32 Burst results for "Dr Emily"

Expect more worrisome variants after omicron, scientists say

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Expect more worrisome variants after omicron, scientists say

"Scientists scientists are are warning warning on on micron's micron's rapid rapid spread spread around around the the globe globe practically practically ensures ensures it it won't won't be be the the last last word word some some variant variant of of the the corona corona virus virus I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas with with the the latest latest variants variants that that could could overcome overcome our our existing existing immunity immunity could could be be lurking lurking in in any any corner corner of of the the globe globe university university of of Chicago Chicago medicines medicines Dr Dr Emily Emily Landon Landon is is among among those those warning warning that that every every new new infection infection provides provides a a chance chance for for covert covert nineteen nineteen to to mutate mutate again again we we could could get get another another variant variant that that is is even even more more deadly deadly than than Makran Makran is is and and it it could could prove prove just just as as quickly quickly drop drop population population research research shows shows Omicron Omicron is is at at least least twice twice as as contagious contagious as as the the delta delta variant variant and and at at least least four four times times as as contagious contagious as as the the original original version version still still landed landed notes notes a a lot's lot's been been learned learned about about the the virus virus we we know know what what we're we're dealing dealing with with now now we we have have treatments treatments that that can can be be made made available available we we have have excellent excellent vaccines vaccines and and we we know know how how to to take take care care of of these these patients patients and and we we know know what what community community mitigation mitigation measures measures are are going going to to make make a a difference difference I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Micron Globe Globe Ben Ben Thomas Thomas University University Of Of Ch Dr Dr Emily Emily Landon Lando Makran Makran
Sex Therapist, Dr Emily Morse, on What to Do With Mismatched Sex Drives

Sex With Emily

02:04 min | 8 months ago

Sex Therapist, Dr Emily Morse, on What to Do With Mismatched Sex Drives

"Have a higher libido than my partner and for me it's really hurtful to ask her sex try to initiate and to to be told no for whatever reason i'm tired or what have you and that said i mean the sexes. Great like it's really incredible. And i think part of it is is is a little bit older than i am. And i'm just i'm kind of in my sexual private thirty two and i understand like late. Twenties to mid late. Thirties is like that peak for women And he's forty one and he's also on depression medications that's that's an aspect of it so Yeah lots of factors but at a high level you know the difference in libido is make one yeah that's a really that is a big one and it's they often say yeah. You're you're late. Twenties early thirties. Thirties is when you have a high sex drive. It varies to person the but you know you're so this is where you are. And his libido is matching is that's that's what's going on right now and you have been with him for six months six months. Yeah we were friends for a couple years and We're actually long distance so when you do see each other because usually a lot of times long distances like we are together for a weekend or week and we have the whole time. You know i know. Have you talked to him about it. Definitely i mean. The communication is so good In the beginning of the relationship he was like ideally like he really was interested in starting to talk about sex pretty quickly great. Initially i was a little bit resistant. Because i was like. I really want like develop emotional piece of relationship before we go there but yeah i mean he asked like how often would you wanna hunchback's i told them like every day when we're together and he was like really. That's not what i you know known before at the time. He seemed like on board for that in like. But but then you know when we've been together it's like i'm tina just about every day and he's maybe like four times a week or so. There's been of discrepancy there.

Depression Tina
"dr emily" Discussed on The Lucky Few

The Lucky Few

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Lucky Few

"Iran's i'm so excited today to reduce dr emily. She's been a pediatric physical therapist for over ten years now and she is the president of conceal kids an online platform dedicated to helping little ones grow into the best version of themselves. Which i think. We're all in support of that. So imagine dr emily. Welcome to the show. Hi jamie yeah. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your expertise with us. So let's start with an introduction. I'd love to know where you're located a little more about your family at your career. Yeah so i'm located here in. Dfw area in dallas texas specifically. I'm in south lake which is closer towards fort worth. Let's say Right in the heart of dallas. And i like you said. I've been practicing for twelve years and but over the past year have started this business right. That started off of instagram. Can use your kids. And i actually treat here as well in person. have other therapists that worked for me as we treat him hurson as well as virtually My husband's also physical therapists. We met in school and he does He works with adults. Mike total hip and knee. Replacements i have two little girls Hannah who has five and heidi. Who's four very cold. Did you always know you wanted to go into physical therapy. No i mean. Think my freshman year of college dance major. But i knew i wanted to do something with the body and i don't think i thought i was gonna probably ever made a dancer so i think Anatomy physiology is really made a lot of sense And teaching him how to like force with these gross motor skills like teachers Dance you know so it. Just it always makes sense to me Had a break things down skills and everything so it came naturally. Then you work with all different kids not just down syndrome croatis all. Yes as the kids. But i would imagine you have clients who have down syndrome. I yeah i have about like three on my case the three four right okay. Yeah so the majority of our audience Is i would say it's probably mostly moms dads and other other folk out there. We love you and see you and most of us kids down syndrome. So let's talk about some of the common reasons that a child with down syndrome needs physical therapy. Okay so there can be yes. There can be things. That are congenital There are things that are characteristic of down syndrome. But i would say in general no two kids. Not what the diagnosis. But definitely no kids to kids with down. Syndrome are the same so when i'm talking about different things. This is a generalization And also i think it should be noted that you know just because they have a down syndrome diagnosis that isn't going to necessarily define and make them Always via candidate for their be. Some kids don't visible therapy in some kids. Do so it kind of waxes and wanes. There's a couple of heart issues that are care jurisdiction that children would be born with that would cause some difficulty with those early motor skills weight during through their arms. That will delay the crawling and things like that But in general quetta's with down syndrome have very low muscle tone so that means that a hair have very flexible joints in with that low muscle tone comes like increased energy expenditure in order to move. Sometimes they don't want to move as much because it's hard to three times harder than it is for us to lift up our armour stand up also with that increase mobility a may have to have an were thought it or like a brace for their ankle so that they're able to stand They may have have additional sport on their trunk so that they're able to kind of be aware of their body and improve their balance so those are just some of the things that go along with. That could contribute to some light delays either early on or later on okay and in regards to hippo tanya seven-year-old with down syndrome and i have a twelve year old down syndrome and it's interesting hearing you talk about. How in order for them to do all those gross motor movements. They're going to exert. It's going to require more energy from them and easily even with physical therapy which my kids have had in some capacity. The majority of their life is that something that follows them into adulthood people down syndrome. Like the hypo- tonia. I would say that early be proactive. And starting physical therapy early and by early i mean prior to the age of three can really change the outcome of how they are going to expend energy. They're probably they will always have low muscle tone but being able to properly use the muscles in learning how to do an activity. The correct way can really help with energy expenditure example of that would be if a child has very flexible ankles and if they decided at a lot of times i will get them orthotics Eskimos something to kind of help. Brace ankle brace. The ankle on the proper alignment than those bigger muscles. Quads hamstrings the gluts can now turn on properly and fire properly if not then. We're kind of fighting against this alignment at the ankle and now these muscles are kind of always turned on and not in the right way so that would be a kind of something that we can modify early on and teach those muscles how to work properly whereas they.

jamie Hannah twelve years Mike two kids dallas instagram five today south lake over ten years Iran twelve year old seven-year-old emily three two little girls dallas texas Dfw four
"dr emily" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

23:27 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Know Show

"dr emily" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on CXMH

"In retrospect you know if if we would have had the response that was the proper public health response it would. It should not have lasted this long and we shouldn't be in this predicament. We can talk lots of reasons for that that there. We should not be here so i thought it would run. Its course after a few months in it just continues And with that has has come shifting from not only talking about the pandemic and the science senate bed early early on. I weaved a little bit of faith of a post called. Who is our neighbor when it comes to covid. Nineteen our neighbor. We heard a lot of the high risk. Older people people with some chronic conditions. But at the time we didn't know how brought that was. But i was also trying to make a point of our neighbor people across town from us with how infectious this thing is So that was kind of my first faith one. There's a lot of solidarity around that. In the you know you gain more followers along the way and now we're what seven months and there's one or two million people that interact with the site per month while continued to talk about faith and i'm sure we will unpack what that means now but you know. I think it has struck a chord to just talk about the science in a way that can be understandable Been lately over the past month. It's really struck a chord as a faith community where there are a lot of people in the us. Say in hold up. This doesn't look like jesus anymore and certain voice to that. Yeah no grande either. Strong to wink. I was wondering. I've been wondering over our listeners. Emily and i i mentioned. We're both at baylor. But we've been talking for quite a while. And when i see some yourself i'm like yeah. I could see that there are some to identify with type two. I don't know if i'm a three or a nine nine. The justice one wine as the justice align. Well i need to set up an appointment with you to pretend it's amazing. I love that. Well we can definitely talk about that. Well find time soon for united debt. But i love your heart behind creating this page and you know and even for me. I mean transparently. I know that your page has been incredibly helpful for me and my family remember re reaching out to you earlier on when we were trying to decide. What should we do around like kids with school. And you know and we had some questions around that and you've just been such a rounding peaceful accurate loving presence. I think around cova information and The science and the faith piece that you know it's really kind of what led robert. I too want to bring you on today to talk about this. So so i just didn't really grateful for for what you have been doing particularly with that that page you had just mentioned talking about like faith communities to and how you've started talking a little bit more around the role of faith and And how that plays into this. And i did recently get to hear you speak on a webinar. That true seminary hosted primarily for pastors. But also for congregants as well talking about you know. How can we navigate this current surge and practices to consider especially as we move into the advent season in the christmas holidays in an another holidays as well. And so if you could. I'd love to hear you talk a little bit about why it is so important for churches to be thinking out covid these days. Yeah and why it looks different than beginning. Because at the beginning. I met with with pastors from all over..

senate baylor Emily us robert
"dr emily" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Sport in today's episode. We will explore the questions concerning the role of technology and sport. Technologies are not just neutral things or equipment but they can have a significant influence on the values. We ascribe sport and even whether and how we find sport meaningful does technology make sport more inclusive more safe and more fair or can there be some adverse effects as well artists. Some good uses bud uses of technology and very delighted to have dr. emily royal helping us tackle these questions. Today this is the second episode with emily. And if you listen to the first episode already you will know that we have somewhat accidentally ended up discussing some of these issues already. Such as runners obsession with their. Gps will chase and counting steps and and that kind of things. So i'm i'm very excited to learn more about this topic and and hope you ought to to introduce august. Emily's reader in applied philosophy at the university of cross the and she has written extensively philosophical and ethical issues in sport. Welcome to the podcast again. Emily i'm really delighted to have you discussing this topic with me today. Thank you i think. Last time it was quite interesting the discussions that we are delving delving on in terms of technology and how it's so common and we have various types of technologies in sport. Helping us helping us do that. And <hes> as critical scholars point thou- technologies not just kind of neutral equipment the neutral aids but can also change our relationship with sport. Perhaps we can start exploring that the little bit and you can share us a bit about your own thinking and and what kind of work you have done in this area. Thanks i mean. I'm fascinated by technology and sport. I think sport is inherently a technological. And i always tend to steal some of my classes by asking students to think of a spore that doesn't require any technology and they usually get stumped had one. I had one suggestion wants of arm. Wrestling doesn't involve any technology. But i suppose if you think about the tabo that's required to all so then that could be considered a full technology so it's really hard to thing. Cassini that doesn't use technology even is most kind of basic so even even cut a running you. You'd think about the technology of footwear. I think oto certainly thinking about sports rather than exercise so you can you could in theory run a in bare feet in naked <hes>. But the only way that you could judges to you know you time will distance would be using a a a measuring device or a stop watch so sport as a competitive exercise requires some forward technology. And i and. I think that's going to start with a question about well. What you mean by technology because i said earlier i said what you think of the table that used an arm wrestling. That's to form of technology <hes>. Technology self exposes quite difficult to define. So you can. You can think of technologies komo things artifacts <hes>. That help you or neighbor you to do something <hes>. So that things the have specifically designed to solve a particular problems and normally let me think about technology we think about core advanced technology but actually technology can be very basic so it can be using a stick to push abboud around <hes>. So technology count encompass a whole of wide range of of different types of things <hes>. I think is also. I quite like thinking of technology. As was kind of attitude that we have towards the world and <hes>. As a as a philosopher martin heidecker and he talked about the technological attitude and that's to me it's kind of an inherently human wave thinking about the road. It's a way of looking around us and looking at things in the world. and how can we. How can we use them for a benefit. So i think as humans were inherently technological creatures because of the way that we we view our the way that we look at our world the way that we divide up into different elements that can be used for our purposes. So i quite like the way of thinking about technology is an attitude as well as some artifacts or stuff that we can touch and hold. You mentioned a work

dr. emily royal Wrestling university of cross
Meaningful Sport With Dr Emily Ryall

Physical Activity Researcher

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Meaningful Sport With Dr Emily Ryall

"Sport in today's episode. We will explore the questions concerning the role of technology and sport. Technologies are not just neutral things or equipment but they can have a significant influence on the values. We ascribe sport and even whether and how we find sport meaningful does technology make sport more inclusive more safe and more fair or can there be some adverse effects as well artists. Some good uses bud uses of technology and very delighted to have dr. emily royal helping us tackle these questions. Today this is the second episode with emily. And if you listen to the first episode already you will know that we have somewhat accidentally ended up discussing some of these issues already. Such as runners obsession with their. Gps will chase and counting steps and and that kind of things. So i'm i'm very excited to learn more about this topic and and hope you ought to to introduce august. Emily's reader in applied philosophy at the university of cross the and she has written extensively philosophical and ethical issues in sport. Welcome to the podcast again. Emily i'm really delighted to have you discussing this topic with me today. Thank you i think. Last time it was quite interesting the discussions that we are delving delving on in terms of technology and how it's so common and we have various types of technologies in sport. Helping us helping us do that. And as critical scholars point thou- technologies not just kind of neutral equipment the neutral aids but can also change our relationship with sport. Perhaps we can start exploring that the little bit and you can share us a bit about your own thinking and and what kind of work you have done in this area. Thanks i mean. I'm fascinated by technology and sport. I think sport is inherently a technological. And i always tend to steal some of my classes by asking students to think of a spore that doesn't require any technology and they usually get stumped had one. I had one suggestion wants of arm. Wrestling doesn't involve any technology. But i suppose if you think about the tabo that's required to all so then that could be considered a full technology so it's really hard to thing. Cassini that doesn't use technology even is most kind of basic so even even cut a running you. You'd think about the technology of footwear. I think oto certainly thinking about sports rather than exercise so you can you could in theory run a in bare feet in naked But the only way that you could judges to you know you time will distance would be using a a a measuring device or a stop watch so sport as a competitive exercise requires some forward technology. And i and. I think that's going to start with a question about well. What you mean by technology because i said earlier i said what you think of the table that used an arm wrestling. That's to form of technology Technology self exposes quite difficult to define. So you can. You can think of technologies komo things artifacts That help you or neighbor you to do something So that things the have specifically designed to solve a particular problems and normally let me think about technology we think about core advanced technology but actually technology can be very basic so it can be using a stick to push abboud around So technology count encompass a whole of wide range of of different types of things I think is also. I quite like thinking of technology. As was kind of attitude that we have towards the world and As a as a philosopher martin heidecker and he talked about the technological attitude and that's to me it's kind of an inherently human wave thinking about the road. It's a way of looking around us and looking at things in the world. and how can we. How can we use them for a benefit. So i think as humans were inherently technological creatures because of the way that we we view our the way that we look at our world the way that we divide up into different elements that can be used for our purposes. So i quite like the way of thinking about technology is an attitude as well as some artifacts or stuff that we can touch and hold. You mentioned a work

Mayor Lightfoot To Allow Chicago Bars and Restaurants To Sell Liquor Until 11pm

John Williams

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Mayor Lightfoot To Allow Chicago Bars and Restaurants To Sell Liquor Until 11pm

"Take take effect effect in in Chicago Chicago today, today, but but mayor mayor light light photos. photos. Made Made a a change change into into a a couple couple of of them. them. W. W. G G M's M's Kim Kim Gordon. Gordon. With the ban on indoor dining at bars and restaurants on the horizon, Mayor Lightfoot will now allow bars and restaurants to continue liquor sales until 11, the mayor last week said sales would have to end it. Nine and there was also a 10 o'clock curfew for bars, restaurants and non essential businesses. Liquor stores, grocery stores and other businesses must still and liquor sales at nine. There will also be a limit on gatherings to 25 or 25%. Room capacity. Kim Gordon WG and news. Dr Emily

Kim Kim Gordon Kim Gordon Wg Mayor Lightfoot Chicago Dr Emily W. W. G
Coronavirus cases surge in Chicago, Illinois

Reset with Jenn White

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus cases surge in Chicago, Illinois

"What does the second surge of covid nineteen cases mean for Illinois and what's the best way to respond to a resurgence of cases across the state joining us now Dr Emily Land She's an infectious disease specialist at the University of Chicago Dr Land and welcome back to reset. Hey, how are you? I'm good. So city state and health officials warning were moving in the wrong direction. They're calling it a second surge were in at what does that mean? Well, it looks like the numbers are going up not just here, but across the country, but they really are going up in Chicago. You know even through the summer surge where we saw a lot of problems down the southern States Illinois remained relatively pretty stable but we're not seeing that this time we're seeing big increases every single week in many different regions, which suggests that there's definitely a problem. Yeah I was GONNA say have to do with the changing weather the fall the fact that we're going indoors no longer. In the summer, we know that as the air gets cooler, it can't hold it much moisture, and so the humidity comes down and we know now that Kuban can spread a lot more easily. So those droplets that travel about sixty and the Arizona that can go even further it can travel a little further. They can last a little longer as the air gets drier, and then when we come inside, there's not as much air for those particles to be diluted because your room is any remaining is the substantially smaller than the. Great outdoors. So you definitely have those particles sort of building up as well, and he's a big reasons why we're expecting to see spread in a sort of be worse in the winter time but we're also seeing a lot of cases in our neighboring states and people cross over those borders they come here for commerce they come to work you coming for a vacation or we do the same and we're bringing cases back and forth yesterday the press conference with the Public Health Director Dr Anthony to the takeaway line, which is. Great. Headline Stop Inviting people to Your House. Really. Was it saying that that really they've pinpointed to say that which which we've gotten very comfortable with as Chicago in saying you know what if we're socially distance from the backyard maybe they can come in a little but that really is what's causing this community spread inviting people over to your house. Well, I think that is a big issue I. Think People feel safe in their homes and they think that they can control the situation a little bit better. So you feel like you know it works out people come over for July fourth in the backyard. So maybe we can have them over. You know for socially distant game night now, and the reality is that things are just really different than they were on July fourth first of all everybody who walks into your. House is much more likely to have covered than they were a few weeks ago and that same thing. It's probably going to be even more true in a couple of weeks, and then you just don't have the same scenario warm moist air mostly outside keeping distance you getting a little bit. You know it's much easier to stay six feet apart when you're outside than it is when you're sitting in your living room I it's got to be part of the problem here. We've got some holidays coming up with Halloween, and of course, thanksgiving and and then you get into Christmas and Hanukkah and the other holidays. It seems that this is going to have an impact on how we are approaching those holidays because what we knew last week is different than what we know this week. Yeah. I would say the most important advice I'm giving about the holidays is to make sure everything stays tentative. You just can't make a final decision about what's the right thing to do until much much closer to the event things are changing. So quickly right now that we just can't you can't decide that it's going to or not going to be safe based on where you go is the message to residents. To go back to our thinking back in March and April is that the way we have to look at this I mean I remember having a different set of washing down groceries I was I wouldn't go anywhere near anybody who didn't have a mask or even on the sidewalk I was walking out into the street that was my march April routine that has changed. Do I need to go back to that October? No. And we've learned a lot since then and we know that groceries are safe. Amazon. Packages or safe. We know that most of the things that you touch don't need, you should wash your hands and you should keep shared services clean especially at workplaces but these things are not as much of a risk as we thought we also know now that if everybody's wearing math that really reduces the transmission risk considerably. Inside. So I think what we WANNA do is really just need to be really strict about those ws and I would add a couple more things that. Wash. Your hands wear a mask watcher distance, and then I'm adding a forest W, which is open the windows. You WanNa to get more ventilation even if that means crank up the heat and opening the windows at least a few times a day that's a really good idea and then I really do think these small gatherings inside of home we are seeing lots and lots of cases at University of Chicago where people have been reporting these kinds of gatherings resulting in a significant transmission,

Your House Illinois Chicago University Of Chicago Dr Land Dr Emily Land University Of Chicago Arizona Kuban Dr Anthony Amazon Director
"dr emily" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"dr emily" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Iheart media as well as. In. Sunny. Southern. California on ABC News Talk, I always say sunny but I don't know you know California. It's sunny there every single day right now every day. Every day. Did you live there for any extended period of time? You sound like you did maybe. No My stepdad did. So when he worked out there for a little bit, I was out there for a few months but not for long though yeah. Yeah. I lived on the West. coast. When I was eighteen outside of. Tacoma. Seattle area for about a year and a half and it was interesting I was young it was interesting I was traveling and you know there's so many parts of the world that are so beautiful and so much that we can learn from traveling and a lot of millennials travel much more than I was I was unusual for that time you know a Lotta kids didn't travel. I did I just got lucky you know but I think it's so important for education. I do to see how how much diversity there is all over the world. So but you know we've got a great show coming up today we have Dr Emily, Ventura us she's a nutrition educator public health advocate writer and Cook, she is the author or the CO author of the book. We're going to be talking about the hidden dangers of sugar that put your child at risk and we have Tina Burnett Alanon the line. And we'RE GONNA be talking about Tina's tips and tricks of how you can't exercise bad diet how you doing today Tina. I'm doing great I'm got. kind of a big old train station here with the. People in my house. So hopefully, we don't have any background noise. You. Okay yeah I remember last week. Yeah. Yeah. I. Here I o here Molly's doing school and my husband is not here because. he got stuck doing something, and so I'm hopefully I can have thirty minutes of of no noise have no noise. Well, you know I it's so cool to be doing it from home I am anxious to get back into the studios here in the upcoming weeks at least once or twice a week. I miss it. I do and radio is wonderful. It is and it's always great to have you on the Air Tina. You've been doing this show with me for a very long time since the very beginning we've been on the air nine years believe it or not one life radio was started over nine years ago. and. So it's always been great to have Tina Burnett Alan on the show she has a bachelor of Kinesiology, and she is certified She is a certified strength and conditioning specialists and a certified expert in bio mechanics. She also has been in the fitness industry for over thirty years teaching cardiovascular classes at several of Dallas's top studios and health clubs, as well as instructing and developing resistance training programs for individuals and groups in the gym and in the home, she's been named top female personal trainer in dfw by personal trainers hall of fame, and you can contact her at fitness pro at g mail dot com. Or on Instagram at TB fitness pro and I'm anxious to talk about this today. I really am because you trained me yesterday you train me twice a week and It's something I, really look forward to, and I always feel so much better the next day about getting out there and getting the job done as far as fitness in keeping my muscles strong. But as we said yesterday, you cannot out exercise a bad diet and that's what we're talking about today with Tina and Tina's going gonNA give us her tips and tricks. So let's get started. Okay. So you can't out exercise a bad Diet Tina why not? Well You know is is, is, of course not just for health reasons is the most important thing I think for us to maintain astronomy system and to feel better and to sleep better and. And working when you bring in working out into the equation. Of. People a lot of women especially think of working out. Just burn calories and you know either so they can eat more and enjoy life more or because you know they've eaten too much and then they go under the work at go gotTa burn you know that Mexican food I had last night or whatever, and I tried it yeah I mean but we all done it and I try to encourage clients to not think of it that way to think of it as 'cause if you focus on. The negative way to look at it it's kind of cleaning some negative energy around the assets of working out. So, if you can focus on that, you're working out should be to make you feel better and have lots of energy and get stronger and and if your goal which are people's is to change your body composition burn fat maybe asthma muscle. Then how you eat is going to dictate the results you get with your workout. Does that make some? Oh absolutely and you know I, think back to in my twenties I used to do this all the time we've talked about this many times. I literally would go and do a triathlon and then go to this favorite pizzeria that we used to go to and we would have a big salad Antipasto we would have we would have pizza we would have. Grilled Rubens, I mean anything we could get our hands on my friend Shirley Beeman an ice stuff ourselves. You know like ridiculous amounts of food because we felt like, oh, well, we and we were we were like little toothpicks you know but we did the equivalent of like crazy amounts of exercise only. So we could go and bench like that and it's really no way to live. It's not good for you and especially as you get older you can get you can get away with it. I think in your twenties you start getting in your thirties or forties or fifties you can't do that anymore. Yeah you don't WanNA use food if. You don't WanNa, use food as a reward for working out hard I mean there is a time I mean I used to run marathons and stuff and you know we? We've you know eat GIG landfill like okay. Now, I can eat a big bowl of pasta or whatever knew nothing really wrong with that. If you really did do something where you're burning tons of calories that one big meal isn't GonNa Affect you when you're doing it on a regular basis it's when you're working out, you know three or four days a week whatever it is. That you're not keeping your nutrition and check and you can't say, Oh, well, I worked hard today's you need a whole pizza well, not if you're trying to reduce your body fat lose weight, etc. so you really have to just think about food as fuel for your body and eat for performance. And allow yourself to cheat nail once a week that you just can't be cheating a lot in and going through drive through and eating burgers and I I think a lot of people that are in the fitness world that bit that workout. Don't do that but I'm sure there are people that that do and it's it's that's where you run into trouble. If you're trying to keep you know if you're if you're working out in aesthetic is important to you and you know being a little leaner and looking better and being strong, you really do have to make sure that you're eating performance and seeing food as fuel for your body. That he always I've always said that to my students stool. And if you give your if you eat. You know, crap you're going to feel like crap as we all know. And you were a little bit about what what that looks like. Yeah. Well, let's talk about it. So if your goal is to burn fat and change body composition, what you eat is what like eighty five or ninety, five or ninety percent of it right Yeah it really is and that's not to say you shouldn't work out 'cause people go and I'm just GonNa dye well, no, because you can diet and and here's another point I wanNA make a lot of people look at weight loss versus fat loss and I think most people whether they realize it or not really when they WANNA lose weight they really want to get rid of body fat. But the problem is if you don't do the workout and and specifically you know later in the second segment I, believe I'm GonNa talk about what.

Tina Tina Burnett Tina Burnett Alan California ABC News Tacoma Seattle Molly Dr Emily Dallas writer Rubens dfw Shirley Beeman Ventura Cook
'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

Marketplace

02:57 min | 1 year ago

'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts

"An update on some muscular mice who spent a month on the international space station. NPR's John Hamilton reports that these mouse tre knots were part of an experiment that may show how humans can stay strong during interplanetary voyages. Without Earth's gravity, muscles and bones could get weak fast. So astronauts on the space station spend two hours a day exercising. Back in April. Jessica mere, Andrew Morgan even made a weightless workout video. This next exercise is cardiovascular exercise with T two treadmill to Bundy's. My Artists are holding me against the treadmill. Pretty fun to have an extra spring in your step. Intense exercise reduces bone and muscle laws but doesn't stop it, and that's a problem if you're headed for, say, Mars. So in December, researchers set some very special mice into orbit. Some of the mice were just along for the ride. Others got injections of a drug that in activates two substances that occur naturally in the body. They're called myostatin and active in a and normally their job is to limit the growth of muscle and bone. Dr Se Jin Lee of the Jackson Laboratory says when they reached the space station, all the mice got lots of exercise. Once they get up there, they've become very active, and in fact, they have a name for race tracking because they're you know, running around quite a bit. After a month in orbit, the mice splashed down off the California coast and were rushed to a lab in San Diego. Lee says normal mice that did not receive any treatment lost more than 10% of their muscle mass. And he says bone loss was an even bigger problem. They lost a substantial not a bone in space. And then even after being on Earth. They actually continue to lose a little bit more bone mass. Lee says the mice that got the drug did much better. The drug was effective, not just in preserving the mussel mess and bone mess that was being lost. But actually caused the muscles and bones to grow. The drug also reversed muscle and bone loss in mice that got it after they return to Earth. Dr. Emily Jermain Lee of the University of Connecticut, says a human version of the drug could help both astronauts in space and millions of people on Earth. That would be a miracle. For a person, either with primary bone disease, primary muscle disease or a combination. But Jermain Lee, who is married to Se Jin Lee cautions that so far the treatment has on Lee worked in mice. They had a phenomenal response to the drug without apparently any bad side effects. That's Not necessarily something that we could extrapolated to humans, but she's hopeful and says experiments on people are underway. The research appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Emily Jermain Lee Bone Loss Bone Disease NPR Bundy John Hamilton Jessica Mere California National Academy Of Sciences Andrew Morgan Proceedings Of San Diego Jackson Laboratory University Of Connecticut
"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"Thought out the challenging courses. So you know junior and senior year we're challenging because I was taking those college credit courses. Anything, that we haven't asked that you feel is important for the listener. To share. Just. Like the match don't Bob. Life's GonNa throw your curve balls. There's no doubt about it You can either swing and swing and Messi swing and mess just it back and take another swing. What is the biggest takeaway from her story? Why are you asking hard questions who? You can find yourself in a situation where most people are going to give up hope on you give up their faith and what it is, you can and cannot do, but you have to persevere even if it's only for yourself wrong because like I said, getting pregnant fourteen. Everyone else. She's going to be another statistic. You know this that and the other thing, and now when I go home. people use my story classroom weight has you know teenage pregnancies a lot more common now. Yeah Something that could have, let me get down actually motivated me to go further ahead. Do. You feel like you have prove people wrong yes. Still motivate you yes and I would be lying if I if I said that I don't like the rapid face but I How, yeah definitely. So motivates me. At the motivation can be. undervalued. Wanting to prove somebody wrong. Accomplishments. Aka twenty-nine Marceau. Dr Emily. Pika. Thank you so much being with us today. Thank you for having me. Thanks. Emily is so great to hear your story. You. Still hosted by Kevin Harrison Lauren Tash created and produced by Kevin Harris the content is copyrighted by the panthers to all..

Messi Dr Emily Kevin Harrison Lauren Tash Kevin Harris panthers Bob
"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"Well. So it's Kinda like having to find that voice in a way especially at the times where might not becoming easily. And I think this kind of bubbles with Do you see yourself slowing down at any point soon? Now, it's not inmate to slow down I'm used to go logo. And I don't think that's going to change for a while. I'd be remiss divided in kind of. Throw in some people might that list are listening? Might like it a lot like that I'm about to do this but I'd be remiss if I didn't throw in kind of the gender card here and say, how does it feel to be a woman putting career I? I had some low back Be careful. High worth us. I've had some blowback because there people around me. Who unfortunately, still give into the gender stereotypes where the woman stays home. and. Cleans and cooks, and everything and Luckily I've been with my fiance for. Eighteen years in June now, and he has always one hundred percent support in my career coming I There's never. been that has never been a topic of an argument in eighteen years. So I'm lucky I have that and he'll stand up for me by. I've definitely had some blowback because of. An. So as you're probably aware a lot of three research that we've been involved with alarm. Is. Related to what it takes to become a really high performer and some of that. Evolves around the classic debate of Nature Versus Nurture. Of course, the extreme nature view would be there's no. Need. To. Does the extreme view? There's no need to do anything. You're have the abilities on extreme nurture view would be you know A natural ability everything has to be developed, and of course, there's all the things in the metal. Could you talk a little bit about? Your thoughts on how much you attribute what you're able to accomplish. What waits natural ability versus hard work. How would you break that down? Tough one I've always been of the mind set. It's fifty fifty.

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"Horrible I didn't get as much feedback on my writing as I. Wish I would have in Undergrad because I was always getting as on my paper. Will my first semester at ut see I, took a multicultural. Society class and I got my I see on Abor. So that was I opening that you know this is a whole different world So that kind of is got put more effort and and other than that I knew I wanted to teach at that point. So I took the teaching of psychology course and Amy, Warren, todd it, and she to this day still laugh about it. We teach a course and record ourselves and I volunteered to teach one of amy's classes. It was an hour and a half class. I taught the whole class in fifteen minutes. and. Maybe this isn't for me, but then I got gotta teach introduction to psychology the next year and I was like, okay, this is for me. That was just nerves. I learned a lot about myself I learned about my weakness as in how to improve and. Amy and David were great mentors that I could talk about my problems and helped me. Can you elaborate on those the weaknesses in how you improve the? Yes. So the teaching weakness I just volunteered to teach an introduction to psychology or period. That's the only way I'm GonNa do it. And I did teach pretty fast. You know the first half of the semester was letting them out early every single class. Then I got more comfortable in my own skin and started you know we would actually make class. my writing I would ask amy when she would look over my drafts to be as critical as possible so that I could improve my writing. And David, he taught me more about the research aspect in anytime. I had questions I would go to him. He would just you know give me the articles show me how to read them. He signed me up as a student editor or student reviewer excuse me for lawn human behavior, which is one of the top journals in our field so he helped me with that. I just sat out every opportunity to improve upon myself. Once I I'm not what my weaknesses where. Do you. Did you find your writing as you're riding the Voice of your mentor? Standing Shoulder That happened to me. For, the.

Amy David Abor editor Warren todd
"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"Think college is a time for partying owned a frat parties and stuff that wasn't me I worked as a waitress also going to school full time. So I was working I had my own car. I had my car payment. So I was more focused on. Improving. My life and being able to make my bills instead of partying all the time. Which sometimes I regret I mean I missed out on that experience but. I was just thinking I remember. When I was trying to keep my grades up an Undergrad that people would. Be in the room studying and someone would invite me somewhere and always kept the mentality that. This isn't just like this thirty minutes of time if I make a C. or a D. or whatever the case be I might not. Be Able to accomplish my goals. Did you have any? Yes similar learn. I was the type of student where I got below an a I was very upset with myself. Yet that definitely played. Why why was that the case? An identity that you wanted to have. I don't necessarily think I wanted to have it. I, think it wasn't still than me by my mother from high school. and was that impart buffer yourself against the impostor syndrome that you send your feeling? Yeah, you had to prove. At least to yourself. Yes. Definitely. So. Go back for one second and. Ask What it was about research that you've found deniable fascinating I'm guess I'm somewhat asking because most of the time you hear people are like research. No. It's the topic. So for example, an Undergrad when did racial bias season police officers it's you learn about the stop and Frisk program that they have and it's like does that happen in our town because I'm from a town of three thousand and it's like does this happen? Will Happen. You know what are they going to do? So I think it's both the top-. Topic as well as the question that really interests me and then being able to look at the.

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"Types of studies one was on friendships over the life span. One was on racial bias season police officers, but I collected hall of it on my own and we had to present it. Has. Our senior seminar presentations and that. That was a pivotal moment as well because I had also present a senior seminar paper and I chose the topic of GRE's and their lack of predictive you'd. In unbeknownst to me, one of the faculty members was very passionate about the gre. And that was the first time. He was asking very rapid fire questions. Now is the first time that I have L. personally attacked in an oral presentation and I left the room crying so. I would say that was another.

L.
"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"You can find yourself in a situation where most people are going to give up hope on you give up their faith and what it is, you cannot do, but you have to persevere even if it's only for yourself to prove them wrong because like I said getting pregnant at fourteen. Everyone else she's going to be another statistic. You know this that and the other thing, and now when I go home. people use my story in the classroom weight because you know teenage pregnancies a lot more common now by. Something could have let me get down actually motivated me to go further ahead. All.

"dr emily" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr emily" Discussed on WTOP

"Dr. Emily Williams night is president of the Texas Restaurant Association. This is another setback for a sector that has taken the brunt of this. There's no doubt that for many of them this will median knew Kobe cases in Texas hit almost 6000 in a day. Florida reported more than 18,000 over the weekend. Correspondent Manuel Bohorquez is in Miami Beach. As young people increasingly test positive. Some appear unfazed by the public health risk gatherings pose We have AH, pretty good immune system, so I think we can all handle it. But the virus can have dire consequences for younger people like 29 year old Alley Gayatri, who was hospitalized with a Corona virus in May, when she went to the hospital. She was only 20 weeks pregnant. She home on long enough to do what she had to do in order to give us Matty Allie died Thursday, but her daughter Madeleine, survived an emergency C section and is now in the neonatal I C U cases are on the rise in at least 30 states. New York is reporting the lowest one day death toll since March. Ford is taking the economy into account. It'll allow customers who lease or buy new or used cars and trucks to return them. If they lose their jobs, they'll be covered for up to $15,000 of remaining balances. President Trump has tweeted and deleted a controversial video in your protesters at the Trump campaign rallied at a retirement community in Florida. One calling out Raise your white voice. Mr Trump says he didn't hear the chance. When he posted The president is denying reports he was briefed on an alleged Russian plot to pay bounties to Taliban linked fighters who kill US troops in Afghanistan. CBS has been Tracy in a late night tweet. The president said The intelligence officials didn't brief him because they did not find this info to be credible. Mr Trump suggested the story was a hoax. The Kremlin is calling all of this lies..

President Trump president Alley Gayatri Florida Texas Restaurant Association Kobe Manuel Bohorquez Miami Beach Texas CBS New York Ford Matty Allie Tracy Madeleine Afghanistan
Easing lockdowns makes day-to-day choices more complicated

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Easing lockdowns makes day-to-day choices more complicated

"Some states are allowing theaters and dine in restaurants to reopen others are relaxing restrictions just for barber shops nail salons and the like Dr Emily Landin who leads infection control at the university of Chicago Medical Center says whatever the business both the bosses and employees have to distance themselves where people eating lunch you can't keep your mask on when you're eating lunch and all your employees are taking a break at the same time in the same room taking off their masks and you're probably not doing enough lead ads of people who want to visit family and friends have to also take precautions including limiting the number of people gathering together and wear masks I'm Tim McGuire

Dr Emily Landin Tim Mcguire University Of Chicago Medical
Easing lockdowns makes day-to-day choices more complicated

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Easing lockdowns makes day-to-day choices more complicated

"As states take steps to reopen some businesses during the pandemic health officials warn employers and employees have to take steps to protect themselves some states are allowing theaters and dine in restaurants to reopen others are relaxing restrictions just for barber shops nail salons and the like Dr Emily Landin who leads infection control at the university of Chicago Medical Center says whatever the business both the bosses and employees have to distance themselves where people eating lunch you can't keep your mask on when you're eating lunch and all your employees are taking a break at the same time in the same room taking off their masks then you're probably not doing enough lead ads of people who want to visit family and friends have to also take precautions including limiting the number of people gathering together and wear masks I'm Tim McGuire

Dr Emily Landin Tim Mcguire University Of Chicago Medical
"dr emily" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"dr emily" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Expert Dr Emily Landin at university of Chicago medicine put it this way restrictions may feel anticlimactic but that's the goal unbelievable to me and this is just going to keep on moving and it's going to go as fast as we let it the only way we can stop it is by that distance and we really need to get the message out I don't know what it's going to take in light of the coronavirus emergency the trump administration is considering whether to create a special enrollment period for obamacare coverage the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services spokesperson confirmed that such a move could boost the number of people with coverage as thirty two states rely on the federal exchange I'm Barbara sack vice president Mike pence and his wife tested negative for the corona virus they were tested as a member of pence's staff had tested positive a growing number of countries Peru included are putting travel bans in place to slow the spread of Kobe nineteen and now hundreds of Americans were visiting Peru can't leave including Dylan the door of Texas who says they were even unable to reach the American embassy for help many Americans myself included called the embassy you have no answer on the automated email responses and this we saw as other countries were flying and there are people out Colombia Mexico Israel France were able to get their people out of the country and we had to phone lines at our embassy a strong earthquake has shaken Croatia and its capital causing widespread damage and panic witnesses say several buildings have cracked walls and rooftops have been damaged no casualties were initially reported.

Israel Mexico Colombia Barbara sack Medicare obamacare university of Chicago Croatia France Dr Emily Landin American embassy Texas Dylan Kobe Peru Mike pence vice president
Most pregnant women aren’t getting flu and whooping cough shots, CDC warns

WIBC Programming

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Most pregnant women aren’t getting flu and whooping cough shots, CDC warns

"It's flu season which means you're going to hear about how important it is to get that flu shot Rakata reports even more important for pregnant women I feel like sometimes moms don't realize the importance of it and how much it can impact both in their health but also the help of their newborn baby Dr Emily Scott newborn director at Riley hospital for children tells wish TV that when pregnant moms get the vaccines they're actually passing it on to the baby and protecting them for the first few months of their life with a baby some partially come into Riley hospital with both flew and whipping cough and it can be deadly she says mom can get the flu shot at any time during their pregnancy but suggest getting the whooping cough vaccine during the third

FLU Director Riley Hospital Cough Rakata Dr Emily Scott
Eye Care For Our Kids With Dr. Emily Ceisler

Mom Brain

08:02 min | 2 years ago

Eye Care For Our Kids With Dr. Emily Ceisler

"Name is Emily Heisler. I'm a physician. I'm a pediatric theatric ophthalmologist in Manhattan I have two offices on the upper west side and in Tribeca and I teach a at NYU and I do my surgeries at Nyu you I am arm and actually a mom is probably been my most important job in life although I love what I do. My kids are nineteen and twenty one. They're both in college so I now. I'm an empty. Nester and that's a whole nother gun conversation but but my kids are awesome and and so my my daughter Carmen started she was probably like her. No almost two she started doing in this thing where she was like bringing a lot and squinting and doing a little bit of like head tilting and stuff like that and we didn't know what to what to make out of it it was it was kind of. We didn't know if she was being funny. We enough. It was like a tick. I brought her to a doctor. not our normal doctor. We're we're vacationing somewhere and he's said tick. Show probably do this and she'll outgrow it. You know maybe one day and you know I got connected with Dr Size layer and and that was not the that was not the situation at all. Um mm so I I think we went one time and we weren't sure right you talk the first time I saw her. you brought her in for exactly that reunion and obviously there are tons of things that little kids do and sometimes they mean something sometimes they don't so that's why obviously it's always good to get it. Chuck is often. It's nothing and you can kind of. Just piss a buy in and say nope. It's nothing and I'm not actually even sure that that was something related to a problem how much she ended up having because at that age you know they they do do a lot of these funny things that can sometimes really not hard to communicate with them when they're so little and that was kind of what was a major amazing by watching you. It's like how do you ask a kid. That doesn't know the alphabet yet. You know how do you get them. I'm to communicate to you if what what they're seeing and so what are what are some for like very early toddler years whereas if you feel like you know your kid needs to get their eyes checked out number one water. What a red flags. which would we be looking for and number two? What is your process as a doctor. We're trying to communicate with these little. Peo- yep well so a lot of red flags are really going to be put there by your pediatrician because when kids are little obviously particularly infants they don't have a lot of ways of communicating and there's a lot of things that are important pick up early early but that as a mom you might not see and so your pediatrician is at each well visit looking for specific things. I mean I I think our pediatricians are so amazing because we ask them to do so much and look for so much pick up all these things and you know what most kids are fine and and there's nothing but then sometimes there is we need them to find that and then they're going to send you to a specialist as a mom you gotta just. I trust your mom instinct because there are plenty of so on on the contrary to what I just said They're planning times when MOMS come in and they say I I keep asking my pediatrician Putian things. Everything's fine but I feel like there's something wrong and you'd be amazed how often there is something wrong and MOMS know and you've got to trust them and that's one thing I teach my residents and medical students is listened to moms. If you're a pediatric sub specialists you really we really really have to trust moms and yeah. We're all particularly first time. MOMS there's a lot of crazy thoughts that go through our head and a lot of irrational things that that that we may say or do or you know notice in our kids that are nothing and at the same time you really have to listen because of a Momma's concerned about something you gotta listen to that concern. It may be nothing but it's worth checking out so we do see that now part to your question. How do we examine kids and check their vision when they're little so first of all again big bias because I'm a pediatric sub specialists that kids are not just little adults and they need to be seen differently and treated differently. you know as you know in my office. We really only do kids and we do adult. I muscle problems but we really are pretty biased with everything is for kids so our waiting room is kid friendly and our staff kid friendly and they're really trained and trained and trained beyond to be great with kids and great with MOMS because half the battle to get the information is making kids feel comfortable and happy and an enjoy it and so we try and make everything game and fine has to be age appropriate different ages demand different things but if it's fun and they feel like they're playing games aims so many times kids will come in and they're so nervous really scared about what's GonNa Happen and if they walk out like skipping and saying I want to come back. We've done our job because all of that is just to get the information in adult you just ask them to do it and they bill it. Totally different with kids in every age is different but you know what once you've been doing this for a long time you get good at different ages and stages and and doing what you need to do to get the information but you know with Carmen even though at the time I think the concerns that she had raised for you. the mayor may not have ultimately been related to what she ended up having it got you in to have a full exam and the full exam is where we get all the information so once we I know that I think I probably said to you right now. We don't really have to worry about this. She's fine but she is something. That's a risk risk factor for emily opium. Which is some people lazy I yeah and most people have never heard the word Amplio Pia. They may gave her lazy. I one of the reasons lazy is a tough word. In kind of the world is that people use it for different things. Some people use lazy. I'm meaning the I. Crosses or Wanderers on. I had an uncle that has I would cross in yet. One I that would cross enter couldn't look at you and I thought that that was lazy. I until I eight met you and Karma had lazy right so the reality is lazy doesn't really mean it. It's not it's our medical term right so it means whatever people use it to means enes people use it for both and in fact I think in the world most people use it more for what your time met with your uncle like and the real word for that is strong business and ends for businesses any kind of muscle problem where the eye turns in or out whereas Ambrogio Pia it which is what Karma has is when the eye looks perfectly normal. Let's perfectly straight but the brain isn't using one of the is or something's both of the is but more often one as well as it should. The brain is not getting that visual information and therefore not developing normal healthy vision which is so important and that's what I found to be so interesting. I mean not only do I want my daughter to to see well well but that idea that she had one either was working just fine and one. I that wasn't jerky working just fine and that you tend to compensate obviously asleep to the I that is stronger and you know what you taught me is that it's important especially as you are growing to have your brain be community communicating communicating properly with both eyes so that we need to not just adjust the is so they can be seeing better but also for brain development hundred

Carmen NYU Karma Emily Heisler Manhattan Tribeca Nester Wanderers Ambrogio Amplio Pia Chuck Opium One Day
"dr emily" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

"The connection has gone there for like the sex is a byproduct of the connection. Yes okay that can be the way it goes. So if you're going to have averill conversation with your partner about your sexual connection. There are some ways to do it that are less likely to result in disaster. One is and this is the classic John Goodman Gentle Start up first of all you ask permission is now a guitar to talk about this or else leg. Let's find a time to talk about it because it really is important to me and and I want to hear your thoughts about it. so one asking permission to the gentle positive startup of leg here the things. I really love about our sexual connection action. These are the reasons why it's really important to me. Tell me a little about like what you value about our sexual connection because again couples who sustained strong sexual connection they prioritize prioritise sex so like what is it about our sexual corruption that really matters for us and then you can talk about you. WanNa get the other person to talk about the things that they feel like are standing between them and the sexual connection and uses very silly metaphor of sleepy hedgehogs Fox and the reason I bring it up now is because I saw this wonderful sex coach working with a couple sort of at a workshop and she had them stand up and she said so face each other but put as much distance between your body's as you need to feel comfortable and safe then good and below desire partner stepped back twenty feet right like the whole stage just all this space and the difficult part was not that there was all this space between them it was that that space was not empty space is crowded with months months of accumulated like will if you really love me would are like. I don't know what's wrong with me but your criticism isn't helping and you're not there for me and end of all this like the hurt feelings and the conflict and the misunderstanding in the sense of isolation and the despair and the fear all like in the book. I use this ridiculous metaphor of sleepy hedgehogs. If you imagine that like the floor between these people is crowded with like all these sleepy hedgehogs all these uncomfortable feelings each which of which has to be like picked up and manage with kindness and compassion so that you can set it free so that you can find your way back to each other one by one unfortunately when you're actually in this process once you get the knack of turning toward difficult vince with kindness compassion you can take. Did you be mass noun for hedgehogs is brickell a trickle of sleepy hedgehogs so you can then take like whole pickles of sleepy hedgehogs and move them into the hedge where they belong when I was doing this they in my own as a married to the man on earth who happens to be a cartoonist and so when we were having this conversation in our own relationship he drew our bed edit with a little hedgehog size escalator and then there's a head over the side of the venture wall where like we were allowing all the sleepy the hedgehogs to help themselves to the hedge off the bed. I like panel on Just switching gears a little bit here own. Maybe a bit more rapid fire is be wound up the show in the episode. What are some of the things that males should know of females and end female should know but males when it comes to sex that you find people don't off turn yeah someone replace your language for precision vision stage to say ciswomen insys gender women as a gender men because we're talking about the gender binary we're thinking about like the ways that vac gets communicated women. I think no but tend to down play the extent to which the men are taught that their value as human beings is measured by their sexual. Sul Prowess even if it's not what a person explicitly believes the cultural message is your worth is measured by the number of Vaginas. You can put your penises in and if you can't get your penises into vaginas because they won't let you then you lose. PS women are morally inferior to you and so you are losing to someone morally inferior to you and that makes you less even than women. These are not explicitly held messages for almost anyone but the idea with human givers syndrome is that women are subordinate and if you can't control your subordinate then you have failed in your masculine duty right then so there's this intense vulnerability ability around sexuality where to reject a man sexuality to reject something really fundamental in his person hood. There is is a wound that I think most SIS hat. Men are carrying around related to sexual rejection reaction. They will almost never tell anyone about. I think I mean am I totally wrong only truly wrong and we especially because the narrative of men is they're supposed to be like super strong and invulnerable vulnerable we sort of accept that they actually are super strong and invulnerable and not carrying around these like really deep permanent bleeding wounds underneath the armor summer that they have been forced to wear their lives you ever defiant to hide. Vulnerabilities relates a weakness yeah and that patriarchal message. It's the I think. The primary source of violence against women perpetrated by men is that they don't know what to do with all their hurt but they know that like they can't control this factor in their life and they're so full of rage and despair. It has to go somewhere I it. It doesn't make that okay nothing but I will add that like what everybody else's. Life is like but I do like my friends and sort of your taught to as as males you talked to suppress emotion. Tuck not be emotional. Increasingly the message in society is like you need to be more and more rational less and less emotional user like disconnected from your feelings and you don't get practice practice feeling right. You don't get part just talking about your feelings. You don't get practice feeling your feelings and I wonder like the long term impacts of yeah okay we are leaving the long term impacts of that and women get the same thing but the specific message of Human Givers Syndrome. If you're human giver Your Job Your moral obligation is to be pretty happy yet com generous and attentive to the needs of others so you suppress every other promotion of real like little girls get..

partner John Goodman vince Fox twenty feet
"dr emily" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"dr emily" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

"Gene legs so then we need to figure out what counts as biological versus what's some other level of analysis because in a technical sense the soulful emotional connection implied by making love. That's part of the biological power of sex is that they bonding socially connecting behavior. Almost none of the sax humans have ever had is reproductive. Even before there was hormonal contraception. There was not consistently significant relationship between frequency of sex and number pregnancies occur so almost none of the sexually reproductive its primary function for us as a species species is as a social behavior so that one specific kind of social behavior of making love of bonding a pair of people together her who intend to like stay and maintain that bond over the long term that attachment behavior is biological. There's hormones involved salved chemical changes its biological but it's also social and it requires a particular mindset. Were you go into it with a bunch of things turned off a bunch of cultural scripts in particular turnoff that this is a sex about performance that this is sex about reproduction that this is sex. That's just about like a notch on a two people use that term still notch on the headboard a A. I don't know I know what you mean when you say it so maybe so you come into being lag. This is an experience that's about me connecting with US other human being who matters a a lot to me and it's about the fact that this person matter so much to me. That's what I think is implied by making love and it's totally possible to have sex in the absence of that is totally possible to just like put your body parts together in a noisy energetic athletic way which I think is what is meant by fucking at. I think having sex is putting your parts together in like a lazy hanaway like you're just just like here. This is sorta like bare minimum. Here's my go. You see that's the thing is. I was thinking. Here's my vagina exactly thing yeah. I was GONNA say. Do you do me go to town. Letting Labra can get it over hopefully I can talk to me. Abode the role of Saxe Inter relationships relationships sex monogamous relationship husband wife yet male male male or female female vary not only do people vary from each other and couples vary from each other but also people change across time on relationships change across time. Tell me about some of the common wisdom people the role of sex and in relationships and maybe and then talk to me but how they change over time so here's a sort of standard narratives is that early on in the hot and heavy fallen in love. There's a greater frequency frequency of sacks greater intensity of sexual experience where you're like bonding together and building the foundation of what it's eventually GonNa grow into it feels. Dell's a very high desire high intensity of pleasure hopefully and you're often using sachs as a way to repair any potential central damage to the bonds leg. If you have a fight or if one of the partners goes away for a while you come back together and it's actual way for sure so that's a sort of early in the relationship and then you like get together and you realize it's person your plan is for them to be there for ever and it's really the easy at that point four secs to drop away from your list of priorities in life because you've got a lot of over stuff to do among the couples who sustain a strong sexual actual connection over multiple decades. This is the talk giving tomorrow. Among the couple's stand strong sexual connection over multiple decades. They have two characteristics in common. those characteristics are not but they have sex very frequently. Almost no one has very frequently because you know we're busy. these are not necessarily couples who have wild adventurous interest sex. This is one of my favorite studies. Just a couple of years ago. Study found that the best predictor of sex and relationship satisfaction was not how often a couple had sex or even like what orgasms they have but whether or not they cuddled after sex and these are not necessarily couples that like constantly can't wait to get their hands on each other. Sometimes they are from comes. How's your note you know the difference between spontaneous desire which just seems to emerge out of the Blue Erika Moen the cartoonist who illustrated come as you are draws spontaneous desire as a lightning lightning bolts of the genitals want it yet verses responsive desire which emerges in response to pleasure so in a long longterm relationship with this often looks like is like you got the child care and you put the last load a laundry in the dryer and so you trump up the stairs because it Saturday at three o'clock like you said you me and the right underwear was do this thing and so you put your body in the bed and you let that your skin touch your partner's skin and your body goes oh right I like this. I like this person. That's responsive. Desire and responses and responses are both normal healthy ways to experience desire but responsive desire is more typical of that leg later in the relationship ship sort of experience the couples who sustain a strong sexual connection the two things they do have in common one. They are friends. They have a strong friendship with trust at the foundation nation of their relationship there it is again trust and two they prioritize sex. They decide the choose it. They believe that that it matters for the quality of their relationship that they set aside all the other stuff they could doing the child care that they need to be doing and the jobs they need to go to and other family family members and friends and God forbid they just WanNa Watch game of thrones right. They cordoned off time just to spend during this frankly Frankley sorta strange thing that we humans do of leg rolling our bodies around combining our fluids and like breathing heavily heavily and like if you're somebody walked in and didn't know what it was they might be worried about you because your facial expression those of the couples who sustain a strong sexual cash. I know this isn't a the story. We're usually told about what like satisfying sex life in the long term looks like we're told we need to like spice it up and if you like to spice it up go for it. Novelty multi can be a great way to keep the wheels spinning but ultimately what matters that engagement with sexual novelty like Porn Horn and role play and toys those things are great if you like them but the choice to engage with them in a positive way is itself prioritizing sex deciding that it matters enough for your life to spend your money and your time collecting those things and participating in those things sex seems to add one more thing yet. Go people have kids. It is normal early in the child. Experience zags ex- do disappear from a relationship for any number of reasons not least being that your sleep is going to be deeply fucked up and we know Oh that sleep is actually a predictor of frequency and quality of sex there was one study from Oh twenty fifteen that showed that adding one extra hour hour of sleep increase the chances of having sex the next night by ten percent so everybody out there who wants to get some get some sleep just get a little extra rest what what are the other predictors of frequency and pleasure of Oh. There's like way too many so okay. Frequency does not matter because again. Pleasure is the measure of sexual actual. Being and frequency of sex is not a predictor of sexual satisfaction because people vary so much. There are some people who were like if I don't get it every day then I don't feel okay and other people are like once a month. That's fine or less everything works. It depends on the relationship. Yeah it depends and everything is normal like you're not if both of you are satisfied. Having having no sex that is just part of the spectrum you do you so. I'm not one of those sex educators. It's like Texas so important. You really need to prioritize prioritize it because there are some people for whom it is not important. Don't prioritize it if it's not important to you. I'M NOT GONNA make anybody but for the people for whom it is important there there are six factors that increase pleasure the first is obviously a personal mental and physical well being the best predictor in particular of a woman's. Women's sexual wellbeing is her overall wellbeing so obviously if you are getting over the flu that's going to interfere with your enjoyment of sexuality -ality. If you were just diagnosed with breast cancer that's going to interfere with your sexuality. If you're experiencing depression anxiety good interfere here with your sexuality so mental physical well being your own two is partner characteristics and we don't just think one-dimensionally about their physical appearance Ross talking about since if humor summer and like watching them be expert at the thing that they do when my husband's funny. That's the main thing for me and my sister is a musician married to musician and wind. She hears her husband. Practicing Piano in the room like that really does it for her partner characteristics. It's not just about like what do they look like and here. It is again in trust Mike. I think if people remember one thing this you probably remember this trust based relationship. Almost you trust your partner. Do you work on that trust. And how trustworthy are you you with them that ability to like investigated get trusses deserved circuit and to give it and there is a relationship between trustworthiness. US worthiness and willingness to trust setting is another factor that influences whether or not something is pleasurable so some people really love having the same sex in the same bed that they've had sex every time for the last ten years. Some people really want to be in like a hotel room where they know they're not gonNA. I have to deal with the laundry. I met a woman who had vacationed regularly at this one very old vacation house and had great sacks at this one vacation house and one year. They rented a house. It was in the same town does a different house and the great sex didn't happen. They have three kids and what she realized was. This house was so old. The bed was built built into the wall so amid no squeaking noise so she didn't have that distraction of worrying about kids hearing this and so they're building living a house now with a bed built building the wall absolutely yeah so setting those sorts of factors make a difference and there's a lot of things that are very controllable about the setting adding and it's easy to figure out what works for you just by thinking about so like water like the great sexual experiences. You've had other life circumstances so this is just I like how stressed out are you about the kids and money and Patriarchy and like all the other things other life circumstances that keep the brakes on and then the last factor is my favorite. It's called Ludik factors Ludik from the same root as the word ludicrous. It means to play so how free he do. You feel to play with your partner to have fun to experiment there. Actually I know we have these scripts in our head about like what order things are supposed to go in and we'll we're supposed supposed to do but the fact is consenting. Adults are allowed to do anything they want to to each other like if you WanNa fuck your partners armpit you are allowed to with ver- permission. It's called actually Andrew. Course people like it when there's names for things so like if I can be like yeah. There's a name for that Larry Intercourse. Do you go for it if you like it awesome awesome if it's not for you don't do that. Someone asked me what I really like is when my partner licks between the arches of my feet when the soldier may feeder are pressed together. I couldn't find a name for it so I made one up. Inter planter linked us now that it has a name go for it like you're allowed to do whatever you want to do so that freedom to play is the last factor that increases people's experience of pleasure with sexuality. One of my favorite quotes is actually from Dorothy sayers mystery novel her detective Lord Peter Whimsey says the worst Sin Passion can commit is to be joyless lists..

partner Gene Saxe Inter Erika Moen Dorothy sayers US Dell Labra Larry Intercourse Frankley Texas Andrew sachs Lord Peter Whimsey Ludik Mike Ross ten percent four secs
"dr emily" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr emily" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome to the show on live radio host are no more now we've heard enough for Swiss for and the dog Whisperer and even the cat was for well it's time to shout about the most important whisper of all when it comes to your dog's health she is a self proclaimed super geek take that Big Bang theory and she is a proud parent please give pause and applies to the back area whisper Dr Emily Stein Hey welcome to the show Dr Emily thank you for having me all right now listeners get ready Dr Emily is about the talk about germs microbes and other nasty stuff and how we can easily protect our canine all that's going to cover on today show but you guys know the drill first you need to sit and stay and we'll be right back after we take this quick commercial break she. time for a pause for very ones actually and stay. right. Hey it's me again yeah are no more posted there will be a show during this commercial you know what I love I love my cats I love that safety cat K. C. I love my sweets Mikey and I love one I'd Morty each one has their unique hearse analogy Casey's a pet safety cat and he just had per state Mikey loves to lounge on the couch and put her in your lap and one I'd Morty he's just her her her machine now you know what I don't love cleaning up the later for Casey Mikey and Morty which is why Armand hammer created new cloud control litter there's no clouded nasties now when I scoop it's a hundred percent dust free it's free of heavy perfumes and it reduces airborne dander from scooping. so what happens in the.

Casey Mikey Dr Emily Morty Dr Emily Stein Armand hammer K. C. hundred percent
From Sexploration to Sexplanation with Pamela Madsen

Sex With Emily

02:12 min | 2 years ago

From Sexploration to Sexplanation with Pamela Madsen

"So he talked about having the sexual authenticity model so having women explore what are their values. What have they been trained with like. What are they believe in so my value is monogamy right. That's my value. What are your desire so he might desire is to have many more lovers anymore. Experiences appearances so value she value and what your desire people can do this at home. What are your values your desires than what your behavior and what you really want is to help people men and women of course we must be working with women align but their values with their desire with their behavior behavior and then there are living an authentic sexual life. Thanks for the scene of sex with emily. This is dr dr emily and on today's show i'm joined by founder and c._e._o. Of back to the body sensuous retreats for women pamela madsen talk about all the ways women can unlock their sexual tinsel tablets and could you probably don't have low libido. What you really might have is high boredom ways to figure out exactly what you like in the bedroom and it isn't your typical sexploitation mm-hmm so what is happening and how can it benefit you and games. You can play with your partner. That will definitely take your sex life up notch. All this and more thanks for listening is why is that our sacred is gone. You got a boyfriend here. He just got his heart broke. Anything kinda the kids. The women know about shrinkage isn't a common. You mean like laundry. It shrink about sexual much minded feel pretty good. Emily's not the kinda joey just playing. You're listing into sex with emily. We're talking about sex relationships and everything in between check our website for more information at sex with emily dot com 'cause you're gonna love all the post as we have up there. If you haven't read it yet a lot

Dr Dr Emily Pamela Madsen Joey Partner Founder
STEMinists: Elizabeth Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:23 min | 2 years ago

STEMinists: Elizabeth Blackwell

"Today we're talking about the first woman mentor earn a medical degree in the united states. She went on to become a champion for women in medicine and an important social reformer. Let's meet our stem in the day. Hey dr elizabeth well. Elizabeth was born in eighteen twenty one in bristol england. She was the third of nine children born to samuel blackwell and his wife hannah who were both well known quakers and anti-slavery activists. This was not your average family. Many of elizabeth's close relatives tibbs became well known in their own right including her brother henry who is a famous abolitionist and women's rights activist and was married to fellow activists lucy stone elizabeth sister. Emily followed elizabeth into medicine and their sister-in-law antoinette brown blackwell was the first ordained female minister of a major protestant artist denomination. When elizabeth was eleven years old her family moved to the united states and eventually settled in cincinnati ohio just six years later in eighteen thirty eight elizabeth's father died and left the family practically destitute in the middle of a major national financial crisis in order order to support the family elizabeth her two older sisters and their mother worked as teachers to make ends meet but elizabeth had other career ambitions. She was inspired to go into medicine. While taking care of a dying friend the friend noted that she would have had a less onerous and likely less embarrassing experience cheap intrigued treated by a female doctor at the time there were few medical schools in america and the ones that existed didn't accept women in order to move towards torturing with going into medicine. Elizabeth took private teaching positions with the families of two different southern physicians who mentored her in their profession then elizabeth moved to philadelphia in eighteen forty seven hoping that she could use her quaker connections to gain entrance into any medical school that would have her. She applied to as many schools so she could but was rejected from all except for one geneva college in upstate. New york apparently sent her an acceptance letter meant to be a practical joke but elizabeth is it didn't find it particularly funny and went ahead and accepted her joke. Acceptance was just the beginning of elizabeth's difficulties in medical school not only when she forced by her professors to sit separately from the men during lectures she was often left out of the labs component altogether that menchu is getting significantly less hands hands on practice than her male peers but elizabeth was a genius she won over her professors and classmates time went on with the sheer force her skill and intellect act. She ended up graduating first in her class. In eighteen forty nine making her the first woman to graduate from medical school in the united states and the first modern day woman woman doctor of medicine after graduation she moved to europe to further train under doctors in london and paris elizabeth was subjected to plenty of prejudice she does from european doctors who would often make her play second fiddle to them as nurse or midwife but even then her brain was churning she noticed that male doctors often caused caused disease transmission and sometimes even epidemics because they didn't wash their hands between patients. Elizabeth began emphasizing the importance of personal hygiene in hospitals tolls and pioneered preventative care in eighteen fifty. One elizabeth moved to new york city there. It was even harder to be a woman doctor than it was in europe. She was refused all posts in the city's hospitals and dispensaries and was even unable to rent offices for her own private practice as a result her. The practice was very slow to develop in the interim she wrote a series of lectures called the laws of life with special reference to the physical education of if girls thanks to the assistance of quaker friends and the quaker community elizabeth opened a small dispensary in a very poor under served neighborhood in eighteen fifty three four years later. She was joined by her younger sister dr emily blackwell as well as another woman doctor. The greatly enlarged dispensary was unified as the new york infirmary for women and children. One of its major missions was in providing positions for women doctors. The block while sisters even trained nurses there during the civil. If a war for union hospitals in eighteen sixty eight after perfecting a plan she created in consultation with florence nightingale. Elizabeth open the women's medical college at the infirmary. The medical college operated for thirty one years and was well known for its very high academic and training standards. Elizabeth served as the chair of hygiene for the school until she moved back to england for good in eighteen sixty nine back in england. Elizabeth established a successful private practice. She also helped to create the national health society an eighteen seventy five she was appointed to a professorship at the london school of medicine for women which she held until nineteen o seven when she was forced to retire due to injury while on vacation in scotland elizabeth took a terrible fall down a flight of stairs and was was left mentally and physically disabled in nineteen ten doctor elizabeth blackwell up died at her home in hastings sussex after suffering a stroke that paralyzed realized half her body

Elizabeth Blackwell Dr Elizabeth Paris Elizabeth United States Dr Emily Blackwell Private Practice Antoinette Brown Blackwell Europe London School Of Medicine Samuel Blackwell New York New York Infirmary England Bristol England Ohio Philadelphia Cincinnati Geneva
Why Do Mosquitoes Bite?

Imagine This

07:22 min | 3 years ago

Why Do Mosquitoes Bite?

Mazi Straw Mazi Mosey James ABC B. Mesquita Dr Emily Bray University Of Tasmania LEE Basel AL Glatt Four Years
Communist Party, Cuba and Dr Emily Morris discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

05:02 min | 4 years ago

Communist Party, Cuba and Dr Emily Morris discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Cuba has had its first draft constitution since the Soviet era published following today's debate, the country's national assembly approved document which makes no mention of building a communist society. It recognizes private property and opens away to gay marriage. What I'm doing by Dr Emily Morris is a research associate at the UCLA institute of the Americas currently in Havana. Welcome back to medical twenty four Emily and explain to us a little bit more about what's in this new, very different constitution. Well, it's it's, it's not funded from is based on the previous ones, but it's called as you say, some significant new departures on what's happened inside of the Las well, they've lost thirty years. So particularly over the love five or ten years, they've been a whole series of reforms have been introduced economic side, which have opened to space from more private business for the exchange of houses for selling players in the house cost. So the society has actually changed already. And so the constitution is really catching up with the changes that are already underway. So in a way, it's not surprising anybody in Cuba Russo because it's a adjusting, mainly things have already happened. So you've mentioned you've mentioned two things. One is the gay marriage and the other is the economic reforms. There's not the reforms as well in there, but on the gay marriage. This is really something that doesn't surprise any control. I think you know that they've been. There's no real opposition to this apart from a few churches have made some noises, but there's they vision to to gain those permissive in in that respect, they look gay clubs and transsexuals and so on. So this is coming out in the boost in one a long time ago in Cuba on the economic side, what's interesting is that the they've already private property people in their houses on the pictures, allowing for the creation of five businesses and giving them a clear constitutional basis than they had before. And this age interesting they detail will be in the laws of hostile, move the exact tons. But it does open a new space for the development of the private sector into the and one thing that people have noticed in terms of the absence of the word from the constitution is the building of a communist society. That's something that was afraid. Geology belonging to the Soviet era constitution. Instead there's something called prosperous. Socialism. Has anyone explained exactly what it means? You've given us lots of examples of what it might look like. But the idea of a thing, a theory, an idea called prosper. Socialism, do you know exactly what that is. On your term. It's already been used in a barrier documents that have been posted last five years talking about the conceptualization bird, the modal so that is prosperous. So for in sustainable, socialism is what they, they say, they tried to build. It's kind of interesting because fifty used to what commu came when qb aligned itself with the union. And so now obviously, that era is over and so they say, have been talking in this is they always talk about and rather than building a community system. So 'cause especially what they're in the process of defining and that's why this is interesting because they're trying to define their own brand of sulfur in the stoop, and I listen and what it consists of and the debates within that a really profound under debate happening at every level. So this is really very interesting moment any given his day, and I think you know globally it's a very interesting case that we've got here. So if they're talking about a socialist system, they do have a communist party the so they don't have a multi party system. They have a a concentration which has what they call participate, true democracy values level. But the only legal political party is the communist party. But the other thing that the constitution signed to do time to separate the the different functions. And so that's the policy to be separate from the government and they're trying to separate the executive from the legislature so that this is a lot of constitutional very profound constitional shift for a thing Mark here, but detail of them though we don't actually know let expect you know how this is going to work, but already close. You. Have a head of the communist party is not famous person country that happened this year when the canal took over the presidency, would this test you?.

Communist Party Cuba Dr Emily Morris Cuba Russo Ucla Institute Of The Americas Havana Research Associate Executive Mark Thirty Years Five Years Ten Years
Students protesting gun violence in nationwide school walkout

Rush Limbaugh

01:01 min | 4 years ago

Students protesting gun violence in nationwide school walkout

"The training to recognize those warning size to prevent violence from ever entering our school grounds florida republican john rutherford former sheriff is sponsoring the bill with bipartisan support though democrats say this must be a first step not the only response lisa jared it's arraignment day for the florida shooting suspects nncholas crews who has just pleaded not guilty during the hearing prosecutors offering to waive the death penalty in seek life in prison if cruz pleads guilty which is something the public defender had previously offered to do but for now there's no deal fox news fair and balanced minnesota news at work i'm jay w cox minnesota students joined their peers nationwide in a school walkout this morning in protest of gun violence dr emily palmer is principal at sanford middle in minneapolis she says students safety is a top priority but they also need to find a balance for students inundated with bad news and negative images we struggle a lot at school with how much does kids.

Principal Sanford Middle Minneapolis Florida John Rutherford Nncholas Cruz Minnesota Jay W Dr Emily Palmer