19 Burst results for "Dr Del Rio"

"dr del rio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I got the Johnson and Johnson do. I need to get another shot with an mrna vaccine. To boost my response, and at this point in time, there is no official recommendation of what to do. At what I'm telling people is if you were vaccinated with the Johnson and Johnson and you're young or you're otherwise healthy your 50 year olds, But you're otherwise healthy. You're in great shape. You're running the P Street. You don't need to worry. Don't don't worry about it. If you got the J and J and you're you know, 65, or 70 and obese hypertension have other comorbidities. Maybe it's time to talk to your doctor and consider a shot of the of one of the Mrna vaccines, either Pfizer and Moderna But again, I'm giving that advice. There's not recommendation for CBC. There's no recommendation from the FDA to do that. At this point in time. We we simply are saying that all vaccines are equally effective against this variance. And Dr Larry, I do have an email question here. Listener wants to know, you know. Do you advise for my Do you advise at my high schooler Get the vaccine. They will be attending a public high school for the first time. Um what's the advice? Stafford from Dr Del Rio. And again. This is your opinion, and we ask that everyone always consult with their Absolutely. My opinion would be that if I had a high schooler, which I don't anymore, But if I had a high schooler, I would vaccinated my my high school kids. I think that The we have heard about the risks of my card itis, particularly in boys, particularly in young boys, especially after the second dose of the visor or the Moderna vaccine. Uh, I still think that is that the risk benefit favors vaccination. Uh, now that's one population. You know that? I may say, you know, why don't you take the, uh, the Johnson and Johnson vaccine And I can tell you that my my, my teenage, uh, nephew who is 18? We have this discussion and he decided to take the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and I'm totally in favor so I would get my my high school are vaccinated. And whether it's Johnson and Johnson or one of the M RNA vaccines. You know that's a decision. You and your physician and knowing the side effects need to take. But at the end of the day, the answer is yes, get vaccinated. Another listener. Emails being said, I'd like to hear more about the booster shot. Is it available? How do I know if I need one? Good question. Well, let's Yeah, Let's start by saying that at this point in time, as I said, there's absolutely no recommendation or evidence that you're going to need a booster shot. And in fact, there's some recent publications that have come out, suggesting that the immunity induced by the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine is actually pretty long lived, and we may not need booster shots unless there's some variants emerges that totally resistant to the vaccines. But at this point in time, I was vaccinated back in December. So in early January, so I'm I'm six months out. And I am not planning to take a booster anytime soon. Because I don't think I need one. Uh Uh, as I said, in the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, especially globally, for example, in gastro Seneca vaccine or some of the of the of the of the Chinese vaccines, I said, for example, uh, the sign of farm vaccine. Uh, I know Bahrain, for example, is giving a dose of M RNA vaccine to all their population that receives a sign of farm vaccine as a way to boost them. But But here in the U. S, were not yet recommending any boosting and the A C i, P. C. D. C has not recommended that we do that. So at this point in time, Unless there's some very specific reason, I would say there's no reason to get a boost. And Dr Dario preparing for this conversation, and I came upon news reports coming out of India. The detection of over 40 cases of a new coronavirus coronavirus variant called Delta Plus Have you heard anything about this? Or Don't mean to scare people, but Well, you know, it's as you said, At the beginning of our conversation, Rose, new variants are going to merge. And you merit variants will be emerging with this corn of ours. This is just this is just what the As long as the virus is transmitting and multiplying. This viruses tend to mutate and as they tend to mutate, then they you know, they produce more variants that are either more transmissible or more resistant to neutralizing activity of antibodies. The delta plus variant has an additional mutation called K. 1417 n. And there's concerns that this one mutation even makes it more transmissible. But the reality is research done by colleagues and friends in India. Dr Gupta, for example, uh, has said that That there there really is, and much, much of a difference between the Delta and the Delta. Plus, as he says, the delta is bad enough. Uh, it's pretty transmissible. You know, this is just another another variant. As you begin to wrap up. I remember last year. It seems a bit longer than that. When you actually the very first guest, and I asked you about how long you thought we might all still be experiencing his pandemic. What are your thoughts now? I mean, we're all we're in a pandemic, but it's a different type of in game now that the nation and obviously the rest of the world wants to get to Um What do you think we'll still be talking about? Variance and all this this time next year, Dr Del Rio. Well, Rose. I think at this point in time here in the U. S is up to us. We have in the U. S, A and an oversupply of vaccines. And if we were to get, you know, 70, plus percent of the population vaccinated by President Biden has said he wants to get one shot to 74% of the eligible population..

December last year Gupta India 70 74% Dario Larry next year U. S 65 six months 18 Pfizer early January second dose one shot Del Rio FDA Moderna
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Australian company to bring the first at home. Rapid covert 19 test available without a prescription. To the United States. This news comes as covert 19 hospitalizations continue to decline, though the number of people in the hospital still higher than it was during this summer's surge. Dr. Carlos Del Rio is the executive associate dean of the Emory School of Medicine. And he joins me now, Dr Del Rio. Welcome. Happy to be with you, Peter. And first of all this stage in the game when we're now deep into a vaccination drive. Why does this kind of at home rapid Covad test matter? I think having better code testing and having rapid test did you could do at home is gonna be critical to do a lot of things like opening schools like opening the economy like opening businesses. I mean, I can envision if he had a test that was cheap. If I was going to go to NATO work, and I wasn't feeling well where I was having a little bit under the weather, or just regularly check myself into a covert tests. I think I'll make a huge difference that we did just testing that way. Now we're also seeing the number of hospitalized patients with cove in 19 in this country going down. What do you seen? What you thinking? As you see those rates fall. Well, I see. I'm very encouraged to see hospitalizations go down. I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that you know the fortunately the what I call the trifecta off Hollywood of holidays is is gone. Right? We we have Thanksgiving Christmas and New Year's and that drove a lot of the disease that we're seeing right now. You know, as That's going away. We're seeing a decrease. But we have to remember that we're still that about 100,000 people hospitalized from Colin and the last speak, which was in the summer. We were about 60,000. So we're still coming down from our very, very high peak coming we're coming up from We're coming down from Everest. And coming down from Everest. You could still get killed on the way down, so and that's really have not decrease, and it's gonna take a couple of weeks for death to start coming down. The seven day rolling average for deaths is still about 3000 deaths. Well, well. The other issue is, Of course, these variants that are now here from South Africa, Brazil and the U. K. What's top of your mind of as we see those develop? I think the variants are are different, depending what we talked about right. Some of the variants are more transmissible, which is the case of the UK variant and that that's one that we obviously are are following very closely and are very concerned about it because The number of cases even though it's not more severe if the number of cases goes up in the number of people hospitalized in debt would also go up just at the similar rate of disease, causing it and death. But I'm also very concerned about the South African Bavarian, which, as you know, last week was noticed for the first time was discovered in South Carolina. And that variant actually has two characteristics that I worry about. Number one is more resistant to the monoclonal antibodies. Those therapies that we have available but number two. It didn't seem to be when we see Don't see the results last week from the Novaks trial in South Africa. That's resulted not seemed like the vaccine. Was that effective protecting against that strain, and that to me is really the concern is, are we coming up with a strength? That our current vaccines are not working. And companies are already working on doing modifications to the vaccines to to take care of that. But again, you know, that means that I've been vaccinated had two doses of the The five year vaccine, but I may not be protected. I mean, still may need a boost from a different variants. And and you know, we cannot just continue be doing Modifications to the vaccine. Every time I knew very appear, so I'm really worried that we have to address this. Well, exactly. So if someone has gotten the Fizer or modern a vaccine, should they still be concerned about getting sick from one of these variants? What should they do? Well, I think the first thing is, you know very this variance or not that common yet in the U. S. And I would still say That's why we're still wearing our mess. That's what we're still doing Social distancing. That's why I'm still recommending that we do exactly pretty much what we were doing before. Even though we're fully vaccinated because the reality is I'm not ready to go to indoor dining. I'm not ready to go to a bar. Don't go too close environment with lots of people in poor ventilation without my mess, because that's the problem. Mm. With these vaccines, we've been working towards the goal of getting about 70% of the population vaccinated or immune in order to reach herd immunity. Do you think these variants have changed? What it will take to get to that point. I mean, have they delayed our path to get into her immunity? Well, they just put the bar higher right? Because the especially, for example, the UK variant of the are not, which is how many cases you get from my transmission increases. In the amount of people you need, vaccinated or immune from infection to get to her immunity also goes up. So just it just increases the numbers we need to reach. But again, the reality is that we also need that. It's a good reminder that vaccinating the people in the U. S is not enough. If we don't vaccinate globally, then we're not protected if we experience merging in South Africa in England We're still gonna be have a problem, so it really speaks to the fact that we as a destination, the U. S. Is that it's a global leader. We have to allude also facilitate global vaccination because we're going to be out of this when everybody in the world is vaccinated. And the takeaway is it is far from over. Dr. Carlos del Rio executive associate dean of the Emory School of Medicine. Thank you so much for your time. Delighted to be with you. Let's turn now to politics and specifically the politics of representation. Now, the Kamila Harris is vice president. There are no black women in the U. S Senate. And that's a big issue, especially because black women helped power key election victories. Most notably President Biden's NPR political reporter, Juana Summers has been covering this high. Wanna Either. So you've been speaking with people like Lisa Blunt Rochester. She's the first black person and first black woman to represent the state of Delaware in Congress. Here's a bit of what she told you when a person's.

South Africa Dr. Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Emory School of Medicine UK associate dean executive Everest United States Covad NATO Peter South Carolina Delaware U. S Senate Kamila Harris Colin Lisa Blunt
"dr del rio" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on WSB-AM

"WSB and headed into this tonight There is some positive news about the Corona virus vaccine. Emery infectious disease specialist Dr Carlos Del Rio, says news that Johnson and Johnson's vaccine is seeing positive results means we could see a surge in the number of vaccine options for use all of the world by the end of the first quarter. I mean, ideally, will have seven. 678 vaccines in a few months that we can actually be using because we're going to need a lot of vaccines. Speaking at a press conference hosted by the World Health Organization, Dr Del Rio says his only concern about the Corona virus vaccine is people not taking it. Michelle, right? 95.5 WSB governor came today remembering Georgians who died of Cove. It was great Georges may be gone, but they will never be forgotten. We will win this fight against Cove in 19, and their legacies will live on for generations to come. Georgia Democrats this afternoon reacting to Governor Kim State of the State address, which was delivered today, welcome to Brian can't believes Georgia has done a good job weathering the pandemic financially. Democrats say he hasn't done enough with 2020 has led to worsening conditions because we didn't do what we needed to do in the beginning, House Minority Leader James Beverly says Kemp should have shut down the state sooner. Schools were forced to go virtual and for all intensive purposes. It's had to experience a get your education. As for the $1000 settlement, Kim points to give teachers Democrats say that's not enough from the state Capitol Center Parish 95.5 WSB Delta Airlines temporarily banning firearms on flights to Washington, D C, joining United and Alaska Airlines and cracking down in preparation for next week's inauguration. And photographed holding the Confederate flag in the U. S. Capitol during last week's Wright is in custody. FBI Tips led to identification of Kevin Seefried and Delaware he was picked up today. Falcons appear sent to hire Terry Fun to know as general manager. He is 40 years old is right now the assistant general manager with the New Orleans Saints, he would be the Falcons first black GM WSB news time 6 34 tomorrow in.

Georgia Dr Carlos Del Rio Governor Kim State Cove Terry Fun Johnson World Health Organization Kevin Seefried Michelle Falcons assistant general manager Alaska Airlines Delta Airlines FBI general manager New Orleans Saints Brian Georges Delaware Capitol Center
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient Mara Liasson senior political correspondent is joining us Now. I'd like to get your take now, yesterday's press conferences from the medical team. Didn't clear a lot up, as Dr Del Rio said, sounded more like spin doctors than real doctors. What about today? Well, today cleared, something's up. Yes, he was given oxygen, but it also raised questions. I think that when they're asked a simple question, like is there oxygen in his room, and he says, I don't want to talk about that. I think the vast majority of people listening, say, Oh, that's a yes. Or to say his blood oxygen level was below 94. But not in the low eighties or anything. Does that mean it's 85? Why can't they just say that? I think that as long as these briefings raise As many questions as they answer or more questions in the answer. It's not good for the White House because credibility this is such a shame, but credit. Billy is the cornet coin of the realm. Now, I mean, the president of the United States has been hospitalized, and people want to know what his condition really is. Now. It's one thing to say he's resting comfortably or in good spirits, or he's doing really well. That's kind of But you know, this is a disease that can take a lot of turns. They're talking about discharging him tomorrow where he'll stay in the White House. Will he be able to fulfill his duties? What about the campaign? There's still a lot of questions. And of course, we are less than a month away from an election in an election where the polls were showing the president at this particular point in time, lagging significantly behind Former vice president Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee, Dr Del Rio. I'd like Tio come back to you on this particular question, looking forward if he is indeed discharged back to the White House on Monday What the long term effects of an illness like over 19, even if he's doing well, now, what should we all be looking for? Let's say a couple things everyone, even though he's being discharged to hospice to the White House, he's not being discharged. The patient still continues to be a patient. He will continue stealing the idea from disappear in the semester. In the White House. So if he's still a patient, and most importantly that the somebody infected with Kobe's like him will still be infectious for approximately 10 base. And if you look at the criteria that we all looked at it, you know somewhere we contend in 14 days, the person is still in fact, if you will still need to be in isolation. People that have contact with him will still need to be dressed in full pp, So no, he's not gonna be back to normal just because he's back at the White House. He's he's still a patient and let's be real clear about that. Whether it's in the hospital in Walter Reed will continue to be patient. Warren gets over, you know completely get here. Assuming everything goes well turn deaf ear here covers 10 to 14 days go by no longer infections. He's he's out of isolation. Then he can continue. Then he will be. You know, he will be officially You know this start, but we have seen patients with Kobe and increasing. We've seen people have long term. The impacts of covered long term consequences, and those are primarily a three level that could be at the level of the brain of the little heart. Lo along and I'm sure he's gonna be monitored very closely for those many patients with covert will tell you that even after they quote fully recover, they continue to be Extremely tired..

president White House Dr Del Rio Memphis vice president Richard FDA Dr Florio Dr Conley Mara Liasson Kobe Walter Reed United States Warren Mark Meadows Joe Biden Billy
"dr del rio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We saw pictures of that event where everyone was unmasked. Where people were gathering inside in close proximity. First of all, if Richard, if we can start with you the clinical definition of that term. Well, I'm not sure there's an exact term. I always wait for the public health officials to declare something a super spreader event. But clearly it's an event where where one person ends up, giving the disease to a large number of other people. And that seems to be the case in the White House. I mean, there's always the possibility that Remote possibility that a bunch of people who had been infected in other places all got together or or there were multiple sources of infection in that in that group, and I think that's one thing that the epidemiologist will help us sort out. But You know, clearly there was a lot of virus going around there, and when you look at the number of people at that gathering have subsequently tested positive for the virus. I thinkit's clear it was A major, an important event in terms of spreading this virus Doctor del Rio. I mean, this looks like it was a cluster that it wass and I think it is one thing that it's worth emphasizing Is as the president of Notre Dame University Reverend John Jenkins sport in his in his message in his Twitter account. You know, you have to realise that just because you test negative, especially with a test that has many false negatives, like is the like Izzy tiff they're using at the White House. That doesn't prevent you from using, uh, face masks That doesn't prevent you from doing social distancing. And I want to emphasize that that you know the way the White House was telling people Well, you're tested so you don't know longer need to use a face mask You don't longer need to social distance. Was clearly a recipe for disaster. And that's what we saw. You know, they did this many times. Nothing happened. But eventually you could only go so many times so well before something goes wrong, right, Mara, I'm gonna bring you in here because, of course, there was a great deal of concern for the president's health, health and the first lady and everybody else who Is now infected. But we are less than one month away now from an election and I'm curious to know what the political ramifications of this are. What are the polls saying? What have you heard? Well, we haven't seen a lot of polling on this. Ah, couple poles about whether the president could have protected himself better. But would I get from talking? Toa operatives on both sides is that it's hard to see how this is good for President Trump. Yes, he might get some sympathy from voters. But that doesn't mean he's going to get more votes from voters. Thie Ads almost right themselves. You know, he couldn't keep himself safe. How can he keep you and your family in the country safe. It also just undermines his macho message on masks. It puts the Corona virus back front and center, which is not where the president wanted it to be. He wanted to talk about the improving economy in the courts. And this is just not a good thing for him, And also he's off the trail. We don't know when he'll be well enough to campaign again. We don't know if he's going to go to the next two debates. Meanwhile, Joe Biden, who did take down his negative ads, and we can talk about that more, but he's just out there campaigning. I'd like to remind our listeners that we're waiting for a briefing by President Trump's team of doctors on his health condition. We actually don't know at the moment who exactly will be giving that briefing. And that is partly Mara because yesterday there was a great deal of confusion by what his own doctor said hey was very unclear. Sean Conley about the president's condition. And he had to actually retract some things or clarify some things after that press conference. That's never a good thing When you have to explain yourself and correct the record. This White House already has a credibility problem because they haven't been transparent about the president, and they've made misstatements and issued falsehoods about so many other things. Now that being said past, presidential doctors have often downplayed the severity of a presidential illness. You know, the phrase is he's in good spirits. He's resting comfortably that those were kind of political euphemisms. Kind of like I'm quitting my job to spend more time with my family went often on this time there was yet this time this I don't can't think of another briefing by a presidential doctor that was so filled with. Refusals to answer the questions and then having to correct the record, you know, hours later and what appeared to be deliberate obfuscations and I'm thinking specifically of the issue of when and if the president was given supplemental oxygen. And this is a real head scratcher. Yeah, and The New York Times reported that the president did indeed receive Supplemental Oxygen on Friday. But Connelly Dr Connelly refused to answer that question. At the time. I'm going to turn now to you, Dr Del Rio. Why is that so key to knowing the president's condition? The guy said previously, the need for supplemental Oxygen is considered one of the indicators that the disease is progressing and that somebody is going from having mild to having severe disease. So it really is a turning point in somebody's illness, and at his age, it will be something that would immediately raise a red flags and as Mark Meadows said. I'm so you know, I'm speculating right now, but I suspect Friday he was at the White House He was doing okay. He was had received his monocle and a body and then they realized this auction saturation was beginning to drop, and that's when they said It's time to go to the hospital, and I think that's exactly what needed to be done. He should have not stayed in the White House. He needed to go to a place that they had more intensive medical management. And then he was started immediately on eye view room disappear, which is exactly what All of us would have done its clinicians of he had a patient and again I want to emphasize whether it was the president or whether it was a patient admitted to my hospital. I worked in the inner city of Atlanta. Poor patient coming in with, he would have been started from disappear of his auction. Separation was coming down. Yeah, and we don't know exactly what his oxygen saturation went down, too, because that was also not something that was Disclosed to the media who were asking the questions yesterday. Perhaps that will become more clear today. But I think the overarching question that I have for you, Dr Del Rio is what are you looking for? Now? If the president were your patient, you have treated many covert patients. What are The questions that you would like answered Well, I think you know there's several things Toby looking at. There's some clinical parameters like how's he doing? How such and saturation wants? This X ray look like, But there's also some laboratory parameters. What is his D dime? Er, doing? What isthe Ah, couple of other laboratory parameters. One of the Lymphocyte counts doing there's a pube laboratory parameters that again are indicators of bad prognosis are indicators of progressing disease. And those are the things that I'm sure he's getting monitored very, very closely in the hospital. I might add that till yesterday, one of the questions that Dr Connelly refused to answer was about his X ray. What did his chest X Ray look like? That's also revealing. He seemed only to want to talk about the The symptoms or the the parameters that showed the president was looking pretty healthy, and he didn't want to talk about any of the ones that that suggested otherwise. I think the other thing we saw was that earlier in the day, of course, Mark Meadows said referred to the president's condition is a za mild case and And I'd be interested in here from Dr Del Rio. If you would consider that to be it. Once you're giving somebody oxygen, it struck me that that would not be any longer considered a mild case, So I think part of the Confusion was how to how to tell a story that was consistent as the day progressed. Dr Del Rio. Do you consider it a mild case? If you're getting to know Once you go on to receive option, you are no longer a mild case. Once you go on to receive round disappear, you're no longer a mile case. So I think the definition of the president being I mean, I think initially he probably was a mild case. But as he starts As he starts rapidly changing and he goes on to is to receive receive oxygen if he received auction and received from disappear. I think those two things over son make him no longer somebody who has a has a mild case and and again, a Zay said before the age of the president really is something that Significantly concerns me because at his.

president Doctor del Rio White House President Trump Dr Connelly Mara Dr Del Rio Mark Meadows Richard Joe Biden Notre Dame University Twitter Izzy tiff The New York Times Sean Conley Atlanta Zay John Jenkins Ray
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nothing happened, but eventually You could only go so many times so well before something goes wrong, right, Mara, I'm gonna bring you in here because, of course, there was a great deal of concern for the President's house Health and the first lady and everybody else who Is now infected. But we are less than one month away now from an election and I'm curious to know what the political ramifications of this are. What are the polls saying? What have you heard? Well, we haven't seen a lot of polling on this. Ah, couple poles about whether the president could have protected himself better. But would I get from talking to operatives on both sides is that it's hard to see how this is good for President Trump. Yes, he might get some sympathy from voters. But that doesn't mean he's going to get more votes from voters. The ads almost right themselves, You know, he couldn't keep himself safe. How can he keep you and your family in the country safe? It also just Undermines his macho message on masks. It puts the Corona virus back front and center, which is not where the president wanted it to be. He wanted to talk about the improving economy in the courts, and this is just not a good thing for him, And also he's off the trail. We don't know when he'll be well enough to campaign again. We don't know if he's going to go to the next two debates. Meanwhile, Joe Biden, who did take down his negative ads, and we can talk about that more He's just out there campaigning. I'd like to remind our listeners that we're waiting for a briefing by President Trump's team of doctors on his health condition. We actually don't know at the moment who exactly will be giving that briefing. And that is partly Mara because yesterday there was a great deal of confusion by what his own doctor said hey was very unclear. Sean Conley about the president's condition. And he had to actually retract some things or clarify some things after that press conference. That's never a good thing When you have to explain yourself and correct the record. This White House already has a credibility problem because they haven't been transparent about the president, and they've made misstatements and issued falsehoods about so many other things. Now that being said past, presidential doctors have often downplayed the severity of a presidential illness. You know, the phrase is he's in good spirits. He's resting comfortably that those air kind of political euphemisms. Kind of like I'm quitting my job to spend more time with my family often on this time there was yet this time this I don't can't think of another briefing by a presidential doctor that was so filled with. Refusals to answer the questions and then having to correct the record, you know, hours later and what appeared to be deliberate obfuscations and I'm thinking specifically of the issue of when and if the president was given supplemental oxygen. And this is a real head Scratcher and the New York Times reported that the president did indeed receive supplemental oxygen on Friday, But Connelly Dr Connelly refused to answer that question. At the time. I'm going to turn now to you, Dr Del Rio. Why is that so key to knowing the president's condition? The guy said previously, the need for supplemental oxygen is considered one of the indicators that the disease is progressing and that somebody is going from having mild to having severe disease. So it really is a turning point in somebody's illness, and at his age, it will be something that would immediately raised a red flag and as Mark Meadows said. I'm so you know, I'm speculating right now, but I suspect Friday he was in the White House He was doing okay. He was had received his monocle on her body. And then they realized this auction saturation was beginning to drop, and that's when they said It's time to go to the hospital, and I think that's exactly what needed to be done. He should have not stayed in the White House. He needed to go to a place that they had more intensive medical management. And then he was started immediately on eye view room disappear, which is exactly what all of us would have done its clinicians of he kind of patient and again. I want to emphasize whether it was the president or whether it was a patient. Admitted to my hospital. I worked in the inner city of Atlanta. Poor patient coming in with he would have been started and destiny of his auction. Separation was was coming down. Yeah, And we don't know exactly what his oxygen saturation went down, too, because that was also not something that was Disclosed to the media who were asking the questions yesterday. Perhaps that will become more clear today. But I think the overarching question that I have for you, Dr Del Rio is what are you looking for? Now? If the president were your patient, you have treated many covert patients. What are the questions that you would like answered? Well, I think you know there's several things to be looking at. There's some clinical parameters like how's he doing? How such and saturation once this X ray look like? But there's also some laboratory parameters. What is his D dime? Er, doing? What is a couple of other laboratory parameters? One of the lymphocyte count is doing there's a pube laboratory parameters that again are indicators of bad prognosis are indicators of progressing disease. And those are the things that I'm sure he's getting monitored very, very closely in the hospital yesterday, one of the questions that Dr Connelly refused to answer was about his X ray. What did his chest X Ray look like? That's also revealing. He seemed only to want to talk about the The symptoms or the the parameters that showed the president was looking pretty healthy, and he didn't want to talk about any of the ones that that suggested otherwise. I think the other thing we saw was that earlier in the day, of course, Mark Meadows said referred to the president's conditions is a mild case and And I'd be interested in here from Dr Del Rio. If you would consider that to be once you're giving somebody oxygen. It struck me that that would not be any longer considered a mild case, So I think part of the Confusion was how to how to tell a story that was consistent as the day progressed door, Vittorio, do you consider a mild case if you're getting no. Once you've gone to receive option, you are no longer a mild case. Once you go on to receive him disappear, you're no longer a mild case. So I think the definition of the president being I mean, I think initially he probably was a mild case. But as he starts As he starts rapidly changing and he goes on to is to receive receive oxygen if he received auction and received from disappear. I think those two things over son make him no longer somebody who has a mild case and again, A Zay said before the age.

President President Trump Dr Del Rio White House Dr Connelly Mara Mark Meadows Joe Biden New York Times Sean Conley Vittorio Atlanta Ray
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Which caused a great deal of confusion. He has not received any supplemental. He's not on oxygen right now. That's right. You said he was his fever free. Now, what was his probability that he will need supplemental oxygen going forward? I don't want to put a percentage on doctor. What was the date of the president's last negative. I'm not going to get in till there any clarity on how he became infected. Ever been on something went off. I mean, Mara, as you can hear their Ah lot of questions that did not get very clear answers what could possibly explain why Sean Conley seemed less than forthcoming. Well, they're a couple explanations. One is just I don't know incompetence, but that they didn't seem to have their story straight. That was a collage of questions that didn't get answered, But they also couldn't get their timeline straight. When was the president diagnosed? When did he learn about the results, Etcetera. They had to issue a clarifying statement later in the day, or it could be a couple things one. The president didn't want them to announce that he had gotten supplemental oxygen. Now there are hippos requirements that provide and protect patient privacy. That's one possible explanation. But that's unusual over president. It would be pretty unusual, but I can't think of any other explanation. Why not just say that the president was given oxygen? From my understanding being given oxygen is not the sign of anything dire. It's something that you would do in a situation where, as we know his oxygen levels were dropping because Mark Meadows told us that yes, Mark Meadows went on Fox News last night and said that the president's oxygen levels have dropped before he was taken to Walter Reed Medical Center and that that had caused great concern and that it was indeed one of the reasons why he was taken there knowing that Dr Del Rio what does that tell you about the President's condition. It is common with the corona virus infection to have this kind of effect, is it not? It is especially as I said, the, uh the older you get, the more likely you are to have more severe disease. We gotta remember that about 80% of people who get infected was diseased. Do not have any any serious effect with it. You know they feel bad etcetera. But the most important thing we monitor as physicians is, is the is the option dropping and when option starts to drop We tell people you need to be in the hospital. That's when you need to be in the hospital because you need supplemental auction. But we also know that the use of ram death severe and the use of Dixon methadone, which we really haven't talked about our critically important does it not the steroid. It's critically important people who start their options starts dropping if you give them room disappear if you give them dexamethasone. They actually do way better than immortality drops. They tend to do better. So if the auction is dropping, it was time to do more intensive intervention that what he initially got, which was a monoclonal antibody. I don't want to ask you to speculate too much, but I'm sure that you did see the video of the president yesterday evening. What did you make of his demeanor? You know, he looked like somebody who is sick with within illness, but he looks like somebody who factually, you know, he was speaking fairly well. He'll speak in full sentences. A good way to know if somebody's option is not doing well is to see them talk and the way he was speaking. I would say, you know, this option was probably doing okay. Richard. I'm going to bring you in again because there are many questions about the timeline. And that was one of the questions that kept on being asked yesterday of the president's doctor, and we did not get a clear answer. What we know is that the president's tweet, announcing that he had tested positive came at 1 A.m. on Friday. Other than that, a lot of things unclear. What do we know? Well, we don't know a lot. And even if we knew exactly when his first initial diagnosis was, we don't actually know how long before that. He might have been infectious because it doesn't happen Instantaneously you get infected. Infection starts to build. You may be shedding the virus for several days before you actually are diagnosed with it. So that's a part of the timeline that may be difficult to decipher. One thing that Dr Conley refused to talk about yesterday was when he when the president had his last negative test that could shed some light on on that a cz well when when he was again. Starting to actually show that he was contagious with the virus or potentially contagious with the virus. So it the best we can tell right now subject to further clarifications from the White House and from the president's doctors as it appears that He was diagnosed Thursday night, announced early early Friday morning. And so he's now in about in the third day essentially of this of his treatment, and so on, So there's a long way to go as Dr Del Rio mentioned Could be. Ah, you know, people could do relatively well and then seven or 10 days into an illness, they can take a sharp turn. And so that's always a concern on and something that people I'm sure we'll be keeping a close eye on with a doctor with it with the president. I mean, we don't yet know how the president got infected and also whom else he may have infected because the timeline is so unclear, And this is a question to both You, Richard and Dr Del Rio. There's been a lot of speculation that the White House reception for Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney, Barrett was a super spreader event. We saw pictures of that event where everyone was unmasked. Where people were gathering inside and close proximity. First of all, if Richard didn't start with you the clinical definition of that term Well, I'm not sure there's an exact term. I always wait for the public health officials to declare something a super spreader event. But clearly it's an event where where one person ends up, giving the disease to a large number of other people. And that seems to be the case in the White House. I mean, there's always the possibility that remote possibility that a bunch of people who had been infected in other places all got together or or there were multiple sources of infection in that in that group, and I think that's one thing that the epidemiologist will help us sort out. But you know, clearly there was a lot of virus going around there. And when you look at the number of people at that gathering, who subsequently tested positive for the virus, I thinkit's clear It was A major, an important event in terms of spreading this virus, Doctor tell Rio. I mean, this looks like it was a cluster it wass and I think it is one thing that it's worth emphasizing Is as the president of Notre Dame University Reverend John Jenkins put it in his in his message in his Twitter account. You know, you have to realise that just because you test negative, especially with a test that has many false negatives, like is the like, is the test they're using at the White House. That doesn't prevent you from using face masks That doesn't prevent you from doing social distancing, And I want to emphasize that you know the way the White House was telling people well, your test natives, so you don't know longer Need to use a face mask You don't longer need to. Social distance was clearly a recipe for for disaster. And that's what we saw. You know, they did this many times. Nothing happened, but eventually You could only go so many times so well before something goes wrong, right, Mara, I'm gonna bring you in here because, of course, there was a great deal of concern for the.

president White House Richard Mara Sean Conley fever Dr Del Rio Fox News Mark Meadows Twitter Walter Reed Medical Center dexamethasone methadone Notre Dame University John Jenkins Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett
"dr del rio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now what was his fever way? Probability that he will need supplemental oxygen going forward. I don't want to put a percentage on that. What was the date of the president's last negative test? I'm not gonna get in till there any clarity on how he became infected. Ever been on something that a lot. I mean, Maheras, you can hear there. Ah, ah lot of questions that did not get very clear answers What could possibly explain why Sean Conley seemed less than forthcoming. Well, they're a couple explanations. One is just I don't know. Incompetence put that they didn't seem to have their story straight. That was a collage of questions that didn't get answered, But they also couldn't get their timeline straight. When was the president diagnosed? When did he learn about the results, Etcetera. They had to issue a clarifying statement later in the day, or it could be a couple things one the president and want them to announce that he had gotten supplemental oxygen. Now there are hippos requirements that provide and protect patient privacy. That's one possible explanation. But that's unusual over president. It would be pretty unusual, but I can't think of any other explanation. Why not just say that the president was given oxygen? From my understanding being given oxygen is not the sign of anything dire. It's something that you would do in a situation where, as we know his oxygen levels were dropping because Mark Meadows told us that yes. Mark Meadows went on Fox News last night and said that the president's oxygen levels have dropped before he was taken to Walter Reed Medical Center and that that had caused great concern and that it was indeed one of the reasons why he was taken there. Knowing that Dr Del Rio. What does that tell you about the president's condition? It is common with the Corona virus infection to have this kind of effect, is it not? It is especially as I said, the, uh the older you get, the more likely you are to have more severe disease. We gotta remember that about 80% of people who get infected was disease. Do not have any any serious effects with it. You know they they feel bad etcetera. But the most important thing we monitor as physicians is is the is the oxygen dropping and when oxygen starts to drop We tell people you need to be in the hospital. That's when you need to be in the hospital because you need supplemental auction. But we also know that the use of Rome disappear and the use of dexamethasone, which we really haven't talked about our critically important write. Is it not the steroid. It's critically important people who start their auction starts dropping if you give them room disappear if you give them dexamethasone They They actually do way better. Their immortality drops. They tend to do better. So if the auction is dropping, it was time to do more intensive intervention that what he initially got, which was a monoclonal antibody. I don't want to ask you to speculate too much, but I'm sure that you did see the video of the president yesterday evening. What did you make of his demeanor? You know, he looked like somebody who is sick with an illness, but he looks like somebody who's actually You know, he was speaking fairly well. He was speaking in full sentences. A good way to know if somebody's oxygen is not doing well is to see them talk and the way he was speaking, I would say, you know, this option was probably doing okay. Richard. I'm going to bring you in again because there are many questions about the timeline. And that was one of the questions that kept on being asked yesterday of the president's doctor, and we did not get a clear answer. What we know is that the president's tweet, announcing that he had tested positive came at 1 A.m. on Friday. Other than that, a lot of things unclear. What do we know? Well, we don't know a lot and one even if we knew exactly when his first initial diagnosis was, we don't actually know how long before that. He might have been infectious because it doesn't happen Instantaneously. You get infected. Infection starts to build. You may be shedding the virus for several days before you actually are diagnosed with it. So that's a part of the timeline that may be difficult to decipher. One thing that Dr Conley refused to talk about yesterday was when he when the president had his last negative test that could shed some light on on that as well when when he was again Starting to actually show that he was contagious with the virus or potentially contagious with the virus. So it the best we can tell right now subject to further clarifications from the White House and from the president's doctors as it appears that He was diagnosed Thursday night, announced early early Friday morning. And so he's now in about in the third day essentially of this of his treatment, and so on, So there's a long way to go is Dr Del Rio mentioned Could be. Ah, you know, people could do relatively well and then seven or 10 days into an illness, they can take a sharp turn. And so that's always a concern on and something that people I'm sure we'll be keeping a close eye on with a doctor with it with the president. I mean, we don't yet know how the president got infected and also whom else he may have infected because the timeline is so unclear, And this is a question to both You, Richard and Dr Del Rio. There's been a lot of speculation that the White House reception for Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney, Barrett was a super spreader event..

president Sean Conley Dr Del Rio fever dexamethasone Maheras Richard Mark Meadows Fox News White House Walter Reed Medical Center Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett
"dr del rio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KCRW

"What was his fever way? Probability that he will need supplemental oxygen going forward. I don't want to put a percentage on doctor. What was the date of the president's last negative. I'm not gonna get until there any clarity on how he became infected he ever You know something? I mean, Maheras, you can hear there. Ah lot of questions that did not get very clear answers What could possibly explain why Sean Conley seemed less than forthcoming. Well, they're a couple explanations. One is just I don't know. Incompetence put that they didn't seem to have their story straight. That was a collage of questions that didn't get answered, But they also couldn't get their timeline straight. When was the president diagnosed? When did he learn about the results, Etcetera. They had to issue a clarifying statement later in the day, or it could be a couple things one. The president didn't want them to announce that he had gotten supplemental oxygen. Now there are hippos requirements that provide and protect patient privacy. That's one possible explanation. But that's unusual over president. It would be pretty unusual, but I can't think of any other explanation. Why not just say that the president was given oxygen? From my understanding being given oxygen is not the sign of anything dire. It's something that you would do in a situation where, as we know his oxygen levels were dropping because Mark Meadows told us that yes, Mark Meadows went on Fox News last night and said that the president's oxygen levels have dropped before he was taken to Walter Reed Medical Center and that that had caused great concern and that it was indeed one of the reasons why he was taken there knowing that Dr Del Rio what does that tell you about the President's condition. It is common with the corona virus infection to have this kind of effect, is it not? It is especially as I said, the, uh the older you get, the more likely you are to have more severe disease. We gotta remember that about 80% of people who get infected was disease. Do not have any any serious effects with it. You know they they feel bad etcetera. But the most important thing we monitor as positions is is the is the oxygen dropping and when oxygen starts to drop We tell people you need to be in the hospital. That's when you need to be in the hospital because you need supplemental auction. But we also know that the use of Rome disappear and the use of dexamethasone, which we really haven't talked about our critically important write. Is it not the steroid. It's critically important people who start their auction starts dropping if you give them room disappear if you give them dexamethasone They actually do way better. Their immortality drops. They tend to do better. So if the auction is dropping, it was time to do more intensive intervention that what he initially got, which was a monoclonal antibody. I don't want to ask you to speculate too much, but I'm sure that you did see the video of the president yesterday evening. What did you make of his demeanor? You know, he looked like somebody who is sick with with an illness, but he looks like somebody who's actually you know, he was speaking fairly well. He was speaking in full sentences. A good way to know if somebody's option is not doing well is to see them talk and the way he was speaking, I would say, you know, this option was probably doing okay. Richard. I'm going to bring you in again because there are many questions about the timeline. And that was one of the questions that kept on being asked yesterday of the president's doctor, and we did not get a clear answer. What we know is that the president's tweet, announcing that he had tested positive came at 1 A.m. on Friday. Other than that, a lot of things unclear. What do we know? Well, we don't know a lot and one even if we knew exactly when his first initial diagnosis was, we don't actually know how long before that. He might have been infectious because it doesn't haven't instantaneously you get infected. Infection starts to build. You may be shedding the virus for several days before you actually are diagnosed with it. So that's a part of the timeline that may be difficult to decipher. One thing that Dr Conley refused to talk about yesterday was when he when the president had his last negative test that could shed some light on on that as well when when he was again Starting to actually show that he was contagious with the virus or potentially contagious with the virus. So it the best we can tell right now subject to further clarifications from the White House and from the president's doctors as it appears that He was diagnosed Thursday night, announced early early Friday morning. And so he's now in about in the third day essentially of this of his treatment, and so on, So there's a long way to go is Dr Del Rio mentioned It could be. Ah, you know, people could do relatively well and then seven or 10 days into an illness, they can take a sharp turn. And so that's always a concern on and something that people I'm sure we'll be keeping a close eye on with a doctor with it with the president. I mean, we don't yet know how the president got infected and also whom else he may have infected because the timeline is so unclear, And this is a question to both You, Richard and Dr Del Rio. There's been a lot of speculation that the White House reception for Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney, Barrett was a super spreader event..

president dexamethasone Sean Conley Dr Del Rio fever Maheras Richard Mark Meadows White House Fox News Walter Reed Medical Center Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett
"dr del rio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Starting to feel good. You don't know over the next period of a few days. I guess that's the real test. So we'll be seeing what happens over those next next couple of days. Dr Del Rio. I'm gonna bring you in. What does what the president saying and what we know about how he is being treated tell you about where the president is in the course of this illness. Well, Obviously the diagnosis was made very early in the president, and that's good because we know that the sooner we act in this infection, the better it is. He has received, as was previously mentioned to treatments. One of them is a monoclonal antibody, which, in fact, monoclonal antibodies are being studied right now in clinical trials in precisely people who don't have very severe disease, who don't need to be in the hospital as a way to prevent them from getting sick. And they have found some preliminary data showing some positive results. But they have not yet been approved for this used so the president away is participating in a you know, it's almost participate in a clinical trial without being in a clinical trial he was giving. What we would call normally a hit out of trial access to a drug right and and then he received from disappear, Run disappears, a drug that has been shown to be useful. In clinical trials to prevent to improve the time Tio improvement and people have been hospitalized, so the way things because he was tweeted early. He's been giving really What are the most effective therapies? We know right now for the treatment of this disease. I think things should be going well. But of course you know his age puts him a very high risk of complications. And and I guess, you know, we will have to just say, because the reality is we've seen people like him at his age who are doing well and then in the next you know 3 to 7 days they develop a side of kind storm and they get sick. I'm going to come back to the medical issue, but we're going to bring in right now. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson first I want to hear a little bit of the press conference yesterday, which caused a great deal of confusion. He has not received any supplemental off. He's not on oxygen right now. That's right. You said he was his fever free..

Dr Del Rio president Mara Liasson NPR national political corresponde
"dr del rio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro. Thanks so much for joining us. The president was hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Centre on Friday. And last night he released this video. It was a video that we should hear. In a small moment. That was an attempt to put to rest. The many concerns raised by yesterday's briefing, led by presidential Dr Sean Connolly were expecting more questions today and hopefully the president's medical team will be more forthcoming and clear. And we have with us NPR science correspondent Richard Harris. Good morning, Richard. Hi Lulu, And we're also joined by Carlos Del Rio. He's a distinguished epidemiologist at Emory University in Atlanta. Dr Del Rio. Thank you so much for being with us. Good morning, Lou. How are you? I'm good on DH will soon have NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson, but let's start with you. Richard. What do we know as we wait for today's briefing? We're told that the president received his second course of that treatment last night with called rammed a severe tell us about what you've heard. Right? Well, what we have heard, And it would be nice to know whether how much of this is actually accurate because we obviously had some real problems last night with conflicting information from the from the various press comments and conference yesterday, But room disappear apparently has been given to the president. Two doses. Ah, this is a drug that that will block the virus sets the hope It is not approved for anything. For that purpose. But it is. Ah is shown in some experimental trials to be successful in easing the easing people who have the disease, not necessarily curing them. But But perhaps low in the course of the virus. So, so that's normally given over a course of five days and president reportedly had his second dose last night. We also know that all drugs have some side effects. We do not know whether the side effects of this are significant at all for the president, but we do know that's always a judgment calls. When you given experimental drug it's it's a You figured that the three expected benefits are going that way the whatever the risks might be. It's not the only drug he's taking. He's actually taking Ah, a bunch of other Ah ah, drugs to that have had hints or suggestions that they might have played some role in slowing down the viral infection. Most importantly, a couple of other experimental treatments called a monoclonal antibodies, which also block the virus, at least in the test tube and have shown some tentative results in people a swell but again, nothing definitive. We can't said that these drugs actually work and we don't really fully understand the risks of that as well. I want to play that clip now of President Trump yesterday evening, talking about his condition. So I just want to tell.

president Carlos Del Rio Richard Harris Lulu Garcia Navarro NPR Walter Reed National Military Dr Sean Connolly national political corresponde Mara Liasson Emory University Atlanta Lou
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Investment in the future of public radio and seeks to help NPR produced programming that meets the highest standards of public service in journalism and cultural expression and the listeners of 68 degrees The expected high in San Francisco today. 74 in Oakland, 81 in Santa Rosa 80 degrees in Napa 88 in Concord. This's weekend edition from NPR News and Lulu Garcia Navarro. Good morning and thanks for being with us This week. At some point, we will reach a grim new milestone 200,000 Americans dead from covert 19 and yet alarm about the disease seems to be diminishing. Among some new poll in Wisconsin by the market law school finds 38% of respondents say they're not very worried or not worried at all by the virus. This as journalist Bob Woodward released tapes of President Trump revealing that the president purposely downplayed the Corona virus in public while early on privately acknowledging how lethal it is, it's also more deadly than your You know you're even your strenuous flu's This's deadly stuff more on the political fallout from those comments. In a moment we begin this hour with our next guest, who says there may be reasons for hope. Carlos Del Rio is an epidemiologist with Emory University in Atlanta. And he joins us now happy to be with you moving. You are cautiously optimistic Why Well, I think we're beginning to see in many parts of the country, including here in Georgia, a decrease in the number of cases on a national level We've seen over the last two weeks. A 13 to 15% decrease the number of cases we are seeing also. Some places where the cases are increasing. I worry mostly right now about North and South Dakota. But in general we see in the U. S. You know, 10 states where the cases were high in are now coming down, and that's that's good to see. Testing, though, has also gone down. Could that not be a product of the fact that testing has slowed down instead of actual infection rates going down? It certainly could. But I don't think testing has gone down as much as cases have, and at the end of the day, we are seeing other indicators coming down. Most importantly, the number of people hospitalized and I really think looking at who gets in the hospital and what happens to hospitalizations. It's a very good indicator of really the severity of disease. Oh, we have seen the number of deaths slowing, but that has happened in other countries on Ly to see the numbers Search again. Is that a concern? Well, it's very interesting because the decrease in the deaths has not been as a significant so far as a decrease in cases that we've seen in this country. You seeing close to 1000 deaths per day in this country, and and that hasn't changed much, and I think part of it is that we're not having one epidemic, right? We're having multiple epidemic. So, for example, in the Northeast, death have really plummeted. But here in the South, they almost are staying stable in some other places that actually going up. The other thing that we've seen. Lulu is an increase in cases among young people, and a lot of it is related to college towns. And as a result of that, you know, young people get infected, but they don't get a sick and therefore they don't die. So part of the issue is that that the epidemic allergy that we have today is very different than the epidemiology we had back in March or April. Bearing all that in mind. We're still closing in on 200,000 deaths in this country. The United States has been the epicenter globally of this pandemic. What has been the biggest failures so far in your view? You know, I think we have had a failure of leadership and the administration essentially gave it to the states and said, Let's each state to its own strategy. This lack of coordination back a national strategy has really hurt us because you have states making very different recommendations and The White House coronavirus taskforce. Honestly, when they put the recommendations of how to open they were very clear on what needed to be done. They were very killer metrics that you have to follow to open and many states just essentially chose to ignore those recommendations. So we really have not had a national strategy and we're paying the consequences of that. I'd like to ask you where you see the science right now. Have we gotten better treating covert 19? What have we learned? One thing that has been particularly successful, I would say is the scientific response in against I'm biased because I am one of the scientists, but I would tell you the way internationally. There's been coordination and scientific response. The way pharmaceutical companies have worked together in unprecedented ways. It's really something that I think we need to be all proud of, you know, think about we went from Describing a new virus and posting the genetic sequence of a new virus to having a vaccine delivered into a human in 62 days. That is absolutely amazing. Never ever before had something like that happened. No, we have major vaccines are three or four vaccines now and face three crowds, so they're in the trials for efficacy. We're really moving in incredible speed, and that is a result of of leadership. And I think you know, Operation or speed and many other things that have been done have actually been examples of what needs to happen when we think about other diseases like cancer, for example. And yet one of the great tragedies and scandals of this pandemic is how it is disproportionately impacting communities of color. Do you see any improvement there? You know, Unfortunately, I don't And I think that the disparities that we're seeing in this pandemic are not new. We have had Enormous healthcare disparities in this country that we have not addressed in. My hope is that as a result of this pandemic, we're going to begin to look at what we need to do to improve. The racial and ethnic disparities that have been so just unacceptable in in this pandemic. So Dr Del Rio. How do you see this pandemic ending and when Well, First of all, I would like to make it very clear that the vaccine is going to be important,.

Lulu Garcia Navarro NPR News Wisconsin epidemic United States San Francisco Carlos Del Rio Oakland South Dakota Dr Del Rio Northeast Bob Woodward Emory University Concord president Atlanta Ly Georgia President Trump
"dr del rio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR News. I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro. Good morning and thanks for being with us. This week. At some point, we will reach a grim new milestone 200,000 Americans dead from covert 19 and yet alarm about the disease seems to be diminishing. Among some a new poll in Wisconsin by the market law school finds 38% of respondents say they're not very worried or not worried at all by the virus. This as journalist Bob Woodward released tapes of President Trump revealing that the president purposefully downplayed the Corona virus in public while early on privately acknowledging how lethal it is, it's also more deadly than your You know you're even your strenuous flues. This is deadly stuff more on the political fallout from those comments. In a moment we begin this hour with our next guest who says there may be reasons for hope. Carlos Del Rio is an epidemiologist with Emory University in Atlanta, and he joins us now. Happy to be with you moving. You are cautiously optimistic Why Well, I think we're beginning to see in many parts of the country, including here in Georgia, a decrease in the number of cases on a national level We've seen over the last two weeks. A 13 to 15% decrease the number of cases we are seeing also. Some places where the cases are increasing. I worry mostly right now about North and South Dakota. But in general we see in the U. S. You know 10 states where the cases were high inner now coming down, and that's that's good to see you. Testing, though, has also gone down. Could that not be a product of the fact that testing has slowed down instead of actual infection rates going down? It certainly could. But I don't think testing has gone down as much as cases have. And at the end of the day, we are seeing other indicators coming down. Most importantly, the number of people hospitalized and I really think looking at who gets in the hospital and what happens to hospitalizations. It's a very good indicator of really the severity of disease. Oh, we have seen the number of deaths slowing, but that has happened in other countries on Ly to see the numbers Search again. Is that a concern? Well, it's very interesting because the decrease in the deaths has not been as a significant so far as a decrease in cases that we've seen in this country. You seeing close to 1000 deaths per day in this country, and and that hasn't changed much, and I think part of it is that we're not having one epidemic, right? We're having multiple epidemic. So, for example, in the Northeast, deaths have really plummeted. But here in the South, they almost are staying stable in some other places. They're actually going up. The other thing that we've seen. Lulu is An increase in cases among young people, and a lot of it is related to college towns and as a result of that, you know, young people get infected, but they don't get a sick and therefore they don't die. So part of the issue is that that the epidemic reality that we have today is very different than the epidemiology we had back in March or April. Bearing all that in mind. We're still closing in on 200,000 deaths in this country. The United States has been the epicenter globally of this pandemic. What has been the biggest failure so far in your view? You know, I think we have had a failure of leadership and the administration essentially gave it to the states and said, Let's each state to its own strategy. This lack of coordination back of a national strategy has really hurt us because you have states making very different recommendations and The White House Coronavirus taskforce. Honestly, when they put the recommendations of how to open they were very clear on what needed to be done. They were very killer metrics that you have to follow to open, and many states just essentially chose to ignore those recommendations. So we really have not had a national strategy and we're paying the consequences of that. I'd like to ask you where you see the science right now. Have we gotten better treating covert 19? What have we learned? One thing that has been particularly successful, I would say is the scientific response in against I'm biased because I am one of the scientists, but I would tell you the way internationally. There's been coordination and scientific response. The way pharmaceutical companies have worked together in unprecedented ways. It's really something that I think we need to be all proud of, you know, think about we went from Describing a new virus and posting the genetic sequence of a new virus to having a vaccine delivered into a human in 62 days. That is absolutely amazing. Never ever before had something like that happened. No, we have major vaccines are three or four vaccines now and face three trials, so they're in the trials for efficacy. We're really moving in incredible speed, and that is a result of of leadership. And I think you know, Operation or speed and many other things that have been done have actually been examples of what needs to happen when we think about other diseases like cancer, for example. And yet one of the great tragedies and scandals of this pandemic is how it is disproportionately impacting communities of color. Do you see any improvement there? You know, Unfortunately, I don't And I think that the disparities that we're seeing in this pandemic are not new. We have had Enormous healthcare disparities in this country that we have not addressed and my hope is that as a result of this pandemic, we're going to begin to look at what we need to do to improve. The racial in myth and disparities that have been so just unacceptable in in this pandemic. So Dr Del Rio. How do you see this pandemic ending and when Well, First of all, I would like to make it very clear that the vaccine is going to be important,.

Lulu Garcia Navarro NPR News Bob Woodward Wisconsin epidemic United States Carlos Del Rio president South Dakota Dr Del Rio Northeast White House Coronavirus taskfo Atlanta President Trump Emory University Ly Georgia
"dr del rio" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"What a great job I think we're doing vaccines doing great on therapeutics. You'll be seeing that very soon. So. There you heard president trump touting progress on potential covid, nineteen treatments and the vaccine. Every health public health official is eager to have a safe and effective vaccine. But some doctors and scientists or publicly expressing concern the president trump could try to roll out of luck safe vaccine by Tober for political gain. Jordan. Now is Dr Carlos del Rio, a professor at Emory University School of Medicine. Thank you so much for coming on. Dr Del Rio you know when we hear the president speak, he seems very focused on treatments and depending vaccine. Do you think when you listen to him he? He is way moved on from the possibility of containing or controlling this virus with effective medication. Well. First of all, we need to continue containing control of this virus because the reality is. Going to be several months before we have seen even accept singles perfectly well. And before we can vaccinate everybody sweet vaccinated. So the reality is we have vaccine right now and it's called. Where facemasks washer distance? Wash your hands if people that we can actually slow transportation expire in by themselves some time. So when we have seen that won't be as many infected individuals and more point that won't be as many death individuals currently about thousand Americans are dying. Every. Day from this virus and it we're GONNA. Wait if Bourbon both well between now and the end of the year you're talking about, you know hundred and fifty thousand people die from this disease i. think that is simply something should not accept and we should wish quite frankly stop. So you're saying look where mass social distance that is a vaccine we can be doing in real time are do you think that this is a realistic concern that president trump could Russia vaccine to market in October surprise before the election despite the safety assurances that we per doctor Chan Others Well I, think a lot of things have not worked well into responses pandemic. One thing has worked incredibly well, and that is the US and the international research infrastructure. We have done as a research community, an incredible job getting virus isolating a virus in getting from discovering a virus giving vaccine, the I shop individual invest, and.

Dr Carlos del Rio trump president Emory University School of Med Bourbon US Jordan professor official Russia
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Tanya. Mostly, I'm Peter rode out. This is here and now residents of Montana and Alabama are facing new Corona virus restrictions today. Governors and those Red states are the latest to order the use of masks in public. But in Georgia Republican Governor Brian Camp has done the opposite. Yesterday, he suspended all mandatory orders from cities in Georgia that require masks and instead Said. They are simply recommended. Georgia saw its second highest count of new cases yesterday, 3800 were reported. Joining us now is Dr Carlos Del Rio, who is a professor of global health and epidemiology at Emory University in Atlanta. Dr Del Rio. Welcome Happy to be with you. Yes. So you're among those advocating that masks be mandatory. But how much of a difference does it make when the governor says mandating the use of masks is quote a bridge too far? We have made. I think two mistakes in this epidemic. We have politicized the technical And we have failed to educate our politicians in technical aspects. Dr. Fauci has done that quite well. He's really been a good person telling our politicians about technical issues. But then technical issues have become political. And that creates a lot of difficulty. When you're trying to control an epidemic, because using a mask is not about protecting myself using a mask in public, it's about protecting others. So I wear a mask to protect you. You were a mask to protect me. So if only I'm wearing a mask, but you're not because you don't believe in mask. I'm not getting the protection that I need, and therefore it's a little bit of futility attached to it. So if you make mass if you want to use them, But if you don't you don't we encourage you to use him? But this is really not required. It reminds me a little bit of saying. Well, you know Why don't we suggest and encourage people to wear a seat belt and to respect the speed limit on the highway, But it's really not required that you do that because we don't want to mandate that were really impinge ing on your civil liberties. And I think our accidents in the freeways will go way up and we don't use that approach. When we're trying to take care of a problem in this case, a pandemic, So I think the the inability to deal with the pandemic has resulted from making this kind of political decisions. Let's talk about curbing the number of cases in Georgia. How urgent is the cove at 19 crisis there? Well, you know, we have you know, George is not Isolated from the rest of the country. We have a surge in big region. We have a surge almost every state in the country, but there's some states right now. All the way from California to Florida. That are having major surges. Whether it's California, Arizona, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee and what we need is a national strategy. It makes no sense for a state like Alabama to mandate masks yesterday, and I stayed like Georgia to not do it. Because of the other day. You know, there's not a There's not a border between us. This is whole contingent this hole right next to each other world continuously going from one place to the other, so the lack of a national strategy Has led to a surge in cases. Dr Del Rio. We're we're reading that half of all new cases in Georgia are in the city of Atlanta. Do you worry about What is in store for the city and the coming days and weeks at the health care workers a physician. I worried deeply, and I worry because our health care system Is going to get overwhelmed. Our healthcare workers are tired. They're stretched, their stressed They're overworked, and I worry that that we're only putting more work on them in this very complicated situation, and this could be avoided. So I do worry. And I worry because we're going to see Maur illness. We're going to see more deaths, and we're going to be dealing with this problem. And as I said, this is this is a A serious issue. And while many people with this disease sorry, symptomatic the number of people that die of this infection is not trivial, and the people that get sick and end up in the hospital is not trivial. So the thing that I can ask people as a physician, it's a public health expert is Please wear a mask. Please do whatever you can watch your distance. Wash your hands don't get infected. Dr. Carlos Del Rio is a professor of global health and epidemiology at Emory University in Atlanta. Dr Del Rio. Thank you so much pleasure to be with you. The Labor Department reported today that another 1.3 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week. Of course, just because you file for benefits in this pandemic doesn't mean you'll get them. Milwaukee resident Deidre Blakely was furloughed from her job at the Pottawatomie Hotel and Casino 14 weeks ago. She still hasn't seen a penny in unemployment. Deidre. Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us. Hi. Thank you for having me and I'm sorry. This is happening to you. Ah, What have you been doing these past 14 weeks? How difficult have they been? And it's been very difficult. Trying to get answers is the hardest part not knowing where your next paycheck is coming from. Is really stressful bills are piling up. People are calling cars almost about to get repossessed infection. It's nonstop. And how often are you calling the unemployment office to get help? I called them about once a week, And when I do call, I get a different story every time and then calling is hard enough as it is. You're calling from back to back for about the hour straight. Once you finally get in. Q. You're probably on hold for about 2.5 hours. If you're lucky, And if you're lucky you don't get hung up on the revolving door. Now I understand the casino where you worked, has actually re opened. But it hasn't brought back all of its employees. And I assume that means you do have any idea if you're ever going to get that job back. I am confident that I will get my job back. But I just don't know when. Now, With the new coping numbers going up. I don't know if there's an open the casino of anymore to more people coming in. Right now. They're unlimited hours. Unlimited shift. And I, um just waiting for that call to go backto work. I'm ready. I'm definitely ready to go back to work. I'm sure you are. I mean, you said how hard it is not to have that income coming in. Do you mind if I ask you a personal question? And you can tell me to get lost if you want to. But how much money do you have left in the bank? Um, I actually just had my daughter. Send me $100 because my phone company Charged my bill because it's you know, it's monthly is automatically taken out and over. Drafted my my account. So now I think I have probably $13 in the in my bank. And you had to ask your daughter to help you. That's got to be. It's going to be hard. It's very hard. It's humbling. It's very hard to have my daughter a, you know. He's got her kids and her life and she has to take care of them. And you know her. Helping me out is is a blessing on how old are you? I'm 44. Have you ever had it this hard? No. Never So how you getting by how you putting food on the table? I got approved for food share Wisconsin food.

Georgia Dr Del Rio Dr. Carlos Del Rio Atlanta Pottawatomie Hotel and Casino Emory University professor Alabama Peter Deidre Blakely California Brian Camp Montana Wisconsin Dr. Fauci Milwaukee
"dr del rio" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on WSB-AM

"B Let US news handle that Sunday Morning, I'm sure cancer alive in the W 1 24 hour news center knew it. 11 o'clock The Georgia Department of Public Safety is speaking out about extensive damage caused to the Georgia State Patrol headquarters overnight by a group of Vandals are with rocks and spray paint. We support those who choose To peacefully protest and the group that was here overnight. Is not that great Lieutenant Stephanie Stallings gave me this estimate minutes ago. This is extremely conservative over $50,000. Worth of damage just in the front part of that building. That's the equipment on the inside of the building that doesn't include the windows that doesn't include the spray paint, graffiti or the patrol vehicle that was parked out front Stalling, says no arrest yet directly related to the damage. Hours earlier, Stone Mountain Park was the scene of a large demonstration to mark Independence Day as protesters, some carrying weapons. Made their way into the park. John Bankhead is the park's public safety spokesman came in, went down below, Hall said their speeches and then lift everything was peaceful Bank. It says no arrests were made, but they did close the park early as a precaution. It's back. Open today. Right now. 84 degrees on Peachtree Street heading up to Ojai. Around 90 degrees, 30% chance of rain. Atlanta's most accurate and dependable forecast is coming up top local news every 30 minutes. And when it breaks 95.5 WSB depend on it. The number of known corona virus infections globally topped 11 million this week. In the Corona virus Numbers keep going up in Georgia. Total cases statewide are well over 93,000 WSB Charlie O'Brien reports. That's a big concern for Emory University's Dr Carlos del Rio. Dr. Del Rio is distinguished professor of metal Awesome at Emory, he tells CNN and Georgia saw another surge of hospital admissions Saturday. We saw over 1600 hospitalizations three weeks ago. In June sudden we only had 700 patients hospitalized. Georgia hospitalizations now total 11,743 As of 3 p.m. Saturday and over 2800 people have died. Charlie O'Brien, 95.5 W speak at least four Atlanta Braves players have tested positive for covert 19 man. Sir Brian Snitker announcing Freddie Freeman Will Smith to key to Sand and Pete Kozma all tested positive. Freeman has a fever and symptoms. So does Cosmo, Who's one of the Gwinnett players available for the Braves? None for Smith and Tucson, a reminder to be faith on the water this holiday weekend WSB is Jennifer Perry reports that it's already been deadly on Lake Lanier, who drownings reported in less than 24 hours. The first was Friday afternoon when a 59 year old Clark County Man jumped from a moving boat near the duck it milk Ground and never re surfaced. His death will be classified as a boating fatality. The second drowning occurred Saturday, a 45 year old man went under while swimming at linear Partner Buford. His body was recovered by another swimmer. WSB news time. 11 03 will check traffic and weather next You've been lied to lied to by corrupt.

Stone Mountain Park Georgia Charlie O'Brien Georgia Department of Public S WSB Dr Carlos del Rio Freddie Freeman Will Smith Georgia State Patrol Stephanie Stallings Braves John Bankhead Emory University cancer Atlanta Pete Kozma Ojai Lake Lanier Brian Snitker Partner
Reopening Georgia: First Steps

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Reopening Georgia: First Steps

"Georgia is one of several states. That are reopening in some form this week. But there's been a lot of debate surrounding those decisions and while many Georgia businesses reopen following rules of a new normal. There are still plenty of questions. We looked at the state board guidelines and tried to implement is needing of those things that was possible some like hair salon owner Shannon Stafford have cautiously decided to open their doors. But it's going to be difficult because we're so hands on so that's why I want to be kinda vital to making sure that we both wear mass arm. Hands ARE BEING CLEANED REGRET. Half fresh garments. We happened to put things like that in place Because eventually we're going to all be reopened. This is happening while others like CHEF. Ian Wins Laid. Still feel like it's too soon. There's lots of things that we can't get a hold of right now. Face masks or big problem Finding sanitizer is a big problem. And so we'd have to address all of those things before we can even considering opening. There's a lot for business owners to consider when thinking about reopening. Can you limit the number of customers? Make sure everyone is keeping a safe distance. Do you make everywhere mask. Not to mention how will each decision ultimately affects your bottom line joining me today to help address. Some of these concerns is Dr Carlos. Del Rio Dr del Rio is an infectious disease. Expert and a professor of medicine in global health at emory university. Where I am also on staff. His life's work is in HIV research. But he's now doing work on cove nineteen treatments and a vaccine politics aside. Carlos are we ready to reopen? You know I I don't think so but I would say sanjay that from a health standpoint. It's always too soon from a business standpoint. It's always too late. It's always such a hard decision in what I think we need to do. Is Find a place that we can have some business some economic development at the same time that we are doing it enough safe public health weight in the problem is we don't know the answer to that because we've never experienced this before. I'd like to send a couple of questions from these business owners to you and I'll preface by saying that everyone's situation is going to be a little different. How they approach. This is going to be how people assess risk is going to be different but I think there was a common sense that there's a lot of information out there. But maybe not enough clarity on what people should do. So this is a a question from Alex Bronstein. He's the owner of grind house killer Burgers in Atlanta. And he had this question right now. I mean six feet seems to be the standard. But you know if you're tables are six feet away sometimes. Somebody walks five inside of six feet or your server has come to your table. I mean how do you logistically make all this work? I don't know a couple of things unless you have somebody who US hyper spreader super spreader walking by somebody. Being close to somebody for just a few seconds may not transmit this. Maybe it's very different. If you're sitting at the table you know you and I have talked a lot about this article from China with the three tables people were sitting there. They didn't talk anything about the waiter. So the cooks it was people sitting at the table that were that got infected right. Is The people that were there for a long period of time so I think that's one thing to think about just to clarify for our listeners. Dr Del Rio is referring to a study. That recently came out of China in that study. They looked at how the virus had spread within a restaurant. There was one infected person who wasn't showing symptoms at the time and what they found. Is that this. One person seemed to have spread the virus to nine others both the person's table and surrounding tables it shows that the real risk there is that you're exposed for a prolonged period of time such as when you're sitting and eating the other thing is. I think that we have grossly underestimated. How much of this transmission is by phone mice by things you touch? So how do you make sure that when people walk in? They don't need to open the door the door so Ben. And what policies do we have in place from a human resource standpoint? That makes it easy for a waiter. If they're not feeling well do not come to work because they said no. I gotta go to work because otherwise I'm not going to get paid. Well that person is gonNA come to work and potentially can start a transmission so we really have to change a lot of things including HR policies. It's not just where we put our

United States Dr Carlos Alex Bronstein Georgia China Dr Del Rio Shannon Stafford Emory University Professor Of Medicine IAN Sanjay Atlanta
"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:11 min | 3 years ago

"dr del rio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What's happened in Florida. And here in Miami is in the absence of needle exchange in the absence of comprehensive sexual education in the absence of widespread access to prep. This is what happens you have a city that has no control over the current HIV epidemic. Together, we will defeat age in America and beyond. And while the president made this pledge last night. His administration's policies have in other ways undercut that vary effort. The Trump administration has worked to gut substantial portions of the Affordable Care Act and the expansion of Medicaid about half of those receiving care for HIV in America, do so through Medicaid or Medicare. The administration is also cut funding to global HIV aids programs like pep for the enormously successful program begun by former President, George W Bush. The Trump administration will give a dollar value indication of just how serious it really is about ending HIV in the US when it releases its twenty twenty budget. To take a deeper look at the president's pledge from last night, I'm joined by two men who have studied HIV extensively. John Cohen has covered this epidemic for thirty years for science magazine. Many of you will also recognize him as our reporting partner on our two multi part series on HIV aids. And Dr Carlos del Rio is an issue aids. Doctor at Emory University in Atlanta a city that's also one of the epicenters of America's epidemic. He runs the global health department Emory's medical school and co directs Maries center for aids research gentlemen, thank you, both very nice to see you both here. John kirwan. I'd like to start with you the president last night said we are going to end the HIV epidemic in ten years. Hung realistic is that. Well, it's an international goal that the United Nations aids program has been pushing for quite some time. I think it's entirely realistic in some places and the question is can you do it nationwide. We already see great progress in cities like San Francisco in states, like New York that have really tried to bear down and do it with detailed plans and with a lot of self criticism. So it's really gonna come down in my mind to how much self criticism there is and how detailed the plans are and how quickly people evaluate their fault lines, and where things aren't working adjust and make a stronger response, Dr del Rio the same question to you how how realistic from your perspective is the president's proposal. You know, it's it's a long shot. But again in the nineteen sixties when Kennedy said we're gonna go to the moon was a long shot, and when President Bush launched far, nobody cares. We will have twenty million people on therapy globally. So I think what we saw. Aw. And what is necessary much needed in our US pedantic responses leadership and whether the president provided that initiative in now, we we're gonna get all the agencies to work together to achieve that goal. I think it's doable. I think it's not going to be easy. But again, you know, big things are never easy. John coin as we as I mentioned earlier, the the administration has laid out that they're gonna target these very specific counties across the US. They're also going to target seven states that have a rural epidemics. What do we know about those places in particular and why and who is particularly at risk in those places. What we know quite a bit. The people who are most at risk have fallen out of the healthcare system. They're hard to reach a lot of them have mental health issues. They have housing problems Dr del Rio, and I earlier today we're talking about a lot of them changing their phone numbers. Frequently it's hard to connect with them and keep them in care hard to get them tested in the first place. It's a big ask. But there's something else on the horizon that hasn't been discussed much, and that's the possibility that there's going to be an improvement and anti drug anti-hiv drugs. So that their long lasting, you don't need to take them every day, which is a major hurdle for both treatment and prevention, and if those prove themselves which could happen in the next couple of years that'll change the equation to Dr wwl legit just pick up on that. I mean, obviously as John is talking about effective treatment. It works. It saves people's lives. It stops them from transmitting the virus to others. But but only half the people who need treatment are getting it isn't that really priority. Number one. Absolutely. I think the biggest challenge that we have as a nation and a response to the Potomac is keeping people in care. We are pretty good at testing. We get them linked to care. But then people fall out of care, and you're not in care. You're not getting therapy. And you're not you don't have your virus oppressed in your transmit it to others. So I think a big challenge we have is how do we get people engage in care, and John, and I were talking earlier today about, you know, pure navigators case managers all different strategies that we need to make sure that people don't for a lot of care that people stay engaged in care. And then we can get them on antiretroviral therapy. And then of course, long acting agents like the ones you're mentioning can also started making a difference, John. This is something I know that you've reported on you, and I have reported on quite a bit. Can you talk a little bit about the role that poverty, and racism and homophobia and transphobia play in how how that complicates our response to the stomach. That's that's the root of the problem is there's so much stigma and discrimination. The nation, and these there's so many communities of people who are outside of systems outside of healthcare, and they're difficult people to help I mean you and I worked with the San Francisco General hospital in two thousand sixteen and in our series there. We looked at a really concentrated program with about nine hundred people who were the most difficult people in the world to help. And it took an intensive effort from a really skilled group of clinicians and outreach workers to achieve. What was phenomenal. Nearly ninety percent long-term suppression of that population of people who are HIV infected. But remember look at what it took Dr del Rio the other big leg of the stool seems to be prevention. The administration officials today said that prevention was going to be an enormous part of their effort. We know that part of that is in education. But also part of that is in the deployment of prep. Why is that been so slow to take off across the country? You know, it's been it's been a huge missed opportunity since prep was approved by the FDA to now really there's been just simply a huge. Lag time of of implementation. This prep is affected rep is useful. And the people that are using it. The most are the ones that are needed the least. So when you talk about concentrated, epidemics, like the one we have in the US. It is critical that you improve the number of people that are suppressed, but you also scale a prep in a significant way. After the president's announcement, John I saw there was obviously optimism on the part of people who have been focusing on this issue. They love the attention being put on this. But others point to the fact that the this administration has also done other things that seem to torpedo the effort like chipping away at the Affordable Care Act to be pushing to not expand Medicaid doesn't. That seem like they've got one hand fighting the other in this effort. As someone said to me today who didn't want to be quoted. It's washington. That's how politics work makes strange bedfellows. It doesn't make any sense that the administration would be working against itself in in this effort with discrimination against the transgender population are gay men or the issues that have come up with people of color. These things have to be addressed holistically, and you can't win unless you do it that way or Dr Carlos del Rio. John Cohen, thank you both very much. Another major initiative of President Trump is improving US North Korean relations in order to get that isolated communist country to give up its nuclear weapons. The president met North Korea's leader Kim Jong UN this past summer last night. Mr. Trump announced that he would meet Mr Kim for a second time at the end of this month. What is on the agenda for this next meeting? And what's the state of play of diplomacy between the two countries? We turned our foreign affairs correspondent, Nick Schifrin. So Hello, Nick, the president said it's gonna be in Vietnam. The end of February. Why Vietnam first of all logistics, North Korea can get there and has an embassy in Vietnam number to North Korea and the United States have relatively good relations with Vietnam number three for the US Vietnam, a model, it's a communist country that has opened up economically diplomatically and has become much richer for that. So the US wants North Korea to consider that model. And fourth is for the US. It's a good talking point the US likes to tell the North Koreans that the US has no permanent enemies, what better place to do that in Vietnam. Of course, it's not a perfect example. Vietnam beat the United States in the war. And of course, North Korea took over a US-backed, South Korea. So it's not it's not a perfect. So is is there. What's the US administration approach going into these talks? We've talked to a lot of analysts and most of them say there's actually a fundamentally different approach than there has been in the past. And that is that the US's North Korea's having a place in the future of northeast northeast Asia. And that's just not something the US have made so explicit in the past. So let's listen to Steve big, and he is the top negotiator in North Korea. He was talking last week, and he just used a different tone than the US has really talked about North Korea in the past. And he started by mentioning the desire to end the Korean war, which ended an armistice. Not a peace treaty. President Trump is ready to end this war. It is over. It is done. You're not gonna invade North Korea. You're not seeking to topple North Korean regime. You need to advance our diplomacy alongside our plans denuclearization in a manner. That sends that message clearly to North Korea as well. We're ready for a different future ready for a different future. The Trump administration sees this as a moment of opportunity, President Trump in the past has said the threat from North Korea is over he's he's tempered that but the Trump administration has been very optimistic. Critics really fear many of them from the right, by the way, the president shouldn't go into this summit so quickly and should instead. Let people like begin negotiate the details and wait. So let's let me ask you about the details up until now I mean, both sides have been saying to the other one you go first how did the US get past that in just their thinking on the sequence of this taking right? The sequence has been vital and the two. Besides have been far apart. And now, they're not the US really has shifted in this. So in the past the US has said denuclearization. I am sorry denuclearization first. And then we can talk about sanctions released North Koreans said, wait a minute. We need to do this step by step. We take step. You take a step? And then eventually we'll get to the end together and began last week really endorsed the North Korean model. And he said there could be progress on denuclearization the ending of the war improving relations step by step. For doing the right thing with each other in relations makes it easier to do the right thing each other on nuclear weapons, and if we're doing the right thing on nuclear weapons, it makes a lot more conceivable that there would be a permanent peace regime on the Korean peninsula. And what the US is hoping to do is create a roadmap for those steps. So one of the other sticking points has been the US asking for a list of the program nuclear and missile programs that the North Koreans have tell us where that's yet another sign that the US is moving towards the North Korean position..

US president North Korea HIV President Trump President Bush Dr Carlos del Rio John President Trump America John Cohen Medicaid Dr del Rio Emory University US Vietnam Miami