16 Burst results for "Dr Eric Carol"

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:05 min | 2 months ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Told that the world has changed fishermen don't go out and small boats alone at night and that the simple life. But that photo tells a different story. Greek myth about the island of Crete, a place where daughters and father share a secret to make time for the sympathies is to invoke the magic of the past. It's time to chat with Lynn. Clark about this week's recipe chef cheesecake with black pepper Graham crust. Lynn how are you? I'm great Chris I don't know if you've met no Angie Maher she's chef-owner of the Beatrice in in the West village in New York and she's all about meet big meet expensive meet you. But she has for example stake it's age for months in cheesecloth soaked in single malt was ski May. Relate, it's cooked marrow bones. She's full-fledged hundred percent out there committed to this. But one of the recipes we really love is a shove cheesecake because she's taking something common. We think we know and making it uncommon, which is what she's good at. So let's talk about that or ship cheesecake. It is Angie does this with a lot of what she makes she takes something that's really familiar just kind of turned it on its head and she's done that here with this cheesecake, it looks like a typical New York style cheesecake, but it doesn't taste like it nor is the texture similar to a New York style cheesecake she starts with the filling has the usual suspects of. Sugar and cream cheese. But she also as chevra cheese, which is a goat cheese, very tangy in flavor, and then a little bit of creme fraiche again back nece but also a lighter texture. So the texture of this once it's whipped up is really nice and airy. The crust is an interesting little twist. It's Graham Cracker crusts as you would expect in cheesecake, but she adds a teaspoon of black pepper to it. So it has a little bit of savory almost a little bit of heat to it to contrast all that richness of cheese. And the problem which cake of course is you have to cook it in a water bath Obama are- which leaks and has also other problems. So do we have to go down that road here? No. So when we were making this cheesecake, we made it dozens of times. It's a complicated thing to make actually, but we really wanted to do it without the water bath and we found this really cool recipe where you put the cheese cake in the oven at a high temperature for about twenty minutes the top gets really nice and Brown then you turn it off, prop open the oven let it sit in there for about ten minutes. That allows the oven to cool down a bit. Then you turn it back on it a low temperature. So the cheesecake can really cook through without any worry about curdling and you get this beautiful texture and please don't overcook cheesecake. Now we recommend pulling it at one, hundred, forty, five degrees, which is a little bit lower than most people recommend it will continue to cook when you pull it out but we found that prevented cracking on the top as well. So thank you to Ngo Mar chef-owner of the Beatrice in Chev- cheesecake with a pepper Graham cracker crust and no water bath, which is very exciting. It's very exciting. Thank you. You're welcome. You can get this recipe for chef cheesecake with black pepper Graham crust at Milk Street. Radio? Dot Com. This is most radio coming up Dr Eric. Carol explains a new way of thinking about nutrition labels. We'll be right back. Hey if you like this pocket, here's another one I recommend from food fifty, two's new podcast network, the genius recipe tapes. So what are genius recipes? Well, they're the recipes that break the rules or maybe they're. Just shouldn't work or sometimes they're just so good that they should be shared and once you start cooking, they'll make you feel pretty genius to on the show Genius Hundred Kristen McClary speaks to Jesus behind the recipes they tell their stories..

Chev- cheesecake Angie Maher Lynn New York Clark Kristen McClary Obama Carol Chris Brown Dr Eric
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

06:09 min | 11 months ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Next up. Let's find out what Dr Eric Carol is thinking about this week. Dr Carol well how are you. I'm good how are you good. You've probably been doing some research In have a new finding force well. The first thing that we talk about has to do with beef I don't I don't know if you saw the news a couple of months ago but there was a huge bunch of studies that came out of annals of internal medicine that you know maybe argument that the health effects of eating being red meat and processed. Meat Aren't nearly as bad as you know. Many people set in the pattern. Therefore really it's okay for lots of people to eat pretty much what they're eating and I I actually wrote an editorial to go along with it with with a CO author But we stressed at the end. And this is what. I'd love to talk about that. While we could quibbling argue about the health effects of meat on the fact that we continue to do so ignores a much larger argument in that is on the environmental impact right and that something we could all agree on probably is that you know meat. Consumption in general has a big effect on the environment right even then. It's not as simple as people think because you know first of all. Let's Acknowledge College. That raising cattle consumes a huge amount of land. Something like thirty percent of the world's ice-free land used as livestock. We have to go. A lot of crops ops to feed animals. It's very inefficient. We cut down forests be especially cattle produce a lot of methane which is not good for the climate and so in general all significant amount of man made or man caused climate change. Bad Gases are caused by the raising of cattle. And so therefore there's been a lot of press recently we're trying to find meat substitutes things that we could eat the tastes like meat might convince people to give up. You got the impossible Burger. You gotta be on meet. You got all that'd be substitutes. But part of the problem is that it's not ground beef which is which is hurting the environment. It's it's stake. Cattles and cows are not not really raised to give us ground beef in fact much of our supply of ground beef comes from whatever is left over from cattle when they're slaughtered for more expensive cuts and and from dairy cows which are no longer producing and so therefore getting people to eat more of these other products that replace Claes ground. Beef isn't necessarily going to save because people are still going to want to eat steak brisket and as long as they're being raised for those meets. We're probably I'll be going to raise a similar number of cattle and as long as we want to consume dairy cows milk. Huge number of cows are gonNA get raised and we're not gonNA have necessarily the environmental impact we might like now. Of course there's stuff on the horizon that people talk about about you know growing cultured meat in a lab and actually creating eating steaks but that's decades away. No one's got a handle on that it's unlikely to occur soon and if we want to find ways to reduce our impact on the environment by eating less meat we really need to focus on things like steak and not necessarily so much of our focus on ground beef. That's really interesting I notice Otis going back to the seventies that people often tried to replicate an item. They don't WanNa heat by using site Tan for example. I just wonder at the end of the day doesn't make any sense to try to replace an item with something similar to that item although manufactured In a different way or should we just reduce the amount of that item in our diet entirely instead of trying to replicate it well from a health health perspective. My God absolutely not so you know. We should all dispense with the idea that all of these fake meat burgers or healthier the impossible Walker's got like six hundred thirty calories versus a traditional opera. Six sixty it has pretty much the same amount of saturated fat and protein. It has more sodium carbohydrates hydrates. No one should be under the illusion that they're being healthier by making this switch now from an ethical perspective. Sure absolutely it makes sense saying I don't eat meat from an ethical perspective and you like these other things then so be it. That's great but if we really WANNA get at reducing the impact of animals the environment ground beef is a good start but it's not gonNA make a real difference for the market or for any of this also physiologically if you look at a twelve hundred pound angus or whatever. There's a lot of meat on those hind legs in all their scraps and it's very hard to sell that compared to the stake so there's superabundance of the ground meat there is and they will wind up shipping it off to other countries. There's there's lots of ways to try to make use of those cuts but unfortunately league giving up ground beef and switching to these fake meat substitutes. It's not even going to get us there. I do believe in my heart if we ever do gain the ability to culture meeting the lab Bob and create fake steak. That's a game changer. That's actually something. which could have a major impact on the market and on the Environment Hothouse Porterhouse steaks? Exactly I mean but I mean they're talking about it about using even like three D. printing of cells. We we do this actually for medical purposes for trying to create transplants or our tissues that we can do of course it's very early stages in experimental but a lot of people did that original research. The ones that went off to start some of these companies which are trying to you actually culture meat for consumption because there's not much bigger market for that clearly than there is in the medical realm but but we're still unfortunately we're just not there yet but that's I think there's much more potential there than people realize so in twenty years older my three D. hamburger printer from Amazon rain hamburger. We'll get there you. Hopefully you can order your three D. Ridi- that's what you really want Dr Carol once again defying conventional wisdom. Thank you thank you. That was Dr Eric Carol. He's the professor of Pediatrics. The Indiana University school medicine. Also a regular contributor to the York Times upshot com.

Dr Eric Carol annals of internal medicine Cattles professor of Pediatrics Indiana University school Bob D. Ridi Otis York Times Walker Amazon
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"So when do these studies about fish consumption. Is it because someone's consuming more efficient less red meat or is it strictly on the basis of the fish itself. It's a great question so some of it is clearly when we talk about things that cardiovascular disease and things like cancer some potential benefit may be from how much fish they're eating versus red meat however however they still try to do some studies in the best would still control for that and actually look at how much fish people are consuming above and beyond replacing it with some other concerning concerning things like red meat especially processed red meat so here's here's the real question which is can. I have one to two thousand sandwich a week. I think easily that would be no trouble. That's i i mean you know it can get pretty large quantities of this stuff in order to really get into danger and and people that are talking about things like once a week i would consider that moderation and almost any book so i can have one cup of coffee one drink scotch and went tuna fish sandwich. I mean you could have much much more and even much more scotch. Gotcha will more wine more coffee more scotch list tuna fish dot jerry carroll. Thank you so much anytime. Dr eric carol is professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also regular contributor to the new york times upshot column early in the show. I spoke with more kiss about pumpkin pie spice. She mentioned that starbucks pumpkin spice lottie might be available as early as august of course that made me wonder if holiday promotions oceans can actually start to early opole by c._n._b._c. found that many young adults holidays starting really chris now starts before halloween at this rate the the day after christmas will.

Dr eric carol indiana university school of m professor of pediatrics jerry carroll cancer new york times chris c._n._b._c. one cup
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"This is most your radio from peer XM, your host, Christopher Kimball. Stinky, tofu fermented shark. Root beer is there something inherently revolting about these foods. Well today, we explore the complexities of disgust with clinical psychologist and curator Samuel west. Who says his work at the disgusting. Food museum is changed people's perspectives on what's disgusting. And what's not? And I started working with this exhibit cutting up durian fruit to give people samples, and I'm just like, it's just it's the smell is overwhelming. But now, let's say it's two months. Three months later. I can't smell the bad enduring. It's it's it's it's amazing. And I haven't tried to like during. Also coming up, Dr Eric Carol demystify alcohol calories, and we learn how to build a better Meatball in Belgium. But I it's my interview with food writer and stylus for Beckham pep ler. About her latest book, a pair of teeth cocktail hour, the French way. Rebecca, welcome to milk street. Thank you so much for having me. So I'm going to start with a dumb question your book is apparent teeth. Cocktail hour the French way. How is cocktail hour in France or Paris quite different than what it is here in America. Not a stupid question at all. Actually, quite a quite a great one. So the main difference between cocktail or French way versus cocktail hour. American way is the type of spirits that are used. So in France cocktail hour is actually the hour of appro or of a pair Tif, and it uses these usually low AB, not super high in alcohol and quite complex and flavor without the aim of getting you tip seed straight off the bat while in America, we kind of think of you know, we end our workday, and we go have a MARTINI or Manhattan earn grow near something that is kind of hard spirit. I here in France. It's more of a you Enger workday and begin your evening with something that opens your palate and opens the night and doesn't necessarily make you forget everything that happened prior to that. That's a good way. Or any of these things you would drink after dinner, or these are all entirely for the Pera Tif our before dinner. So I I think that putting a hard and fast rule, and when you should be drinking. These things is is a little silly mainly because what we talk about with epic chief is what we also talk about a lot with digest tease, which is bitter in agents that either open your palate in your stomach or help settle your stomach at the end of a meal. And so I've been I definitely like take out a bottle of my favorite pastiche and set it on the table with ice and water at the end of a meal and ends the meal just as well. As it starts, it Archer, French friends. Just disgusted by the typical American right? Yes. Yes. Yes. I know and all the rules. So let's do a few of the others quickly. Lillay, you know, back in the eighties in Paris refused. As and I went to restaurant a lamp and at the beginning, I ordered Lillay right? And. The waiter came over with a large class of bilk because obviously I had this pronounced it. And to the horror of of myself and everyone else in the small dining room. So the lay is not the milk. It is something else. What is it? How is it made? So lay is a fortified wine. Brandy is confused with fruits and peels and barks, and then it is strained and blended with local Bordeaux wines. So depending on which variety you're getting it's going to be white red or rose a and then aged and and then poured into a glass over ice and with the twists, and that's that's your life for you. Let's end with three really simple recipes for Goto apparent Teves. There was a bunch of them in the book white wine with cucumber basil an ice. For example..

France Paris America Samuel west Christopher Kimball Rebecca Lillay Pera Tif Food museum Dr Eric Carol writer Belgium Brandy Archer Manhattan milk Three months two months
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Do we need to fear that each shrink carries serious health risks dr eric carol is a professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine he's also a frequent contributor to the are times upshot com dr arnn carol how are you i'm good how are you so you've been up to some research as usual and what have you found so one of the things i wanted to talk about was cancer and alcohol a lot of news got made at the end of last year right actually before thanksgiving when uh the big oncology association released a new report that said that any alcohol at all was going to increase your risk of cancer and that people needed to seriously consider whether to drink it on this of course cause lots of people to get very concerned to get nervous but it's important to look a little bit deeper before we make those kinds of decisions about what we're going to eat or drink that's incredibly bad news for me all it would be if you sort of just took it at face value the problem is that you know a lot of it is is done by cherry picking first of all to important to know that none of the research that was cited in this report was new a lot of it has been around for quite some time and the research they're relying on certainly does show that heavy drinking is associated with an increased risk of cancer and no one should dispute that alcohol misuse and abuse is very bad but the research and the evidence against late or moderate drinking is pretty thin first of all while it is has some in a small associations with some cancers and actually had some associations with reduce risks of others but the the oncological association only talked about the ones that increase the risk they sort of ignore the ones that decrease the risk even when you find a statistically significant increased risk it is still very small so breast cancer gets a lot of attention and they said that even light drinking a raise your risk four percent but you know that's a relative risk really what's happening is that you know of a 40yearold woman or fortyfiveyearold.

cancer oncological association dr eric carol professor of pediatrics indiana university school of m four percent
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"So much going on so much happening and these different layers of both texture and flavor it's a great well that's why we call it here and most read the best soup in the world a superlative that i think you've i probably will hold up jam thank you so much thank you uh you can fight are less be for love lobby by story and all our photos at one 77 milk streak dot com i'm christopher kimbell you're listening to milk street radio coming up more of your culinary questions to my co host sarah multan a dr eric carol reviews the research on drinking and health right after the bring this is mostly radio i'm christopher kimbell now it's time to open the phone lines sent into your calls about cooking or anything else you'd like to know about with my cohosts that remote since sara how are you chris i'm great and i'm ready to go welcome to milk straight who'd we have on the line hi how are you good how're you doing good where you're calling from i'm calling from all south dakota move okay how can we help you are i had a question about sol and baking since i was a kid my mom voice held needs hugh i met salt from all the recipes that i use and um as ivan experimenting more and more we're going to stop you there you're mom said to take out the salt yes you said do not you saw in what was her logic i think it's she's been raised to believe that fall knowing that though no dear that's a harming outdo actually this statistic is 95 percent of your salt intake comes from foods purchased outside the home processed foods snack foods fastfoods restaurant foods very little of your soul comes from home cooking and secondly without salt food doesn't taste like anything so besides that also baking it does play a role in making you know bred needs it and it counterbalances the sugar and sweet recipes you been cooking for all these years without adding salt or you got to appoint your life we realize that that was not good advice i got there prior realize that's how it got it right good for you okay good i feel better good yeah.

christopher kimbell dr eric carol sarah multan south dakota hugh milk one 77 milk 95 percent
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Dr carol thank you so much anytime that was dr eric carol professor pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also frequent contributor to the new york times upshot com okay i admitted i don't like artificial foods but what i liked even less are fraudulent foods how about air thoughts crab meat it's actually made from the pulverise paste of white fish flush with saab is often made from horseradish mustard and cream food colouring and those bacon bits that are actually vegan their me from textured soy flour caramel colors so when it comes to artificial sweeteners i have one good thing to say at least they're not frauds they have to say right at the package that they are artificial thanks for listening this week if you just tuned into mr show you can listen to our podcast on apple podcast itcher tune in google play or spotify remember to subscribe to the show go automatically get every single show download it to your phone week if you wanna learn more about milk street had to one seven seven millstreetcom you can download each weeks recipe subscribed to our magazine watch our first season millstreet television or order the milk street cookbook we'll be back next week thanks for listening limited it at a little too christopher kimble's milk street radio is produced by knock street in association with wg bh executive producers melissa ball dino and stephanie sender producer amy padilla associate producer carly helm attacked senior audio engineer douglas sugars senior audio editor melissa allison with help from vicky merrick in sydney lewis audio mixing by j allison at atlantic public media production help debbie patrick r c music is by two bub crew additional music by george brandel o'clock christopher kimble's milk street radio is distributed by p r.

professor debbie patrick audio editor douglas engineer amy padilla executive spotify google apple indiana university school of m Dr carol dr eric carol george brandel sydney vicky merrick melissa allison carly helm producer christopher kimble saab new york times milk
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"This was veltri basic is how to turn a can of chick peas into a snack now most of the time we call for chick peas we use dry chick the small better by the way we soaked them overnight with salted water absorbs the water and the sulphur flavor you get the perfect texture when you finish cooking them at a super stooped but there are times when you can begin with a can of chickpeas and here's one of them take one kenner chickpeas drain them well take some paper towels put them on a half baking sheet roll the moran on the towels to make sure their absolute try meanwhile heat up a skeleton the tablespoon of virgin olive oil and get the oil to the plate it's just starting to shimer add the dry chick peas to the pan frightened too lightly brown the takes just a few minutes and then toss with kosher or coarse salt some black pepper some smoke paprika in a pinch of sugar so what about ten or fifteen minutes you can take a can of chickpeas and turn them into a fabulous snack today dr eric carol a frequent contributor to milk street ways in on the issue of artificial sweeteners forces sugar carols a professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also frequent contributor to the new york times upshot com dr arnn carol how are you i'm good how are you good artificial sweeteners it's the one food i think is radioactive the in my life but you may wish to disagree you are not alone i will say uh there is no topic which has gotten me more anger and hate then trying to defend our official sweeteners.

dr eric carol new york times professor of pediatrics indiana university school of m official fifteen minutes milk
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Again i think it's also because we we see relationships we see some times people eat tons of cholesterol might also have high levels of heart disease but it turns out that the people to eat high levels of cholesterol might also smoke more might also eat many other things which are unhealthy and it could be those links which are related to heart disease and no direct causal link between the cholesterol that i'm heating and actual heart disease well on this show you've proven i guess that we should drink coffee 'cause that's good for us wining other alcohols is good for us it's a may exist you're listening to the right show if you want to enjoy an absolute outta here to help the charge carol thank you so much thank you those dr eric carol professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also frequent contributor to the new york times upshot call we are a fearful people drink eight glasses of water per day don't eat raw a your food slowly and of course use hans sanitizer at every opportunity you know there's got to be some sweet spot between wearing a seatbelt and hand sanitizer daniel boom live to be eighty six years old despite spending months in the wilderness being adopted by the sean knee after having to run the gauntlet and according to one account being attacked by a panther well standing his ground i don't think mr boom would have been a likely candidate for hand sanitizer then again maybe he would have live to be one hundred that's it for this week if you just to mr show fear you can listen to our podcast on apple podcast stitcher tuning google player spotify.

new york times mr boom spotify professor of pediatrics indiana university school of m hans eighty six years
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Men you know i liked talking things i all the things in life that i love that everyone tells me is bad turn out to be good for me so it and it's more often than that of the year the at the average american eats about three point four grams of salt today that's what the average person's intake is and given that many many people are very high and we all the lower bound of zero that means the most americans are consuming less than three and a half grams of salt today that is right in the sweet spot so this constant drumbeat that were all consuming too much salt and we all need to eat much less of it there's really no good reason to do that at all it's my turn to throw it a statistic which is that only five percent of the saul we consume comes from home cooking its own processed foods so so there you go that's the real issue is that you know people are it's the salter disodium that's in the processed foods that we can't control that's where most people are getting too much salt any way if we would cut that stuff out then people could add as much sought to their cooking or on their plate as they really wanted to so my list of sinful foods is getting much shorter good that's our goal doctare a girl thank you thank you that was dr eric carol professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine now do you wake up in the morning thinking that you need more advice about all of your life well if you've been around a while you know the devices well mostly worthless eat salt do salt toadied fat do we'd fat drink lots of water drink when you're thirsty so here's a better recipes skip the holcomb prescriptions and use the one recipe that is always right that would be of course common sense.

dr eric carol professor of pediatrics indiana university school of m holcomb five percent four grams
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Uh due to his wife wanting to eat what everyone else eight it it and yet in this case we seem to be hesitant so you usually we have no problem with governments telling us we don't this is one of those programmes the where it's been very difficult to touches and this study is fascinating because it's the first study of its kind that's how difficult it is to make changes in the snap program we can't even used it to do research purposes so they actually had to find people who weren't yet on the program and set up a whole different sort amok program even to test it we can't even do research or smallscale studies to see what might or might not work because it's so hard to make changes in these types of programmes so the at the end of the day your suggestion is is what so i think it's i think it's worth bodily study this i mean we we've seen other cities have actually put in applications i mean new york has always been in the forefront of trying to restrict what people can and can't eat or what they you know where they might have to pay taxes i mean even you know restricted so decides not in there and that really worked out well for them of that was not a good but regardless dave actually applied as have other cities and states to to try these types of changes on a trial basis nick keeping denied by the federal government it might be worth it to at least allow some of these pilot programmes to to go and to see what happens and if it turns out that i'm wrong turns out that the prior research is wrong and that it doesn't work with it backfires at least will know but if it turns out that it does work might be worth knowing duct air carol it's time to take a fresh look at food stamps and try to offer healthier alternatives thank you thank you that was dr eric carol professor pediatrics and irregular contributor to the new york times.

new york dave nick federal government food stamps new york times dr eric carol professor
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"In senegal death the life are intimately connected life is bitter sweet and be sure to always spill a few drops on ground for the dead right now it's time to talk to regular guests dr eric carol he's a professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also regular contributor to the new york times upshot column welcome back to milk street it's always great to be here and what revealing bit of philosophy do you have this week so i thought we might talk about the food stamp program otherwise known as snap and some of the recent evidence that comes out of how it might perhaps be used in a better way to help us combat obesity okay so for a long time you know we've talked about a week known that that being poor is associated with obesity and sometimes people find it hard to grasp how that can be that you know somebody who perhaps as bad access to food could also be obese the and some people have even taken so far as to try to claim therefore the food stamps are causing obesity nats not the case it just it becomes that it's harder to eat healthy and sometimes more nutrient and caloric calorie dense food is cheaper so sometimes people were poor also tend to to be heavier and more unhealthy so people have tried to take that sometimes to change the food stamp program were to change how we give out snap benefits and a lot of people fought against that because of course two teams wrong to to stigmatize people were poor or to try to control what people eat but there have been some recent studies which show that that there might be promised indefinitely doing that that a recent letter actually stay i think it was an in minnesota from our correctly but what they did was they took people who were eligible for food stamps but had yet entered the program and the randomized them to a number of different groups some people got regular rolled cards which allow them to buy food some people got extra money in other words bonuses if they bought healthy food some people actually you know we're not or prohibited from buying sugar dance food things like desserts and some people got both the bonuses extra money if they about healthy food and sort of the panel the restrictions they couldn't by on health.

obesity food stamps minnesota senegal dr eric carol professor of pediatrics indiana university school of m new york times milk
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"You can take necessary steps to to make sure they're clean the problem is that very few people doing what your wife does they don't replace the sponges in every few days they can go weeks if not longer and by that time you're sponges just cesspool what about clinton cutting boards if you're cutting chicken which is one of the most potentially dangerous foods you can buy supermarket is hot soapy water on a cutting board okay doesn't have to go through the dishwasher cycle do you have any recommendations i probably run it through the dishwasher because especially when you're cutting part of it is that you're actually cutting into the boarding running back to your getting bacteria things deep in there and so sure if you truly scrub it really really well you're going to get everything out but most people don't they just don't take the time that they need to really get in there and for that reason again a cutting board can be a really potentially bad way to transmit thing all of these things are worse than the floor though so the fact that we're talking about them and bring attention to them is probably better than to have another discussion ever again about the five second more dr carol says eat off the floor not off your counter thank you anytime who that was dr eric carol a regular contributor to our show no sign to take some calls was sarah molten sarah are you ready to go i am ready welcome to milk street radio who's calling from california i tracy how are you good help you well i have had a craving for my mom lima bean which you can make us when we were little and i have no idea.

dr eric carol clinton sarah five second milk
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Everything was on the table from hijacking of boston boss when she was a teenager to stealing credit cards if annual hall and her favorite childhood dinner enormous plate of steak tips at a place called quiet man in south boston and she told me about the kids who didn't get to grow up those whose lives and early lots of folks get out of the projects single want to make something of themselves is just the barber knows when not to leave for past behind you're listening to mostly radio with your host christopher kimble after the break investigating the five second eating off the floor rule of dr eric carol than the tuesday night meal from chef in a sort this is mostly radio i'm christopher kimble right now send a check in with a regular guest dr erin carol carol is a professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also a regular contributor to the new york times upshot column on health research and policy hi erin how are you i'm good how are you what what common conventional wisdom are we gonna destroy this week i think we wanted to talk about the five second rule o of the famous five second rule okay i'm ready gas this is that magic belief that somehow food is on the floor for less than five seconds that somehow it still safe to eat that you don't have to worry about anything be transferred from one end to hear from the floor any other substance to the food and it amazes me because at least every year someone publishes a study which says that the five second rule is not real that food can get transfer bacteria onto a very quickly that you know depending upon the surface the height the force it which is thrown down the stuff will move from the floor or from something else on food very very quickly this idea that the five seconds is somehow the time limit to travel is is is just not true at all.

boston christopher kimble dr erin carol carol dr eric carol professor of pediatrics indiana university school of m new york times five second five seconds
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"It and yet in this case we seem to be hesitant so you usually we have no problem with government telling us we don't this is one of those programs the where it's been very difficult to touches and this study is fascinating because it's the first study of its kind that's how difficult it is to make changes in the snap program we can't even use it to do research purposes so they actually had to find people who weren't yet on the program and set up a whole different sort of mock program even to test it we can't even do research or small scale studies to see what might or might not work because it's so hard to make changes in these types of programs so the at the end of the day your suggestion is is what so i think it's i think it's worth bodily study this i mean we we've seen other cities have actually put in applications i'm in new york has always been in the forefront of trying to restrict what people can and can't eat or what they you know where they might have to pay taxes i mean even know restricted soda size now and that really worked out well for them of that was not good but regardless dave actually applied as have other cities and states to to try these types of changes on a trial basis keeping denied by the federal government it might be worth it to at least allow some of these pilot programs to to go and to see what happens and if it turns out that i'm wrong it turns out that the prior research is wrong and that it doesn't work that it backfires at least will know but if it turns out that it does work might be worth knowing duct air carol it's time to take a fresh look at food stamps and try to offer healthier alternatives thank you thank you that was dr eric carol professor pediatrics in a regular contributor to the new york times.

new york dave federal government food stamps new york times dr eric carol professor
"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"dr eric carol" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"In senegal death the life are intimately connected life is bitter sweet and be sure to always spill a few drops on the ground for the dead right now it's time to talk to regular guest dr eric carol he's a professor of pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also a regular contributor to the new york times upshot welcome back to milk street it's always great to be here and what revealing bit of philosophy do you have this week so i thought we might talk about the food stamp program otherwise known as snap and some of the recent evidence that comes out of how it might perhaps be used in a better way to help us combat obesity okay so for a long time know we've talked about are we've known that that being poor is associated with obesity and sometimes people find it hard to grasp how that can be that you know somebody who perhaps has bad access to food could also be obese the some people have even taking it so far has tried to claim therefore the food stamps are causing obesity that's not the case it just it becomes that it's harder to eat healthy and sometimes more nutrient caloric calorie dense food is cheaper so sometimes people were poor also tend to be heavier and more unhealthy so people have tried to take that sometimes to to change the food stamp program wanted to change how we give out snap benefits and a lot of people fought against that because of course the teams wrong to to stigmatize people were poor or try to control what people eat but there have been some recent studies which show that that there might be promised into actually doing that that a recent look actually stay i think it was in in minnesota from her correctly but what they did was they took people who are eligible for food stamps but hadn't yet entered the program and they randomized them to a number of different groups some people got regular old cards which allow them to buy food some people got extra money in other words bonuses if they bought healthy food some people actually you know we're not or prohibited from buying sugar dance food things like desserts and some people got both the bonuses extra money about healthy food and sort of the panel the restrictions they couldn't by unhealthy.

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