent seven minute
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Something going on that so atrocious and so bad when people see it they commit suicide. It drives them to suicide. So basically drives everybody to try to survive with blindfolds on. Yeah. What do you look at it takes user that he's looking at takes the form of your worst fears and you're done young. You're gone that is dicey. And I'm excited because I hope it doesn't end like that the quiet place movie. I watched that with the kids, and I thought that was going to be absolutely fantabulous. But it wasn't as terrible as awful. But rod tomatoes actually, given that a see what are they given that sixty eight percent. I bet. Certified fresh, you get it also certified fresh rotten tomatoes. I go by because it's an aggregate of different reviews and speaking of which. Rotten tomatoes. The new Sherlock Holmes movie. If your homes in Watson. Yes. This is a welfare Affleck. So basically the stars of stepbrothers are now playing Dr Watson Sherlock, Holmes. Before I came in today, the rotten tomatoes aggregate score ready for this. Zero. It is that bad of a movie it has jumped up though, it's a juggernaut this one a juggernaut six. It has gotten a six not certified fresh. It has gotten a six vice guiding obviously vice is sixty four so it's okay. It's not really, you know jumping out there. But here's the deal though, there have been movies in and I'm calling shenanigans on the Holmes and Watson, I'm calling shenanigans. And here's why I'm doing because it was conversation. I was having rob hunter a few weeks ago when we're on rotten tomatoes looking up different movies. And there were some that had like ones into that were moderate flex there. Okay. We don't want anything great. You know, like the last drastic park movie. It's like, okay. If you if you want to go, and if you want to watch a popcorn movie, that's it like the Meg. Michael the Don movie, I enjoyed it. I watched the dang thing twice. Like if is. It'd be entertaining watching movies stop being a snob about shelf and just watch moving be entertained. Will Ferrell's a funny, man. So I don't understand how zero could be an aggregate score of reviews across the land is it as it opened on Christmas day in the previous before it opened up had that you had to get some laugh at it one or two it's got a it's got a naked gun feel to it. And so what we find out is a lot of these reviews are and I'm not gonna say Russian box because every stop blaming Russia for everything. Their bots. These are these these are things are going in vote in review and voting review. And just do it thousands of times over they do it either take down a movie or hyper movie. So when I said that the conversation I got into with rob hunter, BA basically became what in the world with the world of everybody calling something that they don't agree with fake news. And every time something goes wrong, or it go someone's way, they blame it on Russia's or Russians were they say that they were hacked. And then you can't even go see a movie entrust what you're looking at online because you don't know if it's these are real human beings that are reviewing it ain't going to yelp in the like and all of that we're in a world where you have to go in verified that the person that's reviewing it is actually a verified reviewer. And then what bought made them verify, you know, just what do you believe? And how do you believe that? So here's my my moviegoing advice for you this holiday season as more movies are going to be released top box office right now is aquaman. Mary Poppins returns. Bumblebee Spiderman into the spiders, which I heard was a fantastic animated movie. I didn't know what was going to be animated. But it's a fantastic animated movie. The grinches garbage. The mule. I don't even know what that is. Ralph breaks the internet. I'm excited to see that with the kids in Mary Queen of Scots. What is with these period pieces? I don't get anyway. Mulas the Clint Eastwood movie where he's running drugs. Oh, that's what I want to see that. Oh, good gear. I didn't know that was called the MU everyone heard that. Right. Okay. Good. You weren't just talking. Sometimes. I don't know if those are the voices in my head or not what it is. Okay. Yes. So Clint Eastwood so definitely want to go see that movie. And it's got sixty four percent. But an animated flick is at ninety seven and in bumblebees at ninety three. So it gives me a little bit of hope. But for the most part, here's my advice. It's simple just see a movie that you think hey that might be good and just suspend disbelief grab some popcorn be entertained. Stop being snobby about it. Just go have some fun. I think meals a true story is fantastic based on a true story. Okay. So that's cool. And there's an in Bumblebee is definitely a true story and aquaman true story. I wanted. Here's the deal. Okay. So, but but definitely check out the trailers and see what's your baggage t aquaman. I was excited about because I actually liked the Justice league. I thought it was a good movie. There are people Pooh poohing on that all day long any roster. You like it. He okay. Didn't like it. Okay. I thought it was a decent show maybe because wonder woman's in its everybody can pound sand. All right. So aquaman was in. He was kind. He was kind of a bad. And I was like, okay. I wanna go see the Akron movie. I saw the trailer. I I don't think you can take me kicking and screaming to this movie. I mean, it took just the trailer. Looks like a seven minute trailer took like eight different turns in it with big red aliens and stuff like that got lasers are shooting. Come on. I mean, I know we're dealing with people that talk underwater and mermen and all that. But I mean do come on I draw line at lasers, I guess. But how about that man, Holmes and Watson zero zero you have to call shenanigans on that Sooners. I bring that up and I'm going to check out that bird box. I think this weekend. Yeah. I'm but I'm kind of scared to watch the scary movie. 'cause I hope this is the one that gets me back in the game. Yeah. Scary movies out there a university. A university is claiming that asking a woman out on a date, violates something I'll tell you what that is after we get to look at east side west side, traffic,.

Sherlock Holmes aquaman Dr Watson Sherlock Russia Clint Eastwood rob hunter Watson Will Ferrell yelp Affleck Mary Poppins Justice league Michael Mary Queen Ralph Sooners Akron sixty eight percent
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Could retire if this is what you want. Stay the course. Well, I'm curious for both of you. It doesn't. It doesn't totally seem like Greg is kind of into doing the work. I mean, am I wrong. The truth. Actually, to be honest and the, you know, we're friends and he acts like he wants to do the work. Really, he does. He talks about, you know, hoping that quad will turn and come back. And while it just seems like mentally quiet been gone for years. Right? Okay. I feel like I'm at a reunion right. I'm telling you very medicine gets real. It's weekly risen up to like the top of the rain. Great on last week's medicine, heavenly anger management counselor felt that her spiritual journeys should include a healing pitstop in her hometown of Miami. So here's what having LeBron doctors, Jackie and Simone down to Miami, so that they could be on call to call her out on her. BS watched us. I think it bothered me that'll be demand mother never say she wondering that you considered what that might do for you. If you go back to where you're from. People that feel closest to when you come back with the b word and your mama, that is retaliation girl. So it didn't mean anything to me, but mama's back in the day could say really harsh things and it stuck with. Seem like heavenly was doing the work there. It doesn't really a lot of a lot of driving around in a convertible floppy hat. I have no problem with anyway. Right? Yeah. Great. When I think it was the trip was really about just going back to the root of who have unle is and why she does the job and we got to the root of the problem change. Okay. Okay. Peak of that coming up in a little bit. Finally, Dave may have a podcast by the name home of feel ya. But when it comes to where gay guys stand on Bravo issues as he LGBT queued in, here's what, let's let's find out with play by play. We have called forty gay guys on all things. Bravo, Dave gas, which way the gay guys swung. Boy, I've I've not traditionally good at knowing what. Gay guys say was a bigger gay icon, Erica Jane or the Countess. Oh, boy, that's a geographical one. I I'm gonna I'm gonna say Erica Jane. You got it. Yes. The fiercest looks Cynthia Bailey or door eat there. There is, there is anger towards in the gay community. I'm gonna. I'm gonna go Cynthia, you got it. Shade puts all others to shame, Karen Huber or Niimi leaks. Did they say, can you even Stephanie leaks? It's a landslide. Garrity captain Lee or bearded Ryan, sir hand Ryan with a beard Ryan without a beard Ryan with a mohawk Ryan. Seventy three percent. Everybody's what your for her. I guess he's four foot four now. For what board. Richaud, gee, is the true Queen bee Ramona singer or Lisa Vander pump? Did they say, what do you think be green bit? Yes, Lisa. Yes, you're right. Oh, good below deck. Who would you rather go below deck with? We asked Joe wow or Conrad. Do. Jerry calls from Jay while home Joe and I, Joe, you gotta. I say no more who charms you more. We asked Craig or Shep Craig terms me more seventy. Seventy spokesman for the gay community. Get to turns during girls night to render or Kelly died? Well, I mean both but. Got to give the slight edge tutoring. Really, really good. Oh, yeah. I'm sure Leslie are wanting to know if you feel weird about Greg hanging out with the other married men in the group. I don't feel weird about it at all, Greg and quite have both been around and it would be difficult to let Greg go. What has a problem with it hoops too bad. We'll how size of New Jersey. There was a posh fashion show. There's of course standoff, and then a huge fight where Danielle loses a piece of sculpture and as the cloud of dust and high heels and fists goes down the hall. There's a partygoer who we see she's never named, but she just goes dust as such game. Like that and I swear to God. I think about this woman once a week in a second. I think we've dug it up. Can we take a look at that? We have..

Greg Erica Jane Ryan Lisa Vander Simone Cynthia Bailey Miami Dave gas New Jersey Joe wow Shep Craig Karen Huber Danielle Stephanie Richaud LeBron Kelly Leslie Garrity Jerry
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

15:15 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"AM six forty. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October seventh Paul was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He's the author of several books about American, literature and culture include. Reading Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about po- as an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every workout, and this was a kind of craftsmanship that brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. How much of his his his is interest in the Macab and horror stems from the tragedy in his early. Life is his is his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at growl. And that's a that's a little bit of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other Margrethe's because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. Has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I I know, you know, he didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment, his cousin Virginia Clem who violate counts had this beautiful voice and one day she singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid, and eventually take your life was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily. Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits. The different thing than than his writing. I think now he's he's writing was already pretty well developed by the time that the. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her really. Make him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he bought the form of the poem from a poem. By Elizabeth pair, brownie. Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about an opponent, follow bear Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas and rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on upon the publication of that poll. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieves any sort of commercial success. What would they commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well and on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. This a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always was born in Boston. I don't know you just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked up fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which is the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you go on and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there present in the murders in the room, Mark. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has the sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of this and also to that post detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene. It looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene. And and try to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors onerous president in that one story. We often think of PO depiction of PO is, you know, those the bag is kind of that wild. Look somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he up I mean, he had to walk. Oh, walk for a walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now where things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images, the there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the shape of your skull in the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of genius. And so you look at the pictures of Paul, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the gold? Buck. I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did because how was fascinated with with interpreting signs now it's in in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And you it's it's the. Person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he did I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting. What a person's handwriting men, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and and see how how the external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had deep psychological issues, and that he was a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review in Poges. This gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you in. You know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books, and if you read a he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews and even as a revere, he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he gave grizzled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll was in that he used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself and..

Paul Edgar Allan Poe longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold Virginia Clem New York America Kevin j Hayes Ohio university of central Oklahoma Boston Eddie Toledo Washington college hospital emeritus professor of English Margrethe Baltimore Macab
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

15:35 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Keyword free bottle. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh hole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul regarding to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He's the author of several books about American literature in. Culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about poll as he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that Paul brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now, how much of his his his is interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his his mother died. His father abandoned him is mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at growl in pole. That's a it's a little a poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it. Strict chronological way, you have to start off with Paul and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia Clem who bile accounts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are the different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. That's that's the first answer that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of you kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Fehr, brownie. Oh, I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about an opponent, right actually, follow Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work originally as possible that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on upon the publication of that poem. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Well, I wouldn't say commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that and other even came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven and that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed this a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always I was born in Boston. I know Milton just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of stir up controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the. The founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you going and read truck homes or exit Christie and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in the story itself is is sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of of this and also to. That police detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene and tries to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of PLO it'll depiction of POE is those the bag is and kind of that wild look somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk walk walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images. Are there the first successful photographic process? And is I argue anyways, I'm very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so he looks creepy in those pictures. I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head. How can determine your? Your personality. And so one of the tenets of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of of what a genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PO and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of ciphers city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me did because I was fascinated with with interpreting signs now, it's in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Know individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters, and you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, he he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even on other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of science was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how the external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. It deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of intolerance of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to have you in this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. Kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he said good things about you. And you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he gave Brazil a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken inappropriate the poll was and that he used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself in and. Say, you know, this this obituary, which was later incorporated into a collected edition of Poe's works really shaped Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold Virginia Clem New York America Kevin j Hayes Ohio university of central Oklahoma Boston Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo emeritus professor of English Baltimore Charles Dickens Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

15:03 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KSRO

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh pole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not zone. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American literature and. Culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about poll is he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that poll brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now, how much of his his his is interest in the macabre and whore stems from the tragedy in his early life is his his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I want to thank you for mentioning my my book at growl. And a it's a little biography of poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it. Strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole and that his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't think that maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment, his cousin Virginia Clem who violate counts had this beautiful voice and one day she singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was in in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits. Are the different thing than his writing? I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Make him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in a in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of kind of dark literature already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Barrett. Browning? Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be a father's. As much as I know about an opponent, right actually, follow bear, brownie. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and hot trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. What would they commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. Poa? He always was born in Boston. And that was Bill just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins the literary alita Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine that he was editing at that time, and I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly it is just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the. The founder of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about giving an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then he gone and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing Quincy of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there present in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force. But he often consult with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in the story itself is a is a sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of the of the camera. And also to that pose detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene and tries to interpret what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of the depiction of PO is, you know, those the bag is kind of that wild look. Somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk walk walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images are there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent now one of the things that was know this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was for -nology and the idea that the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head. How can determine your? Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of poetic genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of Paul, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he'd he deliberately posed for the camera to to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me. Because who was fascinated with with interpreting signs now, it's in in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that because you have carrying individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters, and you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he did he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but. They were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with for knowledge is one I mean is also interested in handwriting and what person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would. Interpret all those things and see how how external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that. He had it. Oh, deep psychological issues that he was a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of intolerance of of early American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice for review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it in this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review and Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and, you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books, and if he read a he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyways. And so that ever since he gave Griswold a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death at Griswold published a victory of him. And it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that he used to walk around downtown streets..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Rufus Griswold tuberculosis Virginia Clem New York America Kevin j Hayes Ohio university of central Oklahoma Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo Elizabeth Barrett emeritus professor of English Baltimore Boston Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

15:14 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"AM six forty. More stimulating talk. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh hole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery in the Macab, Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American literature and culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. Oh, he lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about as he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that poll brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. How much of his his his is. Interest in the Macab and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I want to thank you for mentioning my my book at grail, and that's a it's a little Barbara fee of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it. Strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of by way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes and his I know you didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia clam who vile accounts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits. The different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that that his wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from posed mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of. Kind of dark literature already by that time. And in terms of his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by the pair, brownie. Oh, tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about Napoleon, right actually, follow Elizabeth Barrett Browning because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas and rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public on upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Say commercial success because he never never really I was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now other raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years early or no not a couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always I was born in Boston. That was built just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that. Same. Would that same animosity? But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine that he was at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he picked this fight with longfellow mainly is just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the John recalled detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you gone and read shock homes or exit Christie and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until you're not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in. The story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of this and also to that post detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence from the crime scene and and tries to interpret what they mean? And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. We often think of PO the depiction of you know, those the bag is kind of that wild look. Somebody to even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. Then there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk walk walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images opposed there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent now one of the things that was in this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures oppo. And he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me. Because I was fascinated with with interpreting signs now, it's in cryptography is pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Cal individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, he he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking up too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, there's also interested in handwriting and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked in. He would interpret all those things and and see how how. External self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that. He had it. Oh, deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this is a kind of anthology of of early American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice for review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it in this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And in part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You come. Just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews and even as a revere, he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just four he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he gave bristled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that? He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself and..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold Macab New York America Kevin j Hayes Boston university of central Oklahoma Ohio Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo president emeritus professor of English Baltimore Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

15:58 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Forty W H A S. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early in the morning of October seventh Paul was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord helped my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He is the author of several books about American, literature and culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about as he was at and ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this is a kind of craftsmanship that brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now how much of his his his is. Interest in the Macab and horror stems from the tragedy in his early. Life is his his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at grail in pole. That's a it's a little biography of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other blogger Fay's because if you if you structure it a strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. You know has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most. Appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I I know, you know, he didn't think that he may be some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia clam who vile accounts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris lsus which would. Maker an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean that was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start to start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul, and I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from posed mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motif that were part of you kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Fehr Browning. Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well, that may be a bothers. As much as I know about Napoleon, follow Elizabeth Barrett Browning because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas and rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public on upon the publication of that poem? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieves any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well and on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. And other raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no. Couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then won the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. This is a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always was born in Boston. That was just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins the literary alita Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which is the magazine he was editing at that time, and I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you go and read Sherlock Holmes, exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in. The story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of this and also to that post detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene. It looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene and and tries to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of PLO depiction of PO is, you know, those that the baggy is and kind of that wild look somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He was a very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk. Oh, walk for walk for transportation. But but also I mean, it kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images, the there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent now one of the things that was in this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was for -nology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of for knowledge was that a big forehead was a sign of of what a genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PLO, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier E incorporated, a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of ciphers city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did. Because hall was fascinated with what's interpreting signs now. It's in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Know individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And it's it's the. Person's responsibility figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would. Interpret all those things and see how how. External self is reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. It. Oh, deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of anthology of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nicer review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it and Poges this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review and Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for his cutting reviews. Well, anyway until that ever since he gave grizzled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after posed death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propagate the poll wasn't. He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling himself and. Say, you know in this this situation, which was later incorporated into collected additional posts works really shaped Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens. The great Charles Dickens were were were pen pals of a sort, I guess how did they meet, and what kind of a friendship that they have a relationship. I think police jealous of dickens sticking hugely popular at that time. And they they met when dickens came to America on Elektra tour in Americans just loved dickens in. I went to see him and poets trying to get to help him..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Charles Dickens America Rufus Griswold tuberculosis PLO New York Kevin j Hayes president university of central Oklahoma Ohio Elizabeth Barrett Browning Eddie Toledo Washington college hospital Virginia emeritus professor of English
"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

15:00 min | 3 years ago

"dr h h. holmes" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh hole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery in the Macab, Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He's the author of several books about American, literature and culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about as he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a sort story he believed that every word counted and not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that poll brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now how much of his his his is. Interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early. Life is his is his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I want to thank you for mentioning my my book at growl in pole. That's a it's a little a poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of by way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. You know has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most. Appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't think that he may maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment. His cousin Virginia clam who by all accounts. Had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears under lip and that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are the different thing than than his is writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start to start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul, and I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in a in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from posed mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motif that were part of kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by the pair, brownie. Oh, I didn't know tell me more about that. Well, that may be a bothers. As much as I know about. Now voted follow Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public on the upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieves any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years early or no. A couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven and that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always born in Boston. I don't know you're just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then ego and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the years, so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story itself is a is a sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of of this. And also to that pose detective Mischer Japan is someone who's. Was fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene. And and try to interpret what they mean? And so virtually every major motif of detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of PO the depiction of PLO as those that the bag is and kind of that wild look. Some might even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk. Oh, walk FRA walk for transportation. But but also I mean, it kept them kept in thin and wiry. Now, one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose that daguerreotype images of there. The first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head. How can determine your? Your personality. And so one of the tenants of for knowledge was that a big forehead was a sign of poetic genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PO and he's got this big forehead while I think he'd he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me. Because oh was fascinated with what's interpreting signs? Now, it's in cryptography is pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but. They were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with for -nology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting men, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. Deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of anthology of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it. And this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review, and you know, Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And in part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. Kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a book, he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as that the Tomahawk man, I just for his cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he made gave Griswold a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that? He.

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Rufus Griswold tuberculosis New York America Kevin j Hayes Boston university of central Oklahoma Ohio Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo emeritus professor of English Baltimore writer president Henry Wadsworth longfellow