26 Burst results for "Dr Frank"

This Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

KCBS Radio Weekend News

04:33 min | Last month

This Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

"Awarded a contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars to flow. It's a little known Virginia company that is promising to revamp the way medicines are made and distributed. CBS News This morning's Michelle Miller with the story. So what is this? This is our chapel in the grand plan to streamline America's pharmaceutical industry was launched at Virginia Commonwealth University's College of Engineering in Richmond. So these are tour begins with Dr Frank Captain so the cameras would go into the tubes. They're inside these heaters. He oversees this lab where chemists are working on new ways to manufacture medications. And so this is what it's going to innovate. This is part of it. Flow is a company trying to bring back the pharmaceutical supply chain to the U. S. They went to India and China where labor cost over two years ago. His business partner, Dr Eric Edwards, approach Dr Gupta in with a goal to make affordable generic drugs. Right here at home. I was already witnessing massive drug shortages. That were plaguing this country, these area central medicines and their ingredients that really nagged me and it was a struggle. The market is immense Americans filled the equivalent of five point 8,000,000,030 day prescriptions in 2018 alone. But in 2019 the Food and Drug Administration estimated that 80% of active pharmaceutical ingredients And 40% of Finnish medications were manufactured overseas, mainly in China and India. Thiss allows you to be able to run these processes continuously flows key process a method called continuous manufacturing. They say it will increase quality control, reduce the risk of counterfeit medications and provide transparency in labeling. We're creating an end to end manufacturing infrastructure and supply chain. Right here in the United States from precursor, chemical active pharmaceutical ingredient to finish drug into a viol or a syringe. In the 19 nineties, American companies began to rely on a manufacturing process that utilizes large scale equipment and cheap labor. This method thrives under relaxed environmental regulations often found oversees the result. A weakened system here at home is a supply chain broken. Not only is the American medical supply chain broken, the pricing and reimbursement system has broken. This broken system became apparent in March. When the corona virus pandemic depleted the national stockpile of personal protective equipment and critical medications. Demand for these supplies was global, and it brought overseas imports to a halt. This made flows efforts not just relevant but critical. So what I have right now is like a It's a strange built with my starting material. So take this and turn it into like malaria. Developing a new drug typically cost more than 2.5 $1,000,000,000 takes more than a decade flows. Founders say their method will we're due spoke time. And expense. It's all gonna be together streamlining the supply chain, making sure that we have the highest quality that Americans and patients deserve flow is also looking to bridge the gap between underprice generics and those higher price drugs with the more limited market for Children or for rare diseases. There was no profit in these medicines. We've driven the pricing of some of these generic medicines into the ground. A bottle of Fiji water at an airport costs more than a lifesaving vial of medication. Edwards has been in the business for years and has faced some criticism. Calais of the company he co founded with his twin brother than left seven years ago came under congressional scrutiny after pricing for a popular overdose antidote rose by 600%. In three years, the company authorised a cheaper and generic drug soon after. How do you meet that skepticism going into a relatively new company? With these goals. I was not involved in any pricing decisions, and I was in charge of innovation. This is all about innovation and teamwork to try to fix a broken pharmaceutical pricing, reimbursement and distribution system that has left a lot of these generic medicines out of reach for patients.

Dr Eric Edwards Food And Drug Administration Dr Frank Captain Counterfeit Medications Virginia India CBS Michelle Miller China Richmond Virginia Commonwealth Universi America United States Partner Dr Gupta Fiji College Of Engineering
A Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

KCBS Radio Weekend News

04:33 min | Last month

A Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

"Year, U. S officials awarded a contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars to to flow, flow, a a little little known known Virginia Virginia company company promising promising to to revamp revamp the the way way medicines medicines are are made made and and distributed. distributed. CBS CBS this this morning. morning. Michelle Michelle Miller Miller has has more more So So what is this? This is our catalyst. The grand plan to streamline America's pharmaceutical industry was launched in Virginia Commonwealth University's College of Engineering in Richmond. So our tour begins with Dr Frank Captain so the cameras would go into the tubes. They're inside these heaters. He oversees this lab where chemists are working on new ways to manufacture medications. And so this is what it's going to innovate. This is part of it. Flow is a company trying to bring back the pharmaceutical supply chain to the U. S. They went to India and China where labor cost over two years ago. His business partner, Dr Eric Edwards, approach Dr Gupta in with a goal to make affordable generic drugs. Right here at home. I was already witnessing massive drug shortages. That were plaguing this country, these area central medicines and their ingredients that really nagged me and it was a struggle. The market is immense Americans filled the equivalent of five point 8,000,000,030 day prescriptions in 2018 alone. But in 2019 the Food and Drug Administration estimated that 80% of active pharmaceutical ingredients And 40% of Finnish medications were manufactured overseas, mainly in China and India. Thiss allows you to be able to run these processes continuously flows key process a method called continuous manufacturing. They say it will increase quality control, reduce the risk of counterfeit medications and provide transparency in labeling. We're creating an end to end manufacturing infrastructure and supply chain. Right here in the United States from precursor, chemical active pharmaceutical ingredient to finish drug into a viol or a syringe. In the 19 nineties, American companies began to rely on a manufacturing process that utilizes large scale equipment and cheap labor. This method thrives under relaxed environmental regulations often found oversees the result. A weakened system here at home is a supply chain broken. Not only is the American medical supply chain broken, the pricing and reimbursement system has broken. This broken system became apparent in March. When the corona virus pandemic depleted the national stockpile of personal protective equipment and critical medications. Demand for these supplies was global, and it brought overseas imports to a halt. This made flows efforts not just relevant but critical. So what I have right now is like a It's a strange built with my starting material. Silver. Take this area, right? Developing a new drug typically cost more than 2.5 $1,000,000,000 takes more than a decade flows. Founders say their method will we're due spoke time. And expense. It's all gonna be together streamlining the supply chain, making sure that we have the highest quality that Americans and patients deserve flow is also looking to bridge the gap between underprice generics and those higher price drugs with the more limited market for Children or for rare diseases. There was no profit in these medicines. We've driven the pricing of some of these generic medicines into the ground. A bottle of Fiji water at an airport costs more than a lifesaving vial of medication. Edwards has been in the business for years and has faced some criticism. Calais of the company he co founded with this twin brother Than left seven years ago came under congressional scrutiny after pricing for a popular overdose antidote rose by 600%. In three years, the company authorised a cheaper and generic drug soon after. How do you meet that skepticism going into a relatively new company? With these goals. I was not involved in any pricing decisions, and I was in charge of innovation. This is all about innovation and teamwork to try to fix a broken pharmaceutical pricing reimbursement and distribution system that has left a lot of these generic medicines out of reach for patients that

Dr Eric Edwards Michelle Michelle Miller Mille Food And Drug Administration Dr Frank Captain Counterfeit Medications CBS India Virginia Virginia China Virginia Commonwealth Universi U. S Richmond America United States Partner Dr Gupta Fiji
How Dr. Paul Jarrod Frank is Changing the Conversation on Aging

Fat Mascara

05:21 min | Last month

How Dr. Paul Jarrod Frank is Changing the Conversation on Aging

"Hello, everybody. Welcome to fatness Garra I. Am Jess. I'm Jen. It's a Thursday double episode in the we liken this rhythm and it seems like you guys might be into it too. I think. So anyway, I we actually recorded this a little bit early, the interview and the intro. As you listen to this on Thursday I'm going to be in the middle of nowhere camping with my husband's just think of me think protective. No mosquito thoughts, I know my summer vacation right now bringing to protect yourself. I have. I haven't oil-based repellent also have the off spray with the DA and we we are trialing a tent. We have our regular ten, but this company let us try to attend that goes on top of the car. So I won't be sleeping on ground level right now while you're listening to this, I'm up in the air somewhere on top of my jeep in the middle of Maine. Hopefully, not getting bit by mosquitoes. How's that? For Beauty Pike? Wait to see you're going GonNa, take photos, of course, right of this tenth that goes on top of the car. Yeah. I can't remember the name of what it is. But like I'm kind of excited and we figured it was a safe mine has been safe. They're letting people in from New York. We're bringing our masks were camping by ourselves. So we can enjoy the outdoors safely, and that's like a good way to get away for just a little bit and like you know refresh don't roll off the car nervous. Very. Nervous thing back next week. Next week. We'll talk about it, but now we have a big juicy interview. Okay. Let's do now. I love Dr Paul Frank. He's amazing. He for full disclosure a good friend. He's a great friend, but he is also one of my most trusted dermatological sources. This guy knows every technology before everyone else I mean, I'm not. I'm being Harper, bollock because like I really think he's the best, but he really is like my go-to hotline to what's coming down the pipeline, what you know what the hot trends are. He just got his finger on the pulse and I'm so excited to bring him back for a second time. He is one of our only two time guests. We had him about three years ago to talk about all things like. noninvasive light Oh and we want to talk about his new book. Now, it's called the pro aging playbook Dr Frank is he works with lots of celebrities, and he's to discreet to name all of them and he also consulted lots of different big brands and not only is he fabulous? He is a board certified dermatologist though, but he's also clinical assistant professor at the icon. It can. Oh, God, Dr Frank Don't Kill Me School of. Medicine. At Mount, Sinai welcome Dr Frank. Dr Frank. You are one of the busiest Durham's out there. You've got a lot of celebrity clients. You've got a very big practice. You're always doing TV appearances. You you're a very big on TIKTOK. We know this. Okay. You're not doing your take type performances. Why did you decide that you needed to write another book I? mean, that's big. Endeavor. Temporary Insanity. I coned wrote a book nineteen years ago when there were these new things that were experimental called. In. Stiller. And after the work out like okay. And I check off the box to do that again. But I wrote a second book because the had an idea to go against the grain a little bit and write about something that people would expect the lease from a beauty book and certainly one from Cosmetic Dermatology book, and that is hopefully with pro aging playbook is all about. All. Right. So I WANNA to talk about the title, the title when you told me the title I kind of like like I I, got like a like you definitely caught me off guard, but the title pro aging playbook because there's been a lot of discussion about the term Teijin. The past couple of years, we had Michelle Leon, the editor in chief of allure about a year and a half ago, and she put a huge stake in the ground. By saying, we are banning the term anti-aging. She wants to ditch entirely in the background, a lot of press, and you're going a step further. Further and you're saying pro aging. What does pro aging mean while it? Basically a backlash to the negative stigma that generations of people have had toward agent and I think a lot of it is just one big marketing ploy, the term anti-aging. The fact that aging is a bad thing and we have to inject laser moisturizers. Serum is extra dies Diet, get back to a younger state and to me the biggest events I've seen in my field is not injectables. Lasers is in the outlook in perspective we have towards beauty now, which I think is a very positive thing and it can be empowering. Up The audience out there, that has not gotten over the stigma. That is what I'm trying to achieve in the pro aging label and one that I don't think you'd expect from someone like, Ray.

Dr Paul Frank Harper Dr Frank Stiller Maine Michelle Leon New York Cosmetic Dermatology RAY Durham Sinai Clinical Assistant Professor Editor In Chief
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"On Molars and pre molars I don't get any royalties on lingual pets seven ten. But it's been work. Is there a row sealant sealant mastermind course? We're at six. We've got four more to go. It's kind of like choice you do. One acts a two x kind of like working your way up. You get a spotter when you're at three acts. Rubber Dam at four X. Air Waters Garage at five x you. You're working your way up to the DOJ. Oh, which is tax? We're GONNA. Take it to eleven x this year because it's been such a crappy year. and we're not gonNA charge our members for that that that eleven acts is a bonus. For the Roundhouse sealant course and I don't WanNa plug it here. I know we're going to do that another show, but yeah around Halcion's. There've been here to stay there. Here World War Two's. When my grandfather started it and it's been going. We've just kept it going on. So. I think I used the same The same air water syringe golden tipped one that he had in dental school and I use that one and I'll give like two puffs like lighting a free bird lighter. And then dry the tooth in. He knows them their. Nose on there, but. That what what are you guys gotten go? You know it's. It's fascinating. Technique I've seen it in all the you know the great dental journals like dentistry today and Some of those other highly regiment trans. Eight nine different languages yeah Google translate of simplify that from a lot of people. They're having a tough time with it, but yeah I. Appreciate the shout for it. It's it's going well. I'll retire off our listeners to know if you've ever thought about doing around. How sealant on your patient that frank is the guru to to look at and really you know. Look them up. Send him lots of emails. Find his cellphone number online and call him about it. He really enjoys teaching This process I'll answer every call I return every email just in the subject line put roundhouse. So I can keep them straight I get a lot of emails on those so just put roundhouse in there. All right so I think that pretty much covers our whole podcast. But what we really wanted to talk about was. We. We had a conversation. By Messenger about things that are predictable in our practice and things that are comfortable for us, and and that we know you know we, we sort of know the outcome is going to be predictable and done well for our patients, so I want to really sort of throw it back at Frank Because you sort of will lead that discussion. What are the things in your practice that you'd find predictable? That are comfortable for you stuff. Maybe you don't even need to think about, but you know are going work out right? Honestly if it's..

frank Rubber Dam DOJ Google
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Fryer coming to you high from the rock and roll. Hall of Fame City Cleveland Ohio home. Ma'am ass, who are our gets toast are this week we'll have a little story about that but Zach. I, mean just say I. How are things? Go in there and ends a city? Well I miss my royals, baseball, and not being on. I hope by the time this podcast launches. They figured out the season, but it's not looking so good so kind of kind of bored. I think it's weird to be in the middle of summer and no baseball at all. There's a rhythm to life that were missing because of that I think. My. Royals affiliate is been broadcasting a classic games and. While I have enjoyed some of the old school. World Series Games and whatnot I classic out I needed I need some new new blood. Is the George Brett Pine Tar incident one of those games. Yes. That is that is where it's at I. Mean if that doesn't get you if that does that, you fired up. You don't have a pulse. Ever yes, so I wanNA introduce our guest. Today Dr Frank Leighton. You might have heard him last week on this very podcast frank. How're you doing down there in Georgia? I'm doing well. How are you guys doing? We're doing great good Are You missing baseball down there with your braves. A little bit. You know that's it's background you. It's not a destination like Disney. It's waffle house. I guess we'll stop there for drunk. Enough. Baseball's always just on in the background in the summertime, and it's not here. That's what I've always said. It's just goes on grinds on in the background. It's sort of you know the the backdrop to summer and I kind of miss it and like I said earlier before we went on Air I went to my nephew's baseball game today. It's Nice just to see a game you know there weren't quite as men well, actually probably the same amount of fans in the stands for my nephews game as an Indians game. It's Nice A to see a baseball. Franko. How far how far away are you from Atlanta Stadium? Is that accessible or not accessible. It's about forty five minutes away. It's over and. I grew up in so they moved the stadium from in town up to the suburbs over on other side..

baseball Dr Frank Leighton Atlanta Stadium braves Fryer Ohio Zach George Brett Pine Franko Disney Georgia
Coronavirus cases rise across U.S. as states reopen

WBBM Morning News

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus cases rise across U.S. as states reopen

"But corona virus cases in the U. S. has passed two million a recent surge in new infections a bit re openings across the country has pushed some hobble hospitals to their capacity and their intensive care units at least sixteen states have seen a rise in corona virus cases in recent days according to data compiled by CBS news the hot spots include large sections of the southeast and Midwest and west coast Arizona for one is seeing more than one thousand new cases per day up from fewer than four hundred a day when the governor ended his business closure and stay at home orders in mid may I think the question is you know did we reopen too soon you know is a valid one Dr Frank lovecchio is an emergency medicine doctor in the Phoenix area and he says he's seeing a surge of severe covert cases requiring

Dr Frank Lovecchio CBS Midwest Arizona Phoenix
Home Prices Rose In The First Quarter

WBBM Evening News

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Home Prices Rose In The First Quarter

"Home prices rose in April but could be down by next spring and inventory of entry level homes has taken a dive nationally home values rose five point four percent annually in April a sharp increase from the four and a half percent annual increase in March and according to CoreLogic Chicago metro area was up one point eight percent compared to last April the inventory of entry level homes for sale fell twenty five percent this April compared to last year CoreLogic chief economist Dr Frank note have telling us inventories been particularly lean even at the start of this year prior to the pandemic once the pandemic hit

Corelogic Chicago Corelogic Chief Economist Dr Frank
"dr frank" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

11:53 min | 5 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"To sterilize water if you need to So it seems like one tree burns everything crazy so it seems like it's one of those because of medical miracles for lack those miracle. That's your book. It would be nice if everybody had one and the book by the way. If you're a person out there and you're interested in knowing what can I do at home? What kind of what you're talking about Dave. That's what that book is about. It is a very worthy read. That was one of the many reasons I wanted to have you on this. Show to to talk about it Are you if you tomorrow woke up and you had a sniffle I mean I don't know how old you are your younger than you're you're older than you look but you know you've been practicing for fifty years so you know you're you've got to be at least seventy and So you're we would classically be considered in a high risk because as you age function goes down and all that stuff. Would you be particularly worried about yourself or do you think your cells and your immune system or no shaking your head? You wouldn't be worried. I've got no you know I wear that shirt. I got it Your conference last year. Say unstoppable or something. We've got an unstoppable shirt unstoppable. Sure 'cause I kinda feel unstoppable. I know I'm not. I know. Obviously there's vulnerabilities there but now I do not feel like You know my age and it is a little bit weird when I'm listening to the radio or something you're saying you know if you're you're over seventy you're in trouble now. I I feel that's true. You know that's if you're average and you look at Italy man. The people who died the average age was eighty one point five and they had an average of three preexisting conditions. Oh and diabetes. Tell me about Maiocco Andrea and diabetes. So do we talk about this before I would probably did? But that was one hundred fifty hours ago. So there's a lot of listeners. Yes so diabetes is like your classic disease. I wrote a book about this. Because of this reason it's your classic disease of Mitochondrial dysfunction such that it could be totally Illinois. I'm talking about type. Two diabetes could be totally eliminated or close to totally eliminated simply by maintaining my condo function. You have to anything else if you would do that In fact I've started to view it after reading my book as a reference. A lot of your work type. Two diabetes is at its core. Just a disease of myocardial deficient yeah and different reasons for matter control deficiency But they're now working with ozone therapy fixed diabetes because it has such a powerful effect on Mitochondria. Yes shocking you gotta get you know. You can't wait until you're very far. Progressed and things have really become problematic to get the best results. But if you do it fairly early on absolutely if you're practicing intermittent fasting. When would you administer ozone therapy during the fast after the fast before you start fasting? I probably I normally want people to eat before I give them the treatment because it will create a hypoglycemia when you're doing it via via ivy. Yeah maybe even in other ways too like even Asana. It's possible in. King caused low blood sugar and let's face it. If you're doing that odds are halfway decent. You're sick anyway. In which case you know you're going to be a little bit weakened that way okay. I don't know that I'd want you doing it on a fast. Unless you're pretty strong guy anyway. Okay and in your case even if you're not sick you're doing when treatment a week and you you eat before your treatments. Yes okay got it. Do you worry about Ozone Lipids in the bladder? Creating oxidized ldl cholesterol. Or anything. Like that actually. I wanted to do that. To create. Oxidized LDL SLAIN. Because so many people say cholesterol is not really bad. We think it might. You know it's not but oxidized. Ldl's is horrifying. Well where would you walk oxidized? Ldl Is actually the form of the causes the problem so they're absolutely right does it matter if your LDL's high and you're oxy oxidized LDL is low. You're in pretty good shape. I wouldn't worry worry about that. You said you wanted the ozone to oxidized the Dell well. What's happening is when it interacts with any kind of living tissue It pretty much in in a second disappears. It's no longer there. It's it's accepting electron almost always from a lipid so a fat. Ldl's fat so it will accept an electron from the l the L. And in fact you will get an increase in the oxidized. Ldl I haven't measured this. But I'm pretty sure you would have to work that way right. You're going to get whatever lipids in there. Probably you're GONNA oxidise it. There's a good chance and these. Then these oxidized lipids including the LDL ARE. What mediates the signaling that this this ozone molecule can do and Yeah you'RE GONNA get a little bit of oxidative elbow but let's face it. You're what's going to happen is when you get the oxidized. Ldl You are going to stimulate the systems that suppress oxidized ldl. So over the long run. Your Elliot's actually going down. We have looked at this. Specific was with other lipids with ldl. But with other lipids. And we've seen you start the ozone therapy the oxidise lipids go up and maybe after seven days now they start coming down and they'll actually around the twelfth day go below baseline. You'll actually fix the problem. It's ironic but a little bit of a bad thing is a good thing if you'll stay with it that the doses critical to the dentist is critical. All right I I think as well as restoring metabolism And it my mother has She came down with very suddenly on a autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Okay and I said. Hey Mom you know. You're doing some traditional stuff. That's not not traditional some western medicine stuff. That's not working here. I I really really really think you should try ozone therapy and My Dad just sent a charter for labs Since she she's getting weekly labs since she started doing ozone magically all the labs went from red to yellow degreen over the course of about six or eight weeks and honestly wouldn't surprise me if therapy is a major contributor to saving her because that can be a really pernicious Uncomfortable thing and the main difference. There wasn't an apprentice zone didn't work but ozone like did so. It's one of those things where you don't know you're unlikely to cause harm with those on our condition with added have to worry about them going to hurt. Somebody's that dose right okay. So if you get the dose right There's no medical condition you're aware of ozone would be a bad deal. Well actually I need to say number. There are but they're unusual you can get a deficiency of an enzyme called G six. Pm Okay Yeah. That's not that unusual. Like one in one hundred thousand or something. Yeah Okay but if I'm GonNa have that you know that that could potentially be a problem. Okay if you're if you're in a state of what we call thyroid toxic houses. You thyroid is hyper elevated disease type state and not being controlled. That's the contra indication. Okay so you have an acute cardiovascular event so you're acutely stroking or you're having a heart attack that would be contraindicated and acute seizure would be contraindicated. All of those would be into the vitamin C. Instead of the ozone you have plenty of oxidative stress basically just trying to stop sepsis. Okay Yeah have you gone down to your local hospital and you're in Carson City right right okay. I used to. I used to live on on the hill. Up There. Lake Tahoe. Yeah Nice. It was it was years and years ago. And beautiful part of the world. A and Have you gone to the local hospital? In fact that's the one I would have gone to if I fell skiing. Probably have you gone and said hey guys like a thing or two? Let's let's Look Somoza up in here or do they just roll their eyes and go the other way you know. I haven't done that I have made some efforts with the president's His Co. Viet team. I have made some efforts to kind of come around and I am working trying to get some information into that team because I think that's the only way you're going to get anything done here. The conventional guys in hospital their hands are tied. The they can only do with. The administrators are going to let them do they. Can't you know it's sad but we're at a time in our lives. Were doctors don't really get to decide what to do with their patients. You got some bureaucrat. Deciding that and people may in roll their eyes and say you work in a hospital. How do you know I just had a doctor and chippy on Instagram? And she's a former. Ibm Chemical Engineer turned medical doctor and You know She had a patient who had it tested positive. It was recovering on chloroquine. Took him to the local hospital and they put him on. Get this fluids. Iv fluids and he started getting worse. It's just what what are you doing. I already have on this med. Just keep giving him. What's already working and they said. Oh Our hospital committee has decided that our standard of care for covert is fluids until you need a ventilator and why would you go to that hospital? It's yeah you don't want to actually go to the hospital. Be probably the one of the MORE UNSAFE PLACES. You could be unless you actually really needed. Something like a respirator. You don't WanNa be an hospital. Yeah it's not a good time there and plus you know the doctors are working their butts off so I find that when you talk to someone who's practice for decades like you Every time I have these conversations not I hear the same thing like we used to get to practice medicine where we'd say okay. I'm going to use my judgment. My clinical experience my read on this patient in the room with me and I'm going to choose from the tool set availa and do what I think is right And then in this idea that we're going to reduce risk. We actually reduced the ability to do anything other than average young. I'm also hearing from From my wife Emergency Medical Room Physician from Sweden and She said Dave something's wrong. She said in all medical settings that she's ever been in at least in in Sweden where she spent most practicing some in Norway There's an emergency room and if there isn't enough resource than some people. Don't get the resource and that a part of being a doctor is saying you know what actually you're not gonNa make it and that you know this is a part of it and say you know no matter how much we throw at you. Your chances of making it are essentially zero. So we're we're going to preserve those resources for someone who will actually benefit from them and she said that when she talked with doctors when she's practicing in the US Just on rotation or on visiting Dr Status All that that was just a foreign concept to them and said you know like you you have to do everything possible forever. And and that one of her friends here..

diabetes Dave Sweden autoimmune hemolytic anemia Carson City Maiocco Andrea US Mitochondrial dysfunction Lake Tahoe Italy Illinois Dell Viet team King Elliot chloroquine president
"dr frank" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

06:26 min | 5 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"People come in if they've got a flu type syndrome I just put him on this protocol in their over it. I don't normally test what the virus is and you say this protocol. What's the protocol a protocol Let me get into that in a SEC. I wanted to get this idea out and that is that I don't really it. Works on every virus exactly test. Whatever I have had patients come in with. Documented West Nile documented influenza A. N. B. and documented Virus those documented. Come in. Because they weren't getting well. You know with the other therapies. They were doing and knock those out so I know I can knock those three out. I've seen I've seen people like rubber ruins talked about using ozone on Ebola with with great success. Sure so there's there's at least a few cases of that Is How if if you will be real if you yourself had the symptoms of Corona virus right now why would step one be okay so mike. What my protocol is number. One people ought to be doing this probably any way during a flu season. And that would be make sure you vitamin D levels are decent Make sure you vitamin A levels are decent day. You make sure your sink levels are decent. How much zinc do you take or do you think for me? Fifteen milligrams orally a day. Pretty much So I you know. That's first line of defense. Second Line Defenses. If you actually coming down with something you want to be on those things but now you gotta get more aggressive so the first thing I haul out is my nebulizer so you know Back in the early eighties. Dr Charlie far was the guy that taught me this about how how hydrogen peroxide does and interestingly enough back. Then when he told me about this dave the way he checked it out was using the video to analysis that. I know you guys use. Yeah we we've got that upgrade lab so when you invented so so he He that the O'Toole analysis before and after H Two issues. And that's how he established all the protocols. He established what one day about twenty years ago. A A patient comes into my office and at that point. I just been using intravenous. Hydrogen Peroxide as per Dr Protocol and very successfully. It works good. The problem is patients got to be in the office. I got sick a needle in their arm blah blah blah. But other than that were great but I got this patient in the office and she's complaining to me that you know. Her doctor gave her medication that she puts in her nebulizer. And it revs up. It was like a stimulant straight they can taking speed. Her heart rate would get up. She didn't feel good Blah Blah Blah. And that and it just suddenly occurred me saying you know what it's blatantly obvious but I never thought about it when you. When you take something into your lungs it gets into your bloodstream. That's why smoking works. Hello you know but it never really occurred to me so I thought what the Heck. Let's put some hydrogen peroxide in there. It's going to get into your bloodstream. Plus it's going to on. Its way down into her bloodstream. It's GonNa go pass those areas that are typically infected so seems to me. A nebulizer was good so if I wake up one morning and I feel like I got a sore throat or you know some happening a nebulizer and I'm GonNa do it You know for about three minutes every hour every hour. I'm awake and within one or two days. I'll pretty much knocked that out every hour. So you're putting the typical ultrasonic nebulizers take about six Six leaders like a relatively small Three in there three. So it's a small amount. Yes like what ten minutes teaspoon or something? Yeah okay maybe two thirds of teaspoon so you you put that in there you turn it on your breathing and stuff. You can do other things but it's a little bit noisy for some of the Sonics don't make any sound but Y- look a little funny. Yeah you know when you're when you're fighting the flu you probably ought to be home. Yeah laying in bed sucking on your nebulizer your zinc tablets and not try to you know. Force yourself to go on that trip that you're supposed to go on. That would be nice to nice. Are Part of the game is getting some rest so you had You'd make sure that you're a you're D- You're zinc ahead of time. When you started feeling sick you'd be nebulizers. Hydrogen Peroxide is just three percent Medical grade stuff this up you can buy at the store but make sure it's no snow stabilisers anything else. Anything to worry about so for the audience you know I. I use pharmaceutical grade stuff. But it's really hard to get that especially for a lot of lay people. They can't get that and then you have to put it in normal sailing. You can't put it in regular water so you gotta get normal sailing. So where do you get normal sailing? I mean you got to. It's hard for lay people to get this stuff so What I can do is I can tell everybody on if you go on Amazon and probably some other you know a places you can get pure sodium chloride that your salt You don't want US tabby sought you WanNa get the pure sodium chloride and if you take A leader of of of of distilled water and you put into an quarter teaspoons of pure sodium chloride. You've got normal sailing. And just dissolve in their in a pinch. You could take the most filtered water you get you. Boil it. So it sterilized with that same amount of salt in there. Yes it'd be great but you could do what you're saying. Yeah sure I'm saying in a pinch because I wasn't going to go to the store. I'm shedding viruses everywhere. So you could do that. And then you've obviously want to cool it off and then you'd have a one percent saline solution which your long like versus. Just straight up hydrogen peroxide..

flu Sonics Dr Charlie stimulant O'Toole US Amazon
"dr frank" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Been a practicing physician for nearly fifty years in both conventional medicine. And what you could call alternative or functional or integrative medicine. He's been a primary reference for my book head strong in his work on Mike. Okon drill biology and is someone who knows more than you might expect on how viruses operate inside the body. And what you can do about almost any virus in the body I am talking about Dr Frank Shellenberger. Who is a world? Class expert anti-aging and Ozone Frank. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for really nice. Intradex appreciate that It's it's more than earned. I talked a lot in some of my books. Especially my anti-aging book but one of the reasons that we owe it to ourselves to live longer than we're supposed to is that we can finally have enough wisdom enough energy at the same time in order to share it at a point. I think you'll live that I'm soaking wasn't any time I get a chance. I just have to ask Corona virus and ozone. What are your thoughts? Well Okay so how much time we have. We've got at least an hour. The crazy fast rate of new discoveries about our bodies our minds environment all that makes up our world. Fascinates intrigues me. That's why I'm constantly searching for information that pushes the boundaries of what's possible for human potential and sharing all that I learned with you in a dynamic new set of videos on youtube heading over to Dave asprey dot com slash YouTube Yeah there's a couple of things you know. The first thing that comes to my mind is. I don't know that most people understand how this works. How how this whole viral thing works but 'cause I keep hearing people talk about. You know how to kill the virus when the reality is you can't kill something that's not live right and a virus is alive and so the virus can't make energy it can't use oxygen. It can't replicate. It's it's a piece of material. I can't do anything except what it can do. Is it can infest. It can't be in introduced into cells and then use the genetic material in the cells to replicate itself. I like to think of it as sort of a software program but it doesn't have a computer to run itself and needs a cell to run itself on. Is that a good analogy. Well it yeah it needs. It can't replicate on its own. It needs it needs my cell's genetic material and energy and ATP and such to be able to replicate itself. And then so I got a cell in there. It's infected with the virus and the end. The cell basically is turning into a viral factory is just cranking out more viruses which ultimately get released into Outside the south into the interstitial space then infects another cell and on and on you go so basically what you're doing as you're making Viral factories one. After another. And what you can do is you can do things that deactivate the the free virus which is good but the way we actually get over a viral. Infection is by killing the factories the infected cells. Yes you gotTa have a way of killing the infected cells without killing the cells that are infected. How do we do that yet? Do that in my mind by up regulating What certain site a kinds that activate. What's called the Innate Immune System? They call this the innate immune system it's also known as T. h. One Immune system but this is the one that activates natural killer cells and cytotoxic CD eight cells and those are the items that actually kill cells okay. Antibodies themselves can kill the virus. But what kills? The factory is innate immune system so you have to have something that will stimulate the mid innate immune system in patients and I tell my patients for example the guy that the guy that gets exposed to the virus quote infected by the virus but never has symptom. One is the guy with the really good innate. Immune system at the time of exposure. How do you have strong innate immunity so that if you get infected you just don't go to hospital yes so I mean that's the idea? Try and keep your immune system up as much as he. Can you guys already know that? Always looking for that weird information that shows that there are things we can do to push. What's possible for human potential and I'm sharing everything I learned with you across a new channel. Which is the Dave ASPREY DOT COM blog? And this is because I want to be able to write about stuff that has nothing to do with coffee and Collagen. But I'll show the latest in those spaces but I was talking about the things that maybe only a few people are doing. But everyone's going to be doing in ten years so go to Dave asprey Dot Com and look at thousands of blog posts. Listen to hundreds of hours of interviews or you can get connected on any of the social channels. I put all sorts of cool stories on instagram. You might not even know that so I would love to share more information with you and I considered a moral obligation to give you the best information in the shortest period of time I can because you've got stuff to do and I honor your attention and I.

Dave asprey Dot Com Dave ASPREY DOT Dr Frank Shellenberger youtube Mike Dave asprey
"dr frank" Discussed on Beyond the Beauty with Bobbi Brown

Beyond the Beauty with Bobbi Brown

01:34 min | 6 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Beyond the Beauty with Bobbi Brown

"Always do. That's a pleasure and thank you for all the great work you do and spreading the word and. I hope that this passes and I get to come see that beautiful baby. Here's all right. Thanks thanks bobby. Bye-bye for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. For wherever you listen to your favorite shows deep in rural New Hampshire on the side of a dark highway the hills of witness a light in the sky a craft hovering above a field. They thought that was the end of their story. Two years later under hypnosis did learn that there was more to that night. So what had they forgotten the strange case of Betty and Barney Hill this season on strange arrivals a co production of iheartradio and grim and mild from Erin Monkey. Listen to strange arrivals on iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. My Name is Shapiro. Pearl Wells for the past four years. I've been trying to figure out how twenty two year old son. Courtney wound up with a bullet in his back outside of Chicago police station. There's what you hear on the news. That Courtney got shot then drove himself to the station. Where officers did everything they could to help him. And then there's the troop listen to somebody. The iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

apple Courtney New Hampshire Pearl Wells Erin Monkey Shapiro bobby Barney Hill Betty Chicago
"dr frank" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The power of killer T. cells to attack and kill the cancer all right there right there that is some good stuff I've almost got Dr Frank is the CEO and president of PDF files there stopped asked either website about comp more about this everybody really cheer you know it's been a few months since we last spoke my wife and I've been enjoying the retirement life we've done a little bit of traveling spent time in the grandkids and I managed to check off a few projects on my list but I want to tell you that I've missed my viewers and listeners a lot you guys are like family to me which is why I jumped at the chance to talk to you and biz TV asked me if I would address the concerns related to cold wind nineteen you can't turn on the news about wall to wall coverage of the virus and depending on who you believe this could be the worst virus since the Spanish flu of nineteen eighteen or maybe it's much ado about nothing but I want to encourage you to exercise caution please at our age we are most vulnerable to the worst symptoms of the virus that's why the CDC recommends that you limit your travel to only necessary trips for the next few weeks when you hear the term social distancing that simply means keep about six feet between you and the people you're visiting with might be a good thing hi you've heard the old saying this too shall pass my friends it's true our generation has seen a lot and lived to tell our grandchildren all about it Golden nineteen will indeed pass and we will get back to taking amazing trips and spending time with her family finally you know this markets go up and down over time they go up so take a deep breath this too shall pass love you guys and I look forward to catching up soon is.

Dr Frank CEO president CDC
Washington state man becomes first U.S. coronavirus fatality

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Washington state man becomes first U.S. coronavirus fatality

"Washington State Governor. Jay Inslee has declared a state of emergency because of the new strain of corona virus. The governor announced the move after following the first corona virus fatality in the US. A man in his fifties in Seattle who had underlying health issues. Dozens of others in the state are being tested. Gabriel Spitzer from member station K. A. N. K. EX reports. The man who died had no history of overseas travel or contact with other known carriers Public Health Seattle and King County officials. Also say to people at a suburban Long-term Care Center tested positive more than fifty staffers in residents there are showing respiratory symptoms. Dr Frank Rito is with Evergreen Health Hospital. What we're seeing is the tip of the iceberg. So we're seeing the most critically ill individuals usually that means there's a significant percentage of individuals of less severe illness floating around out there. The nursing home outbreak came to light. After federal officials broaden their guidelines on should be tested for the novel Corona

Seattle Dr Frank Rito Jay Inslee Evergreen Health Hospital Gabriel Spitzer Long-Term Care Center Washington United States King County K. A. N. K. Ex
First death from coronavirus in the United States confirmed in Washington state

Kim Komando

00:36 sec | 7 months ago

First death from coronavirus in the United States confirmed in Washington state

"The first corona virus death in the U. S. comes with a renewed call for precaution and preparedness correspondent Jim Roope reports that health officials urge smart practices like more hand washing unless face touching and to stay away from people who are coughing or sneezing a man in his fifties with underlying health conditions has become the first U. S. casualty from the virus which is now just over two months old what we're seeing is the tip of the iceberg Dr Frank Rita with evergreen health Medical Center where this patient died says we've been seeing the most severe cases with this case along with the least five others in Washington state that are sought medical attention there are likely others with more mild symptoms out there that don't know

Jim Roope Dr Frank Rita Evergreen Health Medical Cente Washington
"dr frank" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

11:39 min | 9 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Aw Humans but for the planet for animals for everyone for the workers but grass-fed meat is not ex been pestered ex Good for you. I'm a huge fan of eggs. But you know the regular eggs on that same thing even with Bettas says so I think the sources really important of of the foods that we eat and if we go back to the way grandparents used the head and food wasn't industrialized that yet says what we've done to the food. That is more of an issue than actual food itself. And even if you look had had a lot of the old cultures you know in came to grains and beans which. I'm not a huge fan of day. Soak the grains of Soak Deby's they head ways of you've preparing these foods which took a lot of those harmful factors outlets These are always amazed at the wisdom of so many of these cultures. Things just took for granted we done do anymore. Because you know we have fridges. We have laughing so easy we we don't do the same things. Thanks to our foods that they were forced to do but which were very helpful in in helping people digest foods down. I mean these days you know and it's just like what you said people are coming to you say I don't I don't even need to know why. Just tell me what to do. How is that person? Then GonNa say well. Let me think about preparing this for from tation or sprouting so they can have it like twenty four hours or something like that. You know I think that all gets lost in the quest for fast and easy but at some one point we all pay. You know. It's a matter whether you WANNA pay in small bits along the way and she'll get along the way or whether you WANNA crash and burn learn and have a more dramatic moment one of the other things that sort of under this nutrition pillar for. You is intermittent fasting which I'm fascinated with I've shared and listeners. Know that very recently. I just did a completed a seven day fast with your advice which was super helpful to me as well. I found it really so incredible. The effects at Hatemi was surprisingly easy and I have done some experimenting with this idea of intermittent fasting. Tell me a a little bit more about what this is in an why it matters is more and more research on sort of fasting intimate and fasting in particular how to fix. Is Your hormones in particular insulin but other hormones to and they've found it particularly effective for people to bring down the insulin than levels in to help people manage that blood sugar and and lose weight function bidder. Here's an interesting concept as well. which once again going back to my Chinese midst them? Before there was even people were talking about intimate and fostering ours always taught by my Chinese medicine teachers to try and risked your digestion for twelve to fourteen hours a night to try each little bit earlier to eat in a little bit earlier and eat breakfast a little bit later. I was just taught in Chinese myths and then they weren't talking about incident or intimate and fasting talking about resting your system and and that type of thing is sort of always comes back to me that a lot of this wisdom from these ancient traditionally these old traditions. We sort of started to understand now from a western perspective and given a name Sir intimate and foster just means basically trying to eat the three remains to meals that you eat within. Let's say an eight hour ten hour period classically now. They're talking about Easter meals. Like from start breakfast at twelve overclock and eat dinner by eight o'clock with an eight hour period and then your wrist your digestion but you not arresting your digestion in China's Mitzner toward terrestial digestion. But when you if your body that sixteen hour break you actually causing a metabolic effect in in your body which is very positive for weight loss for learning to balance sugar and probably for a whole host of other things I know I ah go through phases. Where do you know and do intimate and fussing? I just don't have breakfast two or three days a week and you know what without notice if I'm eating mainly fat and protein and very little carbs Etcheverry easy you don't. It's not that difficult and you don't feel hungry so I use it in my practice for people who WanNa lose weight in particular or people who want to bet insists sugar which is a lot of people below. Make themselves a little bit more tolerant to carbohydrates. 'cause I have this concept that I use it so. Many of us are intolerant to the amount of carbohydrates we eat most of us eat too many carbohydrates for what our bodies can metabolize and when that is happening intimate and I I can be extremely helpful so I I'm a big fan of intimate enforcing us see. I know we're not doing myself as feel fantastic. And you lose a little bit of weight and you realize that you don't have to eat as frequently as you know you used to eating. But I'm using it. More and more therapeutically medically impatience and getting great results is a wonderful book by a wonderful doctor. In Canada Jason Fung who wrote a book on fostering fostering and he explains the science behind it and all the studies really well. I'm even know there were so many studies on it and I think it's becoming more and more popular even even in maybe an alternative medical circles but more and more research is being done on it and every time I see an article they always positive results. It's almost every culture has head. Fostering in the traditions. Wise that it's going to be a reason F.. It stuck around for thousands of years. If you've got something to it I mean my first exposure to it was sort of in the like the the quote biohacking community who were always. Just running experiments entitles now. This is interesting and then when I started to do research on it and then experimented with myself like this is really interesting personally. How it makes me feel bill and then I guess there's all this evolving research to while they're long does during research on longevity cancer reduction and how how literally really just compressing the amount of time that you eat may also switch on off sort of the genetic state of certain genes to express disease? which if it's as easy as doing that over sustained basis and time and potentially protect you from all of these life altering diseases and it's really like you mentioned if you're you're not gonNA gorging yourself with a lot of special simple simple carbs? It's not actually that hard to do. Why not exactly? And as you mentioned this more and more research coming out in the cancer world about which is as you said turning jeans on and off but here's something interesting once again going back to the Chinese midst and waste and made some of always tried to talk to you. Know what the Hell is she. An energy from waste perspective and now think the newest understanding is it's the Mitochondria as energy powerhouses every talk about it in the cells and actually intimate and fostering foster is a way to boost the functioning of your monarch Andrea most cutting back on carbs. that's another reason. Probably why Intermittent fasting has some any positive effects. It's boosting your modern congress. Same as high intensity interval training strength training winning or eating more fetes and less carbs or of this mechanism. I think of all these lifestyle changes. We're talking about his possibly the monarch Andrea from a Western by chemical perspective. That that's interesting that you look at that overlay as Caso. Because I have classically learn Medicaid hundred powerhouse of the cell. That's where ATP is created but then to kind of think well maybe ATP is you know Chee and we've got all these millions of little things interesting within cells that created and through life and abuse. They suffered dysfunction so the idea that maybe something like you know the way we eat could bring them back to life as NI. You brought up a high intensity interval training which moves us into the movement pillar also. That's that's kind of interesting because especially in the context of most people think that okay I get it I get better get stronger. More flexible more able body. I can do the things I WANNA do. But you mentioned also in the context of how it actually affects Monaco Andrea and there's research even showing that it may increase the number of Meta Kanji and not just taste better one of the few things that do it which was fascinates me because this is how people always used to exercise. It didn't go to Jim. You know it wasn't excise. It was how they moved their buddies. So yeah I think the whole and you know Monaco cuddly intrigued by Omara Congress sitting the Sun. Everyone loves sitting in the Sun. You know we'll say increases mark conjul function sir in this us so sunlight increases. Yeah sitting in the Sun. Does I mean so. A lot of the you know we've been taught not to sit in the sun now. I'm not saying you sit in the sun like I said in the sun growing up in South Africa now have skin damage but yeah use uses son intelligently. It's the most of these things. Are there for a reason yet. Look using the you know. We don't naturally decide to do steady state exercise that is sort of like a function of the modern day like fitness facility where it's rows and rows of things where you hit a button you now and you said it on a fixed speed and then you try and distract yourself in some way from what you're doing but there's so little variation like when you're out in the field when you're a kid you're doing high intensity interval training Zac but but it's fun and and the other thing about exercising. I know this from a seven. Everyone will probably confirm their own personal experience. Exercising outside first of all is easier more fun seems to be much more effective definitely for me. I wrote him a bicycle inside. It's like I just don't feel good. It does but I can ride my bicycle outside what I always feel fantastic. There's something about being outside to which you know has some effect on the body. What it does? I'm not sure so all these little ordinary everything's of life that we take for granted I believe have our say the ordinary things enough have extraordinary extraordinary effects so now health so the book was a lot about thinking about all these little things you know playing like a kid having fun laughing listening to music back in a music to me has always been so important in almost every aspect of my life with definitely in terms of my health especially emotional health..

Andrea Soak Deby Caso China Monaco Andrea Hatemi congress Zac biohacking South Africa Jason Fung Canada Jim Monaco Chee Omara Congress
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

12:31 min | 11 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Trust accommodate and and the reality is is like the parallel isn't great for medicine and there are family eric this documents but it is. It's in it's and it's something that you know in a way I think don't school needs to be another two three years in. Nearly that's going to happen. How freaking out about the debt for four years so it is it's an interesting thing in residencies Jenner prisons? He's can only do so much to I. I mean so much of it requires some clinical experience. Exactly in. That's something that I think. Lay people don't want to know that they don't want to hear that they don't want to be one of them. Don't want to the dentist is a safe beginner. That's probably not not great marketing. That's exactly so you again kicked off. Today's I think you're are you speaking again at the summit are you tomorrow and Saturday. Okay so yes I was gonna say but he's DJ party but so my understanding is like I took last December. I took with Treating the worn dentition course teaching on you guys teach a lot of these these seminars in my understanding is that's changing for you coming up. Is that correct for me on a a couple of unto seminars exchange okay. Yeah so back in the nineties I used to call it. State of the art aesthetics was really treatment planning primarily aesthetics but it was interdisciplinary your disciplinary aesthetic so had a lot of Perria in a lot of crown lengthening lot Ortho but I taught all of it because I had the relationship with Vince Co Kitchen Dave Matthews and all the cases we've done together and I was comfortable because they we all lectured together so I knew their content well and we've worked together for so long and then that course evolved into sort of what we called interdisciplinary aesthetics. We got greg involved with it kinser and `and we brought in a lot. More implants to it. But in reality it was still greg teaching voting interdisciplinary -ture and you know. In the past year. We've added Mike Gunson world surgeon and we were added Rebecca Barco orthodontist and Jim Janikowski. You know who parried honest. The takeover Davis practice and so we're or exploding the old quote interdisciplinary aesthetics seminar. It's and it's now going to be true interdisciplinary seminar With like gun censure like literally the literally was actually soulsby. Mike back Jim Chen Kef skin. Greg so you'll have oral surgery you'll have Ortho you'll have Perry on you'll have cross all four teaching teaching the seminar and one of my as I get older and I don't have an interest in retiring so that's not on the table. Okay Okay you heard it here folks slowing down a little bit. Wouldn't be bad thrown around. have an instrument retire. I still really liked but I do but what I recognize. This is the course that will be created by those four is a course that will be at a whole different level of refinement than Greg and I talk about oral surgery or own peril even though I did a payroll process program. You know. It's not the same as having somebody that's practicing. Perry would incredibly high I level absolutely and so so the aesthetics course it is going to be those four and then what's happening with tooth wear is so much is changing in terms of our awareness of ideology Airway issues a much better understanding of different types of erosion lesion and how they end up manifesting but they look like and because Greg and Jeff Rouse had you know they practice together for two years. Jeff came to Seattle developed the protocol and and the two of them are really on top of all of that and at this stage. I'm not interested in retirement that that doesn't mean I really WanNa learn a whole bunch of Sir. Sure no I get it. Also you know to really be effective effective. You need to have have experienced a clinical treating patients with some of those things and I don't particularly have an interest in that ear. Sure so the warned in Titian in the ascetic seminar. I'M GONNA be walking out of okay and I'll be focusing heavily on the Tree Planting Case Acceptance Seminar Inclusion Seminar. Dr We're actually adding more of those seminar so I'm actually not going to be here that much less I'll say okay. It's just that the demand in particular for treatment planning inclusion has been high so I'm actually kind of excited to be able to just have those two areas to really look at I we just did Ricardo Ricardo and I just did and Ricardo and Greg and I do the treatment planning time in our ups and then Greg and I and Jim McKee inclusions And we did just do a treatment planning seminar a couple of weeks ago and I already got some jazzed up about the fact that I have time to focus on it. Sure is I actually redid some the first morning and it really was a big improvement actually over what it was done so so I see ya I tell people when I get asked all the time cycle. You'RE GONNA retire in five years I'm going to. I'm going to reassess in five years made I'm GONNA retire. Climb here's what I'm going to reassess five. Yeah you know. I'm still having as much fun and I'm still confident doing it. Then I probably won't retire but sure but at least this way I one of the few look historically at some some of the really great continuing education centers in Dentistry from the past. Some of the things that ended up really hurting them was not being progressive. It's the kiss of death. Yeah in nineteen eighty and then if things have moved on but you're still teaching it sure and there's a whole bunch of other stuff that maybe would say that you don't WanNa be teaching that twenty five or thirty two years later Malcolm slides just exactly. Yeah come back. It's exciting exciting. These glow I just WanNa make sure super progressive sure in terms of US staying on top. You know what that does okay. So literally were were steps away from fifteen hundred superfan the whole spear concept in. What you've just told me is the same courses? They've taken over the years they probably should take again. Because frankly they're our new and improved their Definitely I mean like leary just said you just change some of what you've been giving for a long time and you're excited about you've got all the airway stuff but added to so many of these things so the reality is you guys are progressive and frankly if you took all the courses five ten years ago you probably need to get him again. I'm not even. Yeah so that's kind of exciting. That's kind of cool. It's exciting for me because you know at some as you said. My name is on the building. I'd like to leave a legacy that goes on beyond on and the only way that happens is you gotta stay current and meaningful and you've got to be a resource for people who want help knitting better better and I really think that we do that very well. Now but the the more we continue to integrate and change and alter our curriculum philemon bringing Jim mckeown Tad to add to the temp Roman jewelers joint stuff in our eyes and CBC teas and when you really start learning after you see it a few times ago wow. I had no idea how much I was missing by. Not really understanding this and having some of these people image and I can think back on cases. Oh a guaranteed that that. Sure if I'd had done that I would have found this out. Yeah if you practice long enough and you you you study hard enough. You've got to run into do a lot of that. Yeah the Airways the classic thing on that too. You're like yeah. Maybe they weren't just grinding. And so that's why you know right now Greg and Jeff and I that are in the warned condition seminar but the the two of them actually are already doing about two-thirds of And so it's like you know what you guys just you got all this current clinical stuff. If you've been doing it got the new knowledge base on the airway stuff erosion stuff like you guys. I don't want to be the log holding that's awesome. It's it's actually. It's a pretty healthy way to look at it. I mean how it's a I mean hold on loosely. Right is your data gathering going on concurrently to or is that something. You're going to do periodically a you're you know. I like literature dental literature and like even the stuff I did today. The literature on Practices and what makes them tick one of the really exciting things for me. Because I'm a I I do like data and I liked too. Is You know our practice. Practice Solutions Platform has now. A lot of practice is on And so that's like a gold mine of Data and you can learn about half off and so I actually wanted to dig in more into some of that data and really look at. So what is it. That's making some of these ca some of the growth both staggering. I mean I even find hard to believe how much some people have grown and you go. Okay I got to figure that part out. uh-huh what what exactly happened to translate into. We had a meeting yesterday morning with that group and we have treatment. The plan presented to a new patient was like thirty three or thirty seven hundred dollars. I looked at that one. I see that number. Yeah and then they don't call it accepted until it's completed. Yeah but the average amount of pointed out of that was like sixty seven percent. Well that's really cool you go. Oh big number they are yeah. Those are big numbers. Yeah and that was the average and so I WANNA get my head around some of that stuff because what are the what changes are they making using the the the practice solutions like where were they at. What did they do differently because frankly put that in a bottle? That's literally so when you talk about data gathering I periodically what I do around around topics because I do love it. When like some organizational invite me to come present on something and they might invite me to present on something? That's out of my. I box today. All right that's why that lab group did that. That was way out of my box which creates a little anxiety for me which is good. Because then it motivates me to try and yeah that's cool so upcoming in this next year. I've got three kind of a little bit out of the box. Topics for me they're kind of clinically. Taylor ended but kind of also practice management or in and so they forced me to then start saying okay. I better start digging and I like the process. I can sit down with my computer and pubmed and I can get loss for like three hours digging stuff. So that's that's what I actually want to do. He was some of the practice solutions. Things haven't dug into any of that data. Yesterday was the first time I actually saw those numbers and I knew our clients were doing making really good progress but those numbers were like. Yeah beyond what I was totally expecting to see. Yeah are they gonNA see Spear show up on their front door did you you do what did you do. How did you do that? That's really how you also have to go. So where were they. And I don't know I don't know any of the data yeah. I just know that I was floored by the actual numbers. I saw. Yeah well hey we hope you'll come on after you've done some of that we'll talk more about. It was fascinating snake. Happy to have you guys here for having such a privilege as a chance to visit. Yeah definitely awesome. So you're here till to Julianne we're here to the end. Literally lineup is amazing to me that it looks like we have Dr McKee coming coming up next so yeah so I think you're gonNA have to give us some ideas of what ask them..

greg Jeff Rouse Jim McKee Jenner eric Jim mckeown US Ricardo Ricardo Mike Gunson Seattle Davis Perry Spear Perria Malcolm leary Julianne Jim Chen Kef CBC
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

15:47 min | 11 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Alaska has eighty almost eighty-one dentist for hundred thousand and their their third in average income in the country. When you think about that too Alaska's population so just tiny anyhow? It's another thing maybe to take home as that all data's not the same. I mean looking at a national average is essentially worthless on a local level. Doesn't mean it doesn't yeah it would be the same thing as if we would've actually which which would I know exists but didn't big for it. It would be like well. What's cost of a crown state by stay on average and the numbers would be? So Yeah Yeah for sure so radically for sure. Yeah yeah with all that data. What's what some piece of data that? You're dying to get that you the question that you can get your hands on. You know what I'd love to be able to see and I don't know if the it has it would love to be able to see actually the range of income per state and then even if you could break it down within the different counties in the state and then if you could do the same for overhead Yeah so okay. So here's here's what people are making on average. But here's the range. And here's how that falls into the different counties within each state and and what's the actual expenses to run a practice in those different occasions because that obviously gets old into all of this really can't tell from the numbers if I look at it. State of Washington the differences in fees and expenses just from going from the Seattle title area to the East side of the state radically different. I mean radically a million dollar practice in Arkansas is very different practice than a million dollar practice in Washington. Yeah I've had this conversation so many times with my best friend and and and he always felt like no. That's not really I'm like the cost of living is so wildly different hang employees exactly. Yeah exactly it's like you can't compare. Yeah it's it isn't comparable and that's that's something that's good to know too in other words like dentists loved to compare star but if you're gonNA compare compared to someone kinda down the road instead of across the country a few years ago in a presentation that was kind of a little bit flavored along these lines but because Dennis asked about fees all the time yeah you know I'm speaking about something. Clinical and I will inevitably get people saying to me. So what do I charge for that. Yeah and and obviously I can't answer that. Yeah Yeah because of what. We're just talking exactly so what I did for one presentation probably three or four years ago. Is I actually actually. Instead of doing anything related to dentistry. I found a research paper that the title was. How much will three eight hundred thousand dollars by you in terms of housing in every state in America And then they went through and they took this. Is the average cost of a house per square foot in this state. So if you've got three hundred thousand dollars okay and suddenly when you look at all fifty states there's fifteen states that were ninety dollars a foot or less Well you know three hundred thousand dollars if you're a one hundred dollars the footage of three thousand square foot house you're eighty dollars a foot. Yeah but then when you start looking at it as it rises my state Washington was like number Knbr ten and we were like one hundred ninety two dollars a night under a fifteen hundred square foot. Yeah and then you go to California was like two hundred and twenty any some dollars shirt and then you go to. Hawaii was four hundred eighty dollars a foot. Yeah and suddenly you go all three hundred thousand dollars at four hundred and eighty eighty dollars a foot on six hundred feet. Yeah I mean and so you realize okay. If you're practicing in those places what you can charge in in those places where you can buy a four thousand foot house for three hundred grand is a whole lot different than what you going to be charging you're like I have of a friend in Manhattan. He's in a great location. It's a great office. His office is a thousand square feet. his rent is eighteen thousand dollars. Yeah Yeah I mean how do you calculate that when you can go rent someplace else for fifteen hundred bucks. So that's the issue of fees and stuff stuff it's like even the Wyoming. Even the Wyoming has the lowest average fees in the country relatively th annual income. I think if you probably factored in for for a lot of Wyoming Not Jackson hole for a lot of Wyoming in terms of what you could buy and what it costs a pay your team and you'd probably be shocked at how far that income goes. Yeah Yeah it's like two HDTV index if you've ever watched any of those shows on HDTV where they're they're looking at houses or whatever it really depends. I mean and they tend into being San Francisco or Seattle. Whatever and the people in Michigan looking at this go? Oh my God what the hell you know. So but then occasionally they'll have they'll have the show in saginaw or outside and you're like yeah that's and it's just it's so widely different and the reality is a dentist has to realize that's not just in housing. I mean that's like everything freezing. So so the the realities. What's interesting though is if you send your send your dental work to a national lab? I don't think they charging that definitely exists. There are some things things that are not buying a car. Yeah yeah more or less. I mean I think the car for less just because you live here versus here. I don't I don't think so either. There's not the people drive into Michigan from Washington for sure lab work. Yeah you're using the same lab so it's some things are so dependent in in some are completely not I just interesting concept but I really liked the fact that you were putting the date out there I mean you were discussing the narratives too but like the data that can actually just the overall tenor of your presentation and things are better than things are way better than we liked it. We liked better. And that's a that's a good thing. And honestly the demographic shift I mentioned you know I literally I am that era of that. Massive of fifty thousand dentists graduated graduated between like seventy five eighty five and and we my generation is going to be retiring but we got this massive influx of young young folks coming in and I actually think that's good for dentistry. I don't see that is in a negative. It's competition competitions. Going to be there no matter what you just have to. Except there's going to be competition and you have to figure out how you position yourself and and how you run your business so you navigate the world of competition and you can still thriving avenue but it is going to be an interesting demographic over the next ten years. I think. That's you're going to see. The biggest has what happened is as soon as my my boom Tom Generation when we finally got out that's when they cut all the dental schools shut down and so suddenly the group right behind in me is a much smaller volume of dentists in that age group. Yeah so you're GONNA see the six thousand Dennis coming out a year right now. Plus I think into predicting another thousand something coming from from Foreign Countries Sharia. So that's a that's a lot of young bodies coming in yet is into my guess. Guess is they are going to end up. Probably a lot of those folks starting out India's. Yeah and I know. A lot of those schools are cutting programs. The prosthetics programs are getting catalogue. Fifty fifty percent actually fifty percent across programs have been coming all the land. All the lab stuff is you can't be learned become alantic anymore for what's funny though about process just filling in so there's fifty percent fewer programs right now than there was in nineteen ninety-one but there's the exact same name number of frost graduates coming out. Wow so what they did. is they. Cut The programs and then the programs that remained increase their their pastis. Yeah yeah interesting. Do you think those students that are coming out. Today are as well trained as your generation was I can tell you. At the University of Washington program there right Nelson Stellar. It's really stellar. We are directors phenomenal. And so I think those those young folks are really getting a great training. They are yeah. I don't know about other schools across the country. But so you were talking about your temporaries. I do love that because I like that. It's like this is charged for that. What's the story is too? I almost guarantee you made him indirectly typically right like you would you take you take an impression of the preparations in back in eighty two eighty three. When I used to do is I used to make shells Outta methodic relate and then that would rely on the? I made the shells in a lab. Okay so take a model diagnostic wax up sure making algebra impression of the diagnostic wax up and actually fill that Algebra in an impression of the wax up with methacrylate. Put it in a pressure pot then hollow each tooth out with them. Yeah so you could fit so you had this really really nice dense pretty methacrylate shell that you just realize and you're using it you're using material that remind nicely junk is like a lot so I guess what I'm going with. That is the fact that so little lab stuff is taught in undergrad dentistry. Right now means that. There's people listening this. I have no idea what you're talking about Iraq temporary. Why would anyone do that? We I will say at the University Minnesota we learned. We learned plenty of that and it just as interesting all the stuff they have to get in in that four year period is is like it has to be somewhat diluted so the people who are learning this have to go out of their way to learn it. I mean they. It's something they have to seek out because it's probably not going to be taught school in the same way even in i. I started dental school. seventy-five and Ardine on the first day of school assembled our freshman class and the first hour of our first day. He stood up in front of our class and he said I want you to know. You're starting your first day of your dental education tation and for years from now you're going to graduate and our goal for you is to graduate you as a safe beginner we need. We know that then your education will start her as we don't have the time in four years. Do what you need. You know. If he was saying that nineteen seventy five. He he was ahead of his time. A lot of people want to admit that about school. But that's real. I mean that's the story is like I think even more so today's has dental school. Today's just I I mean I know what my son's doing and he's got so much stuff he has jake. Yeah absolutely and you know so. It's not right now is in the second year and it's he can't really focus on clinical sorts of things because he's inundated with all this other second year. Oh my God. Yeah one of the darkest periods in my life and all series second year is the words. Do you help him out or you kind of I don't know you have to figure it out yourself. No you know my wife is a dentist also. She's retired but she practiced twenty eight years. And and and so Naro Middle Daughter's dentist and our oldest daughter is married to an end on us and my brother-in-law's a dentist my nephew's a dentist. He hopes his Bahir my nephew anyway so when the families together there's like seven then just yeah a lot of fun. Thanks so our our son he likes to do stuff enough monster and do it on his own. Yeah which I get it. You don't want to right so he even likes kind of pretty much staying anonymous in his class. He doesn't really want his class to know a lot about you know. Follow this up and so he actually did this summer. He said you know. I think I wanNA come to Scottsdale and take a class and I would never prompted it. Nothing and so. I said that'd be great. You know why didn't you pick a friend and in the two of you come and probably come to the treatment planning seminar seminar. Because that's going to get you a real overview of a lot of stuff. Yeah and so. He came to the treatment funding seminar about three weeks four weeks ago and it was fascinating mating. Because he's he knows enough now to be able to start to really kind of get Oh Wow I didn't realize from what I'm doing now. Yeah Yeah. So it is September beginning of Washington's goes on for years. Okay so he's he's a little further just but still solidly second year..

Washington Wyoming Alaska Dennis Seattle Michigan saginaw Scottsdale America India San Francisco Arkansas Hawaii Manhattan California Tom Generation University of Washington Nelson Stellar Knbr
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

12:33 min | 11 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Going to the dentist interesting. But it's because the compensation the reimbursements going to L. Wile so it's one thing if you saw a state where people people were not going to the dentist in the income was going down but the insurance stayed the same stayed the same areas as you go well. The reason that people are making less money is that that people aren't going anymore but our state people are going are the consumer costs going down for them as well as part of the drive to consumer ever go down. Our states cost of living has gone way. Uh skyrock yeah so but on top of that like that as the the monkey brain dentist. WHO's looking for a narrative it's just too irresistible to talk about? That's the canary in the coalmine. We're all going to be like Washington soon enough so we're going down and I don't know I would take my opinion what it would take is a whole whole bunch of dentists deciding. They're not gonNA participate anymore and the only obvious risk in that is everybody's afraid if you do that you're going to lose patient right and suddenly unle you're going to be sitting in your office. Nothing to do. Yeah I mean I get that anxiety I get that yeah so I don't what I really don't understand is is how you can have a Washington. That's having this massive reduction reimbursement and then I think and I. There's five states. I think it's North Dakota South Dakota Minnesota those were three their reimbursements going up. Yeah Yeah you go. How can insurance company there be raising what they're paying dentists one these other states thereof paying less? Yeah it doesn't logically translate to me a Yeah it's it's interesting that what what you can mean what you derived but what you could derive from data and you gotta remember these insurance companies. Have all the data. They've got yeah they they know a lot more than we're on that stuff so it is interesting you know. I think medicine set the model years ago when when medical insurance started squeezing and you know physicians basically solo physicians almost disappeared and went into groups and then from groups she. I went into my internist. I've had I've been with twenty some years. When I first met him? He was with a small group of four and then they got together into a group of like twelve Bove and then that group became like fifteen and then that group ended up in a major clinic employed by the clinic. And it's like so in Madison. Listen you've seen it happen. I do think getting together in groups for dentists is actually not a bad thing at all. As as I mentioned I've never practiced Solo. I've always practice actus with a minimum of one other person often too. I think the most I was actually at one point maybe three people but I always enjoy the fact that was I was number one. It was sharing a lot of things like sharing some facility shots sharing managing emergencies sharing overhead stuff and just the camaraderie of yeah so for me. I never thought of it as a negative that I wasn't quota Solo Practitioner. Today when you look at the statistics you do hear people again again. It's that Narrative Solo practitioners are disappearing. Yeah well they are but they're not all going to. It doesn't necessarily mean about the I have say we we've podcast it. Allow Lot with Jason Smith and over the years and in we podcast with him talking about the practice that he's in in that model and it's literally the I don't know how any dentist wouldn't WanNa do that because it's not necessarily multispecialty although you could but it's also sort of like there's a multi specialization naturally specialist. But like for instance a restorative dentists. Who really likes doing direct or whatever and so there's a group of guys that kind of have things they like to do any refer to each other and literates the best of everything because you get to like do this? Have you WANNA do because you're working with someone else you know. He hates endo refers isn't but he refers it in practice. Yeah I mean that's not a that's a group practice so it's like it's like heaven when when I get to do what you WanNa do and let the other people who love the other stuff do it. Yeah yeah so the narratives are sometimes we might hurt ourselves with the narrative would come back to the narratives of DSO's student debt insurance. Those three things. I think they're so scary Gary and so like the Big Bad Wolf that dentist you know. It's just kind of our human nature. The student loan debt is hard for me to get my brain around. I still freaked picked up by that. Why so how do you? How do you look at that as a narrative? It's not helping US Bernie Sanders on. Jerome's podcasts the other day and they're listening even mentioned dental sign there specifically the middle school and I mean obviously associated with that but he mentioned that dental school was insanely expensive savvy having an inability to give give medical school away. They're gonNA charge no tuition to to medical something like you said when you graduated you thousand dollars. My total cost of all of that included buying articulates and pieces instruments. Books every books at this point. No I saw the second checking your Dental Students University of Washington. I tell you. And he's a state rather than his. Yeah so do you think you could turn into if you were that age today day could you turn into francs but frank spear is the request with that you know of debt or would that be you know I think if you really asked me. So what was the most important thing in me kind of getting from walking out of dental school to here and certainly Grad school was a big part of it but even walking out of Grad School. You know if I'd had the debt Mike Commitment at that moment in time was I was committed. I was going to just do the best dentistry. Austria could do and I was going to make it work financially so I mean I literally told myself consciously in one thousand nine hundred eighty two I said and I wanna be the guy who around my community is known for doing aesthetics and the nobody knows me so oh the one tool ahead in my tool belt that I could use was I could make spectacular temporaries so whenever I had a chance to do an tear an answer case I literally made spectacular temper. I don't care if I lost money or not. Yeah I mean back then. My crown was four hundred bucks not included lab fee and everything else. Yeah so I would make these spectacular temporaries but what I knew. Is that person most of the time if it was anti teeth back then it was a female that person would then go be having lunch dinner with their friends and inevitably you know what they're gonNA do. Ask What do you think of my teeth and literally the the patient would turn to her friends and say wow these are just the temper is Dr Spears dances. And it's actually how I met Vince coach. I was trading reading four interiors on a patient. Eighty late eighty two early eighty three. I had done the preps impressions temps her son and was being treated. ORTHODONTIC vince coke. She took her son to events and at the end of the thing when Vince was talking to her about her son she ended advertently says Doctor Coach what do you think about my front teeth. and He's other beautiful she says well. Yeah Dr Spear the young dentist. He's doing my front teeth. These these are the temporaries and -fensive what he called me calls. You really called me so we can get together. That's all he said. I need to meet you. Yeah so I think if somebody but he has the commitment to put in the effort and you do have to manage the other aspects of your life financial. Yeah you can't go out out and I mean I made it worked for me. I was divorced my last year of Grad School. Okay so I had alimony to pay. Yeah Yeah and so. I didn't have a practice of my own like building. Yeah four four years. Yeah I mean I just rented space and I was committed to doing even the best I could and I was also starting to teach mattress and study clubs but I want to spend any money on anything. Yeah I just was. Yeah marketing such such a whole different game now than it was then ten really word of mouth is probably where it was at then totally. Yeah yeah which is a lot of sweat. It's not a lot of money money but it's a lot of sweat. Just don't talk to each other anymore. Well exactly gym the other day and there were sixty people in there. Not Not a peep. Nobody was saying a word. I wasn't sure if they were talking. I had my headphones on. That's the problem. You know that the the piece I talked about about you know are we do a lot of surveying surveying of patients and dentists. I mean literally thousands and thousands of people over the years and the latest survey. We did on five hundred patients. Where we we asked them? How did you find your dentist? And thirty nine percent of them said I was referred by somebody else but then when you ask them we'll have you referred anybody to the dentist and four hundred of them two hundred nine or something hadn't refer 'em referred antibody and then there's no like two hundred and one had referred like one I. Yeah and you start going so in my era of the eighties in particular patient referrals was huge. I mean and patients telling their friends about the dentist was massive and I still think he can be today. Yeah but you're also inundated mandated with all of the other media and marketing. Yeah so and obviously a lot of the patients today you know. Get the name of somebody in their media on the Internet going. Okay look at their website. Yeah no that's very true. Complex yet is a much more complex issue than when I started out. Take home messages. Make really good temporaries. Jeez I that's it even when you sat down and you know a little bit surprised to hear Frank Spirit talk about guru reviews and when you sit down and he said that was not my typical talk. Yeah do you find it your your duty as one of the singular people that out there that has the reputation of being such a great teacher that it's your duty to give give out this information to kind of keep this chicken little type fears down to you've really set the record straight. You know what I actually do feel that way. I'll I'll tell you why I feel that way. In terms of kind of having a bit of a responsibility to take a topic like that is so out of my wheelhouse I mean my gut compared to what I usually doing that but what I know. I'm really good at is. I'm really good at taking data data and making sense out of it. So you can either correlate that it does have an impact or it doesn't and then being able to communicate that it and I do fear right now that there's so much fear and anxiety among dentists that they need to know do a lot of the facts about all of those other things means just like if you only look at that one graph that I think would have scared me the most had I not filled in the rest avenues was that graph that looked at K.. From Eighty one to ninety one dentist incomes went up twenty percent and General Practitioner from ninety one O one one. They went up twenty five percent from a one to seventeen. They went down ten percent. WHOA scary but in reality then then when you start digging deeper and looking state by state there's dentists that are killing it talk about like two thousand and five being the peak year for income for dentist my word? There's people today if you just look at the average state averages of places like Delaware and Alaska and they're killing those numbers that we used to look up to in two thousand five and say well. This is the best dentist the reserve best. That's the Delaware thing is funny because we have a friend who lives in Delaware who basically one of things. It's pretty tough to get a license in Delaware Valley. There's a lot of hoops to jump through to get through in Delaware because like all the guys know they have a great. But then the Tako Messages Alaska. Alu- I didn't I would have never ever. Yeah so that's that's really not to mention doc. Alaska Delaware I think has forty five dentists per hundred thousand people that national average right now is like sixty dentist for one hundred thousand people right..

Delaware Grad school frank spear Washington vince coke Alaska North Dakota L. Wile Bernie Sanders Delaware Valley Dental Students University of Minnesota General Practitioner Bove Madison Austria Jason Smith Mike Commitment
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

03:21 min | 11 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Amazing lineup which you can check out. We have a bunch of really cool exhibitors. They're going to be there. It's the space is really cool Jason. We're really we're really cool. Of course. Hello what would your life be like. If we didn't have voice administration tell me that my January it'd be so cold and would would not have a moment of would not have a moment of warmth and French. I've I've talked to some some exhibitors potential exhibitors lately in and what I found is is exhibitors for Minnesota in northern Michigan. Pretty excited about Scottsdale in January to say and there's a little easier herself and say you know San Diego but like that I do love God. Love Scottsdale every time I go there to my wife. I said we're moving moving I'm sure I'm sure spears is knocking. That might be an start there. You know. Obviously I've like I do enough ACLU's feelings feelings a day where I clearly you're the guy. Yeah I'm the guy so Some someone else that we've oftentimes run into in Scottsdale Arizona. A Guy I by the name of Frank Spear you ever heard of that guy who hung Jason and I had the chance to interview Dr Frank Spear At the spear summit some weeks back in it was a really good interview. This is the first time we actually sat down with them. which I won't lie? You was a little bit a little bit intimidating when you're sitting sitting down with the man that everyone has talked about this but he's a very approachable and easy to talk to guy. Would you think him down there. And you know it's a lot of times we can't have if we put celebrity on people and and kind of forget that they're they're real people when you sit down and talk to him. It's pretty cool. Yeah it's pretty arts fire. I completely agree. That's kind of how it felt to me too. So we sort of dug in a little bit more like Gal back in April we had him on talking about the the talk that he had given in to the the big lab group in February whereas basically he was sort of out of his element doing some statistical work and so we dug in a little a bit more on that and and and his take home was basically that things in dentistry are better than we're acting like. They are like a lot of a lot of the narrative that dentists tell each other not really backed up by facts which was really kind of refreshing. He and he actually told us he kind of felt obliged to let the world know that. It's not as bad ATAS. Its own so that was pre- pretty refreshing. Actually you mean there's fear mongering dentistry about like group practices and stuff you know. God sounds like people people would be like a transition specialist or something. FACEBOOK group said talk a lot. About how practices are Kinda hurting everything you know. That's that's weird. The Franks fear would say the opposite. Strangely specific a analogy Jason speaking generalities it just totally just totally off the top of my head. Nothing nothing okay. So you guys have to sit back and take a listen to this interview. We really had. I mean I really had a great time talking with but also what a what a great guy. And he's just he's good at stories off the top. Just love that stuff so sit back. Take a listen to our interview with Dr Frank Spear Dental.

Jason Dr Frank Spear Dr Frank Spear Dental Scottsdale ACLU FACEBOOK Arizona spears San Diego Minnesota Franks Michigan
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

11:15 min | 11 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Hey there I'm Jay Phillips Chasing lipscomb. You know what I like about you. You just want to help people. You're just going to help people that's what it is. You don't need to make money. It's not about the money it's about helping people with you. That's what it is. Yeah where's that Timothy Timothy leary had the song I mean It's a Dennis leary. Okay okay that yeah. That was a that was a deep cut for the the early nineties. MTV towers with with a little short form cartoons they used just to play and then Dennis leary pop in and aggressively smoke cigarettes and he would just smoke so fast I love. I love that that'd be that'd be a rated eight at our movie right now. He's a spokesman for Ford trucks. So I did not know. Eventually you'll sell eventually. You'll sell out him just saying how they don't have explanations supports Ford trucks. Ford Ford tough like Jalen. I am looking forward to the twenty twenty twenty twenty Ford Bronco Come. I'm waiting to see what that's GonNa look like. I had thought that you and I should probably talk about with if our audience. Though I don't know that I don't I interested to know. What percentage of the listeners are practice owners? I would say probably at least fifty percent maybe more and I think a lot of them if they are they're spiring to be. I'm assuming we only talked to one percent of Dennis jets Res Restaurant Recipe if you're listening or you're not part of the one percent and turn it off turn it off. We don't want you. We're only only talking for the one percent kid kid no century so you own multiple practices. I'm only on one practice. Don't remind can you tell me how you do book keeping in Bill Paying not necessarily like accounting. I WanNa know like the day to day who puts the deposits in the check. Check Register. Who who pays the bills who make sure everything's balanced and gets over? Like how do you do. Do you have an account and do all of that or do you do some of that as your wife do some of that. What do you do that? Maybe we've done it a different differently than Brecca's whatever poorly so so whatever just make it and do the opposite that we've done a little bit of everything here lately. I take all positon. It's in The office manager puts in puts an all positive. I kinda go back later on and run reports and check on the deposits deposit reconciliation legal soft Go back into the bank account. Make sure that the what's putting put into the bank account matches with the The reports run on Eagle Soft for bookkeeping. Actually Matt Count and pretty much do everything so I just sent him all my bank statements credit card statements every quarter Sometimes I don't do it right now. The only reason I'm really doing that is because as I am beholden to the bank for my bank and so they require they keep they keep up on everything crazing. Yeah so like profit and loss statements. I I have to provide that to them every every quarter. I mean otherwise. I probably wouldn't know much of what's going on I probably should but Yeah I kind of keep track of it like that. I I have to tell you so I like I said I've owned the same practice since nineteen ninety eight. It's relatively small practice and my dad. I inherited my account from my dad. He's always kept me in a in the straight and narrow but also my mom used to kind of do the bookstore sir. My Dad's office you do payroll and she would. Do you know she would pay the bills. And she would do the check registers and everything to countenance everywhere and so. I just sort of did that and I continue to do that. And I've changed over the years how I do it but like I used to put it in a big paper packet and drop it off or mail it now I just I I mean I e mail it essentially it's all in all PDF's and all that stuff so it's it's much more efficient now but what's so funny is month after this first month that I had it done in the first couple well days of the month like I'm super proud of myself. I suspect my accountant may have actually had a heart attack. When he saw stuff comes through like on the third day of November in actually? He's pretty great. If you're on top of it it's much easier. You rarely on top of it as multiple times. I think when we've been flying to to spear I'm like I'm Sitting in the sitting in the airport like several days late trying to finish my accounting reports. While I'm getting on a plane and I remember telling you about that so I I tend to do more of it than I should and the thing is like whatever amount of money. It would probably cost to have my count do that. It's probably not that much compared to the aggravation time that I spend on it so I'm torn. I do like to know what's going on. I know what's coming in and going out and all that stuff but it's also part of his clearly. It's not what I was trained and do. It's sort of a waste of time so I don't know I'm not. I'm not sure I kinda think sometimes too I filter stuff and I may kind of move stuff around. And before I present it to my account because I think the he may not have understanding of Of what I really WANNA do. And and you and some counts. I've taught my account about doing a cost segregation analysis. Because I've I've built out stuff in the past couple of years and he's not all that aware of of doing it cost segregation analysis. So he hasn't really done that or had a client. That needed that done. So we've had some talks with him in the past of for the listeners who don't know to cost segregation analysis and what does it cost segregation analysis. What what would that give you so basically if you build if you build a officer you build a building Some portions of that of that build out can be depreciated at faster rates than than others. So like I. I'm not really an expert on it but you know like the electrical system that you put it in the building and can be depreciated at at five years where Gus can be depreciated twenty years so basically over time it will all be depreciated At the end of it so so if you did it if you didn't know what that was and you just had a depreciated as an off yes or as a lump sum or something. Yeah you would get that at the end but for some people depending on what your needs are you may want to appreciate that. That might get tax benefits from doing it fast. So there's there's a lot of timing and and stuff And especially I sold a practice Last year And there's a lot of timing that you really need to get right and I've kind of gotten burned on that to That I probably should have thought a little bit of mine was more of an emotional motionless. Sal so it's it's there's a whole lot of different moving parts in there and in I think choosing an accountant or choosing a bookkeepers is is is really important and to I'm kinda going off on a tangent but a little bit of We talk about owning real estate You know refining different ways that you can if you own real estate or unreal. Save Your Privacy Your own real estate elsewhere. There's a lot of Miller stuff that you can do to depreciate stuff or write off stuff and so there's a lot of real estate wasn't dental would you use a our is the account that you're using is a is are they dental specific or not necessarily and and for real estate that separate for. Let's say you were doing rentals for duplexes or something like that. Would you use the same counter. Would you find someone who does real estate accounting separately separately. I'm just curious I mean I personally use it if my my real estate dealings aren't You know I have a couple of them but they're nothing. I don't don't have a big apartment complex or anything like that I think if I did then I would I'd hire somebody else or higher Some other type of person that kind of work in concert concert with with all those people together Right now minor just run through different. LLC's gotTa Run through into my personal tax acts account. So I mean I have. I have one One tenant and kind of just paying me and I just run that through into the LLC. So it's not that not not the complicated but if he got more complicated it would probably make sense to work with someone who does that specifically maybe and you want somebody knowledgeable and then you would be looking at something like a Cossack creation analysis or some more complex things to be able to to to get your benefits ahead of time so yeah. It can People don't realize you know when you start getting into dentistry if you have a small practice it's it's one animal that grows as it grows. Its another animal as it grows even further as you get older be able to have some money to invest in different stuff. You are another animal all of a sudden so the levels of complexity kind of kind of go up along with that too. Oh yeah and it's a it can be a pain in the butt sometimes trying to trying to figure it all out and we given Evan good ABS. PODCAST with Craig Cody. Who's WHO's an account? He's he was at the voice dentistry last year. And we we podcast with him and he was talking about how I mean. He basically just does accounting for dentists in actually is a podcast or two but He basically the thing that he tries to get his clients to do. You is calm and talked often. One of the things that dentist do is put that. That's the last call they want to deal with. They've got other stuff to deal with. And then Lo and behold they make a move that they might have made differently. They just consulted their accountant prior to doing it. I'm a little notorious for that too. I try and just do stuff through email or whatever in a lot of times. They don't make the calls when it probably should I and so it's I think it's important to have a real wide open relationship with your own and this I mean there's lots of stuff to be talked. Yeah no don't don't drop stuff on them like at the end of the year and trying to halo. Is this purchasing man do you. I have no idea yesterday. Guilty as charged man. It's not even kidding like that's another reason to do your do your accounting quick as you can because you're that many days further further out from last month I'm guilty as charged big time. But I don't have if you have thoughts if you if you think Jason and I do this pathetically you're right for one thing but but also I'd love to know if you have ideas or suggestions or how do you guys do it. I mean are any of you guys accounts yourself. Were you an accountant. First and then you you became a dentist just you could ruin your practice. That will that's pure sex right. That is I mean seriously. If you buy an accountant was sexy and then add the dentist.

accountant Ford Dennis leary Timothy Timothy leary Dennis jets Res Restaurant Ford Bronco MTV Jay Phillips LLC Matt Count Brecca office manager lipscomb Jalen Jason Gus
"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"dr frank" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Dental hacks nation. I am really excited to tell you about a virtual course. That's being being offered by cosmetic right now. I just looked at the video at dental dot com slash virtual. Jason Jason Smithson is giving a course virtually which means you can sit on your couch. Your pajamas watching it. On minimally invasive ceramics so good so he's covering all kinds of veneer situations including like super minimally invasive point three millimeter invasive years. He's also talking about vertical crown preparations which are all the rage on facebook groups every night. There's no one better to do this. I know he's known for composite. But but he's an amazing restorative dentist and more importantly he's an amazing teacher. He's.

"dr frank" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr frank" Discussed on WTVN

"Dr Frank elbow, author of books about hermetic representation in architecture and also somebody who has studied the cathedral of Notre Dame inside and out. We're talking about some of the things that have been damaged. But also some of the things that people didn't even know were there, and that brings you back to a question that somebody asked last night Frank about about the placement and they had maintained. I didn't know enough to simply say other than I'll ask you tomorrow night. But I doubt that I kind of doubted that it was true that the rigid. The reason why they built Notre Dame where it was was to stamp over a a church or or some sort of worship site dedicated to the action goddess ISIS, which the caller insisted was also the basis for other things regarding Paris where I that's not true, right? Or is it true? I I'm not familiar with that. There was a that particular site. It's important understand that Paris was initially founded as a Roman town, and the very process of finding Roman town what an enactment of dividing heavens into cargo and modest it's a term and. Township and that particular site where Notre Dame was was initially dedicated to temple of Jupiter, and then it went through a series of basilicas, I think from the fourth century onward to the eleventh century, but that was a Roman innovation is to take what is known as a genus loci or a the notion that a particular site has an ancestoral spirit and then on that site, build another sacred temple so the Christian audiences there after obviously respected that Roman. Inheritance? That adds to its significance in extenuation of that site. But now it like so many other things we see in early Christendom. It was a way of of both reaching out to pass tradition and superseding it at the same time at least in imaginations of the of the faithful. So it could have been then that the Romans built this temple to Jupiter at a spot that had originally been built as a temple to ISIS as this caller had claimed it's but you've never heard that one way or another highly dubious, even though I was venerated in Roman times the site was I think initially founded by Julius Caesar who would have co-opted do putter if any been included they're not ISIS, although I. Swipe white widely venerated throughout the Roman world will. And I think part of the callers claim was that concept of Notre Dom started with a worship of Cleopatra. And that doesn't have the ring of truth for you either. Then. That prediction of all Aji or that could be for the most part that cathedrals are dedicated to marry as an intercessor between heaven and earth. So as they're building nippy drill as a exemplification a building skyward the whole purpose of the cathedral stepping into one year meant to look upward and see this elimination of glass that that marvel of engineering was enough to show that the the the building accident as what the historian of religion LES Elliott a called an excess Monday, a a an interlocutor between heaven and earth and very much. A gothic building is a vehicle is meant to take you somewhere. It's a medium of transportation to heaven like a three dimensional manifestation of art science and faith all in a single place. And by that time it in. Medieval world, most people were literate. So it would be like seeing the avengers. And or whatever the last of blockbuster movie is. In with religious steroids, and with a sense of on that you would look up and not be awestruck by how did they do this even today? Eight hundred years later, we look at the construction of of gothic engineering and think how did they arrest?.

Dr Frank elbow Paris temple of Jupiter Julius Caesar LES Elliott Eight hundred years one year
Millions may be misdiagnosed with penicillin allergy

Paul W. Smith

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Millions may be misdiagnosed with penicillin allergy

"Risk of serious infections, taking those alternative antibiotics not taking the penicillin here to tell us all about it. Dr Frank McGeorge. Good morning. Hey. Good morning, Paul. Yeah. This comes from jam article that was recently published and you know, roughly thirty two million American have noted in their medical records somewhere that they are allergic dependent. Dylan. But in fact, research has shown that somewhere between ninety and ninety five percent of those that have been labelled as penicillin allergic can actually tolerate the drug just fine. So, you know, it's a really important problem. Because penicillin is a great drug. So why did the case that so many people think that they're allergic when you're not really, well, I many people who get an antibiotic might really have a viral infection and viruses often produce rashes, especially when they're children. So if you were given penicillin the same time that a viral rash appeared standby often gets blamed labeled allergy, and that's often the case with children who are told that they're penicillin allergic. And then they're labeled that for the rest of their life. And also antibiotics can force side effects are not allergic like nausea vomiting or something else. And while it might be a sensitivity. It's not true allergy and people often misconstrued that. So those are some of the reasons that people who are not really penicillin allergic might think that they are. It's incredible. Dr Frank McGeorge should discovering and telling us that researchers estimating now up to ninety percent of patients who've been told they're allergic to penicillin actually, aren't that significant. Well, exactly, you know, if you think that you might have a penicillin allergy. It's a good idea to talk to your doctor about a simple allergy tests to find out for sure, and it's also possible, by the way that you might have grown out of your allergy in fact in one recent paper when a small group of people who were once positive on skin testing for penicillin were retested often about six years later. None of them were still positive roller GIC. So they hit actually changed their allergy over time and correctly identifying a penicillin allergy is really important for a bunch of reasons. First of all penicillins are great medications like they said earlier that can be used to target very specific infections with a more precise focus rather than using an overly broad. Non penicillin alternative. It's more likely to breed resistance. Sometimes a penicillin is actually the only or the very most effective antibiotic for a particular infection, so incorrectly assumed allergy could actually deny someone in the best treatments. And also when someone reports a penicillin allergy we often rule out using all of the silicon plight amoxicillin or die clocks and also a lot of doctors avoid using other antibiotics like, yes, lex, although that practices well-supported. It's just what Dr sometimes do because of the potential for a frost reactivity. So it does have a lot of downstream consequences if you are allergic in your record dependent schilling, but it has never really been proven. And people's perceptions of allergy are very different. And so it's important really characterize the reaction, there's some sensitivities. And then there's true allergy dock it occurs to me in this presentation in the morning, which we so greatly. Appreciate you taking time off from your. Henry Ford medical group duties duties, and all the things that you do to be with us. And we appreciate it. We don't very often give absolutes. But it sounds to me this morning. We are establishing that it is an absolute that if you have been told you're allergic to penicillin for your own good. You really absolutely should go. Get retested to find out for sure. Yeah. Definitely there's you know, there's a there's a ton of people out there who basically say, they're penicillin allergic. And frankly, you know, in the emergency department setting, for example, we don't have the time to prove that you are not allergic. So we just avoid penicillin, which in many cases can actually be to your detriment because of penicillin may in fact, be the best choice. So if you, you know, art shore, or maybe your mother told you this years ago, but she doesn't really remember why they were told that or something like that. It would be a good idea to actually just get tested. It's not a really complicated process. It's really simple process, and you can basically find out for sure one way or another. If you are in fact, sensitive penicillins or to what degree you might be allergic. It's there is a high probability that you are not really allergic to penicillin, and that can be life changing rather than having to go to the broad-based antibiotics as alternatives to penicillin that oftentimes kill off more good. Actinium and leave you in a bad way. Doc, always a pleasure. Very helpful useful information and and life changing this morning. Thank you, sir. All righty. Take care. Have a good day. Dr Frank McGeorge, Henry Ford medical group physician at six. Hi, I'm Jan, fingerling. With fingerling, number Kathleen. After eight years, we've decided to retire and

Penicillin Dr Frank Mcgeorge Viral Infection Henry Ford Paul Dylan Schilling Kathleen Amoxicillin Actinium Ninety Five Percent Ninety Percent Eight Years Six Years
"dr frank" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr frank" Discussed on KTOK

"So call eight hundred mega dash nine one. Oh. Newsradio one thousand KT. Okay. Dr Dan Solloway PHD nutrition. So I really appreciate you being with us. And there's a lot to learn. And speaking of that, I have one of my great guests, Dr Brian Frank, and he is an MD. Anesthesiologist specialize in acupuncture, and and then pain, and then winning all kinds of areas at any on top of that. He did a five year study to to pick up a fellowship, which I call a PHD in anti-aging medicine. So we really have a extrordinary doctor here the functional medicine degree adds a whole new dimension that most doctors don't know much about. And if they did they could really do a lot with the practice that they may not be able to do now. And I just talked to you in a show just recently about diabetes, and some of the things that you approach on really analyzing the and the and also the damage that can come from the little things the the areas of classroom that some people don't know the look at inflammatory sticky parts that they may not look at closely or the the instant Steve -ness of the insulin. When the H one looks good. They may still the pancreas may not be working, right? As a fun. Doctor Dr Frank. What are some of the therapies that you can do to help bring a person back from the bis, basically from the diabetes and all the damage can cause can you reverse that or at least make it where the person functions a lot closer to normal? Yeah. Dan, you know, you actually can kind of laugh because in conventional medicine and even in my life and in conventional medicine in the past we would've never even presumed that we could help someone resolve or your diabetes. It would have just been one of management intriguing, but it, but in fact, when we get the more comprehensive testing that we do in functional medicine, and we're looking at those various factors that you just mentioned as well as hormones adrenal. I wrote all that stuff when we really get the big picture. There are things we can do to help the body get healthy both from a nutrient based therapy as well as dietary therapy, and and you know, with your PHD in nutrition, the average medical school you spend four years and medicine and you spend one to two hours of education and nutrition. It's just it's just a, you know, abysmal, and and yeah. But in functional medicine, we spend a lot of time on that. And and there are some dietary approaches along with various nutrients that really make a huge difference. So I've got a number of nutrients, I've I've got one for instance, that we put a patient on she had both diabetes, and hypertension, and she has basically gotten she has complained gotten off of her any hypertensive medicines. And she has drastically reduced her diabetic medicines. And in fact, I know people that work with her, and they kind of on her, and if she would eat properly, she probably would be off of those as well. And and that's just one nutrient. I'm looking at four to six different nutrients that we can consider that help decrease insulin resistance that help decrease inflammation because the new paradigm. Whether you're talking about, diabetes, or or blood pressure problems are. Disease is that this is a it's just like a triangle. It's a trilogy of oxidative stress and inflammation leading to auto immunity, so diabetes is not just a blood sugar problem. That's nearly a symptom. We've gotta understand that at the heart. We're dealing with oxidative stress, and inflammation, and that's at the heart of almost every chronic disease. Yeah, we're talking about literally the destruction of your organs, folks. And one of the places show up is in a form of neuropathy. I talked a lot of people, and they get older they go. My feet are numb some people. I hadn't felt my feet in years. Eighteen goal they hurt, you know. Like, you've got a little bit frostbite and are your talk to me, and they could be thirty forty years old and their treble having trouble in the area of erection because the blood flow is so compromised because of the diabetes, and then one of the worst things that happens is people literally go blind. They lose her eyesight because the capillary start breaking down. And so it's a very very serious problems that all through the body every every organ every cell in your body is affected by too much elevated blood sugar elevated insulin. It has to be addressed don't take in do not think. No. If you need insulin. I'm not telling you, not take your insulin. But do not think that all you have to do is take more insolent you have to get it under control and try to get the body healthy again. And then it will your life will be so much happier. The pains the the Bill to sleep the likelihood of being obese because of elevated blood sugar argument too skinny because the bodies eaten up muscle. So you're you're an expert acupuncture can't acupuncture affect the patriots. Can you get the patriots function better? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. In fact, the conditions. You mentioned whether it's e d or neuropathy in the feet or eyesight problems. We've got a quite a variety of therapeutic options within the integrative medical community. So acupuncture would be one of those the bio magnetic pair of that you, and I talked about that would be one of those some of the libertarian based therapies. Would be considered there. And then the the for the gains waiver or the pulse wave therapy. So we've got a number of therapies that literally stimulate the body to restore balance restore equilibrium, and with that begins to make strides towards you know, where your feet are burning all the time where your eyes are actually getting healthier. I mean, I've got a gentleman seventy some odd years old with macular degeneration that we have significantly enhanced through the bio magnetic therapy. Well, I'm wondering can you do you also think you're making the receptor sites to the insulin more sensitive on the sale? Yeah. I think you you have an effect on a cellular basis you have an effect on a micro circulation of vascular basis, we have with all of those therapies we've mentioned the acupuncture, the bio magnetic there. The gains wave you all of those actually have an effect on stem cell activation and regeneration of healthy metabolism. And so, you know, the the key is sitting back with thirty six years of experience.

diabetes inflammation Dr Dan Solloway Dr Brian Frank patriots Newsradio Steve -ness Disease hypertension thirty forty years thirty six years four years five year two hours
What's best for kids: Flu shot or flu spray?

24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

What's best for kids: Flu shot or flu spray?

"What's best a flu shot or the nasal spray vaccine while there have been improvements to the spray the American Academy of pediatrics recommends the flu shot over the spray? That's because it's been more effective against. Most strains of the flu virus, Dr Frank Espinosa pediatric infectious disease expert, while the would be an option the shot is still the recommendation when a child goes to get a flu vaccine, the pediatricians are really going to stress the importance of the flu shot, according to the CDC last year there were one hundred eighty pediatric deaths due to the flu and about eighty percent of them were an unvaccinated children. The CDC recommends that everyone six months of age and older get

FLU Flu Vaccine CDC Dr Frank Espinosa American Academy Of Pediatrics Eighty Percent
"dr frank" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"dr frank" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"Hey guys you're listening to the most captivating podcast and i tunes that's right the elite man podcast return average men into a leap man every day read over the very best experts from the lifestyle health fitness social even entrepreneurial world and with their help we give you some of the best advice on the planet subscribe now if you haven't already and enjoy the show ano yeah if you really enjoy it leave us a review on today's episode episode number one hundred sixty three entitled the six keys to a happy and healthy life i chat with dr frank lippmann dr frank lippmann is a new york times bestselling author and integrative and functional medicine pioneer in today's episode dr lipman talks about the six core areas of optimal health and how you can begin mastering them today he covers his vast teachings in both eastern and western medicine and how he's been able to incorporate so many different modalities over the years into helping so many individuals become healthier in this action packed episode we cover everything from diet to sleep to supplements and so much more if you're wondering what the six keys to having a happier and healthier life are and more importantly how you can improve these areas and take action right away check this episode out now you're going to love it and now a quick word from our fantastic sponsors and by the way all of our sponsors can be found in the show notes or at elite man magazine dot com in the show's description where you could click their links and check out the special offers they have for our elite men audience the elite man podcast is sponsored by health i q and insurance company that helps health conscious people like runners cyclists weightlifters and vegetarians get low rates on the life insurance go to health i q dot com slash elite to support the show and see if you qualify health i q use the science and data to secure lower rates on life insurance for health minded individuals you being an elite man podcast listener almost certainly among those health conscious people that's why you should really listen up health iq can save customers.

dr frank lippmann york times elite man magazine dr lipman