17 Burst results for "Dr Graham Brayshaw"

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"It really makes my home complete. And and is like I said just the absolute best thing that I come home to at the end of the day. I agree. And Dr Graham, I love your bio, you do have max a black standard poodle. Let's go to the dog side. I tell us a little bit about max max is he's twelve years old sweet old boy, the they talk about how smart poodles are. And I love him just the same. But he's not always the the brightest bulb out there. Right. But he's he's he's a great boy got him from Walla Walla Washington about eleven years ago from someone who just couldn't care for him anymore. And then now he's been great with the regular through a slew of kitties. And he loves his cats and loves his kittens, he's not the healthiest guy right now anymore. Yeah. Unfortunately has cancer, but he just finished up radiation therapy. He's starting chemo on Thursday. So hopefully, that'll keep them happy healthy as long as we can. Well, we do wish him a speedy recovery. And I think he should have been named Wally from Walla Walla come on. I I will say I did not pick the name. He came with the day when we brought him into our family and the max is actually the most common last into the survey most common dog and cat name out there. So it is the highest level of creativity can have in my life is having a dog named max. Well, I had a cat named Kelly. And guess what? Calico? I wasn't very bright calculus. Aren't they? I know they're like a box of chocolates sweet on the outside. That's on the inside yet. Never know. I never know. What mood? You're calico is going to be and it keeps us honor. That's my guess, she's a calico and she keeps things spicy. There you go. And Dr Graham, how come your bio says many, comma, many cats, it is live has plenty with with five cats, but I seven which lives said she says the goal number, Michael. I love animals devoted my wife to cared for as many as by as I can my wife blows me away when it comes to how much she cares and loves, and we have a loving tug of war of how many animals are actually going to end up in our lives on any given day. So that is where we ended up with seven. Now, let's give a shout out to your wife. What's her name Bryn, grandma? Yup. Minnesotan through and through. And I'm actually a Texan. You're saying Dallas. I am grad born in Houston transplanted up here and love being from Texas. But Minnesota's great think I'm here to stay. I say real men love cats. So the seven cats do can you say their names because you know, live did with five it's it's funny. You mentioned that there might have been a time in the recent past where sounds a little tired that Dan couldn't quite remember all seven in it in preparation for today. Live might've pulled me aside and said, hey, hey granny winner, right down the names of all seven cats. Don't get. Yeah. Yeah. Did you print them on your forearm? Let's go for actually written down in front of me. So I I here we go. All right. So I have the Lila who is she's twelve thirteen. Not sure exactly where in that transition yet. Tortoiseshell cat, she she definitely ruled the roost use the matriarch we have Stuey who's eleven and seventeen pounds. Very large buoyant got him from Spokane as little six week old yelling kitten with Nastya infection. But he he grew from there. All right of Jessie Belle, who is a orange tabby got from a barn. Seven eight weeks old. She's about eight or nine now, we have Ripley who is a dilute calico that is mostly blind. Can't walk very well and incredibly mean, but we love still the same. We have Sala may who's a very large black kitty that isn't HSA animal. Humane society alum on insane with con who's a grey tabby and Lilith who is a another. Tortoiseshell? Wow. These aren't your basic names. This isn't I give you pause up for that. That's pretty good. And I can't wait for live to have to call all our cats. Yeah. You get confused sometimes in banks one of the sixteen year olds well at chase around beaker the two year old and they get into sometimes. And sometimes I'm going be speaker. The big fat cats. Get along. 'cause I might have a song out of that. You know, you might wanna call the and say, and you know, and or a rapper you might have a cat rap. You don't there might be something there? I think you're right. You're right. So getting back to the animal humane society. So you're trying this prototype to to get all the senses and get to have some social interaction with dogs and cats what's been the response in the community as well. As some of your other shelters all over the country. We'll start with you, Dr Graham, community wise, it's been amazing every time it's since it's been open you walk by it specifically in our shelter in golden valley, one of our core sites. And there's always a small crowd right out in front watching the dogs play watching the dogs interact when we first opened it. It was actually staff hanging out in watching everyone did, but the moment has been open. It's been a huge interest from the community. And then for the broader shelter animal world, we've had at least two or three humane societies. Visit I wanna see and we've only been opened a few months and as well. Well, it it's really been fascinating to see how it shows us the biases. We never knew we had of when it came to disease transmission, or how quickly after surgery candidate will be in the habitats or things you always thought were preconceived notions of how a shelter should be referred heard it internally we've heard it from the community. And we've definitely heard it from outside groups in some of the foremost experts in shelter medicine. That's impressive and coming from the zoo world live. I mean, you're going with flipper and all these other animals. What's your take now seen this firsthand? It's then just incredible. It's really been amazing to see the support that the dogs really provide each other. And so we talked a little bit about the jobs experiencing shelter stress or shut down. And you know, sometimes we see dogs in our downstairs holding areas that are even too afraid to come out of their run. They won't walk on leash. And we do have a really incredible group of volunteers are adopting preparation are ad Pratt volunteers that are specially trained to work with shine fearful dogs. And we now have another resource for these dogs during their shelter. Stay to be able to sort of escape the exile of the holding of that solo housing and come up into this group housing situation. What we've seen from these shine fearful dogs is they just transform once. They're in the social situation they come out of their shell. If they don't know how to play they watch and they learned from other dogs. They take those social cues and other dogs really teach them how to be dots. And we see dogs that Taylor and adjust their play style to meet the needs of other dogs. And so we've seen just these really beautiful moments of jogs helping other dogs, and it's just been really fantastic. You said that so well, and I do think that other dogs can't be great mentors for the others that just need a little more help in the social department. Don't you think? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. It's very much as I mentioned dogs teaching other dogs and selfish dogs. Not really sure what to do. There may be a little scared. Just seeing other dog. Comfortable that environment is a lotta times enough to get that dog to come out of their shell. And and join in the fun, and sometimes dogs don't always join in the place, sometimes they like to watch or they like to sit next to the people and get Rob's, but dogs watching play is also very enriching and very mentally stimulating for dogs as well. And so they're sort of something for everybody in that environment. There's toys there's people there's other dogs in so jobs can can find what works for them. What will bring them out of their shell and alleviate that stress and really get to capitalize on it. Well, this is well put hey, everybody, we've been speaking with Dr Graham Brayshaw and also live Hagan there from the animal humane society based in Minnesota, and I just wanna make sure that your head gal is Janelle Dixon. I want to pronounce her name. Right. So we salute her to in the whole staff volunteers in the community for being willing to kind of, you know, break the mold and go with this new habitat, you guys might be onto something. What do you think that Graham, I hope so? The threes. And we use prototype for the term for it is we are testing. We gotta find out. What's the the right way to do it? And if you look out for what research is out there. There's not much when it comes to. What is the right way to house dogs and get them into homes. So we've got months and years ahead of us of really testing and finding out what is the right way to do this. So we can hopefully house dogs the best way we can in the future. All right. I want everybody after the show to please dash over to animal humane society that org and check out. What's happening? Follow them on Facebook. Any parting message live? What would you like to say to our we have like did, you know, we have like six hundred thousand listeners, and they're not all related to me. That's fantastic. That's Oprah Winfrey. Said you know, what Arden's oh behave show is one of my top three pet podcast on the planet. So we are enriched, but not rich. What do you think? So what's your message to our wonderful listeners that are from here all the way to Singapore. Yeah. I think that's wonderful. I think certainly like Graham said go to remain society dot org to learn more. If you're going to be in the Minnesota metro area, please please stop by come see us. Come see what the habitat prototype is all about we have a really incredible opportunity to revolutionize the way we house shelter animals, and we we want absolutely everyone to be a part of it. And so it, and if you're up in Minnesota, we'd love to have you as well and Oprah if you're listening right now. Come on over the animal. Humane society love to give you a tour and have you see what the prototypes all about? Because we really think that you'll love it like Graham said people have really loved it. It's this really incredible immersive experience that way people can connect with animals. And so if you're in the area if anybody's in the area, I really want to encourage them to come by and see what it's all about. All right. The welcome. Mat is out at any party. Messages sacked Graham, something just I always try and get out there animal welfare. No one is there for the money, and it doesn't make any money. So always look at if you're looking at places to donate and give always look.

Dr Graham Minnesota Walla Walla Washington cancer Oprah Winfrey Dallas Spokane Houston Singapore Facebook Kelly Wally Jessie Belle Dr Graham Brayshaw Lila Stuey Dan Sala Mat
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hail from the animal humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I that we're going to give pause and applause, Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now, I gotta say love your Becker on live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been a zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis. Chicago, right. Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life was working in you failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minta soda, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yup. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how. House dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters and honesty, you look at the majority of of our shelters are dogs space. It was all designed how do you fit the most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house as many as he can. And then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs when they're in shelter are almost always will degrade over time. They're usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some but most their time is spent closed up they won interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting, and it really takes a toll on him. And we're trying to get to where the shelter stay as as as as close to a homestay homes are still the best place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. And well that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen. And if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't wanna have dogfight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative. Touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress and we've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype, where dogs can actually interact in social environment. And I feel like I'm you guys are on stage at the Academy Awards site. Do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO name, Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both Gino is jails the one who set this vision where we're going to and keeps us go and make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. Make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything and she's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But. Making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks delights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the the best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in your recent issue. I guess you did profile what's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society and Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country with the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually. Worked with kids as slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different companion animals coming through as well. Well, I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just calculator can't go up that high. But you've been at the place a while. Right. Dr ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long journals been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I want to do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization and yourself, but really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're. Trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks, those few bucks right towards the care of the next animal so incredibly rewarding and live. You talked about the fact that you know, when most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yes. So what we have developed and we're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area. The dogs spend the night then in their individual runs. But during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so they it's a much more enriching experience a much more enriching environment, and they can express those social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way litmus test, if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs and their stocks. That are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that are currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really want doctors to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other dogs. But on the flip side of that it is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading, and or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have a doctor's in there doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of. Of high density environment in a hospital is a shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually use the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called the full might is just one of my favorite us. I'm not a great worry. I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that? F O M I T. Nice and simple to spell it. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a full might the Carey's a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study at down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things. Meaning if you're not for people to if you're under a lot of stress if you are in a very stressful environment. There's a lot of stress in your life. You're more likely to get ill. And you're not gonna fight off diseases as well. Right. If we have them living in a place where they are happier. They are less stressed. They're more calm their piece. They are going to be in a much better place medically to fight. Off any sort of disease may come around. That's great. And I had met for my good. What about we know that the center is a pretty large shelter? You've got more than one location. It's over one hundred and forty years old. I understand you guys. When I said at the start of the show, you have about a ninety seven percent adoption rate, which is pretty good that isn't folks for just like ten pets. I think something like over what twenty three thousand dogs cats and other critters have gone through your shelter. Just last year alone. Yup. Numbers wise, we bring in about twenty four thousand dog cats and critters a year. We actually find adoptive homes. The adoption rate itself is actually not at ninety six ninety seven. That's our our placement rate. We'll be able to adopt about twenty thousand of those okay? That's still pretty good still definitely proud of it. And then there's also a group of animals that we know we aren't able to adopt for one reason or another this is dealing with the habit has trying to get at the stress of being in a shelter. There's some dogs. Just don't do well with that stress. So we partnered with a lot of local rescues a latte. I heard almost one hundred. Yup. We had about one hundred local rescue groups, and it's a testament to the twin cities. There's a ton of people around that want to do everything they can to try and help as many animals as they can. So they they work with us that if they're on organizations, and there's a lot of home based foster base rescues that'll give animals dealing with a don't deal with the stress of shelter. Well, a place to stay until they can find a home. So everyone working together. I'm here at deep in the heart of Dallas where it's one hundred.

Dr Graham Elvis Facebook Chicago Dr Graham Brayshaw Memphis Susan Memphis Hagen Saint Paul Minnesota Becker Academy Awards Johnson private practice director Dallas Dr ram Mary tan Oregon Minta soda Gino
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome to the show on radio. I'm your host Ardmore. Now, there's an animal shelter in Minnesota with almost a ninety seven percent placement rate for all the animals who come to their center. Now, that's quite a high percentage. But as you will learn on today's show, the people at this shelter are also Trail Blazers in the quest to bring out the best in pets under their care and improve their chances at landing forever homes now here to discuss taking a novel approach to shelter design asked the animal humane society in Saint Paul Minnesota. We have Dr Graham Brayshaw say, hi, Dr grail. Hello. Hello. Hello. And behavioral live Hagan. Hey live. How you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks for having us. All right now, folks, raise your PA. If that great head on your lap or next to you right now as you're listening to the show came from a shelter now as I say this I'm raising both hands because pet safety dog coal knock and pet. Safer cat, Casey are a pair of shelter alums who I adore. You can get great pets from shelters. So I want you all to call your pet over and get ready to discover what the shelter Minnesota's doing to break, the mold not the mold like remould structure, mold and boost adoption rate. But first we have to pay for the show. So we gotta take a commercial break, you know, the drill sit and stay. We'll be right back. Time for a pause four furry ones, actually, sit and stay..

Minnesota Blazers Dr Graham Brayshaw Saint Paul Minnesota Ardmore Dr grail Casey ninety seven percent
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

14:36 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Rain. You're listening to OB Hayes with Ardmore on bike riding. We're back from the lot. Just check the paper. And we had a record showing the box the litter box that is now back to over here. Here's art. Welcome back to the behaved show on live radio. I'm your host Ardmore Lestat put live up. I live your bio that I was given by your folks at the animal humane society. It says that I'm gonna mess this up. But let's go with the dogs. I I love these names you I have Joey easy. That's a cattle dog has. Yup. And a chocolate lab named ready listeners, Abby waffles. All right. Give us the four one one on these two fine canines sewer. So Joey Joey since he was a year old. He actually is originally from Arkansas he was brought to Minnesota through another rescue group called midwest animal rescue services, and would he came up here at a year old that was the first time he had been in a home. So he didn't understand cabinets and stares and doors and and things like that. And so he actually started out as a foster with my family, and then I don't like the term. Foster fail. I sixty s when we decide to make our fosters permanent members of our family. And so that is how Joey came to be and Abby waffles, I've actually only had for a few weeks. She was an owner surrender to animal humane society, and she actually came in with another chocolate lab who was able to go right to our adoption floor, Abby though experience that shelter stress. She shutdown. She got kennel cough. Jan monja. She wasn't eating and so she was actually in one of our offices. So we have a program called office cats where our cats that are shut down not doing well and shelter can spend some time in an office, which is a more home like space to see if that helps the transition helps bring them out of their shell a little bit. And so we decided to do that. With Abby Abby spent some time in our transport office. And she started to get a little bit better. But she still had a long way to go for health recovery. And when I met her I just absolutely fell in love with her. I have a really special place in my heart for geriatric animals senior. Animals and fell in love we bonded right away. And I brought her home, and she just sort of plugged right in and fit right in with Joey and all my cats, and it was sort of the the perfect match and the perfect addition to my family. Well, congratulations. And thank you lucky dog. I have a sixteen year old retired surfing dog. I used to live in California. So Cleo, Cleo Cleo have to shout. Cleo. She met another senior Goldie oldie named Abby Cleo's here right now saying, oh, that's wonderful. We don't have any surfing waves up here. But we do have a lot of lakes Abby will actually compatible with me. Oh. Well, yeah. Yeah. It's a lot of fun. Well, we gotta go to the feline side because I love cats and dogs, folks. See we hit something on the head. They're not foster failures their foster successes, and I don't call them shelter rescues. I call him shelter alums because we should promote the shelters that are giving us the chance to have the best. Possum Hal in our in our lives. So with that. You are the proud mom. I'm gonna it's Lucy Baker Bopper banks and to panga. Yes. Five cats. Yeah. All at come into my life at once. It was definitely something over time. But Lucian banks actually came from animal humane society sixteen years ago, there sixteen years old now says kittens yet, and then to panga and beaker and Bopper were all cats that found me off the street. So they showed up at my home as young either young cats or kittens, they were abandoned or lost star needed needed a place to stay in. So so those three really found me, and that's how that's how I ended up with five. So from one pet lover to another what is the best thing or more than what I that. They do for you. What's something that these fabulous five felines and the dynamic Dougie duo are making you a better person. How do they do that Lil my gosh late where do I start right? I don't know if I can pick just one thing at the best part of my day is going home to all my pets. And all my. Animals, and that unconditional love and happiness, you get when you walk in the door, and you have seven smiling faces that are all so happy that you came home and ready to play and ready to walk and ready to snuggle. It's just it's wonderfully fun and hysterical. And they all love each other. It's entertaining. It's it's really it really makes my home complete. And and is like I said just the absolute best thing that I come home to at the end of the day. Well, I agree. And Dr Graham, I love your bio, you do have max black standard poodle. Let's go to the dog side. I tell us a little bit about max max is he's twelve years old Swede old boy, they talk about how smart poodles are. And I love him just the same. But he's not always the brightest bulb out there. Right. But he's he's he's a great player got him from Walla Walla Washington about eleven years ago from someone who just couldn't care for him anymore. And then now he's been great with threat of a slew of kitties. And he loves his cats loves his kittens, he's not the healthiest guy right now anymore. Yeah. Unfortunately has cancer, but he just finished up radiation therapy. He's starting chemo on Thursday. So hopefully, that'll keep them happy and healthy as long as we can we do wish him a speedy recovery. And I think he should have been named Wally from Walla Walla come on. I I will say I did not pick the name. He came with the day when we brought him into our family and max is actually the most common less than did a survey most common dog and cat name out there. So it is the highest level of creativity can have in my life is having a dog named max. Well, I had a cat named Kelly. Can guess what? Calico? I wasn't very bright calicoes best though. Aren't they? I know they're like a box of chocolates sweet on the outside. That's on the inside never know what you're going to get. I never know. What mood? You're calico is going to be and it keeps us on honor. That's my guess, she's a calico and she she keeps things spicy. There you go, and Dr Graham Huckabee your bio says many many cats, it is live has plenty with with five cats, but I seven which Linda said she says is the goal number. I love animals devoted my life to cared for as many as as I can. And my wife blows me away when it comes to how much she cares and loves, and we have a loving tug of war of how many animals are actually gonna end up in our lives on any given day. So that is where we ended up with seven. Let's give a shout out to your wife. What's her name Bryn, grandma? Yup. Minnesotan through and through. And I'm actually a Texan. You're saying Dallas. I am grad born in Houston transplanted up here and love being from Texas. But Minnesota's great think I'm here to stay. I say real men love cats. So the seven cats do can you say their names because you know, live did with five it's it's funny. You mentioned that there might have been a time in the recent past where? Sounds a little tired that day. And couldn't quite remember all seven in it in preparation for today. Live might have pulled me aside and said, hey, hey, Grammy winner right down the names of all seven cats. You don't get. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So did you print them on your forearm? Let's go for actually written down in front of me. So I I here we go. All right. So I have Delilah. Who is she's twelve thirteen. Not sure exactly wearing that transition yet. Tortoiseshell cat. She. She definitely ruled the roost. She's the matriarch Stuey who's eleven and seventeen pounds, very large. Boy got him from Spokane as a little six week old yelling kitten with nasty infection. But he he grew from there. All right of Jessie Belle, who is a orange tabby got from a barn. Seven eight weeks old. She's about eight or nine now, we have Ripley who is a dilute calico that is mostly blind. Can't walk very well and incredibly mean, but we love still the same. We have solemn may who's a very large black kitty that isn't HSA animal. Humane society alum. Insane with con who's a grey tabby and Lilith who is a another tortoiseshell. Wow. These aren't your basic names. This isn't I give you pause up for that. That's pretty good. And I can't wait for live have to call all our cats. Yeah. Do you get confused sometimes and being one of the sixteen year olds well at chase around beaker the two year old and they get into it sometimes. And sometimes I'm going be speaker. Oh, big fat cats get along come on. Is. Have a song out of that. You know, you might wanna call saying, you know, or a rapper you might have a cat wrap. There may be something there. I think you're right. You're right. So getting back to the animal humane society. So you're trying this prototype to to get all the senses and get to have some social interaction with dogs and cats what's been the response in the community as well. As some of your other shelters all over the country. We'll start with you, Dr Graham, community wise. It's been amazing every time since it's been open you walk by it specifically in our shelter in golden valley, one of our core sites. And there's always a small crowd right out in front watching the dogs play watching the dogs interact when we first opened it. It was actually staff hanging out in watching everyone did, but the moment has been open. It's been a huge interest from the community, and then for the broader shelter animal world, we've had at least two or three humane societies. Visit wanna see and we've only been opened a few months, and is well it it's really been fast. To see how it shows us the biases. We never knew we had when it came to disease transmission, or how quickly after surgery can be in the habitat or things you always thought were preconceived notions of how a shelter should be. We've heard it internally. We've heard it from the community. And we've definitely heard it from outside groups in some of the foremost experts in shelter medicine. That's impressive and coming from the zoo world live. I mean, you're going with flipper and all these other animals. What's your take now seen this firsthand? It's just incredible. It's really been amazing to see the support that the dogs really provide each other. And so we talked a little bit about the jobs experiencing shelter stress or shut down. And you know, sometimes we see dogs in our downstairs holding areas that are even too afraid to come out of their run. They won't walk on leash. And we do have a really incredible group of volunteers are adoption preparation are ad Pratt volunteers that are specially trained to work with shine fearful dogs, and we. Now have another resource for these dogs during their shelter. Stay to be able to sort of escape being Zayed of holding of that solo housing and come up into this group housing situation. What we've seen from these shine fearful dogs is just transform once. They're in the social situation they come out of their shell. If they don't know how to play they watch and they learned from other dogs. They take those social cues and other dogs really teach them how to be docs. And we see dogs that Taylor and adjust their play style to meet the needs of other dogs. And so we've seen just these really beautiful moments of dogs helping other dogs, and it's just been really fantastic. You said that so well, and I do think that other dogs can be great mentors for the others that just need a little more help in the social department. Don't you think? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. It's very much as I mentioned dogs teaching other dogs dogs. Not really sure what to do. There may be a little scared. Just seeing other dogs comfortable that environment. A lotta times enough to get that dog to come out of their shell and join in the fun and sometimes dogs don't always join in the place. Sometimes they like to watch they like to sit next to the people and get Rob's, but dogs watching play is also very enriching and very mentally stimulating for dogs as well. And so they're sort of something for everybody in that environment. There's toys there's people there's other dogs in so dogs can can find what works for them. What will bring them out of their shell alleviate that stress and really get to capitalize on it. Well, this is well put hey, everybody, we've been speaking with Dr Graham Brayshaw and also live Hagan there from the animal humane society based in Minnesota, and I just wanna make sure that your head gal is Janelle Dixon. I want to pronounce her name. Right. So we salute her to and the whole staff volunteers and the community for being willing to kind of, you know, break the mold and go with this new habitat, you guys might be onto something. What do you think that Graham, I hope so that the reason we use prototype for? The term for it is we are testing. We gotta find out. What's the right way to do it? And if you look out for what research is out there. There's not much when it comes to. What is the right way to house dogs and get them into homes. So we've got months and years ahead of us of really testing and finding out what is the right way to do this. So we can hopefully house dogs the best way we can in the future. All right. I want everybody after the show to pres dash over to animal humane society that org and check out. What's happening? Follow them on Facebook. Any parting message live? What would you like to say to our we have like did, you know, we have like six hundred thousand listeners, and they're not all related to me. That's fantastic. That's Oprah Winfrey. Said you know, what Arden's oh behaved show is one of my top three pit podcast on the planet. So we are enriched, but not rich. What do you think? So what's your message to our wonderful listeners that are from here all the way to Singapore. Yeah. I think that's wonderful. I think certainly like Graham said go to remain society dot org to learn more. If you're gonna be in the Minnesota metro area, please.

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"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:31 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hail from the animal humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I that we're going to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at the shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now, I gotta say love your background on live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis. In Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life was working in the zoo failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minnesota, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yep. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how. The house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters, and honestly, you look at the majority of of our shelters are dogs space. It was all designed how do you fit the most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house as many as he can. And then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs when they're in shelter are the almost always will degrade over time. They're kept in usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some but most their time has been closed up they one interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting and it really takes toll on him. And we're trying to get to wear the shelter. Stay is as close to a homestay homes are still the best place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. Well, that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen in if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative. Have touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress. And we've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact then in a social environment. And I feel like I'm you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards site. Do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both Gino is tells the one who set this vision where we're going too and keeps us going make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work out. Make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything. She's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But. Making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks delights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the the best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in a recent issue. I guess you you did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society in Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, no, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually work. With kids as slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different companion animals coming through as well. Well, I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just. Calculator can't go up that high. But you've been at the place awhile right back to ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years in. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I want to do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization in yourself. But really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal, so incredibly rewarding you talked about the fact that you know, in most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yeah. So what we have developed in. We're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dog spend the night then in their individual runs. But during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so. Hey, it's a much more enriching experience and much more enriching environment, and they can express those social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way litmus test if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four Lakers. Yes. Absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that aren't currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really wanna doctors to know that just because a dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other. But on the flip side of that. It is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading, and or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have adopters in. They're doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environments in a hospital in the shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually you to the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called the might is just one of my. Remind us. I'm not a great worry. I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that? For us. F O M I T. Nice and simple. Dispel, it's. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a foe might the carries a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study at down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is it is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things..

Dr Graham Chicago Elvis Dr Graham Brayshaw Facebook Johnson Susan Memphis Saint Paul Minnesota Hagen Academy Awards Memphis private practice director Minnesota Lakers Mary tan Gino Oregon CEO
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

14:29 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We're back from the lot. Just check the paper. And we had a record showing the box the litter box that is now back to Oviedo. Here's our welcome back to the OB show on life radio. I'm your host Ardmore Lestat put live up. I live your bio that I was given by your folks at the animal humane society and says that I'm gonna mess this up. But let's go with the dogs. I I love these names you I have Joey easy. That's a cattle dog has. Yup. And a chocolate lab named ready listeners, Abby waffles. All right. Give us the four one one on these canines sewer. So Joey Joey since he was a year old. He actually is originally from Arkansas he was brought to Minnesota through another rescue group called midwest animal rescue services and would he? Came up here at a year old that was the first time he had been in a home. So he didn't understand cabinets and stares and doors and and things like that. And so he actually started out as a foster with my family, and then I don't like the term foster fail. I think I think they should foster sixty s when we asked decide to make our fosters permanent members of our family. And so that is how Joey came to be and Abby waffles, I've actually only had for a few weeks. She was an owner surrender to animal humane society, and she actually came in with another chocolate lab who was able to go right to our adoption floor, Abby though, experienced that shelter stress. She shutdown. She got kennel cough. She had pneumonia. She wasn't eating. And so she was actually in one of our offices. So we have a program called office cats where our cats that are shut down not doing well and shelter can spend some time in an office, which is a more home like space to see if that helps the transition helps bring them out of their shell a little bit. And so we decided to do that with Abby. And so. Abi spent some time in our transport office, and she started to get a little bit better. But she still had a long way to go for health recovery. And when I met her I just absolutely fell in love with her. I have a really special place in my heart for geriatric animals senior animals, and we fell in love we bonded right away. And I brought her home, and she just sort of plugged right in and fit right in with Joey and all my cats, and it was sort of the the perfect match and the perfect addition to my family. Well, congratulations. And thank you lucky dog. I have a sixteen year old retired surfing dog. I used to live in California. So Cleo, Cleo Cleo have to shout. Cleo. She met another senior Goldie oldie named Abby Cleo's here right now saying, oh, that's wonderful. We don't we don't have any surfing waves up here. But we do have a lot of lakes and so apple actually compatible with me. Oh, well, yeah. Yeah. It's a lot of fun. Well, we gotta go to the feline side because I love cats and dogs, folks. See we hit something on the head. They're not foster failure. There foster successes, and I don't call them shelter rescues. I call him shelter alums because we should promote the shelters that are giving us the chance to have the best possum pal in our in our lives. So with that, you are the proud mom. I'm gonna it's Lucy bigger Bopper Binks and to panga. Yes. Five cats. Didn't come into my life at once. It was definitely something over time. But Lucian banks actually came from animal humane society sixteen years ago, there sixteen years old now kittens yet, and then to panga and beaker and Bopper were all cats that found me off the street. So they showed up at my home as young either young cats or kittens, they were Bandon or loss store, you know, needed needed a place to stay in. So so those three really found me, and that's how that's how I ended up with five. So from one pet lover to another what is the best thing or more than that. They do for you. What's something that these fabulous five felines and the dynamic Dougie duo are making you a better person. How do they do that for you Lil my gosh late where do I start right? I don't know if I can pick just one thing at the best part of my day is going. Home to all my pets, and all my animals, and that unconditional love and happiness, you get when you walk in the door, and you have seven smiling faces that are all so happy that you came home and ready to play and ready to walk and ready to snuggle. It's just it's wonderfully fun and hysterical. And they all love each other. It's entertaining. It's it's really it really makes my home complete. And and is like I said just the absolute best thing that I come home to at the end of the day. Well, I agree. And Dr Graham, I love your bio, you do have max black standard poodle. Let's go to the dog side. I tell us a little bit about max max is he's twelve years old sweet old boy, they talk about how smart poodles are. And I love him just the same. But he's not always the brightest bulb out there. Right. He's he's he's a great boy. I got him from Walla Walla Washington about eleven years ago from someone who just couldn't care for him anymore. And then now he's been great with Prego through a slew of kitties. And he loves his cats and loves his kittens, he's not the healthiest guy right now anymore. Yeah. Unfortunately has cancer, but he just finished up radiation therapy. He's starting chemo on Thursday. So hopefully, that'll keep them happy and healthy as long as we can. Well, we do wish him a speedy recovery. And I think he should have been named Wally from Walla Walla come on. I I will say I did not pick the name. He came with the day when we brought him into our family and max is actually the most common less than the survey most common dog and cat name out there. So it is the highest level of creativity. I could have in my life is having a dog named max. Well, I had a cat named Kelly. And guess what? Calico? I wasn't very bright calculus. The best though. Aren't they? I know they're like a box of chocolate sweet on the outside. That's on the inside. Yeah. I never know. What you're gonna get never know what mood. You're calico is going to be an keeps us on honor. That's my guess, she's a calico and she she keeps things spicy. There you go, and Dr Graham Huckabee your bio says many, comma, many cats. It is a live has plenty with with five cats. But I am up seven which Linda said she says the goal number, Michael. Their cat. I wove animals devoted my life to care for as many as by as I can my wife blows me away when it comes to how much she cares and loves, and we have a loving tug of war of how many animals are actually gonna end up in our lives on any given day. So that is where we ended up with seven. Now, let's give a shout out to your wife. What's her name Bryn? Yup. Minnesotan through and through. And I'm actually a Texan. You're saying Dallas. I am grad born Houston transplanted up here and love being from Texas. But Minnesota's great think I'm here to stay. I say real men love cats. So the seven cats do can you say their names because you know, live did with five, and it's it's funny. You mentioned that there might have been a time in the recent past. Where sounds a little tired that day? And couldn't quite remember all seven in in preparation for today. Live might have pulled me aside and said, hey, hey, Grammy winner right down the names of all seven cats. You don't get. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Did you print them on your forearm? Let's go. It actually written down in front of me. So I I here we go. All right. So I have Delilah. Who is she's twelve thirteen. Not sure exactly wearing the transition yet. Tortoiseshell cat. She definitely ruled the roost. She's the matriarch we have Stuey who's eleven and seventeen pounds, very large. Boy got him from Spokane as a little six week old yelling kitten with nasty upper during fiction, but he he grew from there. All right of Jessie Belle, who is a orange tabby got from a barn. Seven eight weeks old. She's about eight or nine now, we have Ripley who is a dilute calico that is mostly blind. Can't walk very well and incredibly mean, but we love so the same. We have solemn may who's a very large black kitty that isn't HSA humane society alum on insane with con who's a grey tabby and Lilith who is a another tortoiseshell. Oh, wow. These aren't your basic names. This isn't I give you pause up for that. That's pretty good. And I can't wait for live have to call all their cats and go bigger. Yeah. Do you get confused sometimes and being one of the sixteen year olds well at chase around beaker the two year old and they get into it sometimes. And sometimes I'm going be speaker. No. The cats get along come on. 'cause I might have a song out of that. You know, you might wanna call say or a rapper. You might have a cat rap. You don't live. There may be something there. I think you're right. You're right. So getting back to the animal humane society. So you're trying this prototype to to get all the senses and get to have some social interaction with dogs and cats what's been the response in the community as well. As some of your other shelters all over the country. We'll start with you, Dr Graham, community wise. It's been amazing every time since it's been open you walk by specifically in our shelter in golden valley, one of our core sites. And there is always a small crowd right out in front watching the dogs play watching the dogs interact when we first opened it. It was actually staff hanging out in watching everyone did, but the moment it's been open. It's been a huge interest from the community, and then for the broader shelter animal world, we've had at least two or three humane societies. Visit wanna see and we've only been opened a few months. And as well, it it's really been fascinating to see how it shows us the biases. We never knew we had. When it came to a disease transmission, or how quickly after surgery candidates will be in the habitats or things you always thought were preconceived notions of how a shelter should be. We heard it internally. We've heard it from the community. And we've definitely heard it from outside groups in some of the foremost experts in shelter medicine. That's impressive and coming from the zoo world live. I mean, you're going with flipper and all these other animals. What's your take? Now. Seeing this firsthand. It's been just incredible. It's really been amazing to see the support that the dogs really provide each other. And so we talked a little bit about the jobs experiencing shelter stress or shut down. And you know, sometimes we see dogs in our downstairs holding areas that are even too afraid to come out of their run. They won't walk on leash. And we do have a really incredible group of volunteers are adoption preparation are ad Pratt volunteers that are specially trained to work with shine fearful dogs, and we now have another resource for these dogs during their shelter. Stay too. To be able to sort of escape being Zion of the holding of that solo housing and come up into this group housing situation. What we've seen from these shine fearful dogs is they just transform once. They're in the social situation they come out of their shell. If they don't know how to play they watch. And they learn from other dogs. They take those social cues and other dogs really teach them how to be docs. And we see dogs that Taylor and adjust their play style to meet the needs of other dogs. And so we've seen just these really beautiful moments of dogs helping other dogs, and it's just been really fantastic. You said that so well, and I do think that other dogs can be great mentors for the others that just need a little more help in the social department. Don't you think? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. It's very much as mentioned dogs teaching other dogs dogs. Not really sure what to do. There may be a little scared just seeing other dogs comfortable in that environment is a lotta times enough to get that dog to come out of their shell in and join in the fun. And sometimes dogs don't always join in the place, sometimes they like to watch or they like to sit next to the people and get Rob's, but dogs watching play is also very enriching and very mentally stimulating for dogs as well. And so they're sort of something for everybody in that environment. There's toys there's people there's other dogs in so jobs can can find what works for them. What will bring them out of their shell and elite that stress and really get to capitalize on it. Well, this is well put hey, everybody, we've been speaking with Dr Graham Brayshaw and also live Hagan there from the animal humane society based in Minnesota, and I just wanna make sure that your head gal is Janelle Dixon. I want to pronounce her name. Right. So we salute her to in the whole staff volunteers and the community for being willing to kind of break, the mold and go with this new habitat, you guys might be onto something. What do you think that Graham, I hope so that the reason we use prototype for the term for it is we are testing. We gotta find out. What's the right way to do? And if you look out for what research is out there. There's not much when it comes to. What is the right way to house dogs and get them into homes. So we've got months and years ahead of us of really testing and finding out what is the right way to do this. So we can hopefully hells dogs the best way we can in the future. All right. I want everybody after the show to please dash over to animal humane society that org and check out. What's happening? Follow them on Facebook. Any parting message live? What would you like to say to our we have like did, you know, we have like six hundred thousand listeners, and they're not all related to me. That's fantastic. That's Oprah Winfrey. Said you know, what Arden's oh behave show is one of my top three pet podcast on the planet. So we are enriched, but not rich. What do you think? So what's your message to our wonderful listeners that are from here all the way to Singapore. Yeah. I think that's wonderful. I think certainly like Graham said go to remain society dot org to learn more. If you're gonna be in the Minnesota metro area, please please.

Joey Joey Dr Graham Minnesota Cleo Cleo Abby Abby waffles Walla Walla Washington Bopper Binks Oviedo Ardmore pneumonia Arkansas Bandon Dr Graham Huckabee Oprah Winfrey cancer Facebook Abby Cleo Singapore
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I that we're going to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now, I gotta say I love your on live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been a zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis and Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life. Was working in the zoo failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continue to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minnesota, and I would so I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yup. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how we house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters and honesty, you look at the majority. Of of our shelters are dogs base. It was all designed how do you fit the most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house as he can. And then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs. When there are almost always will degrade over time, their captain, usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some but most their time is spent closed up they won interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting, and it really takes a toll on them, and we're trying to get to where the shelter stay as as close to a homestay homes are still the best. A place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. And well that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen. And if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress, and we. We've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact in a social environment. And I feel like you guys are both on stage at the kademi award site. Do want wanna make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both is jails the one who set this vision where we're going too. And keeps us going make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. You know, make sure that literally right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything, and she's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks delights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is. The best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in recent issue. I guess you. You did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society and Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't with the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids as slightly vault over the years to get to where it's up mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different compared to the animals coming through as well. I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just my calculator can't go up that high. But. You've been at the place a while. Right. Dr ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Genitals been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years. Then there's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization and yourself, but really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal so incredibly rewarding and live. You talked about the fact that you know, in most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yes. So what we have developed and we're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dogs spend the night then in their individual runs. But during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really they take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dog as well. And so. They it's a much more enriching experience and much more enriching environment, and they can express those social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way litmus test, if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that aren't currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really want adopters to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other. Jogs. But on the flip side of that. It is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have adopters in. They're doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environment in a hospital in shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually usually the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called the full might is just one of my. Favorites. Remind us I got a great worry. I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that F O M I T? Nice and simple. Dispel, it's. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a full might the carries a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study at down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is it is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things. Meaning if you're not for people to if you're under a lot of stress, if you are in a very stressful environment is a lot of stress in your life. You're more likely to get ill. And you're not gonna fight off diseases as well. Right. We have them living in a place where they are happier. They are less stressed. They're more calm their piece. They are going to be in a much better place. Medically to fight off any sort of disease, and they come around. That's great. And I had met for my good. What about we know that the center is a pretty large shelter? You've got more than one location. It's over one hundred and forty years old. I understand you guys..

Dr Graham Elvis Chicago Dr Graham Brayshaw Facebook Saint Paul Minnesota Susan Memphis Hagen Johnson private practice Memphis director Minnesota Dr ram Mary tan kademi Oregon CEO Giral Dixon project manager
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Show on radio. I'm your host Ardmore. Now, there's an animal shelter in Minnesota with almost a ninety seven percent placement rate for all the animals who come to their center. Now, that's quite a high percentage. But as you will learn on today's show, the people at this shelter are also Trail Blazers in the quest to bring out the best in pets under their care and improve their chances at landing forever homes now here to discuss taking a novel approach to shelter design, the animal humane society in Saint Paul Minnesota. We have Dr Graham Brayshaw say, hi, Dr Graham. Hello. Hello. Hello and behavioral live Hagan. Hey live. How you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks for having us. All right now, folks, raise your paw. If that great pet on your lap or next to you right now as you're listening to the show came from shelter now as I say this I'm raising both hands because pet safety dog Kona and pet safe. The cat Casey are a pair of shelter alums who I adore. You can get great pets from shelters. So I want you all to call your pet over and get ready to discover what the shelter in Minnesota's doing to break, the mold not the mold like three mold a structure, mold and boost adoption rates. But first we have to pay for the show. So we gotta take a commercial break, you know, the drill sit and stay. We'll be right back. Time for a pause four. Bury one's actually sit and stay all behave. We'll.

Saint Paul Minnesota Blazers Dr Graham Brayshaw Ardmore Dr Graham Casey ninety seven percent
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Radio. Let's talk pets. Oviedo Arden more. They show the teaches you how to have harmony in the household with your pets. Join Ardley she travels coast to coast to help millions better understand why cats and dogs do what they do. Get this coupon famous faces they're perfectly pampered pets and who's walking in Renton Tinseltown from famous. Paddock's, Burton bestselling authors to television and movie stars. You'll get the latest buzz from wagging tongues in tales garner. Great pet tips and have a dog on line one time. So get ready for the pause and applause as we all behave owes America's agitator Arden more. Welcome to the hey show on radio. I'm your host Ardmore. Now, there's an animal shelter and mint the Solta with almost a ninety seven percent placement rate for all the animals who come to their center. Now, that's quite a high percentage. But as you will learn on today's show, the people at this shelter are also Trail Blazers in the quest to bring out the best in pets under their care and improve their chances at landing forever homes now here to discuss taking a novel approach to shelter design at the animal humane society in Saint Paul Minnesota. We have Dr Graham Brayshaw say, hi, Dr Graham. Hello. Hello. Hello and behavioral live Hagan. Hey live. How you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks for having us. All right now, folks, raise your PA. If that great head on your lap or next to you right now as you're listening to the show came from a shelter now as I say this I'm raising both hands because pet safety dog Kona and pet safe. The cat Casey are a pair of shelter alums whom I adore. You can get great pets from shelters. So I watch you all to call your pet over and get ready to discover what the shelter Minnesota's doing to break, the mold not the mole by three mold structure, mold and boost adoption rates. But first we have to pay for the show. So we gotta take a commercial break. You know, the drill set and stay. We'll be right back. Time for a pause for very one's actually sit and stay behave will be right back. Molly, you dinner. Don't let that happen to your precious cat elevate your cat's eating experience with the cat tree. Trae the cat tree. Trae keeps your cats food off the floor and conveniently located on the cat tree. It's the perfect way to eat. It's a beautiful wrought iron trae that easily attach to your cat tree at keeps dogs and other critters out of your cats dish must multi bet households. There's a six x Ray for large bowls. And a four inch for smaller balls her just your cat tree. Trae today. Go right now to catch free trae dot com. That's cat tree. Trae dot com. CAT T R E T R A Y dot com. Let's.

Trae Blazers Oviedo Arden Dr Graham Brayshaw Renton Burton bestselling Minnesota Dr Graham Tinseltown Ardmore Saint Paul Minnesota Casey America Paddock Molly ninety seven percent four inch
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hail from the animal. Humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I up we're gonna get pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animals services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now. I gotta say I love your background live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis and Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life. Was working in the zoo failed started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minnesota, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yup. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how we house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters and honesty, you look at the majority of. Of shelters our dog space. It was all designed how do you fit? The most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to houses easy, can and then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs. When there are almost always will degrade over time. They're kept in usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some, but most time has been closed up they won interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting, and it really takes a toll on them. And we're trying to get to where the shelter. Stay as close to a homestay homes are still the best. A place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. And well that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen in if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress, and we. We've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact then in social environment. I feel like I'm you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards site. Do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both Genucel is the one who set this vision where we're going too and keeps us go and make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. You know, make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything. She's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks delights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the. The best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in your recent issue. I guess you you did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society and Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, no, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids as slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different compared to the animals coming through as well. I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just my calculator can't go up that high. But. You've been at the place a while. Right back to ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Genitals been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization in yourself. But really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal. So it's incredibly rewarding and live. You talked about the fact that most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yeah. So what we have developed and we're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area, the dogs spend the night then their individual runs, but during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so. They it's a much more enriching experience a much more enriching environment, and they can express social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way a litmus test if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs. And there's dogs that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that art currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really doctors to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other. Dogs. But on the flip side of that it is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have adopted in there doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environment in a hospital in a shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually you the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called might. It's just one of my. Not a great worry. I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that F O M I T? Nice and simple. Dispel, it's. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a foam might the Carey's a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things. Meaning if you're not for people to if you're under a lot of stress if you in a very stressful environment. There's a lot of stress in your life. You're more likely to get ill. And you're not gonna fight off diseases as well if we have them living in a place where they are happier. They are less stressed. They're more calm there at peace. They are going to be in a much better place medically to fight off any sort of disease may come around. That's great. And I had met foam. I did what about we know that the center is a pretty large shelter. You've got more than one location. It's over one hundred and forty years old. I understand you guys. When I said at the start of the show, you have about a ninety seven percent adoption rate, which is pretty good that isn't folks for just like ten pets. I think something like over what twenty three thousand dogs cats and other critters have gone through your shelter. Just last year alone. Yup. Numbers wise, we bring in about twenty four thousand dogs cats and critters a year. We actually find adoptive homes. The adoption rate itself is actually not at ninety six ninety seven. That's our our placement rate. We'll be able to adopt about twenty thousand of those okay? They'll still pretty good still definitely proud of it. And then there's also a group of animals that we know we aren't able to adopt for one reason or another this is dealing with the habit has trying to get at the stress of being in a shelter. There's some dogs. Just don't do well with that stress. So we partnered with a lot of local rescues just a lot. I heard almost a hundred. Yup. We had about one hundred local rescue groups, and it's a it's a testament to the twin cities. There's a ton of people around that want to do everything they can to try and help as many animals as they can. So they they work with us that if thrown organizations, and there's a lot of home based foster base rescues that'll give animals dealing with don't deal with the stress of a shelter. Well, a place to stay until they can find a home. So. I'm.

Dr Graham Elvis Chicago Facebook Dr Graham Brayshaw Memphis Saint Paul Minnesota Hagen Susan Memphis Academy Awards Johnson private practice director Minnesota Mary tan Oregon CEO Giral Dixon Carey project manager
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hail from the animal humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I that we're going to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now, I gotta say love your background live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been a zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis in Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life. Was working in the zoo failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minnesota, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yup. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how we house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters and honesty, you look at the majority of. Of of our shelters are dogs space. It was all designed to have how do you fit the most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house easy, can and then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs when they're in shelter are almost always will degrade over time their captain, usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some but most their time has been closed up they one interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting, and it really takes toll on them, and we're trying to get to wear the shelter. Stay as close to a homestay homes are still the best. Place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. And well that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen in if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress, and we. We've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact then in a social environment. And I feel like I'm you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards site. Do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both journalis- jails the one who set this vision where we're going to and keeps us and make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other she puts us back on track very nicely. And and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. You know, make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything. She's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks a lights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs now to see what really is the. The best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in recent issue. I guess you. You did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society and Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids as slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's up mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different compared to the animals coming through as well. Well, I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just my calculator can't go up that high. But you. You've been at the place a while. Right. Dr ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long been to an animal welfare for twenty thirty years in. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term, but I've been here. Good while. What makes you say? Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization and yourself, but really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal. So it's incredibly rewarding and live. You talked about the fact that you know, when most shelter. There's dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yeah. So what we have developed and we're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dogs spend the night then in their individual runs during the day. The dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really they take social cues from each other. They can express those social. Behaviors when they're out in that common area there during acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs is well, and so they it's a much more enriching experience a much more enriching environment, and they can express social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way litmus test, if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that are currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really wanted doctors to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in. The group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other dogs. But on the flip side of that, it is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs, and Dr Graham, how long has this prototype been being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading or you know, having a dog bite another dog. I know we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have doctors in they're doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environments in a hospital in shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease. Between each other. It's usually to the staff are usually things water bowl things. Like that. I love the term. It's called the might is just one of my mind. I'm not a great worry, I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that? For us. F O M I T. Nice and simple to spell. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a full might the carries a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is it is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things..

Dr Graham Chicago Facebook Elvis Dr Graham Brayshaw Saint Paul Minnesota Susan Memphis Hagen Academy Awards Johnson Memphis private practice director Minnesota Dr ram Mary tan Oregon CEO Giral Dixon project manager
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome to the show on radio. I'm your host Ardmore. Now, there's an animal shelter in Minnesota with almost a ninety seven percent placement rate for all the animals who come to their center. Now, that's quite a high percentage. But as you will learn on today's show, the people at this shelter are also Trail Blazers in the quest to bring out the best in pets under their care and improve their chances at landing forever homes now here to discuss taking a novel approach to shelf design at the animal humane society in Saint Paul Minnesota. We have Dr Graham Brayshaw say, hi, Dr Graham. Hello. Hello. Hello and behavioral live Hagan. Hey live. How you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks for having us. All right now. Both raise your paw. If that great head on your lap or next to you right now as you're listening to the show came from a shelter now. As I say this I'm raising both hands because pet safety dog Kona and pet safe Casey are a pair of shelter alums whom I adore. You can get great pets from shelters. So I want you all to call your pet over and get ready to discover what the shelter and Minnesota's doing to break, the mold not the mole bike remould structure, mold and boost adoption rates. But first we have to pay for the show. So we gotta take a commercial break, you know, the drill sit and stay. We'll be right back. Time for a pause for very one's actually sit and stay always cave. We'll.

Saint Paul Minnesota Blazers Dr Graham Brayshaw Ardmore Dr Graham Casey ninety seven percent
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:28 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I we're going to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at the shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now, I gotta say love your Becker on live. You are currently the behavior modification rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been a zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis and Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life. Was working in the zoo failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know of Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minnesota, and I'm like, so I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yup. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how we house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters and honesty, you look at the majority. Of of our shelters are dog space. It was all designed how do you fit? The most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house easy, can and then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs when they're in shelter are almost always will degrade over time, their captain, usually it's a relatively small run out some but most their time has been closed up they one interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting and it really takes toll on them. And we're trying to get to where the shelter. Stay is as close to a homestay homes are still the best. A place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. And well that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen. And if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress, and we. We've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact then in social environment. And I feel like I'm you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards. I do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both is the one who set this vision where we're going to and keeps us going. Make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. You know, make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything. She's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on lights. We we do have three or four different banks delights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the the best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in recent issue. I guess you did profile what's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society and Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, no, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids as slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different compared to the animals coming through as well. I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just my calculator can't go up that high. But you've been at the place a while. Right. Dr ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Genitals been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years. There's definitely people that put me to shame. When it comes to long-term. But I've been hearing good while what makes you say. Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization and yourself, but really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but a few bucks, those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal so incredibly rewarding and you talked about the fact that you know, and most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yeah. So what we have developed in. We're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dogs spend the night then in their individual runs. But during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really they take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so. They it's a much more enriching experience and much more enriching environment, and they can express those social behaviors than because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way a litmus test if you will to see how this potential adopt adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that are currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really wanted doctors to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other. Jogs. But on the flip side of that. It is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading, and or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have adopted in there doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environments in a hospital in shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually use the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called fo might just one of my. All right. I got a great worry, I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that for us? F O M I T. Nice and simple. Dispel. But it is. It is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a full might the Carey's a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study it down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things. Meaning if you're not for people to if you're under a lot of stress if you in a very stressful environment. There's a lot of stress in your life. You're more likely to get ill. And you're not gonna fight off diseases as well. We have them living in a place where they are happier. They are less stressed. They're more calm there at peace. They are going to be a much better place. Medically to fight off any sort of disease, and they come around. Oh, that's great. And I had met foam. I did what about we know that the center is pretty large shelter. You've got more than one location. It's over one hundred and forty years old. I understand you guys. When I said at the start of the show, you have about a ninety seven percent adoption rate, which is pretty good that isn't folks for just like ten pets. I think something like over what twenty three thousand dogs cats and other critters have gone through your shelter. Just last year loan numbers wise, we bring in about twenty four thousand dog cats and critters a year. We actually find adoptive homes. The adoption rate itself is actually not at ninety six ninety seven. That's our our placement rate. We'll be able to adopt about twenty thousand of those okay? That's still pretty good still definitely proud of it. And then there's also a group of animals that we know we aren't able to adopt for one reason or another this is dealing with the habitats trying to get at the stress of being in a shelter. There's some dogs. Just don't do well with that stress. So we partnered with a lot of local rescues just a lot. I heard almost one hundred. Yup. We had about one hundred local rescue groups, and it's a it's a testament to the twin cities. There's a ton of people around that want to do everything they can to try and help as many animals as they can. So they they work with us that up throwing organizations, and there's a lot of home based foster base rescues that'll give animals dealing with don't deal with the stress of shelter. Well, a place to stay until they can find a home. So I'm I'm here at deep in the heart of Dallas where it's one hundred.

Dr Graham Elvis Facebook Chicago Dr Graham Brayshaw Memphis Saint Paul Minnesota Hagen Susan Memphis Becker Academy Awards Johnson private practice director Dallas Minnesota Dr ram Mary tan Oregon CEO
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome to the show on radio. I'm your host Ardmore. Now, there's an animal shelter in Minnesota with almost a ninety seven percent placement rate for all the animals who come to their center. Now, that's quite a high percentage. But as you will learn on today's show, the people at this shelter are also Trail Blazers in the quest to bring out the best in pets under their care and improve their chances at landing forever homes now here to discuss taking a novel approach to shelter design at the animal humane society in Saint Paul Minnesota. We have Dr Graham Brayshaw say, hi, Dr Graham. Hello. Hello. Hello and behavioral live Hagan. Hey live. How you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks for having us. All right now, folks, raise your PA. If that great Ted on your lap or next to you right now, as you're listening to this show came from a shelter now as I say this I'm raising both hands because pet safety dog Kona and pet safety cat Casey are a pair of shelter alum. I adore. You can get great pets from shelters. So I want you all to call your pet over and get ready to discover what the shelter and Minnesota's doing to break the mold not the mole bike three mold a structure, mold and boost adoption rates. But first we have to pay for the show. So we gotta take a commercial break. You know, the thrill sit and stay. We'll be right back. Time for a pause for furry ones, actually, sit and state behave. We'll be right back. Molly..

Saint Paul Minnesota Blazers Dr Graham Brayshaw Ardmore Dr Graham Molly Ted Casey ninety seven percent
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hail from the animal humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I that we're going to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animals services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now, I gotta say I love your Becker on live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society but life for you has literally been Uzumcu you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis. In Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life was working in the zoo failed started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continue to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis didn't work with any named Elvis. No, I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and meant to soda, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yep. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how. The house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters, and honestly, you look at the majority of of our shelters are dog space. It was all designed to have how do you fit the most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house as many as he can. And then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs. When there are almost always will degrade over time. They're usually it's a relatively small run to get out some, but most time has been closed up they won interact with other dogs, but there's barriers between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting and it really takes toll on him. And we're trying to get to where the shelter. Stay is. As is as close to a homestay homes are still the best place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. And well that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the, you know, health decline that can happen. And if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative. Touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress and we've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype, where dogs can actually interact in social environment. And I feel like I'm you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards. I do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both is tells the one who set this vision where we're going too and keeps us go and make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. You know, make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything. She's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself, but make making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks delights in there. That we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the the best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal, and humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in your recent issue. I guess you you did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society in Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, no, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids as slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different compared to the animals coming through as well. Well, I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just my calculator can't go up that high. But you've been at the place a while. Right back to ram I started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Been to an animal welfare for twenty thirty years. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for the animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization in yourself. But really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal so incredibly rewarding and live. You talked about the fact that you know, in most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yeah. So what we have developed in. We're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dogs spend the night then in their individual runs. But during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really they take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so. It's much more enriching experience a much more enriching environment, and they can express the social behaviors than because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way a litmus test if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four Lakers. Yes. Absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that are currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really want doctors to know that just because a dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household. Other not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other. Dogs. But on the flip side of that, it is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs, and Dr Graham, how long is this prototype been being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading, and or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have adopters in there doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environments in a hospital in shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually usually the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called fo might is just one of my. Favorite remind us. I got a great worry probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that? For us. The F O M I T, nice and simple. Dispel. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a foe might the carries a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into study at down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is it is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things..

Dr Graham Chicago Elvis Dr Graham Brayshaw Facebook Johnson Susan Memphis Hagen Saint Paul Minnesota Becker Academy Awards Memphis private practice director Lakers Mary tan Oregon CEO Giral Dixon
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hail from the animal humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I that we're to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagen. Now. I gotta say I love your background live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been a zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis in Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life. Was working in the zoo failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple of years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minnesota, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yep. We're really trying to take a deep put a great a new look at how we how dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters and honesty, you look at the majority of. Of of our shelters are dog space. It was all designed of how do you fit the most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to house as many as he can? And then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs when they're in are they almost always will degrade over time their captain, usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some but most their time has been closed up they won interact with other dogs, but there's bears between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting, and it really takes toll on them, and we're trying to get to where the shelter stay. As is as close to a homestay homes are still the best. A place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. Well, that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the, you know, health decline that can happen in if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that you know, like the hang out, but as Dr Graham, so well put you don't wanna have dogfight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress, and we. We've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact then in a social environment. And I feel like I'm you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards site. Do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both Gino is tells the one who be set this vision where we're going too and keeps us going. We're on track. If we get skewed a little way one way or the other. She puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work. You know, make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything. She's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on whites. We we do have three or four different banks the lights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the the best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in your recent issue. I guess you you did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society in Facebook, and we will be right there. All right and. You know, about animal humane society. I was like, wow one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, no, we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids has slightly evolved over the years to get to where it's mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different companion animals cutting through as well. Well, I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just can't go up that high, but you've been at the place awhile, right? Dr ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Al's been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization in yourself. But really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal so incredibly rewarding and let you talked about the fact that you know, in most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yeah. So what we have developed in. We're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dog spend the night then in their individual runs. But during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really they take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that interacting with people. We have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so. It's a much more enriching experience and much more enriching environment, and they can express social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way a litmus test if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that art currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really want doctors to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other. But on the flip side of that. It is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading, and or you know, having a dog bite another dog. I know we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have doctors in they're doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environments in a hospital in shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually usually the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called the might as just one of my. I'm not a great worry probably fail spelling bee's. Oh, can you spell that? For us. F O M I T. Nice and simple. Dispel, it's. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be a foe might the carries a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study at down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is it is true is validated. But there's also the stress side of things..

Dr Graham Chicago Elvis Dr Graham Brayshaw Facebook Johnson Saint Paul Minnesota Susan Memphis Hagen Academy Awards Memphis private practice director Minnesota Dr ram Mary tan Gino Oregon Al CEO
"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:30 min | 3 years ago

"dr graham brayshaw" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Humane society located in Saint Paul Minnesota. So I up we're going to give pause and applause to Dr Graham Brayshaw he is the chief of veterinarian at this shelter and director of animal services. Can I just say welcome, Dr Graham, thank you for having me. I really appreciate the time to be on your show. All right. And joining him is live Hagan. Now. I gotta say I love your background live. You are currently the behavior modification and rehabilitation manager shoe at the animal humane society, but life for you has literally been a zoo you've been a trainer at Susan Memphis in Chicago, right? Yes. Yes. It definitely has. So that was kind of my past life. Was working in the zoo failed. So I started off as a marine mammal trainer in Chicago. I work with dolphins seals and sea lions. And then I spent a couple years down in Memphis where I continued to work with sea lions and also worked with a variety of large carnivores, so bears wolves and some birds and a variety of animals any of them named Elvis it didn't work with any named Elvis. No, okay. I didn't know if Elvis left the pool. Okay. All right. So we're here today because a fellow member of cat writers named Mary tan reached out to me and said, you gotta check out what's going on at the animal humane society and Minta soda, and I'm like what? So I'm gonna let you start Dr Graham now people have a vision of what an animal shelter looks like particularly where you how's the dogs? But you guys decided to to be a little more creative. Yup. We're really trying to take a you put a great a new look at how we house dogs and shelter. If you look at most shelters, and honestly, you look at the majority of. Of of our shelters are dog space. It was all designed how do you fit? The most dogs into the smallest space possible to be able to houses many can and then try and find homes for them. And while it is incredibly efficient when it comes to space. It's really not good when it comes to dogs and dogs trying to show their natural behaviors and dogs really trying to be themselves. So the the twist for taking on what we're looking at. It is how can you house dogs where they can basically be themselves or as close themselves as they can while they're in shelter dogs when they're in shelter are the almost always will degrade over time. They're kept in usually it's a relatively small run. They get out some but most their time is spent closed up they won interact with other dogs, but there's bears between them often to try and prevent disease transmission or just to make sure that there's no fighting and it really takes toll on him. And we're trying to get to where the shelter stay as as as close to a homestay homes are still the best. A place for these guys. But we want their time with us to be as good as possible. Well, that sounds good. You've touched a little bit about some of the health decline that can happen in if I could live what about the behavior aspect because these are social beings that like the hang out. But as Dr Graham, so well put you don't want to have a dog fight. But on the other hand, there's a balance, right? Yeah. Absolutely. And so that social piece is something that dogs really miss out on in the shelter environment. And so we do really good job of providing food water shelter. Our veterinary team is really awesome. They do a super job on the medical side of things, but that ability to express normal behavior and reduce a lot of those stressful or anxiety behaviors that we see happen when dogs can hear and smell things going on but not see or interact with their environment. That's one of our freedoms that this new initiative touches honor those freedoms to express normal behavior and freedom from fear and distress, and we. We've done that accomplish that through this group housing prototype where dogs can actually interact in social environment. And I feel like you guys are both on stage at the Academy Awards site. Do want to make sure that you acknowledge you have a CEO named Giral Dixon and a project manager for this and Johnson, did I do good for you. Both Gino is jails the one who set this vision where we're going too and keeps us go and make sure we're on track. If we get skewed a little one way or the other she puts us back on track very nicely and Johnson is the one that makes the really just makes it all work out. Make sure that literally the right lights are on that everything is kept clean everything and she's not scrubbing cleaning much yourself. But making sure that everything really is moving in the right direction. Heck even on the lights. We we do have three or four different banks lights in there that we are testing out to find out the right kind of lighting for these dogs to see what really is the. The best thing for their stay. Well, I do want folks to go to the animal. Humane society that Oregon you guys can check out some stuff, and you do have a publication. I'm looking at that just in a recent issue. I guess you you did profile. What's going on? Is there a Facebook page to we can assure our listeners. Oh, definitely there is a just look up animal humane society in Facebook, and we will be right there. All right. And you know, about animal humane society, I was like, wow, one hundred and forty years. Plus, that's one of the oldest shelters, isn't it in the country. Don't know what the oldest shelter is out there. But yeah, no. We've we've been going since the late eighteen hundreds it started with mostly horses and actually worked with kids as lightly evolved over the years to get to where it's up mostly dogs and cats, but quite a few different companion animals coming through as well. Well, I'm just trying to compute that in dog years, and I just my calculator can't go up that high. But. You've been at the place awhile right back to ram started in in two thousand twelve so not not too long. Al's been doing animal welfare for twenty thirty years. There's definitely people that put me to shame when it comes to long-term. But I've been here a good while what makes you say. Hey, I wanna do shelter medicine versus a family practice. I have my years in practice. I really enjoyed private practice, but it is very much one on one and the real limit of what you can do in private practice is the resources of that owner how much they have available to provide care for their animals in shelter. You are you're beholden to your organization in yourself. But really you are your own boss when it comes to how much you're trying to do with each animal. The great thing is if I find some way to cut a corner and make sure they get good care, but save a few bucks. Those few bucks goes right towards the care of the next animal so incredibly rewarding and you talked about the fact that you know, in most shelters dogs waiting for their forever. Home are able to hear and smell to very very powerful. Senses. But. But they're not able to touch our see each other. What's going on here at the animal humane society? That's that's pulling back the curtain if you will in a safe way. Yes. So what we have developed in. We're calling it a prototype because it is still in its testing. Phase. We're learning a whole lot from it to make sure that both people and animals are getting the most benefit out of it. And so what we have is a space where there's a common area, and then we have six different runs that. So we can accommodate up to six dogs in this housing prototype. And so at night for feeding and overnight when there is an attendant and the common area the dog spend the night, then their individual runs, but during the day, the dogs are out in the common area interacting with each other playing resting being enriched altogether. And so they can really they take social cues from each other. They can express those social behaviors when they're out in that common area that are acting with people we have customers go in and interact with the dogs as well. And so. Hey, it's a much more enriching experience much more enriching environment, and they can express those social behaviors then because they're out all hanging out with each other throughout the day. So if I have a dog at home, this is a good way litmus test, if you will to see how this potential adoptee will do in my home because I'm getting to see firsthand how this dog gets along with two three and four leaguers. Yes, absolutely. It's a great way for potential adopters to see their potential new family member in a situation with other dogs in a social situation. Now, it's also really important that we're acknowledging that this environment isn't right for all dogs, and their stocks that are going to be successful in social environments with other dogs that aren't currently being housed in the habitat. And that's okay. Sometimes the environment is just not quite right for some dogs. And so we really want doctors to know that just because the dog isn't in the participating in the group housing doesn't mean they're not going to be a good fit for their household or they're not going to be a good fit for a social situation with other job. But on the flip side of that. It is a really great way to see potential new family members interacting with other dogs. And Dr Graham, how long is this prototype than being tested, and what are some of the things you do to reduce any risk of any disease spreading, and or you know, having a dog bite another dog. No, we got rolling in early March and just past few weeks, we fully opened it up. Meaning that we have adopted in. They're doing visitations in the habitat. So we've progressed over the past few months to really have it fully functional disease. Transmission wise, disease transmission in any sort of high density environment in a hospital in shelter even dog kennel. We know from previous research done. It's actually not the visitors and often not even just the animals themselves that actually transmit disease between each other. It's usually you to the staff are usually things water bowl things like that. I love the term. It's called the phone might as just one of my. Favorites. I'm not a great worry. I probably fail spelling bee's. So can you spell that for us F O M I T? Nice and simple. Dispel, it's. But it is it is whatever can carry some contagion. So a water bowl can be to the carries a contagion for one dog to another. But what we found is that really having these dogs together does not significantly increase the risk of disease transmission. And this is our preliminary approach we will definitely build good metrics into its study at down the road to ensure that what we're seeing right now is is true is validated. But there's also the stress of things..

Dr Graham Chicago Elvis Dr Graham Brayshaw Facebook Saint Paul Minnesota Hagan Susan Memphis Academy Awards Johnson Memphis private practice director Mary tan Minta soda Oregon Gino Al CEO Giral Dixon