3 Burst results for "Dr Emily Thomas"

"dr emily thomas" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily thomas" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"A maximum of two hundred pounds each for every thousand pounds they reach in Sales. They pledged to spend two hundred pounds on their colleagues work from its start in the UK the pledges spread around the world generating an estimated fifteen million pounds in sales Monaco's team match. Larry caught up with Murphy to find out more about how he came up with. Pledge and what impact might be on the art market in the long term? I came up with the are support. Pledge Idea on the sixteenth of March when are sitting sort of doing my early morning emails? When I've noticed I was GONNA hear lots of messages from friends and colleagues saying that exhibitions were closing opening and that work technical work teaching work visual Gig Economy Employment that a lot of artists have was stopping almost immediately and this could go on for months so new artists would be in a very vulnerable position. I sort of thought. Well Okay what can we do about it? I guess in some ways sort of sense of realizing that this was pretty drastic and needed fairly drastic measures to combat it so I literally just sort of thought. Okay what a lot of our assets assets what can I do? That might help so I try to simplify as much as occurred and they came to ideas had artwork so most oft works lying around and the other one was about a kind of cultural idea which was about a cultural trust and generosity. Because I've always worked with that idea that if you create a culture trust generosity then everything else is much easier to do. It's easier to kind of develop. Creativity is easy to develop a critical framework when you can trust those you work with and your journalists with one another. It seems like Blue Chip Galleries. Magic commercial galleries have the infrastructure to migrate fairly quickly online. There's been a lot of institutional exhibition that have had digital walk-throughs nets exciting to see digital space being occupied in this way but full artists to reliance on zero hours teaching wet stuff or on smaller levels Moscow sales of that work that has been updated. Shoot ful in the Institutional Response. Do you think that the artists support pledge has served to highlight maybe some of the shortcomings all the response at an institutional level? Yeah I think definitely. I mean it wasn't intended to. I didn't intend to sort of highlight the sort of cumbersome nature of gas at the way the industry works and I suppose necessarily it works that way you know. There's a lot of people involved as a lot. Layers between an artist does in the studio and then what is seen shown and sold out in the world. I didn't really think that I was highlighting that. It was much more urgent than that. It was a artist. Need money on the needed right now. What we do that was my question to myself. I knew that that was not going to be an easy answer in an institutional sense because the market was going to slow down you know. I work in the art market. I sell my working day blue chip galleries and expensive. I knew that they sort of sales. We're going to slow down. They weren't going to be continuing the might start up again at some point but certainly in the short term. They weren't going to carry on so that to be some sort of response. That was much more across the board. It was much more of an artist generally not just about a sector of the art world. At this point. It's anyone's guess. Really honest with a future has in store. There's obviously an urgency to getting the economy back on track. Different governments have announced varying stimulus packages. Some have been more generous towards the sector than others. We've already mentioned those bridge chip galleries who have migrated a large portion of that upcoming schedule onto the Internet. I wonder if you think that this project points towards maybe a healthier art market again. When I started wasn't ready smile intention but it is something I I'm very much aware of I think about. It's something I'm always sort of looking and researching into because I've always sort of fell in a way that the way the art market works and I can see how it was. I'm part of it and you know if you're making large scale expensive ambitious pieces that take time to make an are expensive to make than value of those pieces will be quite high but there are limits to that and they're in a way one of the problems with the way the market works as it pushes the finance ever higher and higher and said there's a huge field of artists spectrum of artists in the middle and below that who might be sending work at pretty high some but cash flow's always an issue. You know they're not selling those every day necessarily and that's always been a really tricky point for artists because there isn't that kind of model of bringing income other than traditionally of artists have done it through teaching color kind of activities like that. A lot of those models have disappeared or are disappearing as we speak one of the things. I think it's been very positive outcome off. If it's crazy to sort of micro-economy that can sit underneath or alongside the larger scale kind of consumer capitalist economy which is kind of you know more pointed higher economy. This is a flatter more even economy that is more sustainable in a way because it allows us to make living day in day out we can. We count lost the conversations. I've had with gallery sector since they started. I've been and pains to make clear that. Actually this is good for everybody because if they're up and coming artists in their artists. You're just on the cusp of making more sustainable dodger. Scaling come can have sustainable income on a daily basis on a weekly monthly yearly basis that allows them to invest in being in the studio invest in their work pay their mill which pay their rent put food on the table then. Actually it's good for everybody because they're doing what they should be doing. She's making our rather than doing other jobs or not. Having any time to make our when they do they're exhausted. That's not good for anyone surprised me. I didn't expect this to happen. So unwittingly created an economy that has allowed artists a lot of different levels to have a sort of more sustainable even income. I mean how long lost whether that can lost outside of the pandemic at me. Nobody knows is generating huge figures. Even now. It's only a month in. I mean if it grows more than this. We don't know where it's going to go. No doubt be a point might slow down but it certainly isn't at the moment. It's hard to say you know what the long term effect is. It certainly had a positive effects an colleagues the I know on the arts I get to hear from every day all over the world. That was the autism monkey bars in conversation with Augustine. Much Larry and that's all we have few on today's program before we go. I just wanted to point you towards a couple of other shows. I think you might enjoy meet. The writers. This week is an interview with Christopher Steele Klausner. He is the Australian Booker Prize long listed author of the Slab. You might remember. There was a lot of hype around that book and we had this lovely lovely conversation in which he discusses everything from his sexuality to his faith his new book is called Damascus. A LMS A on monocle. Reads a conversation With Dr Emily Thomas. It's called the meaning of travel and it's a part philosophical ramble part travelogue and just looks at all the places where Philip Philosophy and travel intersect. Will now that we know can travel. It's something you might want to listen to many. Thanks to our producers page rentals Marcus Hippie. Collateral Bella and researcher Charlie Phil mccord. A studio manager was some impede and Steph. Chengdu helped edit. I'm Georgina Godwin. Thank you for listening..

Larry UK Dr Emily Thomas Monaco Georgina Godwin Marcus Hippie Moscow Chengdu Steph Murphy Philip Philosophy Christopher Steele Klausner Charlie Phil mccord Bella researcher Augustine Damascus
"dr emily thomas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"dr emily thomas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In california that benefited three point eight million people dr portion mac works at a safety net clinic in hayward i saw a new group of patients that didn't have healthcare before it was a working class crew people at nontraditional salaries be knew that they're like the food service industry tips or real estate agents who rely on commission medical has always been a major provider of healthcare in california since the aca expansion it now covers a third of all residents in the state with that growth california brings in more healthcare dollars they flow into community clinics like dr max diversity of vasquez health centre to brazil has expanded in the last several years but they're still more to do they're still more outreach to do but the money allowed to icao vasquez to construct an entirely new clinic an and they shifted from paper to electric health records ceo david fleet says the expanded dental care to when we are able to make sure that mr smith or mrs rodriguez doesn't chauvinist er with tooth paying everyone in the community enjoys lower cost because of that well lead says he's relieved for now he'll continue to watch what happens in dc closely and so will doctors across the day at sucker burke san francisco general hospital some of them have been working for months to protect the aca dr emily thomas said that type of activism should keep going even though the dc ari has collapse at the center the the threat is still there for our patience and our patients are relying on everyone in this room to continue to advocate for their expanded access to care there is a chance senate republicans try to revive the stalled health plan that's what happened months ago in the house and laura kleindienst kqed news if you wanna start up a new tech company who do you turn to for funding venture capitalists in where did they get their money retirement funds and.

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"dr emily thomas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"dr emily thomas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Poverty line in california that benefited three point eight million people dr portion mac works at a safety net clinic in hayward i saw a new group of patients that didn't have healthcare before it was a working class crew people that nontraditional salaries fina that they're like the food service industry tear chefs or real estate agents who relied commission medical has always been a major provider of healthcare in california since the aca expansion it now covers a third of all residents in the state with that growth california brings in more health care dollars they flow into community clinics like dr max tip i see a vasquez health centre to repeal has expanded the last several years but they're still more to do they're still more outreach to do but the money allowed to versiya vasquez to construct an entirely new clinic and they shifted from paper to electric health records ceo david fleet says the expanded dental care to when we are able to make sure that mr smith or mrs rodriguez dozen chauve and the er with tooth paying everyone in the community enjoys lower cost because at that while lead says he's relieved for now he'll continue to watch what happens in dc closely and so we'll doctors across the day at sucker berg sampha cisco general hospital some of them have been working for months to protect the aca dr emily thomas said that type of activism should keep going even though the dcr a has collapse at the senate the threat is still there for our patience and our patients are relying on everyone in this room to continue to advocate for they're expanded access to care there is a chance senate republicans try to revive the stalled health plan that's what happened months ago in the house and laura livens kqed news if you wanna start up a new tech company who do you turn to for funding venture capitalists and where did they get their money retirement funds and wealthy investors recently.

california hayward vasquez health centre david fleet cisco general hospital senate the house tech company real estate agents aca versiya vasquez ceo mr smith mrs rodriguez dr emily thomas venture capitalists