5 Burst results for "Dr Felipe"

"dr felipe" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:10 min | 3 months ago

"dr felipe" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Rest of their life with their children and for us to be making decision because of our believe I don't think it's necessarily the best approach. I think the best approach is to try to do the best. We can to try to educate families about the things that we now to make them arrival of the things that we don't know for them to make the decision about possibly of terminating pregnancy are not. Let's talk a little bit about pregnant moms and some of the things that you've found more recently that might affect the outcome the likelihood of a healthy baby and I realized that this is not directly your specialty. But I, know that you've seen the ramifications of the wrong moves in there's so many wives tales everybody knows that pregnant mothers should not be excessively drinking or drinking at all too much coffee. No drugs that that goes without saying. But what about exercise do you believe in a certain amount of rest necessary? What are some advice? We can give to the moms that are listening. I would certainly tell them to listen to the situations but acting sense that minimizing stress and you know there are stressed that are probably not good for pregnant mother and optimizing healthy lifestyle. So I do believe that exercise the meditation or wellness is is very important for the mom and her baby I think said that I think we're in a country that plays a lot of emphasis on working in how to support the economy of abiding family and I think that when you see other countries where. They are emphasis in trying to get also some some rest for for the pregnant mother in minimize the stress of the fetus adding debt it makes sense. So I do think that we should look at optimizing better lifestyle for most women. In this country, they are large gap in healthcare in the opportunity to have access to care in. Obviously we we are. Probably the country has the best resources to get the best healthcare aren't for some but not to all, I think that unfortunately we could do better. Do you think that autism is a neonatal issue when I was growing up in America every once in a while, we would see a child one of our classmates that obviously was on the spectrum it was maybe one per. And now it seems. So pervasive is this a developmental issue? What do you have any thoughts of theories about where this is coming from? Is it so prevalent and is it in your realm or is it more even before your realm? The genetic side of times? Yeah. I. The spectrum of causation for autism I believe there's a genetic basis for for many. Delete that there is also environmental overlay probably even starting in Utero, we know, for example, that pollution mufflers are exposed to. You know impact the brain of babies actually USC's doing a fascinating study looking at pregnant women and where they are living and traveling to, and so there is no question that may be able to diagnose classify autism maybe differently than the past but I do think that our environment in our society as also exposed more children's the effect of mopping different brain disorder including on them so very. Clearly. Your perspective do vaccinations have anything to do with the conversation of autism? No absolutely not it's there was some way on this show to keep saying that like several times so that the general public would hear it and process it. That would be wonderful but I appreciate your your very clear and succinct answer. So doctor if you could pick one advancement, that C. H. La has made in your specialty over the last decade, is there something that you're just particularly proud of that? You can tell us about? Their Hugh in my field I think that the. To care for babies dairy fragile longs as has been very rewarding. We often care for babies that are referred to as because their lungs are very injured from the disease in our ability to experts at managing those special ventilators has been tremendous is actually kind of a ventilator that is so subtle and careful that it can handle the fragility of a newborn lung. Obviously the machine, but it's much more than that. It's really approached the rationale to use a specific modality. We have very specific greeting machine debts can deliver the very small volumes to protect belongs at a very fast rates in. So the good news is that the long as a tremendous ability to heal, we are born on me with a a fraction of a boar, the ourselves, and if we can protect them from further injury, we know that the long will grow back so to speak, and so there there are many children's who are knowing dard situation as newborn and with those special techniques we can now really allow. Them to have normal lives and that has been you know suddenly tremendous feeling of success. It's a truly amazing statement about our society in Nice in these days that we're living in the you can have a bright side like this I know that I have spent a good part of my life enamored with my friend. Dr Steve Because of the dedication that he brings to his science and his art Dr. Free. I am absolutely honored to have spent the last hour. So with you inspired and I think that what you do in your hospital is really a bright side for us. Thank you very much for joining us. You'd. I echo that sentiment as well. Thank. You for being here. It's truly a pleasure and enlighten. It was my pleasure things much. Well that's it for us today. Thank you Dr. Felipe Freed Lick and Dr Steven. Tailback doctor, how can people follow you? IF THEY WANNA keep track of your activities and breakthroughs I would say. He has a great website and anyone that wants him support or caused to deliver better care and their outcomes. I would just think each them to support the..

USC Dr. Felipe Freed Lick Utero Dr Steve America Dr Steven Hugh C. H. La
"dr felipe" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:54 min | 3 months ago

"dr felipe" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"More strange days Kovic on the rise. So many important procedures and medical needs are still being allowed to fester because people are afraid to go to their doctor let alone a hospital. So this pandemic is claiming lives from people who don't even catch the disease one specialty that can't wait for covert to be rear view mirrors neonatologist the care necessary for some of the smallest of us to survive catastrophic challenges. We have a special guest today from a hospital that is leading the country in the quest to place the odds in the newborns favor welcome to medicine. We're still practicing I'm Bill Curtis of course I my friend and Co host Dr Steven Tailback He's the quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care these days he continues to fight on the front lines of the COVID battle in California for which we are eternally grateful Steve How you doing I'm well thank you. It's good to be. I'm sure you've heard of children's Hospital of Los Angeles notice. Hla US News and World Report has consistently ranked the H. L. A. in the top five nationally and the number one pediatric hospital in California for thirty years. Running this remarkable nonprofit children's care hospital is nationally known for Neonatal Research and care that is funded entirely by generous philanthropists. Dr Felipe Friedli is chief of neonatologist at Children's Hospital. He is also co director of the fetal and neonatal? Institute. And he is professor of clinical pediatrics and surgery at the renowned kept school of Medicine at USC where he's published over one hundred, fifty abstracts, Peer Review Articles and book. Chapters Dr. Freedland is a rock star in one of the world's most complicated pressure filled and delicate specialties that include newborn respiratory failures newborn pulmonary hypertension even surgery on unborn babies. Can you imagine welcome Dr Felipe Free Lick? It is an honor to have you here tonight and having me. So doctor. Can you just bring our listeners up to speed on C. H. LA and your mission there? Sharon's HUSK local Sandra's mission is to care for sick children's no matter what their background cultural background or insurance they have we are. Laced to gear for family and children's in babies when there's no other place that could care for them. Are we talking about like one of the few medical specialties that truly couldn't wait for Covid to pause that's a great question fortunately or many children's covid has not been has impactful. They are some babies are insurance that are sick but by four unless we compared to adults we. Are Really lucky so far. So we're not going to spend the whole show on Kovin because frankly I think people wanted to know much more about your specialty, but maybe you could tell us a little about what kind of a regimen as C. H. L. A. Developed uniquely for this pandemic and what are some of the special things that you do at your hospital to manage this. A lot of it has to do with making sure that became screen families in staff when they arrive at the hospital in make sure that they're the environment for caring for the Germans you regardless of the reason why they're in the hospital is is optimal until the hospital has and significant resources to ensure that we screen families and visitors and parents when they arrive psychologically, how do you get your clientele to feel safe under these circumstances that has been Estonia As you can imagine a lot of families or speared to even go close to a hospital. So said, only our data's suggesting that we can provide a safest environment to bring Ren's and care for them, but it is a concern. Certainly, we can see that visit to the emergency room are significantly down obviously a lot of the outpatient clinic. I've had to restructure their environment, but I think that honest conversations with family in trying to make sure that. Children can get the care they need. So they don't have complications from their Biz orders diseases are we tried to do our best to get the message across near infected pregnant women? What percentage of the infection will affect the units? It depends how you define a fact neonates that we have not seen certainly in our area in each show drums or need neonates infected with the virus is very reports in the world literature. Around that, what we do see though is mother who gets sick with that of nineteen illness and systemic inflammatory response, and then for metro reason the the baby. Has To be delivered early, some more of a high risk delivery as opposed to neo natal issue for set right in. So premature babies that are born because the mother is sick is is something that we see are not sick with Kobe, but they have all the risks of complications from prematurely you use the term premature and for our listeners we think. We know what that means but can you define it at what level is it become a problem and I also understand that your hospital very often doesn't get the babies until there's a problem you just suddenly get a call that there's a need that's correct. What prematurity is is defining general and any a pregnancy debt is not reached thirty eight weeks but. Obviously, there are gradation of prematurity. In this country, we have made remarkable advances in support premature infants. Now, we care routinely for babies that delimit the viability that's around twenty two weeks gestation. So if four twenty, eight weeks, it's fair to say that those babies are the highest risk of complications after eight weeks. The outcomes in this country are really really good. What kind of complications do you deal with when it's actually ten weeks too early, there are lots of complication that those babies can be suggested to. They are complications involving the brain. So these baby's brain or very fragile own and they can have significant damages to to their brain. All the organs are augury fragile. The good news is that most babies do do quite well in in recover. Would we worry the most is obviously the Oregon's that damaged don't cover such as the brain or the is. By, far with the technology that we in this country, most babies do quite well. So I I watched one of your videos where.

doctor of Internal Medicine Pu Covid Children's Hospital Hospital of Los Angeles California Dr Felipe Friedli Dr Felipe Kovic Neonatal Research Kovin Dr Steven Bill Curtis USC Dr. Freedland Oregon Estonia Steve director Ren H. L. A.
Dr. Philippe Friedlich On Pediatric Surgery And Neonatal Therapeutic Hypothermia

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

03:54 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Philippe Friedlich On Pediatric Surgery And Neonatal Therapeutic Hypothermia

"Welcome to medicine. We're still practicing I'm Bill Curtis of course I my friend and Co host Dr Steven Tailback He's the quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care these days he continues to fight on the front lines of the COVID battle in California for which we are eternally grateful Steve How you doing I'm well thank you. It's good to be. I'm sure you've heard of children's Hospital of Los Angeles notice. Hla US News and World Report has consistently ranked the H. L. A. in the top five nationally and the number one pediatric hospital in California for thirty years. Running this remarkable nonprofit children's care hospital is nationally known for Neonatal Research and care that is funded entirely by generous philanthropists. Dr Felipe Friedli is chief of neonatologist at Children's Hospital. He is also co director of the fetal and neonatal? Institute. And he is professor of clinical pediatrics and surgery at the renowned kept school of Medicine at USC where he's published over one hundred, fifty abstracts, Peer Review Articles and book. Chapters Dr. Freedland is a rock star in one of the world's most complicated pressure filled and delicate specialties that include newborn respiratory failures newborn pulmonary hypertension even surgery on unborn babies. Can you imagine welcome Dr Felipe Free Lick? It is an honor to have you here tonight and having me. So doctor. Can you just bring our listeners up to speed on C. H. LA and your mission there? Sharon's HUSK local Sandra's mission is to care for sick children's no matter what their background cultural background or insurance they have we are. Laced to gear for family and children's in babies when there's no other place that could care for them. Are we talking about like one of the few medical specialties that truly couldn't wait for Covid to pause that's a great question fortunately or many children's covid has not been has impactful. They are some babies are insurance that are sick but by four unless we compared to adults we. Are Really lucky so far. So we're not going to spend the whole show on Kovin because frankly I think people wanted to know much more about your specialty, but maybe you could tell us a little about what kind of a regimen as C. H. L. A. Developed uniquely for this pandemic and what are some of the special things that you do at your hospital to manage this. A lot of it has to do with making sure that became screen families in staff when they arrive at the hospital in make sure that they're the environment for caring for the Germans you regardless of the reason why they're in the hospital is is optimal until the hospital has and significant resources to ensure that we screen families and visitors and parents when they arrive psychologically, how do you get your clientele to feel safe under these circumstances that has been Estonia As you can imagine a lot of families or speared to even go close to a hospital. So said, only our data's suggesting that we can provide a safest environment to bring Ren's and care for them, but it is a concern. Certainly, we can see that visit to the emergency room are significantly down obviously a lot of the outpatient clinic. I've had to restructure their environment, but I think that honest conversations with family in trying to make sure that. Children can get the care they need. So they don't have complications from their Biz orders diseases are we tried to do our best to get the message across

Dr Felipe Friedli Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Professor Children's Hospital Hospital Of Los Angeles Dr. Freedland California Covid Dr Felipe Dr Steven Neonatal Research Bill Curtis Kovin USC Steve Estonia School Of Medicine H. L. A. Peer Review REN
"dr felipe" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

13:14 min | 6 months ago

"dr felipe" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Visit he may have suspected that Hannah was endanger in the late. Seventeen hundreds asylums were highly controversial letters from patients. Some of which were later published revealed that they were beaten starved and frozen. Dr Felipe Penal. Even published a book treatise on insanity that argued the poor conditions in asylums. Actually made people's mental health conditions worse he theorized that abuse and neglect which were rampant in mental health facilities worsened the residents anxiety and stress. But it's also possible that tooked didn't believe asylums. Were all that bad? He was a quaker and one of his core. Values was a belief that all people were innately good. It was hard to reconcile that notion with the possibility that some individuals brutally abused people with mental health conditions for no reason and he may have trusted that once he visited Hannah. She'd confirm she was well taken care of except he never got the chance on April. Twenty ninth seventeen ninety. Hannah died at the York asylum. She'd been committed less than two months. Her specific cause of death was never recorded. Just like Reverend John Schori's at the time. Asylum casualties were so common. They almost weren't worth commenting upon. During thirty seven years of Operation York asylum lost more than three hundred patients under their care and until survivors like Schori's wife spoke up. Nobody investigated the deaths tuke grieved. Hannah's death also filled him with resolve. He and other devout quakers believed they had a duty to care for all God's children and few needed care quite like people with mental health conditions in March seventeen ninety. Two tuke made a bold proposal to his church. The quaker should open their own asylum. Unlike other facilities they wouldn't neglect or abuse their patients. They treat them. The York. Retreat opened in seventeen ninety six. The head physician. Dr Fowler focused on humanizing his patients. He he had conversations with them and encourage them to explore their interests and hobbies. He hoped that once people with mental health conditions got in touch with their inner goodness and rationality. They begin the healing process. His new facility was the first to truly focus on healing rather than confinement. Patients weren't restrained. They were kept under observation but free to roam the premises. Nobody was beaten. Nobody was doused with cold water. They simply attended talk. Therapy sessions and were always treated with respect in theory. The York retreat represented a new breakthrough in mental health treatment. A safer more empathetic alternative to places like New York asylum. That mental health research hadn't caught up to Fowler's ambitions. His human centric treatment was a step in the right direction but it wasn't enough to treat all of his patients and to complicate matters. Most of Fowler's theories were based on quaker theology. It was hard for him to be taken seriously. Even Christians quaker ISM was regarded as a fringe denomination unworthy of serious consideration since his practice had little scientific backing. It didn't catch on outside the quaker community instead. Most asylums of his era continued to abuse and neglect before people with mental health. Conditions could get the help they needed. The scientific community would have to fully abandoned the asylum system but that man to people on the outside also needed to take these abuses seriously. Luckily an undercover reporter was about to blow the whistle up next asylum abuses are exposed and now back to the story on April twenty nine Seventeen Ninety Hannah Mills died at the York asylum. Her grieving friend William Tuke resolved to find a better way to treat mental health conditions. And in Hannah's he helped found a facility called the York retreat. The institution was revolutionary. It adopted a person first. Ethos quakers believed that all human beings regardless of class race or mental ability reflected God's goodness while other asylums at the time treated people with mental health conditions like animals doctors at the York. Retreat embraced their humanity and they're progressive talk. Therapy program actually worked as one. Visiting physician claimed at the retreat they sometimes have patients brought to them. Frantic and an irons whom they at once release and by mild arguments and gentle arts reduce almost immediately to obedience an orderly behavior. The York retreat became a model for mental health treatment but only in the quaker community in eighteen seventeen. The FRANKFORD retreat opened in Philadelphia in eighteen. Twenty One New York's quaker operated BLOOMINGTON. Hospital also opened their doors. The success of these hospitals proved to be a double edged sword. People with mental health conditions willingly checked into the facilities. They knew the asylum's that practiced quaker style moral treatment represented their best chance at getting help but these hospitals were only effective when they weren't overly crowded and soon there wasn't enough space to go around so in turn more asylums. Private and public alike opened their doors. Trying to accommodate the overflow but these complexes didn't always share the kinder gentler vision that Doctor Fowler had pioneered at the York retreat from the outside. It was impossible to tell whether a particular hospital was one of the good ones. The mental healthcare industry wasn't regulated. Even well meaning caretakers sometimes made dangerous mistakes. In addition many patients never got real diagnoses. The question of whether and when they were allegedly cured was fairly arbitrary. But if you people manage to leave and were able to share the stories of life inside like Lydia Smith in eighteen sixty five. Lydia had plans to go to a small town Michigan Festival with her husband while she was preparing for the party. Her husband and sister-in-law drugged her then carried her senseless to a train car during the journey. Lydia slipped in and out of consciousness. She heard people describe her as crazy but she didn't know why they were saying that. Lydia wasn't crazy. She hadn't seen a doctor. She didn't have any symptoms. She knew she didn't have any mental health conditions even worse. She couldn't speak up to defend herself every time she started to come to her husband. Or sister-in-law would dose her with more chloroform. Then she'd sleep for hours only to wake with the distinct sense that something was very wrong. The husband who she was supposed to love and trust unconditionally was dragging her. Lydia almost died of the repeated. Careless chloroform doses. She was bedridden for days later. She looked back on the situation with fury but at the time she was too exhausted to feel anything at all a doctor visited her frequently. But when Lydia tried to piece together what had happened. He didn't believe her. He claimed she was delusional against her will. She was taken over six hundred miles away to an asylum. In New York. Lydia's had her committed. But Lydia didn't have any symptoms or a disorder that she knew of but that didn't matter to the nurses and doctors at her facility. Who did nothing to find? Out More about Lydia's mental state. For years she argued that she didn't belong there. She even tried to escape. But all these efforts earned her was a transfer to another asylum in Michigan where her concern still went ignored. She spent seven years committed during that time. She rarely saw her husband and never saw her children. Finally in February eighteen. Seventy two thirty six year old. Lydia managed to escape during a walk outside the grounds for exercise. She managed to slip away from an attendant and hitchhike out of town in a carriage. Ironically nobody came looking for Lydia. After her breakout she went straight home and reunited with her husband and family openly. If Lydia ever wondered why her caretakers were so unconcerned. She didn't speak up. It seemed like just one more instance of incompetence for six years. She settled back into her life as a wife and mother. She stayed quiet about her experiences. She didn't want to lose friendships. Due to the stigma of her supposed- mental health condition. But then she finally found out how she'd been committed and it had nothing to do with her mental state. Lydia had never gotten along with her sister in law. Sarah and Sarah had never been shy about spreading hurtful rumors about Lydia. She argued Lydia was a bad mother. Who abused her? Children and Lydia's husband believe the lies rather than repair his relationship or begin divorce proceedings. He tried to make his inconvenient wife. Go Away by having her committed her release coincided with Sarah's death and an end to the gossip campaign against her Lydia revealed the entire scandal in her eighteen. Seventy eight autobiography behind the scenes or life in an insane asylum. She condemned her husband and sister-in-law for conspiring against her. She blamed the asylum staff. Admitting her without a proper medical examination and diagnosis she implicated the United States government for its lack of oversight in allowing such things to happen. According to Lydia these situations were startlingly common. She claimed that many husbands had used a silence to get rid of their unwanted spouses so long as mental health facilities failed to diagnose their patients. The problem would persist. She ended her memoir a call for asylum. Reform the facilities needed to fund more research into how mental health conditions were caused and to implement better diagnostic procedures. But it was all too easy for the asylum staff to discredit lydia. Who were the people going to believe? Upstanding healthcare workers or some woman with documented history of mental health conditions. If someone was going to blow the whistle on asylum mistreatment and find a way to actually treat mental health conditions. They had to be unimpeachable. Somebody who could infiltrate the facilities without affecting their own credibility enter.

Lydia Smith York retreat Hannah Mills Doctor Fowler New York The York Dr Felipe Penal William Tuke Operation York Sarah United States John Schori Philadelphia reporter Michigan Michigan Festival BLOOMINGTON
"dr felipe" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"dr felipe" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Dr felipe. This Philip, but I like Philippe don't you sounds a little more international distinguished, doctor Philippe Salom is a Houston on college. He's a former White House healthcare advisor to President George Bush and Bill Clinton. He's been practicing medicine and treating the cancer for fifty years and his book, which he is very generously. And may I say lovingly dedicating to me is entitled defeating cancer knowledge alone is not enough. Dr Salam, I appreciate your time. I've got some questions from our listeners if you would first of all number of questions with regard to diet. So if you were to keep it, very simple and say do eat this and don't eat that. What would it be? I would say. You may e. Anything you want that you need to decrease. The volume food you consume most important thing and diet to eat less. And you know, my advice to the public for what? What? Lasts size more. That is my advice. Number of questions regarding red meat vegetarianism veganism. Do you see a parallel there? Now, there's no scientific evidence to indicate that any kind of diet would have a major impact on the call or on the incidents. Of course, that is the salty diet salt fish in Japan, which is associated with a higher incidence. Of this comic that few instances diet has been shown to be directly or indirectly linked to. But in general, I do not have a specific the by men my major recommendation. To eat less. And alcohol. Alcohol. Out of all is damaging the mouth and to the assaulted. Who smoke and consume a lot of all this combination disaster for mouth can some. On the floor of the mouth. Let. That is nothing you can do which is more damaging. Than smoking. And when you combine the smoking was alcohol, it becomes a disaster. Because then you will have a lot of. In addition, the which are produced by smoking on the. So if you if you want to drink alcohol, my advice is to be very modern. And to avoid completely smoking. If you smoke you should stop if you don't smoke, you should never stop smoking. If you think I'll make as little as possible. All right. Do you have suggestions dietary advice in addition to eating less are the you know, every few years, we hear about the Mediterranean, diet and superfoods and things like that. I do I think you need to eat good food avoid junk food. Avoided junk food. Good food. But it doesn't make any difference. Whether it's a high protein, low carbohydrate. Doesn't three D. May. I know that the American Cancer Society has so many different advices on the issue. But in my to my knowledge that is no specific item. And diet, which is clearly linked to come. But certainly article man good. Died. Lenient diet is one of the best. But. I don't want to complicate flights to people. Right. I think people. Eat what about their life? But in small quantities, we eat a lot. That's why that you'd see national health problem in America. If you go to easily. Talion probably eat as much of not more than Americans. But the quality of food is so good. So you do not see that. She is not an astronaut problem and. This is a major problem in America. Dr Phillip Salam as our guest the book is defeating cancer knowledge alone is not enough, Angie. Writes, doctor, please ask the good doctor what he thinks about juicing. My mother had stage. Four colon cancer it moved to her ovaries. And that's how she found out after having no symptoms for ten years. Long story short. She had surgery to remove part of her colon and her ovary. She then went on a strict diet, mostly juicing, no, red meat. No, dairy, no sugar processed food. She's going back to the doctor every six months, the cancer is gone, and she has no signs of it. I would like Dr Salim's opinion. When number one that is an exception. Should. Uses. This is not true. There's no data to show link between should and. And therefore, I would like to defeat to that this conception among the public. However, I would certainly recommend that to eat as little as possible. Because it may be to Abacha and up song. Well, that's a general. Statement for health reasons, but not particularly for. So that's number one number two. Is no concern. Which is not an men have been to the possibility of pure problem is that many doctors lose to. Utterly many patients in die who utterly because either the loses. Hope he does not have enough perseverence, right? Can you hold just one moment? Yes. We gotta break. Hold on..

Dr Phillip Salam Philippe Salom President George Bush American Cancer Society Dr felipe Bill Clinton America Philip Houston Dr Salim Japan White House Mediterranean Abacha Angie fifty years six months ten years