17 Burst results for "Dr Gates"

"dr gates" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"dr gates" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Like the first season to the second right. That was original. Went off on that tangent. all right. yeah. I think what you see with potomac. It's analogous what happens with all of these shows right. Like the first season. I think their everyone the cast and producers. Everyone's trying to figure out what the show's going to beat. There's a lot of exposition. There's an emphasis on whatever the pitch was whatever. The theme is right. You see that in something. I mean this woman obviously but like jersey shore right like jersey shore is pitched as is going to be this show about italian americans at sure that first season all they're talking about you know but that's also likely all the producers are asking them about is how do you feel about what what does being guido quote unquote mean to you right. Because that's the focus. Its second season. Everyone's kind of settled down a little bit. But also i think when the first season is aired and they've seen themselves on television that now you have this slightly. Different engagement is a horrible analogy. But i was thinking like terminator two. There's this moment where they talk about. When the machines became self aware like that's part of happens in the second a reality show. Is there like oh. I need to go get a better. We've like oh. I need to get a better wardrobe. I need to gland team. But also i need to think very carefully about what i'm doing on camera when i'm presenting on camera and how that's gonna play and i also think that by the second season the audience we have our understandings now who we think. The star of the show is right and and how we understand personalities dynamics i mean i always like the first season of the show but to me the second season is really where things start to get cooking when you really really kind of gets to meet the cast real stories. Yes yeah yeah. More from my conversation with dr gates after the break this school year. It's not just about kids going back to school. It's about families companies and the whole country embracing their first as again instead of thinking about going back. Let's move forward with the lessons. We learned this past year. Coles has everything you need to move forward whether that's in the at the office in the gym or at social gatherings you can trust coals for your favorite brands at a great value for kids headed back to school. There's the latest looks from top active. Wear brands like nike adidas and under armor and grown-ups headed to the office. You won't just be seen from the shoulders up anymore. So kohl's has must have beauty adams in stylish accessories get great looks for a great value so go ahead save on everything you and your family needs to move forward at kohl's or kohls dot com. I know i'm not the only one who loves radiant louis skin so i have to share the good with y'all meet your new favourite skincare product the gleaming vitamin c. Klay mask featuring the powerful glow duo of tumor egg. In aloe vera is a great for fading dark spots hyper pigmentation improving texture and visibly evening skin tone naturally it can also be helpful in reducing acne and scarring. I've been using it for a few weeks. Now and love the easy application and the fact that i saw increased glow with only a few uses it comes with the free super smooth applicator brush and you can start to see more radiant skin in just ten minutes. The mask is safe for all skin types in his vegan and cruelty free. But don't just take my word for it. The mask has over two hundred and fifty thousand customers and has sold out fourteen times. Check out all the before and after reviews at gleaming dot com and then use code. Tv bg for fifteen percent off your first order another popular. You know kind of type of reality show are like these. Dating love has of shows it does feel like there is like a particular kind of black women there typically is cast for these shows. I just love to hear your thoughts about like. Are you seeing the same kind of thing. Or are there a varieties in terms of like people who are says. Well what shows in particular. Are you thinking about when you're talking about the dating shows like to handle love is blind the bachelor. That's a whole new guy. That kinda show right right. Dating shows are not like not the thing that like light me on fire in terms of arenas but what what. What i think is interesting about the dating shows right is we tend to talk a lot about reality. Tv in terms of like the content. What's in front of the camera right instead of thinking about networks and thinking about audiences and things like that. What's interesting about like bachelor in whatever has been happening for the past couple of years with discussions about blackness in the bachelor is there isn't as much of a discussion about what who's the audience the bachelor right like. There's all of this kind of black bachelor but the woman he loves like did some weird racist patch. Whatever that's which immediate felt really clear that you can cast a black person. But if for instance you're casting questionnaires never changed. If you're approached casting is the same this wouldn't have been. I mean i don't wanna say would have been issue when a matter but had the bachelor been white and i'm assuming that the one black bachelor they picked the other four possible bashes white dudes right. This wouldn't have been a major air. This would had been issued right. And so i think that when you're talking about for instance like slotting black women into that formula like formula is the formula. And so you're going to get a specific type of black woman because they're not necessarily like they're not interested in in universities a tricky word anyway right versus past year but i mean not interested necessarily in like a diversity of black women right. They're interested in like a fina typically black body to slot into whatever they wanted for that show and i think dating shows tend to be much more formulaic than i think dating shows. I think any kind of competitive reality show is really what i would say like competitive reality. Dating shows like survivor. The amazing race versus candidate reality shows like real housewives. Loving hip hop. I think competitive reality shows tend to be much more formulaic and they tend to cast type much more often and so. I don't think it's ever really surprising that you see the same types recurring over and over and over again Yeah i want to kind of stick with your point around like really thinking about like the different networks who their audiences are. You mentioned this idea of the bible. Wink we're kind of position to side with the producer in. You mentioned that you feel like that's very different from like what we would see on eleven hip hop. But i'm also aware that if feels like the own network is has developed a different kind of like slate of reality tv. I love to hear your thoughts. Maybe just about the differences between like what we see on which network. Yeah i'm trying to which which only shows in particular are you thinking of. 'cause there's put a ring on it. Yeah ready to love. Which i think is an interesting dating show to me. The people who are on that show are very different than what you would see on a lot to handle. Also what are the other ones loving. Love marriage huntsville. Oh that's right. That's right those kind of in the vein of like a real housewives levin who pop but not quite the same yes. That's the asleep. I mean so there's a couple of things i think that different networks have just they just have different approaches to things right and so like i mean i always.

jersey shore dr gates nike adidas kohl Coles aloe vera adams huntsville levin
"dr gates" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"dr gates" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Some of my favorites have been trading spaces early seasons of the real world. And of course the real housewives. It's been really interesting to see how programming in this space has developed over time. Ansa follow the commentary and what has been most interesting is the way the space has been accommodating or not so much to black women cast members and black audiences to help us explore this world today. I'm joined by dr racquel gates. Dr gates is an associate professor of film at columbia university and the author of double negative the black image and popular culture. She received her phd from northwestern university's department of screen cultures and holes in ma in humanities from the university of chicago as well as a bs in foreign service from georgetown university. Currently she's working on her second book titled hollywood-style in the invention of blackness for which she was awarded an academy film scholar grant by the academy of motion picture arts and sciences in twenty twenty. Her reading appears in both academic and popular publications such as the new york. Times the los angeles review of books and film quarterly. She lives in brooklyn with her partner in two sons. Dr gates and i chatted about the complicated nature of black women's representation on reality tv. How audiences often response a majority black casts the stereotypes that are both upheld and to spill through reality tv and the changes. That often happened between seasons one. And two of a show if there's something that resonates with you all enjoying our conversation please share with us on social media using the hashtag. tb g in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much joining us today. Gates thank you so much for having me. Yeah i am so happy to have you here reality. Tv is like one of my favorite things to enjoy the. I love to talk to people who are researching in this area. So can you start by telling us a little bit about what fascinates you about media studies. In how you got into studying reality. Tv sure so what fascinates me about studying media but also film is that i think that element television are these sources of connection between people and i think that sometimes in spite of our backgrounds sort of our shared experiences with different movies or different television shows allow us to tap into something and sort of form a site of human connection. I also think that sometimes we can work out our own feelings and experiences vicariously through watching film and television. And i think that's where reality television is particularly unique because it's so much about sort of daily lived experience and of course that's like played for drama and for comedy and all kinds of things but i think that at its core reality television particular. The draw is the sort of very real connection with the cast members. And i think that's a huge source of pleasure for the audience from me. How do i get into studying reality television. So i'm by training. I am a film and media studies. Scholar i'm also a fan of reality television and you know there's a point where at least from me when i was reading you know like newspaper articles or just sort of listening to the ways that people are talking about reality television. It always seemed to sell the genre kind of short. it seemed to presume. The lack of sophistication on the part of audiences which are primarily women and from meade. A light bulb went off. Because that's typically what happens when you are talking about john. Roses that are primarily enjoyed by audiences who are not like straight white milk. And so for me. I really wanted to sort of turn a second of my research to reality television to really sort of get at the nuances of what. Make it so pleasurable. But also i would argue so powerful and so endure it So it feels like the. John really has kind of expanded right. Like i think right. I'm guessing you probably know this better than i do. Like is the real world kinda like our first real foray into reality. Tv so can you talk just about like how genre has expanded beyond stuff like real world. Sure i mean people always cite the real world right like that nine hundred ninety one nine ninety two moment i think that is like the dawn of the contemporary era of reality television. But if we're thinking about the nuts and bolts of what makes something reality television like the idea that it's unscripted the idea that we're getting a behind the scenes. Look at either a person or a community that we don't normally get then. I'd argue it. You have to actually go back to the nineteen fifties right and something like edward murals person. A person which was a television show where the journalists would he go visit the home of celebrities and get this sort of candidate interview where they would talk about various things in terms of their personal life in their in their professional lives. You have to think about something like candid camera that television show right which is about playing you know. It was on unsuspecting people. You could also think about. All of the game shows that became really popular in the nineteen fifties. There's a television show that i like to teach in my reality. Tv class called queen for a day. Which was the show where women would come on and they would sort of talk about you. Know all of the things that were going wrong in their lives and it's like the audience dot. They're sob stories. Were pathetic enough. They would win. They'd win a prize in clearly. A predecessor to something like extreme home makeover which is a show that we're more familiar with now at also throw out the film sociological experiments. That happens like in the sixties in the seventies stanford prison experiment things like that and one of my favorite examples that i liked to teach. Jfk's filmed televised birthday party at madison square garden. Where marilyn monroe comes out and sings this very sort of sexy version of hafner him as his wife confront rogue watches it like.

Dr gates dr racquel gates department of screen cultures Ansa academy of motion picture arts northwestern university georgetown university columbia university university of chicago tb ma brooklyn hollywood Gates los angeles edward murals new york meade john John
"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Back with me on the phone from finding your roots on PBS and Dr Gates. What do we got coming up this week on the show? Well, this week's episode is entitled. No Irish need apply and are featured guests of Jim Gaffigan and Jane Lynch. Jane, of course, is famous actor and Jim of famous comedian and we reveal the challenges that they're Irish ancestors Faced in order to become Americans, Let's start with Jim Gaffigan. Jim grew up in the Midwest, and he had absolutely no idea that his maternal line story in America began in Maine, predating the influx of Irish people who came because of the potato famine of 18 45. Jim's mother's ancestors immigrated to America sometime early 18 hundreds. Most people don't know this that they were Irish people migrating before the potato famine. But after the potato famine began in 18 45, a huge wave of impoverished and unskilled Irish people immigrated to the states. Igniting, of course and anti iris fervor. And soon after Jim's ancestors, like many other Irish Americans in their community fled main for the American frontier. Jim's great great grandfather ended up in Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he eventually became a prominent businessman. And a pillar of the town now and Jim's father site, We found a long line of Irish American coal miners, and at the time there were no established union, so coal companies a sensory control their employees lives. Compelling them to live in company housing and chop it company on stores and by the mid 18 sixties situation to reach the boiling point. Miners were fighting their employers in each other in an effort to unionize, So Jim's family got tangled up in these politics. He was 74% Irish 24% English and Jim Gaffigan. Sedna cousin. Is Derek Jeter. Really? Yeah, because Derek's mom is white and of Irish descent, and there you go. All right. Second guess was the famous Jane that Lynch James Paternal grandmother, Mary Lynskey was born a poor farm girl in Ireland. She had absolutely no chance of ever inheriting her family's farm, so she opted to immigrate to America. But she's a teenager, and she made her way to Youngstown, Ohio, where she found a job as a maid. It's many Irish female immigrants did, where King and living in the home of an older Irish woman who was likely sympathetic to her play as a maid, not having to pay for room and board. Mary was able to save enough money to finance her brother John's journey to America. John then brought their younger sister Sarah, over. This is a classic example. Scott of what we call chain Migration. Yes, my grandmother did this Really? Yep. She came over and worked and brought over a brother and then brought over another brother, And then the three of them worked and brought over the whole rest of the family. And that's the way it's supposed to be, man. Yeah, but James grandmother did more than help her siblings. She took her savings book to Chicago and Mary James grandfather, a fellow Irish immigrant, then helped him to purchase the home. This home would become central to Mary's family for generations and generations. And James even visited it when she was a child and shared with us that her grandmother had come full circle in a sense, making your own hub for new Irish immigrants reading out the top two floors of this home to new arrivals, So she was like the Queen of chain migration. Yes. Jane's father side, We were able to go back to her second great grandfather, John Lynskey, born around 17 95 in Ireland on her mother's side, ready for this back to her seventh great grandfather's pair and spend both likely born in the mid to late 16 hundreds in tweeted, and she, too, as a Edna cousin, Mia Farrell. Oh, wow. He's Dr Henry Louis Gates. His show, of course, is finding your roots on Pete. Yes, it's on Wednesday nights. Check your local listings for times. Good to talk to you again. Skip, have a great.

Jim Gaffigan Jane Lynch James grandmother America Mary John Lynskey Jane Mary James grandfather PBS Derek Jeter Dr Henry Louis Gates Dr Gates Jim Ireland Midwest Youngstown Fort Dodge Maine Mary Lynskey Iowa
"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Upcoming episode on Finding Your Roots on PBS. Dr Gates, Good to have you again. Thank you, Scott for having me on your show. We have lunched Season seven of finding your roots. I can't believe it's amazing. It's amazing and this business second episode in Episode two. It's called Against all odds. And it features Andy Cohen and Nina Totenberg, as you know, Andy Cohen's media personality, and Nina is the famous NPR radio journalists and they meet ancestors who struggled mightily as we're going to hear to survive. Let's start with Andy Cohen and he grew up in ST Louis, where his family owned a food distribution company known as Last Co. And both of his parents worked there and as a youth, of course, So did Andy. The company's origins lay with the Andes. Great Grandfather Mandate. Lewis Allen Lewis came to America from Russia in the 18 nineties, when he was about 23 years old. He had nothing. Of course. He started out as a peddler, hauling his wares from farmhouse to farmhouse on foot before he was even able to afford awards in the cart. And he went on. He saved his pennies. And he found that a dry goods store that would eventually grow into Louis Allen sons and company and its acronym is last Go Now. A rival records show that Lewis came to America from a small town outside of the city of B, A. With stock in modern day Poland. It was at that time, part of the Russian empire located what was known that's pale of settlement. The records from the paler scarce we were able to show Andy Incredibly, the synagogue where his family most likely worshiped and to trace his Alan line. Their name was yelling Back in Russia. We traced the Alan line back to his fourth great grandfathers who were likely born in 17 50. A quarter of a century before the American revolution. Wow! Endings 100% Ashkenazi Jewish, but he had a beautiful, brilliant didna cousin who? Scarlett Johansson. Wow! On those. She's Scandinavian. Her mother is Jewish. And that's the connection. And now I'll tell you about Nina Totenberg need his father, Roman Totenberg was a world famous violinist suit. Let a truly epic life Roman was born in 1911 to middle class Jewish family. What is now pull it In part of the Russian Empire. He was a child prodigy and talents helped him survive and feed his family during the Russian revolution and the massive famines that followed that by the early 19 thirties, he had a fabulous career touring Europe in the Americas. And the statue is an artist's enabled him to immigrate to the United States as World War two loomed, But that didn't mean his family back in Europe was safe. After Roman came to America, his mother status, Wahba found yourself trapped in Paris, unable to leave due to American immigration quotas, and Roman Oh, Scott. It's so sad, desperately tried to get his mother out, found all these letters he wrote to all these government officials. And unlike the vast majority of European Jews, Nina's grandmother got out quickly because of that, the day after France surrendered to the Nazis standing Suada cross into port school the day after France surrendered. Wow! It was able to board one of the last ships carrying Jewish refugees to America, but that his mother has been saved. The family's ordeal wasn't over. His older sister need is on you, Nina. Stranded in Warsaw with her husband and child. When the Nazis invaded, Then fall of 1940. The Germans established a ghetto for Warsaw's Jewish population. You Nina's husband died in that ghetto, though you need to manage to obtain false papers and escaped with her young daughter, Miraculously. At least 10 of Romans. Many aunts, uncles and cousins perished in the Warsaw ghetto, and she had a famous didna cousin. And that was Carly. Simon. Really? Yeah. And of course I can't wait to see the show. It's on Wednesday nights on PBS. Check your local listings for the time and Dr Gates will talk to you again next week. Okay, Take.

Nina Totenberg Andy Cohen Lewis Allen Lewis Americas Dr Gates Alan line Scarlett Johansson Scott Warsaw Russia Roman Totenberg Louis Allen Andes Europe France ST Louis Simon United States NPR
"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"The PBS series Finding Your Roots and ratings are going through the roof again this season. Dr Gates. What do you got for us this coming week? Well, next week's episode is called to the manor. Born in it Features actor Glenn Close and film director John Waters. Glenn and John, both come From well to do families and both turn their family traditions got upside down. Let's start with Glenn Close. OK, we're going back to her quicker ancestor. Glad to maternal great great grandfather was called Peter of Be War. Al. W R R A L L He was a self made man who rose from nothing to run a dry goods store in Pennsylvania, we discovered that his father Glenn's third Great grandfather's name was John Morale. Came from a long line of Quakers, but he was just owned by the Quakers. You ready for this for fornication after he married a woman outside the faith. Glenn admires our ancestor's spirit and says, I get some of that from him. I'm going back further into her maternal roots. We come to another independent spirit. Her ninth grade grandfather's name was John Strong. Win. 16 30 sailed from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony when the colony was in its infancy, still struggling to survive in the wilderness, and his descendants include You Ready for this. Clint's cousins, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin Roosevelt, Clint Eastwood and Diana, Princess of Wales. They're all cleanse cousins. Wow, the eighth cousin of Lady Di and on her father's side, Thomas Booth. Attallah Pharaoh was born in 18, 16 and Gloucester. Virginia, and the 18 60 cents is revealed. He owned nine slaves and in 18 40 newspaper article indicates that he was a member of a vigilance committee quote unquote, and that was a group formed to suppress abolitionist and his father Glenn's third Great grandfather, James, tell a Pharaoh was also a slave owner. He on 31 human beings in 18 30. Glen knew nothing about this part of her family. Marvels of the difference between our northern Southern ancestors and was deeply remorseful there. Didna cousin was Dr Phil McGraw. Oh, wow. John Waters. His maternal great grandfather was Clifford Whitaker. Born in 18 63, raised in Maryland heir to the family fortune. But when he was 34 years old, Clifford turned his back on that fortune, enjoying the climb Die Gold rush, working as a minor and prospector in northwestern Canada, one of the most remote spots on earth. His efforts came to not he never found any gold and he died Scott tragically by an accidental pistol shot. Oh, wow, John said. I knew someone had to be crazy in our families. It was like one of my movies, Huh? Finally, John's maternal great great grandfather was named Somerset Water, same surging. He was a farmer and also a slave owner in Carroll County, Maryland, and in 18 58. He probably said advertisement offering the reward for the return of Caroline and enslave Woman. Weeks later, three Friedman and one insane man were charged with helping Caroline Escape and the three Friedman were ultimately convicted and ordered to be sold as slaves. And after sentencing, Somerset purchased two of the former Friedman himself. And John said, I would go spit on my ancestor's grave and his DNA's cousin was former Republican member of the House of Representatives. Paul Ryan. And John is very liberal. Almost had a heart attack all over get well, it all goes to show we all descend from saints and sinners and kings and poppers. You've got it. Well, of course, it's finding your roots on PBS is coming week. Check your local listings for times, Dr Gates. Good to talk, you'll catch up with you again next week. Bless you, My brother. I love doing our weekly segment. I have Alexis set the alarms that Scott Fisher's called Good to talk with the Skip. Stay safe. Okay. Thank you, Brother..

Glenn Close John John Waters John Morale Dr Gates John Strong Attallah Pharaoh Scott Fisher Caroline Escape Maryland Dr Phil McGraw Clifford Whitaker Friedman director Clint Eastwood Massachusetts Bay Colony Virginia Pennsylvania England Lady Di
"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"She is the power behind genetic genealogy with finding your roots with Dr Henry Louis Gates on PBS. She's the person behind the Edna detectives. C. C. Welcome back. It's great to have you. How are things? It's wonderful to be back. I always loved speaking with you. So thanks for having me. Well, thank you. Philistine on what's new? I know. I know You're coming up on a milestone with your DNA's a detective group. And this is pretty exciting. Yes. This week we will hit 150,000 members. I created the group February 27th 2015. So we're about 5.5 almost six years in and I believe that's the biggest Edna group in the world. I can't think of Can't imagine many people know I wouldn't imagine that. What's going on on finding your roots. You're still doing that as well. I am And you know, a lot of people think I was just been a consultant all these years, but I've actually been a full time. Production team member all of these years since 2013 and it's been really hard to balance that with everything else I'm doing and I'm so fortunate that we finally have somebody else on the show. Kimberly Morgan has come on is one of the associate genealogist working with Nick's Ch'ti. She is really good with DNAs. So this is the first time I've had somebody to help me. With the genetic genealogy research on the show, and it's been just wonderful. How fun is that? And we got a whole new season of that coming up in January. We've got Dr Gates coming on at that time to talk about some of the celebrities coming up, so that's gonna be a lot of fun. And and, of course, the genetic detective's been out there for a while, and I would imagine with covert. That's kind of shut down a lot of things because you did a lot of travel for the show. I did, and I haven't been able to do anything like that. I've definitely been working from home. It's also affected finding your roots. But we have been in production you might notice when you start seeing the newer episodes that the table is longer. They've got Dr Gates 6 FT table Now sort of the guest is further away. They're following all of These very strict guidelines for being able to film the show. No one else is in the room that the cameraman typically and they're watching for a monitors and other rooms. Everyone's mast up, except for Dr Gates and the guests. They're doing testing, so we are able to continue to create content for that series, but it has been challenging. And you know, it's harder for people to travel. Of course, Dr. Gates has been driving long distances to get to those interviews in some cases, so the show is gonna look a little different, but we hope everyone will still be happy to have it. You know, it's certainly better to have it, even if it's not exactly the way it's always been. A lot of cases will only have two guests instead of three. As some people have seen in the recent episodes. They've done some remixes, where they've taken some of his former guest stories and mixed them with newer guests. And so sometimes people think it's a rerun that it's actually not a rerun. It's a remix, and there's going to be some new material in that as well. So this is, of course, just your side work because your main job is putting people behind bars for things from a long time ago. Cold cases cold case murders. And you've actually had a couple of court cases recently is understood that were one and this is kind of unique and important for a couple of reasons. First of all, you get a lot of people who confess up front, so it's never really tested in court. The question of genetic genealogy, helping to identify a potential suspect. But when it gets into court, we haven't seen anybody challenging the technique because it's just treated like a tip. But now you've actually had some people who pled not guilty, went to court and got convicted. Right? So we're about 2.5 years into this now, and when we started, there was a lot that was unknown. Of course, we didn't know how the courts would treat this and how Juries would view it. And it took a lot of time before the case has started going to jury trials, Of course, and so in summer 2019. We have the very first case that went to a jury trial where the suspect has been identified through investigative genetic genealogy. But it's been pretty slow going. And just recently, we've seen a number of cases go to jury trial and get convictions. And so it's starting to set a real precedents, the use and acceptance. Of genetic genealogy and these cases, so that's exciting. Well, it is a little surprising that there haven't been more challenges. You know, There's been a lot of talk about Fourth Amendment issues, but the defense attorneys are not bringing those issues up. By and large. This isn't becoming an issue in these trials. And so every time I'm on hold to be an expert witness. I've been canceled without exception because they've all decided that genetic genealogy isn't really an issue that they can challenge. Now That's not to say, you know that will never change may be a defense attorney. One day will challenge it to a greater degree, but it is setting a precedent across the United States now. Genetic genealogy really is a tool. This isn't evidence to be admitted in court in front of the jury. This is a tip that pointed them toward someone. And then it's the investigation they did from there. That is what is used in court. And it is just a tip. And it's nice to know too that as more and more people get involved in genetic genealogy, we might be able to solve more and more of these things. Yeah, you know, we're up to 133 successful identification and those are just once where they've been fully confirmed in..

Dr Henry Louis Gates Dr Gates Kimberly Morgan C. C. Edna United States attorney consultant Nick
"dr gates" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

09:42 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Boogie Woogie things to be a lot more simple, Wouldn't it? Welcome back to the Doctor Dali's show. 1877, Doc Dolly 1877 D O C d l I think so. Genesis Communications Network from making this deal happen, thanks to Daniel for working the dials and big thanks to you all for turning and we really do appreciate it. Don't forget to follow us on Twitter, Doctor Dahlia and on Facebook that after Dolly show, So a few weeks ago, the CDC had offered guidance. On how we should celebrate Halloween. There's been guidance on Thanksgiving multiple holidays. I really urge you guys to look at the CDC website. Unfortunately, that just drew a lot of Drama, and people were concerned going. Wait a second are kids have been locked up? This is Halloween and Halloween is finally on a Saturday night and, you know, I was asked how I felt about how we should celebrate the holidays, and it just it just kind of started to become a little drama fest. Well, who better to actually, you know, kind of lend some guidance on how we should celebrate the holidays this year. Then somebody has been in the trenches with Covad. Pulmonary and critical care specialist. Currently, we have on air who I'm a huge fan of at Northwestern Memorial Hospital Doctor Khalili Gates to join us. So Dr Gates thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to kind of help blend some clarity on what you think we should be doing for the holidays. Absolutely thank you for having me. Wow. Do I have an almost four year olds? Oh, my God. Oh, my God. Halloween was like our favorite holiday with the kids. And you know it was the one time they would listen to us because they would bundle up They would let me inspect the chocolate. I need by chocolate. Oh, my guys. So what have you told your child about everything going on? I know. So you know, she knows that we're not canceling. Holloway. We have so many mouths Which and the pumpkins on the porch on DH. We're going Teo do a scavenger hunt at home. Andi. That's kind of what we decided as a family. But there are other absence, right? If you want to go down the street of the neighborhood for having to do individual body banks like we do at birthday parties, as opposed to everybody reaching in the bank. If your Halloween costume doesn't have a mass, let's make sure the kids are mass and if they are distant, and we're maintaining social distance, but we're not canceling holidays. We just want people to do it a little bit differently this year. Exactly exactly And I think There's ways to do it fun. I gotta tell you, you know, every time we have Ebola candy, you got the big grabbers. I don't know who invites the middle schoolers, but they take a big chunk. So I almost kind of like the excuse to, you know, Bag up little bags of candy, You know, so then I know I'm actually triaging enough Where you know, Souto, tell us what you saw. You know, during the thick of this, and you know what? Personally that it must have been pretty trying on you. What? What did you experience with Cove? It and your patients. We saw the devastation of Cove. It's where families were hard hit. We had multiple family members and I used to love at the same time. We unfortunately had people that didn't make it. But we also saw and continue to see the success story that Cove it where we are able to get them. Recovered and back home with their family members. And so it's been a really trying time. But it's been a rewarding time as well. I was telling someone earlier today I kind of felt like ground how dated last seven months where you get up. You go to work, come back in and do the same thing over because you don't have those brakes and changes in time. So it's been, you know, passing and exhilarating and that we're in the middle of a pandemic and trying to learn the virus comeback. Um, I'm just thankful that we have been able to work together and provide the care for our patients that's required, so it's cinema a bundle of emotions. Absolutely. Now you know, Joking aside, I've told my listeners that I've been trying to, you know, you know, work this cove it, you know, pandemic locked down to my advantage, keeping family and in laws away, But this Thanksgiving Families coming there there, I think fatigued by this, and I think this is probably gonna be one of my biggest Thanksgiving dinners and we're talking about older individuals and grand parents. And you know one thing that I don't think he's being talked about is, you know we want to protect their seniors, and we're telling them to stay away. But I can't say how many want to come to my house and I can't even cook, which means that's how isolated they feel. I and and you know what the one recommendations You have, because I don't think the older people are the boomers are really having it in terms of you know what? Not this holiday. What advice do you have for that? Yes. So if you are, you know my initial advice is if you can keep the holiday to just your common nuclear family. Let's do that. But if that is not an option, unless looking, explore other options in those absence, our grandma grandpa and everybody else's come in. Let's talk about whether or not whoever is going to be there going foreign team for two weeks before you come To minimize the potential exposure before you got there. Once you get there, you still have the same ass right? Even in the house open windows so that we can get some good good ventilation. When it's time to eat dinner. You have to provide space so that we can take the mask down safely. We can all be crowded around at the table. Perhaps passing around a turkey platter from hand to hand. It's not the way to go this year, and so there are things that we can do and changes that we can make to decrease the risk of transmission even during family gatherings. That's what we choose to do. What I want to do is I want to take that Halloween idea of bags of candy right that you leave on the on the driveway and put the turkey there and just let the family do a drive by take the turkey and leave anyway. But you see, I'm not getting out of Christmas presents here for my family. We're speaking to Dr Khalil, a gates pulmonary critical care specialists at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. You know, I know we weren't going to talk about this. But the fact that you have a four year old daughter, you can also kind of lend a lot of guidance to how his parents are talking to our little kids. Have you had I'm sure she's as bright as Khun B. You know, have you add the covert talk? And has she been kind of wondering? You know why things were different? Absolutely. We have the cove. It talk on a regular basis, partly because when I want service or saying Kobe patients what happens in our household changes, and so we had to be willing to talk to her that she could understand, understand that changes and so she feel very much. Greet me at the door and say, Did you see Corbett patients today? And if she if I say Yes, I did. She goes back to what she's doing, and so I can kind of be contaminates. So she is very much aware of covert and the importance of masking and the impact of the violence that she speaks of things like when the virus is over. You're watching something on the news the other day, and there were people out that didn't have a mask and she was screaming at the TV mommy they don't have on get some degree, and I think we have to be willing to talk to Children about it. Oh, absolutely. The generation Alphas are going to be some of the wily ist smartest ones that probably the most flexible because they're kind of growing up in this Now, you know flu shots. We've been recommending flu shots. I'm sure your team is well anything You want to comment on flu shots this year. If you have never had a flu shot in your life, this is a year to get it. We do not want to be battling flew and cold, but at the same time, and there's no reason to believe that you can't have both. Which is horrible to even think about him. Please, please, please get your food back. And what do you think? What's that mean? You know if you had a crystal ball, Where do you think we're at with the covert vaccine? If I had a crystal ball, I would expected kind of maybe early 2021 early to mid 2021. I don't see it any sooner than that. But we'll have to see how things pan out and how these kind of reports of adverse effect shaped out. But hopefully by 2021 21. Then we're hoping to and then you know, a lot of stores are looking forward to block Friday Sales and many stores like Wal Mart has had to adjust. You know what advice do you have for people that want a Christmas shop that, you know, want to kind of support local business? Yeah, but our kind of leaning more towards religious to Amazon again, So I think that a lot of local businesses are still doing online. But let's do our ally. You don't have to shock just from Amazon like he went online. The willing and if you're not if you're somebody just has to be out in the stores. That's okay. But let's minimize the risk of infection. So let's wear masks. My social distance use hand sanitizer intermittently. Just think about all that mechanically my hands and hopefully the stores will help us by controlling the flow of traffic inside by minimizing the amount of.

Northwestern Memorial Hospital CDC Doc Dolly Twitter Covad Facebook Genesis Communications Network Amazon Doctor Dahlia Dr Gates Daniel Ebola Wal Mart Teo Holloway
"dr gates" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ah, a solution that's right for all of humanity. Do you think the public gets this? Do you think they understand what's going on with black holes and then and your work? I think black holes are fascinating to the public for some reason, unlike so much of physics Black holes capture people's imagination. I mean, of course, I think it's helped by science fiction where people play with, you know, all sorts of, you know. Concept of space travel, but it means one of things I really like about working in this field is that you can hook capture that that hook that people have. Or that curiosity about black holes. So where do you go from here? You've won the Nobel Prize. What's what's next on your agenda? Oh, gosh, it's doing science. I mean, in my For me, it's never doing this. It's not about prizewinning, but rather about scientific exploration. So there's so much more for us to do in terms of understanding gravity and understanding the Astrophysical role that black holes play. And then you know, quite frankly working through these issues associated with the 30 M telescope, which another complicated their authority, and in some sense, you need people with E. I know the scientific stamp of ah, approval that can be viewed as leaders. Well, that's a good place to end it. I hope hope that comes to pass Dr Gates. Thank you for taking time to be with us today on congratulations again to you. And all your staff. Thanks so much. Thank you factor. Andrea Ghez is a professor of astronomy at the University of California in Los Angeles, where she also directs their Galactic Centre Research group. When we come back, we'll talk about the marvelous microbes that live on shipwrecks. We want to control the growth of microbes that could cause damage. We also want to maybe promote the growth of bacteria that can help preserve these rats. Stay with us. We'll be right.

Nobel Prize Andrea Ghez Dr Gates Los Angeles University of California Galactic Centre Research group professor
"dr gates" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

10:16 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Club. I was honored to serve as a deputy assistant secretary of defense in the 19 nineties. Now it's my pleasure to introduce today's distinguished guests. There are many issues today surrounding national defense in our military. Should the military be used to quell domestic unrest, such as the recent protests should the U. S be terminating many of our arms control treaties and even contemplating resuming nuclear testing? Should the names of Confederate military leaders be removed from U. S military bases and their statues be removed from our public places? To address these questions and many more. Today we will have a unique conversation between two recent secretaries of defense, Dr Robert Gates and General James Mattis. As a bipartisan secretary of Defense Secretary Robert Gates served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. He is the author of a new book, exercise of Power, American Failure, Successes and a new Path Forward in the Post Cold War world. Dr. Gates was an officer in the US Air Force and spent 27 years at the CIA. He served a CIA director and became the first career officer and the CIA's history to move from entry level employee to head of the agency. Secretary. Gates served as a member of the National Security Council staff in four different administrations and for eight presidents of both political parties. For his numerous professional contributions. Secretary Gates was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award by President Obama. He is also a three time recipient of the Distinguished Intelligence Medal. One of the CIA's most prestigious honors. In conversation with him today is General James Mattis, General Mattis served as our 26 secretary of defense from 2017 to 2019 and is now the Davies family distinguished fellow at Stanford University. City's Hoover Institution. General, Mattis served over 40 years in the Marine Corps. Starting as an infantry officer. He later served as commander of the U. S Joint Forces Command and his NATO's supreme allied commander for transformation. General Mattis also directed the military operations of more than 200,000 soldiers, sailors, Airman Coast Guardsmen and Marines and allied forces across the Middle East as commander of the U. S Central Command. He commanded forces in the Persian Gulf War, the war in Afghanistan and the Iraq war. He's been out, spoken recently about the president to use of military troops in domestic unrest in Washington. Please join me now in welcoming Dr Robert Gates and General James Mattis for this very unique conversation. Well, thank you, Dr Duffy. It is a pleasure to be here with the Commonwealth Club. The club it's been devoted to finding truth and setting it loose for over 100 years. And in that spirit, I'm especially honored today moderate the club discussion with former Secretary of Defense Bob Gates about his latest book, exercise of Power, which he uses lessons from the past to craft a new path forward. A guy to America's role in the world. It's a timely book and one bringing The forefront decades of experience in service door on protector. Gates is my former boss predecessor, an office and an inspiring role model Secretary Gates and reading your book, one that I would be reassured were required reading for presidents and Cabinet officers. I was struck by you, attributing a large part of America's 25 year decline. And status in prestige. To the failure of post Cold War presidents in Congress is recognized resource what you call our arsenal of non military instrument of power. Can you explain this fundamental failure and the significance of the title that you chose for your book? The germ of the book really began with a question, in my mind of how the United States had gone from a position of supreme power probably unrivaled since the Roman Empire in every dimension of power in 1993 to a country today, beset by challenges everywhere. I thought about how did we? How did that happen? How did we get here? And so I began looking at all of the major foreign policy challenges we've had since 1993 and thinking about what we had done and what we have not done that contributed to That decline in in our role in the world in our power in the world, and what I came up with was a set of of non military instruments of power. That we had that had played such an important role in our success in the Cold War against the Soviet Union and had largely been neglected on withered after the end of the Cold War. At a time when we continue to thunder military, we basically dismantled all of the non military instruments of power from diplomacy to economic leverage. Two strategic communications on DH and more. We can go into that later and as I looked at the situation's a TTE these challenges from Somalia, Haiti in 1993 and and others right up to our relationship with Russia and China. Today, North Korea. It occurred to me that we had failed in many respects to figure out how to compete with these powers outside of the military realm. And so I and the realities of the 15 challenges that I write about For all practical purposes, I I consider 13 to be failures, and that's why in the title the word failures comes first. There are a couple of successes and they're important six passes and there's some lessons to be learned from those as well, but we had a lot of problems during that 2027 year period. And and I would just conclude by saying, you know the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan both began with very quick military victories and the problem that identified whether it was Iraq and Afghanistan. Or Somalia or Haiti or others was that once we had achieved military victory, we then changed our mission. We then decided to move to trying to bring democracy on reform the governments of those countries and that's where we ran into failure. Sector Gate. I'd like to go more deeply into what you just mentioned this symphony of power and I took a few notes from your book. But could you give a brief overview of the type of instrument you're For into on where they might be more applicant, perhaps, or most likely, the nude in the military form of power. And if they're not played, why aren't they played? But start, please? What are these instruments? What do you look to bring on into the forefront here? So the two primarily coercive instruments of power, obviously that military But I would say, also cyber. In my opinion, cyber has actually become the most effective weapon that a nation can have, because it can accomplish military, political and economic harm. To one's adversary. It's difficult to identify who perpetrated the attack a cyber attack. It takes time to attribute figure out attribution and the more damage that was done. The more important it is to identify exactly where the ones and zeros came from. And so cyber is. AH, is a huge player now in a way that it has never been before it can dismantle. Oh, our disarm weapons. It can redirect weapons. It can shut down infrastructure in countries, so it's a very versatile weapon. And it doesn't take the kind of enormous expenditure of dollars or of money that a nuclear enterprise or even a chemical or biological threat would would be would represent. So so I think cyber is is a very important one and And we've been pretty good about developing it for our military purposes, But I think we have not taken advantage of it in an offensive way with respect either political or economic targets. Another important instrument is clearly economic measures. And these Khun b, both carrots and sticks. The truth is, as I make the point in the book that we've developed the sticks part of the economic instrument pretty well. Well, we levy sanctions on any country that looks at US process ID, and it's become actually very complicated for a lot of companies because we've got so many sanctions against so many countries figuring out how you could do business internationally. And stay within us long become a full time enterprise for lawyers and accountants in these in these companies, So we've got the sticks, part of it down pretty well embargoes, terrorist sanctions and so on where we've fallen down and where we once had really capability is in. How do we use economic assistance or econo our economy as as an asset as a carrot who encouraged to induce other countries to do what we would like for them to do or to follow policies. That we would like for them to follow whether its loans at discounts whether it's economic concessions, the trade concessions and so on were very good. As I said it's sanctions were not so hot at figuring out how we might advantage someone in dealing with us now President Clinton and President Bush both were pretty good with Africa when they arrange debt relief for a number of African countries back in the 19 nineties in the early two thousand's then and that really helped a lot of African countries, But that's a rare example of us using economic measures A CZ an instrument of power, strategic communications, or, as we used to call it, the Cold War propaganda. How do we get our message around the world? The Chinese have developed this and to an extraordinary degree. Several years ago, Hu Jintao devoted allocated $7.

Dr Robert Gates General James Mattis president CIA deputy assistant secretary of Secretary secretary President Obama officer United States Somalia Iraq General Mattis George W. Bush America Afghanistan Haiti Distinguished Intelligence Med
"dr gates" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Program. I'm Gloria Duffy, president and CEO of the Commonwealth Club. I was honored to serve as a deputy assistant secretary of defense in the 19 nineties. Now it's my pleasure to introduce today's distinguished guests. There are many issues today surrounding national defense in our military. Should the military be used to quell domestic unrest, such as the recent protests should the U. S be terminating many of our arms control treaties and even contemplating resuming nuclear testing? Should the names of Confederate military leaders be removed from U. S military bases and their statues be removed from our public places to address these questions and many more. Today, we will have a unique conversation between two recent secretaries of defense Dr Robert Gates and General James Mattis. As a bipartisan secretary of Defense Secretary Robert Gates served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. He is the author of a new book, exercise of Power, American Failures, Successes and a new Path Forward in the Post Cold War world. Dr. Gates was an officer in the US Air Force and spent 27 years at the CIA. He served a CIA director and became the first career officer and the CIA's history to move from entry level employee to head of the agency. Secretary. Gates served as a member of the National Security Council staff in four different administrations and for eight presidents of both political parties. For his numerous professional contributions. Secretary Gates was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award by President Obama. He is also a three time recipient of the Distinguished Intelligence Medal. One of the CIA's most prestigious honors. In conversation with him today is General James Mattis, General Mattis served as our 26 secretary of defense from 2017 to 2019 and is now the Davies family distinguished fellow at Stanford University. City's Hoover Institution. General, Mattis served over 40 years in the Marine Corps. Starting as an infantry officer. He later served as commander of the U. S Joint Forces Command and his NATO's supreme allied commander for transformation. General Mattis also directed the military operations of more than 200,000 soldiers, sailors, Airman Coast Guardsmen and Marines and allied forces across the Middle East as commander of the U. S Central Command. He commanded forces in the Persian Gulf War, the war in Afghanistan and the Iraq war. He's been out, spoken recently about the president views of military troops in domestic unrest in Washington. Please join me now in welcoming Dr Robert Gates and General James Mattis for this very unique conversation. Well, thank you, Dr Duffy. It is a pleasure to be here with the Commonwealth Club. The club it's been devoted to finding truth and setting it loose for over 100 years. And in that spirit, I'm especially honored today moderate the club discussion with former Secretary of Defense Bob Gates about his latest book, exercise of Power, which he uses lessons from the past to craft a new path forward. A guide to America's role in the world..

General James Mattis Dr Robert Gates deputy assistant secretary of President Obama Secretary CIA secretary General Mattis Gloria Duffy Commonwealth Club officer president and CEO Distinguished Intelligence Med supreme allied commander Hoover Institution commander National Security Council US Air Force
"dr gates" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"CEO of the Commonwealth Club. I was honored to serve as a deputy assistant secretary of defense in the 19 nineties. Now it's my pleasure to introduce today's distinguished guests. There are many issues today surrounding national defense in our military. Should the military be used to quell domestic unrest, such as the recent protests should the U. S be terminating many of our arms control treaties and even contemplating resuming nuclear testing? Should the names of Confederate military leaders be removed from U. S military bases and their statues be removed from our public places? To address these questions and many more. Today we will have a unique conversation between two recent secretaries of defense, Dr Robert Gates and General James Mattis. As a bipartisan secretary of Defense Secretary Robert Gates served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama is the author of a new book, exercise of Power, American Failure, Successes and a new Path Forward and the Post Cold War World. Dr. Gates was an officer in the US Air Force and spent 27 years at the CIA. He served a CIA director and became the first career officer and the CIA's history to move from entry level employee to head of the agency. Secretary. Gates served as a member of the National Security Council staff in four different administrations and for eight presidents of both political parties. For his numerous professional contributions. Secretary Gates was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award by President Obama. He is also a three time recipient of the Distinguished Intelligence Medal. One of the CIA's most prestigious honors. In conversation with him today is General James Mattis, General Mattis served as our 26 secretary of defense from 2017 to 2019 and is now the Davies family distinguished fellow at Stanford University. City's Hoover Institution. General, Mattis served over 40 years in the Marine Corps, starting as an infantry officer. He later served as commander of the U. S Joint Forces Command and his NATO's supreme Allied commander for transformation. General Mattis also directed the military operations of more than 200,000 soldiers, Sailors, airman Coast Guardsmen and Marines and allied forces across the Middle East. As commander of the U. S Central Command, he commanded forces in the Persian Gulf War, the war in Afghanistan and the Iraq war. He's been out, spoken recently about the president to use of military troops in domestic unrest in Washington. Please join me now in welcoming Dr Robert Gates and General James Mattis for this very unique conversation. Well, thank you, Dr Duffy. It is a pleasure to be here with the Commonwealth Club. The club it's been devoted to finding truth and setting it loose for over 100 years. And in that spirit, I'm especially honored today moderate the club discussion with former Secretary of Defense Bob Gates about his latest book, exercise of Power. Which he uses lessons from the past to craft a new path forward. A guy to America's role in the world. It's a timely book and one bringing to the forefront decades of experience and service toward protector. Gates is my former boss, predecessor in office and an inspiring role model Secretary Gates and reading your book, one that I would be reassured were required reading for presidents in Cabinet officers. I was struck by you, attributing a large part of America's 25 years. Decline and status in prestige to the failure of post Cold War presidents in Congress is recognized resource what you call our arsenal of non military instrument of power. Can you explain this fundamental failure and the significance of the title that you chose for your book? The germ of the book really began with a question, in my mind of how the United States had gone from a position of supreme power probably unrivaled since the Roman Empire in every dimension of power in 1993 to a country today, beset by challenges everywhere. I thought about how did we? How did that happen? How did we get here? And so I began looking at all of the major foreign policy challenges we've had since 1993 and thinking about what we had done and what we had not done that contributed to That decline in in our role in the world and our power in the world, and what I came up with was a set of of non military instruments of power. That we had that had played such an important role in our success in the Cold War against the Soviet Union and had largely been neglected on withered after the end of the Cold War. At a time when we continue to thunder military, we basically dismantled all of the non military instruments of power from diplomacy to economic leverage. Two strategic communications on DH and more. We can go into that later and as I looked out at the situation's a TTE these challenges from Somalia, Haiti in 1993 and and others right up to our relationship with Russia and China. Today in North Korea. It occurred to me that we had failed in many respects to figure out how to compete with these powers outside of the military realm. And so I and the realities of the 15 challenges that I write about For all practical purposes, I I considered 13 to be failures, and that's why in the title the word failures comes first. There are a couple of six assets and they're important successes, and there's some lessons to be learned from those as well. But we had a lot of problems during that 2027 year period and and I would just conclude by saying You know the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan both began with very quick military victories and the problem that identified Whether it was Iraq and Afghanistan or Somalia or Haiti or others was that once we had achieved military victory, we then changed our mission. We then decided to move to Trying to bring democracy and reform the governments of those countries and that's where we ran into failure. Sector Gate. I'd like to go more deeply into what you just mentioned this symphony of power and I took a few notes from your book. But could you give a brief overview of the type of instrument you're referring to And where they might be more applicability, perhaps, or most likely, the news in the military form of power. And if they're not played, why aren't they played? But start, please? What are these instruments? What do you look to bring on into the forefront here? So the two primarily coercive instruments of power, obviously that military But I would say, also cyber. In my opinion, cyber has actually become the most effective weapon that a nation can have, because it can accomplish military, political and economic harm. To one's adversary. It's difficult to identify who perpetrated the attack a cyber attack. It takes time to attribute figure out attribution and the more damage that was done. The more important it is to identify exactly where the ones and zeros came from. And so cyber is. AH, is a huge player now in a way that it has never been before it can dismantle. Or disarm weapons. It can redirect weapons. It can shut down infrastructure in countries, so it's a very versatile weapon. And it doesn't take the kind of enormous expenditure of dollars or of money that a nuclear enterprise or even a chemical or biological threat would would be would represent..

Dr Robert Gates General James Mattis deputy assistant secretary of CIA Secretary secretary president Commonwealth Club General Mattis officer President Obama Iraq Afghanistan Distinguished Intelligence Med Somalia CEO Haiti Hoover Institution
"dr gates" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pushback on the Iranian regime just a few months ago after they shot down the airliner That they had painted on American flag. The students had painted an American flag on the steps of one of their schools and people were walking around that flag, so it was not to step on it. So I think the rest of the world knows that were flawed. But they also know we're about the only country in the world that consistently tries to get better. We consistantly. We know what we believe in and we work every day and trying to make our actions coincide with our beliefs. And with what we profess to Admire the most in Democratic countries, so I think we have to address our problems here at home. We do need to be a model and frankly, we're not a very good model right now are our politics or paralyzed. We can't tackle any of the big problems that our country faces, whether it's immigration or education or infrastructure or other things. We still have to battle racial injustice. But we're trying to fix these things. And I think other countries recognized that and as long as we continue to profess started ideals. As long as we try to help them create democracies. I think our ideology if you will is still to be admired around the world. Now, the truth is, I think that it is Tarnished now. As a result of several things over the last dozen years or so. The 8 4009 economic crisis in this country undermine sentiment around the world that the American economic model was one they wanted to emulate. I think that economic inequality in this country is a problem that other countries see makes them wonder whether the American economic model is one they want to follow. Our paralysis are polar polarization has been with us since the very beginning of the republic. The names that Jefferson and Adams called each other would fit right into today's political campaigns. But what's new since the end of the Cold War? Really? Is a paralysis and our inability to get really big things done in the country because the two political parties are just frozen at the federal level in their war on each other for all practical purposes. Everybody seeming to forget that the only thing that makes the American system work is compromised. I think right now she Jim. Paying in China is pointing to all these problems that we have here at home, economic and political in particular. And and he is arguing to the rest of the world. Look at the Chinese model. We brought hundreds of millions of people out of poverty were ableto have this incredible 21st century infrastructure. We're willing to help you build a modern infrastructure in your country, Arma and we get things done. So our model is the one that you should look to, and frankly, there are a lot of countries. That look at the Chinese and they say, Well, maybe they maybe their their approach. The Chinese approaches is better than the American approach. So if we want to have our our ideology, our belief and liberal democracy and capitalism be a model for the rest of the world. We got a lot of repair work to do here at home. I still believe that most of the people in the world believe that America stands for freedom and and for human and political rights, and that's our ace in the hole. If you will. We just have to work at making it even more credible. The problem is right now we have a competition in the world that's going to go on for quite a while. This is a ll this as a cz democracy itself. And that is the conflict the competition between democracy and authoritarianism. My view is communism's dead as a door nail. The only malice left in the world would probably handful somewhere in China, maybe a few in American universities in France or someplace, but I think communism is dead. Authoritarianism, though, has incredibly deep historical roots, And that's the real danger. We defeated authoritarianism twice and in the 20th century if we don't address our problems and figure out how to move forwards the country our ability to defeat authoritarianism in the 21st century. I think will be at risk. But I I That's a very long answer to your question. But I believe that our ideology of freedom and are pro pounding that ideology. Is an asset for us in the world, not a liability, walked and learned most about our country and what freedom means to others, and what we represent to others through for a nice I've had Villagers and dirt or villages and I've had prime ministers and kings question me on. How does American do it? No matter how bad something gets. We learn something from it. We have knowledge that we've got to improve and we roll up our sleeves. We do it, and the political paralysis right now is preventing that last part rolling up the sleeves and fixing thing. At this point. What can you say to the young people watching today about government service Now what I consider to be the very hard work but also the noble work building a country because not built yet. We're still building it. But what do you say young people who say Why should I follow Dr Gates and put my life work? Into the country or even five years were or even two years working. How do you respond to that Quit? Well, First of all, I would say that at the end of your life, you don't want to look back and realize that you only lived for yourself. George H. W. Bush, the first President Bush once said that the only way to have a full life and that any full life must have some measure of public service in it. Public service has never been easy. You know, we get focused on our own time. And believe me, I'm joined CIA in 1966. We were just heading into the heart of the Vietnam War. I lived through Watergate. I joined the National Security Council staff for the first time. A few months before Nixon resigned. I used to tell people that joining the National Security Council at that time was like signing up was a deckhand on the Titanic after it hit the iceberg..

China National Security Council George H. W. Bush Arma CIA Watergate Nixon America Jim France Jefferson Dr Gates President Adams
"dr gates" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> You know what? <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Time is almost <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> up. This has been <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> great and all <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of these conversations you've <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> had I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> really wanted to get <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Louis Gates on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that gates. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> But this was such <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a great <SpeakerChange> out. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And if another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> person on the street <Speech_Music_Male> says <SpeakerChange> Hey, <Speech_Music_Male> Dr Gates <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm I'm GonNa <Speech_Music_Female> have to knock somebody. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> After Game <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Some <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of them think I look like. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> I said, <Speech_Music_Male> listen of all <Speech_Music_Male> is much more canceled, <Speech_Music_Male> and secondly <Speech_Music_Male> he's <Speech_Music_Male> ten time <Speech_Music_Male> slaughter. <Speech_Music_Male> Bird. <Speech_Music_Female> He's about a hundred <Speech_Music_Female> times. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Back. <Speech_Music_Male> Let <Speech_Music_Male> me. Be The privilege <Speech_Music_Male> of being Dr, J.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jeff, you're my friend, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Friend. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You know what <SpeakerChange> Dr Jet. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This has been <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a main thing, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and if you <Speech_Music_Female> don't mind <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> now, only <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in fact, you back <Speech_Music_Female> at some point, but <Speech_Music_Female> I also want <Speech_Music_Male> to interview <Speech_Music_Male> my book. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You, <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Everybody Dr <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Death Gardir <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> America. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank colleges. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks so much for coming. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> God bless <SpeakerChange> America. <Speech_Music_Female> Let's America <Speech_Music_Female> before. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Standing <Speech_Music_Female> thank you so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much! Dr Jeff. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Everybody we have. <Speech_Music_Male> Even <Speech_Music_Male> more. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Coming Up, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> if we can tampon. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I want to introduce <Speech_Music_Female> the psalm <Music> reintroduce <Speech_Music_Female> others. <Speech_Music_Female> Riley! <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Is. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> The coaches <Speech_Female> park as <Speech_Female> does every deduction <Speech_Music_Female> known size communication. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> PODCAST <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> a registered trademark <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> of NO <Speech_Female> SILOS COMMUNICATIONS <Speech_Female> L L C.

"dr gates" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It's getting crazy hot around here, guys. Of course it is. It's July for crying out loud, of course, is going to get hot. But it's crazy Hot here in the Philadelphia area, So people are saying You're not drinking her hot coffee on these days, are you? Yeah. Is the Sun shining? Is the moon shining? Is there air in the air? Of course, Things will never be so odd Things will never be so hot that I do not drink Coffee. Coffee is just here. People were talking iced coffee knew. No iced coffee is a little too sophisticated for me. I need my coffee in a very hot mug with a lot of heavy cream and a couple of packets of whatever's handy. No, I don't do the iced coffee. I know many people who do AA lot of our listeners down South have taken iced coffee to a art form. I'm not already enough. I wish I was so raise your iced coffee, my direction. I'm raising my mug of coffee in your direction. As we sit here, saving America's wallets one hour at a time, and we're coming up on fourth of July. I love it. We got the cookouts. We got the hanging out with friends and family and way too many carbohydrates. Maybe that's just my house. And, of course, our favorite tradition. Watching PBS is a capital Fourth. I absolutely adore it always have no other broadcast comes close. Who better to join me via our newsmaker line than the host. My social media exploded when I bragged about getting the chance to connect John Stamos. Welcome, sir. How are you doing? Oh, Kristen's good morning. Good morning. Good morning to you. No doubt already Know this. You've got a huge fan base you up to my standards tremendously. Holy mackerel. Everybody loves you. It's July. My God, the summer's flying has everything jelling for another capital for its. Hopefully, the weather gods will be kind again this year. You know, we talked about the list of names coming up for this amazing event. It's just incredible again this year. They keep upping the bar and they keep leaping over it. They have you? The National Symphony Orchestra. Something for everybody. Just magic. Vanessa Williams. Colby Kolia could go on and on. You have been doing this for a while. You're a seasoned pro at this. But there are some new names on the stage this year with you Are they intimidated at all by what's easily going to be millions watching them or are the kind of low key about it? What's been your advice to them now? Are you talking about it's because they have no our fearless Sesame Street 50th anniversary, and I'll tell you who is the most nervous is me because I'm going to fulfill a lifelong dream and get to sing with the Muppets on Little fourth television. So I'm about that also something I've been wanting to do for years. I'm any chance I get to celebrate our Vets in our men and women in the service we do, And this year I'm going to visit a group within the wounded warriors called Music Court, and they are a bunch of musicians. They need a drummer. So we are walking up Zac Brown song, which is extremely patriotic, and it's going to be extremely emotional, and we're going to play live on the Capitol fourth stage, and that is what I'm most excited about. That's incarnate. No one. I was bragging about having you on the show. One of the biggest strongest fits of social media feedback that I received was huge appreciation for all that you do so much to honor. Our troops. Tell our listeners a little bit more about your plans for a capital forth and you're Huge interaction with our men and women in the armed services. It's got to be so appreciated. Well, I appreciate them and I know we all do it. Any chance we get to celebrate them. We do and Tio when you see these musicians that have overcome their their injuries. Able to play and have optimistic attitude is now let's go back in social media because I'm gonna have to check you out. As soon as we get done this interview, maybe have to, you know, Say hi. And thank you because you keep talking about the social media wi I I got to get on. I gotta follow you. Holy mackerel know it was on Facebook and you upped my You have my name considerably with just the name recognition there. They're just freaking out. And why not? You're being very low key about it. But you've had this tremendous career where U have connected with so many people on so many levels. Will Blackie Parrish in Dr Gates and Jesse from full house? I mean, I've got all three of those on my resume growing up, so it's no big surprise on 72 years old this week. You are not. You have simply jampacked through a lot of hard work an incredible career. But in all seriousness as your career has evolved when you first started as a kid, Did you ever envision yourself July 4th being the name in the face of a capital forth in our nation? Capital Was that ever on your radar? No way. You know, I always said that I probably will never write a book. But if I ever did it would it would be called if you would've told me if you would have told me when I was a kid that I'd be hosting the capital forth like to be In our nation's capital on the Fourth of July. With all these patriotic acts and celebrating the troops, I never would've believed if you would have told me that I'd be talking to you one day on the on the radio. I would have said I don't believe I've had a good left beautiful life. I'll tell you that much you do and you know I'm a big fan. If you make your own luck, so I think you're reaping what you sow of it here, too. When you interact with these great crowds, you know, we're all watching it on the big screens in our family rooms were sitting there enjoying everything. Tell me a bit about the energy of those crowds. They seem so wonderfully appreciative. It's almost seems like the crowds get bigger every year. It has got to be a logistical nightmare. Getting everybody settled and up and running. But every year you pull it off. What What's that kind of thing like for the prep? Especially now, in an age of quarantine and such you guys, We're switching gears with how you're getting it out the door, But there's just so much work involved. We'll you know, I've been Again. I've had such a blessed life where I've got to play with the greatest American rock and roll band in history. The beach Boys and I played some gigantic crowds, but the crowd seems to be The most appreciate like you said, the most patriotic certainly, I mean, you know I could look out and all the 1,000,000 home. They're watching PBS, and it doesn't matter what side of the political fence they stand on. They're celebrating being American. They're celebrating being a family this year. We're going to really, really gonna highlight what it means to be a family American family right now in our country and its The energy. I'm telling you, I get to stand in the middle that stage and then there's this, You know, 100 piece orchestra in developing the sort of and this is great. It's just a lot of Love and patriotism, and I couldn't be I just luckiest guy on the planet when I'm standing in the middle of it..

PBS Philadelphia Vanessa Williams Facebook John Stamos America Colby Kolia National Symphony Orchestra Kristen Zac Brown Tio Music Court Blackie Parrish Jesse Dr Gates
"dr gates" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"The year was nineteen ninety five. I was in my final year of Grad School. At the time I was working at Channel Four it was the fox affiliate hit become Fox from being CBS. Yes dating myself as I was wrapping up my time at Texas Christian University. One of the deliverables. If you've been a Grad school before in any of the liberal arts you'll know that you have to deliver a thesis. Not only do you have to deliver it to your committee but you have to defend it. My face cheer person was Dr Badly. He's the same professor that ensure that all three or four of US black students at Tcu made it to the National Association of Black Journalists Chapter Meeting there in Fort. Worth each time. They met well. Dr Babbling was all about multiculturalism. He still is. He's all about globalism he still is. And he's all about diversity and inclusion as my thesis chair person he wanted to ensure that my thesis and my studies had some cultural lens to it. So I was. I was deciding on the topic that I would explore a year before and decided to look into what African American images were lake on local television news and how newsrooms could impacted in fact. I have it right here. And it's called African American images in local television news and it was a qualitative and quantitative look at what those images were and who impacted them. Lots of interviews. Lots of sources cited but among those cited was a book called Colored People by Dr Henry Louis Gates Junior Doctor Gates SA- Professor of African American Studies at Harvard University. His wasn't the only book that I quoted from or cited Dr Cornel West. Who's also at Harvard? Laurent Bennett Junior. You may remember his groundbreaking black history book. One of the first of its kind. At least it was the most prolific before the mayflower. He went on to do work at Ebony. Magazine the list of citations in this book reads like the. Who'S WHO in African American Studies and African. American culture was interesting about my thesis is the timing. If you recall nineteen ninety-five five. Maybe nineteen ninety-four that famous White Bronco was captured on network news in that low speed chase. I'm talking about Oj Simpson. Yeah I thought that was GONNA throw off my entire study because we were going to see his face on television all the way through the trial. Well I couldn't write this book without quoting Dr Gates. I had read several of his books before. And I really admired Dr Gates. Lo and behold fast forward to two thousand sixteen. I'm working. At and T. and it's time for black history month. During that time we had a program called twenty eight days and we needed a spokesperson well. Budgets were low. We had to pull a rabbit out of the hat spoke to my friends over in sponsorship. Who shared with me that they had a contract and the sponsorship with PBS. Which would allow US access to Dr Gates? My team and I had an idea. Why didn't we start leveraging Dr Gates Voice during Black History? Even though his show finding your roots wouldn't come on into later that fall. All we can do is ask and we did and he agreed and never will forget the first conversation ahead with Dr Gates. In fact I told my team give me a few minutes to speak with Dr Gates. Just put your phones on mute because I have to go here and there was just as jovial on the line in friendly as I imagine and I told him that I cited him in my thesis and I had a fan girl moment by. Call it it. You know what he was so down for. He wanted to know which book I quoted and we talked a bit about it for the next three years. We would work together on and off around the sponsorship. For finding your roots we culminated in two thousand eighteen in December of that year with an event that I'll never forget and we talk about it in this broadcast. Ladies and gentlemen. I am so fortunate to have the Doctor Henry Louis Gates junior on the culture soup podcast today. When this show airs the first episode of the two thousand and one thousand nine season season sex of finding your roots would have aired on the Tuesday before so I feel very blessed and very fortunate to be one of the first media to interview Dr Gates ahead of this show so first of all a little housekeeping all of my listeners in the United States and maybe you can also stream around the globe wherever you are because we are heard on nearly every continent you need to tune in to finding your roots on Tuesdays and it airs at eight eastern time. We talk about how he turned his absolute pitch for ancestry into a real thing you know. He's an entrepreneur. He's a businessman. He and his team of genealogist in Ancestry. Experts and historian are using the very latest in technology to tell the stories of our lives in our ancestors lives. He's also a professor but he is the King of culture. I'm also very proud that we have become friends. Ladies and Gentlemen joining me by phone Dr Henry. Louis Gates Junior Alphonse Fletcher professor and Harvard and the Director of the Hutchins Center for African American research and the host of PBS's finding your roots your show and so exciting we and it features twenty eight guests who represent a range of occupations. But the main thing is that we are expanding from can episodes to sixteen episodes over here because of our popularity on on PBS. And we have the most amazing diversity ever from our guest Isabella Rossellini Anjelica Huston being being Pharaoh in the first episode and listen McCarthy and Eric Stonestreet or in episode two but over the the sixteen episodes and get ready for this weaver at Amy Wine Poland Diva in China Machado Jeff Goldblum Gayle King Jordan. Peele Diane von First Bir- Narciso Rodriguez said Rupaul. And even Nancy Pelosi Ignore Odom. Mina you have quite. I.

Dr Gates Dr Henry Louis Gates Doctor Gates SA- Professor of Harvard University Dr Badly US Dr Cornel West Dr Babbling Dr Henry professor Texas Christian University Louis Gates Grad School African American Studies fox Hutchins Center for African Am National Association of Black Oj Simpson Diane von First Bir- Narciso R Isabella Rossellini Anjelica H
"dr gates" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

11:34 min | 2 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Why BC my name is Nigel Jason hammer is here four hundred and forty new cases of cove it nineteen in Indiana hammer it's enough from the last two days but there's a cabbie out we knew that it might be a little bit higher because those may have been artificially low because of the Easter weekend so the numbers that came out over Easter weekend little bit low again four hundred and forty new cases is an up tick but today is lower than the three days before that it's the third lowest since April third so I mean if you look at the look at the new cases it's pretty much what Holcomb has been saying the past couple of days the curve is showing signs of flattening but that does not mean we are we're we're done or even about to be done governor Holcomb earlier talking about how he's working on a rolling re open for the state of Indiana in terms of business and later on today he's going to meet with some trade in some business leaders around the state and try to figure out a game plan of how we can get this rolling reopen going which is something that we've been wondering for a long time we've been asking about for a long time what's the plan where is the it's forced right to ask for I don't know if the sense of urgency is the right word but I haven't seen Eric Holcomb really adamant about getting things rolling again in terms of Indiana's economy because when you watch these national press briefings Donald Trump whether you like him or not he's all about laying out his ideas of how and when he would like things to get rolling you know what's in his mind that he wants things to get open again I haven't had that feeling with Eric Holcomb Cuomo announcing getting together with other governors in the north east talking about working with other states in terms of A. S. solo will re open of the economy said and certainly on the west coast in California Oregon Washington all doing the same thing and I I was encouraged me look the point isn't to get to zero here all right the point isn't to get to zero dad love zero deskside love zero new cases it's it's just to make sure this whole thing has been to make sure the hospitals are overwhelmed and devote to to avoid any like sort of a double U. shaped curve where the infection rate bounces back at doctor box talked about some of the ICU bed usages currently in Indiana forty five percent available ICU beds then twenty five percent of those are actually in use because of cold impatience seventy percent of our generators are open right now because it feels like if we're shutting the economy down the argument was because if somebody got sick it would overwhelm the health industry right well it looks like everybody's playing ball everybody's doing the right thing Nigel your family they stayed in they do the social distance yeah as do my family and pretty much everybody listening right now but if we have seventy four percent of the ventilators available and almost fifty percent of the beds available maybe we need to start having some conversations about some dates some possible rollouts here I understand you want to work on this curve and we're kind of in a flattening stage right now but you got to be ahead of this thing I'm not saying that feeling from the governor that he's got dates in mind but he doesn't have dates but again he's having conversations with other governors surrounding us Ohio Kentucky talking about this pandemic pandemic in coordinating at it at least to some degree to to open up in the in the in the easing up these the state home orders so you look at the number of deaths in Indiana very tragic number we are at three hundred and I'm sorry four hundred and thirty six now a hundred and fifty five of those in Marion County the next county with the highest total up on north west in Lake County next to Chicago with thirty three so Marion County definitely a hot spot in terms of death sentence for sure in the number of cases three thousand two hundred cases of covert nineteen in Marion County and when you break down those who have lost their life by age eighty eight point eight percent almost ninety percent of these deaths in Indiana have been age sixty and over meaning if you look at the age bracket of zero two thirty nine it's just one point one percent so if you're telling me that we've got seventy five percent of the ventilators available about fifty percent of the beds available and one point one percent of those you know who have lost their life for age zero to thirty nine maybe this is why you start having those conversations about okay we're gonna open since things up but if you're in a specific age group but I know it might not be fair to you right now but we're gonna bring in the younger folks first and maybe at least that's something to kind of get things rolling again and I wanna know what the plan is if any what discussions have been taking place about K. through twelve schools opening up for the twenty twenty twenty twenty one session that is something that's one of the things I'm very concerned if the right now because look the deaths in this state zero point zero deaths that's the demographic for deaths of people aged zero to twenty nine years old and in terms of the number of cases one point seven percent we have what is it a total of eighty nine hundred positive cases in Indiana one point seven percent of those are ages zero to nineteen and what I'm all about keeping you know our distance is right now but you gotta give me some something to look forward to you got to me give me some sort of game plan here can you start talking about the schools you need to start talking about the work force it shouldn't take a reporter asking a question in these daily press briefings for the governor to bring these things up yesterday president of the United States he was doing his daily task force briefing in the rose garden and he made the announcement he's going to put a hold on the United States funding for the World Health Organization today I'm instructing my administration to halt funding of the World Health Organization while a review is conducted to assess the world health organization's role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of the corona virus the United States has a duty to insist on full accountability one of the most dangerous and costly decisions from the WHL was its disastrous decision to oppose travel restrictions from China and other nations they were very much opposed to what we did fortunately I was not convinced and suspended travel from China yeah I mean who the who not the band the who World Health Organization yeah but you know you're getting old when you first being an organization that is basically a mouthpiece for China I'm for one I'm okay with the with the funding or holding off on funding those who for now and I get a lot of people hate Donald Trump with the passion of a million fires I get it he can get under your skin perfectly understandable but even if you hate Donald Trump tell me why the United States should continue to put this amount of money into the World Health Organization when they clearly thought that you could not get corona virus from human to human transmission they said that Donald Trump closing off the travel with China was a bad idea and encourage people to continue to do it why should we continue to pay for that type of sage advice were slow to declare the virus an emergency even spreading rapidly around the world and they publicly supported China's what amounted to be deceptive early claims about the virus saying in mid January well yeah you've been with human to human transmission thanks but that's not been proven so that's not necessarily a surprise coming out of the trump administration well somebody that is a never Trumper somebody that does not like the president is Bill Gates of Microsoft fame Bill Gates is came out and said the president's holding of WHL funding is quoted as dangerous as it sounds when the hell did we start going to Bill Gates for health advice right if anybody has a computer question or Microsoft question by all means run don't walk run to Bill Gates but while the sun is he the guru on all things health in the world you can even keep your computer from getting a virus and now you're telling all of us how we shouldn't be getting viruses from corona Stompin you taken a vaccine that Bill Gates came up with no no no in any sort of coded nineteen vaccine looking ahead down the road I mean there are is that something I mean look you go back to twenty seventeen twenty eighteen hammer CDC reporting sixty seven thousand deaths in the United States caused by the flu sixty seven thousand forty percent of the adult population got flu shots that year and they were free vaccinations that were readily available to all anybody who wanted only forty percent of vaccinations and sixty seven thousand deaths occurred via the flu again I'm not making a point here I'm not comparing the flu to the corona virus I'm right that's not that but I never go down that rabbit hole vaxxers Elaine is there was no social distancing there was there was no news coverage no economic ruin people decided not to get the flu vaccine I'm not even talking I'm not even slamming those of you that didn't decide to get them the flu vaccine I'm just saying are we going to see this type of response when a covert vaccine comes about you know what I mean and when it comes around are we gonna think Bill Gates for that question Dr gates thank you that that king pen of health Bill Gates I think you're really going to see an outpouring of.

BC Nigel Jason hammer Indiana
"dr gates" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"dr gates" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"Three for now the top most downloaded episode of the podcast was literally a thorough Act Thursday. It was a re rack of Torah on the coaching corner where he talked about his book coaching business this we won't do that again because we just redirected about a week ago number two another throwback Thursday a doctor Logan Hampton of Lane College now listen we aren't adding up both episode the original broadcast with throwback these are just the numbers from the throwback so Dr Hampton and the HCC you episodes can you guess well not Dr Gates yet Dr Gates really has only been out there what two weeks or we talked about history yes he's got a lot of downloads but he hasn't been able to catch up with some of the ones that have been out there for a while number three is micon relation with the guys from East Chop capital want to get away without further ado. It's a throwback Thursday I enjoy my conversation with Calvin L. Butts Junior and Carrington M Carter of East Chop capital hey y'all this culture soup where tech culture and business collide it's a podcast at spoons up everything hot from social media I'm your host El Michelle Smith and each episode bring you some of the most notable and not yet notable thought leaders in heck business and Culture.

Dr Gates Logan Hampton East Chop El Michelle Smith HCC Lane College Carrington M Carter Calvin L. two weeks