17 Burst results for "Dr David Sinclair"

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:58 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"And see if the other three would work. And no one knew of three was sufficient. Most people thought it wasn't. And he put those three genes in and they're called O for oct four, Sox two S and K four. OSK. And if you're wondering what are these genes actually do? They make proteins that turn genes on and off during development. Starting to see the theme here. And they work with sirtuins. And those DNA methods. All right, so we put in those three genes into old human cells in the dish. And they look fine. They kept growing. They didn't turn into a tumor. They didn't grow and controllably. And they didn't die. And then when he measured the patterns of which genes were on and off, they resembled a young cell again. And that was a Eureka moment in the lab, I would say. We could reverse aging in the skin in a dish. But the real experiment that changed everything was he then made a virus, a domesticated virus, we call it an AAV, and he could now deliver those genes into a living organism, which in our case is typically an old mouse. And he did a very clever thing. He said, I want to work on the eye. His father had a BioTech company that is trying to solve blindness cube liners. And I said, the eye, are you kidding me? I know nothing about the eyes. Blindness has never been cured. How's it going to be possible to deliver this into an eye? Let's just do the liver. I understand the liver. It's easy. We'll just get it into trust me. I've got the good feeling about the eye. All right, fine. And I've learned over the years. If somebody really wants to do something, let them go do it. And usually they're right. There's this thing in science where you have this gut feeling, but you're not really sure where it's coming from. There's a spirituality, and I've learned to tap into that as do students. It's one of the things I teach them. So he took an old mouse. Actually, the first exponent was he actually caused the mouse to become blind. And then he put the virus into the eye, just straight in, turned on his three Yemen are genes. I was okay. And then he looked four weeks later at what happened in that eye. And he found out that the optic nerve that was damaged started and for the most part grew back. And that never happens. Optic nerves don't grow back. If you go blind from damaging your eye, you're not going to see again. Same with your spinal cord, same with your brain damage. The central nervous system with nerves in your body does not grow back. It's a factor of biology. And here was one Chang showing he was able to do that. So why is that relevant to aging? Because when you're very young, if you damage your optic nerve, or even your spine or your brain, it can grow back. But we lose that ability as we get older. And he was taking the eye back so young that it could regenerate and function. But then he did something very clever. He then put it into a mouse that we gave glaucoma to, so pressure in the eye damages vision. And then he also did it to old mice that had just aged and were blind as well. And he started to cure blindness with his treatment. And we could now measure the age of those nerve cells, and they were literally younger. And those bundles, and those loops, we can measure those, and the DNA methylation, the chemicals we can measure those. And he was sending them back 75, 80% of their age. But not to zero. Or not a 100%. So he sent me, I don't know if I've still got it on my phone, but it's recorded in my book because he sent me this text that said, David, I got to show you these photos. And he sent me an image of the nerve, which is a long strand. It's orange. We stand at orange so you can see it. And the damaged one just looked like there were a few dead cells. But the one that was reprogrammed was bright orange, all the cells almost all had survived the damage, and then they started to grow back towards the brain. From the eye to the brain. And you could see it's like a jellyfish tail. And he sent me pictures of that. And he said, I thought I was going to fail, but do you see what I'm seeing? And I said, yeah, I see it. What are you seeing? And I said, the future. And that is literally what we saw. So now we know you can reprogram other tissues. It doesn't have to be the optic nerve, it can be the retina, it can be the cone cells of the eye. And so reversing aging of the eye, that's not hard at all. But we can reverse the age of the liver, the skin, other labs are doing the spleen, thymus. Through this method. So it seems to be somewhat, if not universal method of resetting the age of the body safely. Safely is the key. And because I started a BioTech company called life biosciences that wants to cure blindness and other age related diseases using this method for the last two and a half years we've been doing safety studies in mice and now we're in non human primates. And those animals are fine. We can blast these three genes in the animal and they find. They don't get tumors, their eyes are healthy. You don't get malformation of the eye. So it's great. We lucked out humanity lucked out that we can actually do this. And that there's a backup copy of youth in each of our cells that can be tapped into. That's crazy. Do we know what is going on that allows it to realize what it's supposed to look like? What the bundling of that cell is supposed to look like. Because that is what's going on, right? It suddenly remembers these are sticking out. They shouldn't. And how do we go from? It has so many fires to put out that it's just roaming all over the place and it can't get back. How do we sort of give it that breather to come back and go, not only do I remember how to bundle this, but I've got the time to dedicate two bundling it correctly again. Well, the bundling, it takes a few days, and a week you're getting pretty close a month, you've now got vision back. And then actually, by the way, if you stop the treatment, we now I didn't know this when we talked last, but when you stop the treatment, it's long-lasting. That mouse will still have young eyes 6 months later. And I always, I still do. I want to test how many times can you reset? Because if it's once, it's interesting. If it's a hundred times, it's super interesting. And we couldn't do that experiment because the mice would dying from old age with super young eyes. So we got to reset once, but now we're resetting entire mice. And by the way, you mentioned earlier the quote from my podcast, we can actually control aging in the other direction. We now know how to distract and move the sirtuins away. We cut the chromosomes and let them move away. And those gene packages open up the same as aging. So we can make a mouse poor things that we can make them age rapidly. So if you were to come to my lab, I could show you a mouse that's a twin, and it's, let's say, brother and sister, the brother will be 50% older than its sister, but they were born on the same day. Wow. And now we're reversing the age of those mice. Our main mouse is called Lisa by coincidence. And we're taking Lisa and we're going to rejuvenate her so that she hopefully gets back to being like a little better up. And now you want to see if you can take her back. Jesus man, like this is, I mean, you said that this is going to be remembered as the moment that human history changed. I mean, that's crazy. If this ends up working out, like this is really bananas. So aging actually has been worked on for about 5000 years or more. And just in the last 20 years, we've come up with a set of hallmarks of aging. There are about 8 of them. And I think many of your viewers will know that there's telomere attrition the ends of chromosomes get shorter. Mitochondria, the power packs we're running out.

OSK Eureka Sox Blindness Chang glaucoma blindness tumors David Lisa
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:17 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"From birth, say that this gene needs to stay off because it's a liver gene that's working and shouldn't work in the brain. So don't expose it. Don't expose it. So we've got bundles bundles bundles, a big loop. Bundles bundles bundles. And some of these loops are really important for when we're developing as an embryo. One of these big loops, it's called hox, and there are 13 hox genes, HOS. And they get read in a certain order. The first ones get read and tell the little embryo. This is your tail. Which eventually goes away in humans, but we have a tail. And then others are midsection, then this is your upper body, then your neck and your head. That's what this hawks does. And eventually once you're born, it gets bundled away. Okay, we don't need those anymore. We've built the body. It's got a head and a tail. Hox is there. But when we were looking at older cells, in mice and in humans, guess what? That bundle of hox developmental genes started to open up again. Because the sirtuins got moved away and did some other things during aging. And now we've got genes that tell us head to tail coming on in our body when they shouldn't. And that's part of the problem with aging, which is genes getting turned on when they should be kept off for decades. And then cells start to get confused. Does the revealing of the wrong things that unbundling does it happen because the sirtuins are not re bundling them or are they actively going in and unbundling things that they shouldn't. Well, what we think is happening is that they physically move away to other parts of the DNA molecule where they shouldn't normally be. That's the distraction. They get called away to do other things. They are very good at handling emergencies. These are emergency survival proteins. That they have two roles. One is to make sure that everything's good every day, super optimal health, stay young. But they also, through, I think, evolution and very early in evolution, their role was to put out the fire. And so they go away. They actually leave where they should. So that they're bundling and for a few minutes until the emergency is fixed. They actually float away, go repair something. So it might be a broken chromosome somewhere else over on another chromosome. They go there. They fix it, and then somehow they find their way back to make sure that bundle is maintained. But if you keep doing that, and every cell gets at least one broken chromosome every day. Wow. And so that's trillions in our body every day. These fortunes get I call it distracted, but basically they're doing this other role, putting out the fire and then coming back. If you do that, for decades, eventually, some of them they're lost. They don't find their way back and these loops that shouldn't have DNA that should never be turned on start to come on. I may have been wrong then, maybe distracted isn't a metaphor. They literally have so much work to do, which would make sense. And so now to actually use a metaphor, you talk about for people that know what a CD is. That you would get these scratches in your CDs, and it would cause the songs to not play right. It was really obnoxious actually. And that idea of aging, you're going to get these scratches. You're going to get the fires that have to be put out. The sirtuin is going to get busy, dealing with breaks and whatever. And so it's got to go handle that, put out that fire, deal with that break. And as we age, there's an accumulation of damage that we do. And so these things are constantly busy. And therein lies the information theory of aging that the sirtuins are too busy to maintain the integrity of the bundling of the DNA in a given region, which will be different everywhere. But it's no longer holding to the integrity of just be a brain cell, just be a liver cell, just be a pancreas cell. And the readers are only instructed to read what's exposed. And so now, if your brain cell also has a little bit sticking up for skin cell or tail or whatever, now all of a sudden you have a dysfunctional cell in your brain. That's aging. As I see it, that cells lose their identity. We call it X differentiation, which is an old theory, but this is what we've given a name to it. And so cells when you're developing from an egg fertilized egg to a baby to an adult. That's called differentiation. Cells get their identity, the bundles and loops get established. That's youth. That's health. X differentiation is what happens after that. But then the question is, with the scratches on the CD, can you get rid of them? Can you polish them? Can you get those bundles that have been exposed to go back to where they came from and reset the age of a cell? And get the brain to wake up and remember, oh, crap. Oh yeah, I forgot. I am actually a brain cell, or an eye cell. So this was the big question that I had after figuring that other stuff out. We just talked about was, is there a backup copy of a youthful.

hawks
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:40 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Life. He started a new career down in Sydney. He's hiking at the world right now. He's traveling around America driving his elderly friend around. His friend, unfortunately, ended up going to the hospital the last few days. So my father is taking care of his friends, who he's seeing on the decline. And if anything, improving every year. I'd love to hear more about resveratrol, which is something that I've completely written off until I started researching you. It seemed for a red hot minute like it was real. And then it seemed to completely die, and I know that you got caught in the middle of some of this stuff. So where has all the forget what pop culture thinks of it? Like what's the reality of it? Yeah, so resveratrol was a proof of concept molecule back in 2003. The first of its kind that could mimic calic restriction make my healthy on a high fat western diet and it was a great proof of something that we were trying to figure out. And it led to drugs that went into humans that look really promising. I got embroiled in a scientific and a corporate war. So in the case of Pfizer, they put out a scientific paper that said, essentially everything that David has said is wrong. Okay, and then that was a great headline. Harvard scientists started companies is wrong. And then I spend about a week in bed saying, fuck the world. Why am I doing this? Why am I working so hard for society if they don't care? But I work my way out of bed. I thought, let's dig deep and see if they're right and if we're right. And so for another three years, we really worked hard in my lab at Harvard to test whether we were right. So the question was, with this PacMan that spools the DNA, does resveratrol work on it, or is it working on something else? And that to scientists is really important. Because if it's not working on this, all the drugs that we're trying to work on this are probably working the wrong way that we thought to cut a long story short, what we found and published in the journal science, which is one of the top you can do. And I say that because it's validated science is that we show that resveratrol does bind to the PacMan and it is responsible for this. And we now have new information that we haven't published, but I'll tell your audience about it. We've made a mouse that is resistant to activation of the PacMan. We can tweak the enzyme just in one amino acid in that protein out of about a thousand that blocks this movement activation. It's normally chewing like this, but if we add resveratrol to a normal mouse, it'll do that to our mutant mouse. It's this. And which is better. Or the rapid munching? Rapid munching is better. Because the rapid we think was responsible for the health benefits and the longevity. So what you're showing is by slowing it down and you cause real problems and thusly, if you have resveratrol on there and get it munching really fast that you've done something positive. Right. And our mutant mouse should be resistant to the benefits of resveratrol if we're right. But if Pfizer is right, then resveratrol should still provide benefits, even though this ends up because it's working on some other. Some other way. Got it. So the mouse that could not be sped up, the mutant mouse does not live longer when given resveratrol on its high fat die interesting. So that will be the punctuation mark, the FU. We were right. But interestingly, the world has moved on. Well, I'm left to clean up the pieces. Right. Yeah, and when you say the world has moved on, you're talking about people like me who just assume that it was garbage and that it's not real. Okay, so you've said that the only supplement you take is vitamin D so how are you getting resveratrol in the system? Is it a drug? Do you have to have it prescribed? Well, I'm taking resveratrol. I have and what do we call that a supplement? Sure. And it's commercially available. It is, if it's a legitimate seller and it's 98 plus percent pure, it seems to be similar to what I take. And ballpark how much do you take? I take a teaspoon into my yogurt. That's probably close to a gram every day. Every day, yeah, okay. Resveratrol, roughly a gram. Are you taking nmm, or is NMN, or is that just your dad? Both of us. Okay, and then metformin. Right. Those three, anything else? Those are the main things that I think are helpful. And I've been monitoring my blood biochemistry. So you said you took an MRI of your heart. Right, which I love. What are things that we should be testing? Assume for a second, I'm willing to go all the way, do any crazy tests to know what I'm doing is working. What would you recommend? Well, I avoid x-rays and CT scans, unless I have to. Sure. If your doctor says go for it, please don't refuse that. But otherwise, don't do it for fun. Don't do it because you're curious. Because those CT scans will break your DNA. And when we break the mouse's DNA, it's age goes up by 50%. Wow. Right. So avoid DNA breaks as much as possible. What I do is I take a blood test from a company called inside tracker, which in full disclosure I invested in years ago. And they look at about 30 parameters in your blood and give you feedback. It's doctor supervised. So it's legit and it's based on a lot of science. And that at least gives you some feedback about your body about what's actually happening if you change your lifestyle or you take a supplement. Or even a new drug for that matter. So you've got to have to be monitoring because you don't want to fly blind. You don't know if for you you're doing harm or doing good. So do a blood test, at least go to your doctor and have a blood test for a goodness sake. You could have your genome sequenced or do something that looks at the variance in your genome for relatively little cost. I think it's $99 now. I gave a test of that kind to my whole family as Christmas present. And what we've learned is that some of our members, lab members are not lab members, family members have variants that are predict longevity, some don't. Some have mutations in their genome that are a little bit scary. Down the line, you could get your DNA methylation age determined. The true what's called the horvath clock. Some people measure their telomere lengths. They have to do a biopsy to do that, or can you do it from blood? But blood test is fine. For a long time, I was really focused on living forever, and that was the dominant thing I thought about as I mapped out my life. And then about a year or two ago, it started to feel more important to recognize my mortality. And part of it was I had really lost faith that it was going to happen in my lifetime. And I definitely wanted to happen in researching you for this episode. I am regaining belief that we really may hit health escape velocity in my life. And so in the first half of the show, I want to talk about why we age exactly and you've gotten extraordinarily good at mapping that out with real conviction. And then in the second half, we'll talk about what we can do on an individual level to really slow that down. Or possibly even reverse it. So I want people to stick with me because I'm actually going to start with a story and a quote. And I want to make sure that people know the map of where we're going. So first the story on Christmas Eve, I was throwing a little party for my family and it was a poker party. We had a dealer come 40 years old. And the energy's high, imagine balloons everywhere. It was actually a birthday party, happens to be somebody who's born in my family on Christmas Eve. And I go into the kitchen to get a drink and my wife runs in and says, we think the dealer is having a heart attack. She was like, you need to get in there right now..

Pfizer Harvard PacMan Sydney America David heart attack
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

04:48 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Disease. And that turns on these reprogramming factors. We don't use all four of the factors, OSK M they're called because one of them causes cancer. The M we leave off the M, we put OS and K into the eye, turn it on, leave it for a few weeks, measure what happens to the eye. And those mice can see again, like they were young. So we've tested three different types of damaged damage to the eye. The first one we did was a Hail Mary. So the lab near ours across the road works on rejuvenating the spine and the optic nerve, which is crazy. Yeah, because we know as soon as a couple of months old, you're not going to regrow a spine. It's one of the first parts of the body that ages, in fact. But jellyfish can regrow, axolotls can regrow an arm. We lose that ability when we're very, very young. So the question was, if we turn the clock back a lot without OSK genes, will those nerve cells be young enough to regrow back to the brain. If we damage them. And that was the experiment. They pinched the back of the optic nerve so that the nerves were defective, and they started to die back towards the brain, caused the mice lost their vision. We then turned on our reprogramming factors. We now see that the nerves get young again. Wind the clock back, and they regrow back to the brain. We could give ourselves the healing ability that we only had when we were embryos. And you start to think about what could this lead to if we can do this safely, of course, safe is the important word across the body. Imagine one day you could have every cell in your body able to be rejuvenated like that. You cut yourself. You break a bone. You lose your mind. You have a dementia. You take a course of doxycycline for a few weeks and then stop, switch it off again, and you heal. If you turn it on at high levels, there's a lab in Spain that has shown that you can get small tumors in some animals in a kidney. So we've been very careful to not just blast the cell with these factors permanently. We've titrated what we say brought the levels down to very low levels and switch it off when we don't need it. But we have given mice this virus throughout the body. We inject it into a vein and we turn it on. We've left it on now, expecting the mice to die. A year later, the perfectly fine. Wow. So it appears to be safe, but of course there's a lot more work to do. I'm a scientist, and I'm developing drugs, have to be very aware of the dangers. Please, nobody go out and try this at home at all until we know more. But the eye is a good testing zone because it's protected. And if there's a problem, it's shielded from the rest of the body. It won't go too far. But everything we know now is that it seems to be very safe, at least in the eye. Wow, this is crazy. So that is, is there an element of getting better improvement in human performance or anything that you can tease us with? Well, we've actually published results that in mice, if you give them an NAD booster molecule, that will turn on these PacMan enzymes called the sirtuins. Those mice when they're old can now run 50% further. In fact, some of our old mice ran so far that the treadmill stopped because mice are not supposed to run more than three kilometers. We haven't talked about NAD yet. Tell me what NAD is, what are the precursors? How do I supplement for it? So there are a few on the market. I don't endorse or sell anything just by the way, even if you see me online that's not me. So that said, there's one called NR. Which is then which stands for nicotinamide riboside, which is a very early precursor to making NAD in the body. There's an intermediate from that called NMN, not to be confused with M and ms. Please don't do that. That's not healthy. And then the cell turns NMN into NAD. And you can take all three actually and each one of those three and raise NAD levels in animals. And now we're doing myself and many others are doing human studies. And we've seen that in our and in my case, NMN does raise the NAD levels of older people and young people alike up to levels that we think you could rarely achieve even with being a marathon runner. That's crazy. So just to bring this home for people talk to me about your dad and his N of one experimentation with NMN. Yeah. So my father has been on the same regimen as me, resveratrol for over a decade, the red wine molecule. He's been on metformin longer than me because he was in borderline diabetic type two diabetic. And he's also on NMN now. And he seems to be doing great. He's now 80. When he was in his 70s, he was slowing down he was starting to say the same things twice. Typical 70 year old. He's doing great now..

Hail Mary cancer dementia tumors Spain diabetic
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"We're sitting there chatting. It's great. Temperatures lower in the steam room because it's humidity is saturated. The roof's dripping on you hot water. But I don't know if the steam helps, but I certainly love the feeling of being in there and my skin starts to be healthier because of course it's cleaning itself out. And then the final thing I do is hot tub, pretty hot, hot water. And then I go and dunk below the water. A couple of times in water that's less than 4°C. So that's so cold that it takes your breath away. Yeah. But it's great. Interesting. Was there anything else on level three that we should know about? Yes. So work that we've done recently, just in the last year is finding ways to tweak the cells and the tissues of mice, at least, to reset the clock. We've been working for ten years, as I said, accelerating the clock. We can drive that hand of the clock forwards now. We cut the DNA of the animal, let it heal, and in doing so, we distract those proteins from where they come from. So disturbing this survival circuit so much that we disrupt the spooling of the DNA and what we got was an old mouse by every account based on histology, which is looking at the tissues based on their physiology, they got gray, they got arthritis, they got heart disease even. And when we look at the molecular clock, that methylation clock, there were 50% older communicated. They had more like clumps everywhere. Those methyl groups were added to the DNA. Right. Right. Okay. So we had given them heart disease and Alzheimer's or dementia, we'd given them all these diseases, but by measuring the clock, what we had actually done is give them aging. But that was the first step. That took ten years. The last year we've been asking, how do you get the hands to go backwards? That's a lot harder, but we were fortunate that the 2012 Nobel Prize was won for the ability to reverse that clock in cells. It's called was the prize awarded to shinya Yamanaka, a Japanese fellow, very smart guy, and he found at least four genes that when you put into, say, skin cells of an adult, if you gave them your skin cells, I could go back to 11, basically clone you. I could take your cells make a stem cell pool, and I could grow you into a new little liver or a new little kidney. That's all easy, not easy, but it's doable. It's doable. What that tells us is that those four Yamanaka genes can reset age. If I can take someone who's in like you who's in their early 40s and make a new you, as we've done now for many species, dogs, cats, sheep, monkeys. Those animals, we can reset the clock 100%, and those animals actually live in normal lifespan. That tells us that the instructions to be young are still in the cell somewhere. As though there's a backup hard drive that tells the epigenome those spools had to go back to be young again and get those methyl groups back to being young again, not up here, but back there. But don't strip them off too far to be a stem cell or basically turn you into the world's giant tumor. Yeah. Okay, so one, why do I become a tumor? Because the tumor is a cell that doesn't know to stop. Right. So what is it that you're breaking in that process that makes it so dysfunctional? Yeah. So in terms of the clock, let's just start with that. Shiny Yamanaka wound the clock so far back it went back to zero. Back to midnight. That we do not want to do because the cells lose their identity, and that's the last thing we want to do. We don't want to go back to us. Because it's dangerous to have a pluripotent stem cell in the wrong place in the body. Of course, it'll grow. It won't stop growing. But why doesn't why does it become a tumor? Why doesn't it become a liver or a lung? I would get the problem of having a liver develop in my brain. But I'm just saying like, why does it become a tumor cell instead of an actual functioning liver? Well, so when you go back far enough and it loses its identity, it will just multiply into a mass without cellular identity. So there's something else going on that stops it from figuring itself out. Right. So in the lab, if we take a pluripotent stem cell and we want to make a liver cell or a neuron, a nerve cell, we give it a bunch of chemical signals in what we call the niche. And when one of these cells lands in a niche around those old cells, they'll use that stem cell to rebuild tissue. But imagine if we could reset the clock, not all the way back to a stem cell, but just partial reset the clock. So that you could go back to being 20 again. That's what we're able to do in some tissues in the mouse right now. You do it on mass. When it's cell by cell, DNA strand by DNA strand like how the hell do you get this to take effect through a whole joint, let alone the whole body. Right now the way we do it is we inject a virus called an AAV, and this virus will target certain tissues and deliver the genes to most of the cells in that tissue. For example, we are treating aging of the eye in my. So we can take an old mouse. We deliver a virus, the AV into the eyes, tiny little prick. It's the same virus that's used to correct genetic deficiencies in the eye right now. FDA approved drugs. So this isn't science fiction. This is out there in the world right now. We give it to the old mice. We give them an antibiotic antibiotic called doxycycline. Same thing you might take if you've got Lyme disease. And that turns on these reprogramming factors. We don't use all four of the factors, OSK M they're called because one of them causes cancer. The M we leave off the M, we put OS and K into the eye, turn it on, leave it for a few weeks, measure what happens to the eye..

Alzheimer's shinya Yamanaka heart disease Shiny Yamanaka Nobel Prize dementia arthritis FDA Lyme disease cancer
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:47 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"A bit of brown fat is all good. So my friend ray Cronus and I have written on this and Andrew bremer. And at the NIH, we call it the metabolic winter hypothesis. And essentially, it's saying that lifestyles these days were always warm. I'm wearing this jacket. We sleep with the covers on. We turn up the heat. We never get exposed to coal unless we force ourselves to. And we think that that's possibly largely responsible if not maybe partly perhaps largely responsible for the diabetic problem we have. Okay, so if you're cold at night, you're gonna burn a lot more energy staying warm. Yes. Turn on your brown fat. Now that's gonna keep people lean. If we bundle up and we eat the kind of diets that we see in the supermarket, that's gonna be doubly bad for our bodies. We're warm, we're not losing energy, and we're eating a lot more. Yet this is this stuff is so interesting. Okay, so what's your advice? Whatever you're about to tell me, no, I'm going to do it. So, how frequently do I want to be doing it? Is it every day? What's that look like? Well, what I do is because I'm busy and I don't have a sauna or a cold tub at home. I subject myself to this stuff for about an hour on Sundays. And what I do is I spend about 15 minutes at a 150° Fahrenheit. Well, that's reasonably intense, but you get used to it. Then we go into the steam room. We're sitting there chatting. It's great. Temperatures lower in the steam room because it's humidity is saturated. The roof's dripping on you hot water. But I don't know if the steam helps, but I certainly love the feeling of being in there and my skin starts to be healthier because of course it's cleaning itself.

ray Cronus Andrew bremer NIH
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:15 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Type two diabetic accelerates aging. Why you don't want to have high levels of glucose in my eye try to keep my mind open. You think insulin is irrelevant in this chain. I do. It's a signaling molecule. Over time, your pancreas will suffer because it has to make more and more of it. But that's not what's aging your brain and your muscle and all these other things. What's going on is two things. One is that glucose will attach to proteins. All the time, it just sticks to it. And in fact, the diagnosis of type two diabetes is to look at an abundant protein in your body in your blood that you can access at your doctor's office. And figure out what percentage of that protein is stuck to glucose. And that's hemoglobin. In your red blood cells. And if you've got 5% or less hemoglobin attached to the glucose, you're healthy. And then you get 6.5, your pre diabetic and higher than that you're heading towards type two diabetes. And that's just all about glucose attaching to proteins. And glucose attaching to proteins messes things up. And they can really not work well. But that's really not the root cause of aging, as I've told you. What's also going on is that the high levels of glucose are making your cells complacent. Tons of energy. Got lots of this stuff going around. The hormones, your brain thinks that it's good. You're swimming in treacle. And so you're adversity and repair systems. The sirtuins, they don't work as hard. And so your clock is ticking faster. That's why type two diabetics have other work is hard or they're lumbering under the weight of glucose that's stuck to them. Interestingly, both. So tunes will get attached to sugar. But they also, they don't turn on. Like this. They get attached to sugar or sugar gets attached to them. Sugar gets attached to them. Okay. Yeah. But what's also a real problem is that that adversity system is complacent. And so by keeping your glucose levels down, even at a young age, well, I'm not young, but even at a young age, your body will be in this adversity state versus abundance. And that can explain why type two diabetics are older when you measure it, and also are susceptible to heart disease. Dementia and even certain types of cancer and why metformin, the drug that keeps you glucose levels down and activates this mitochondria defense doesn't just protect you against type two diabetes. By looking at tens of thousands of patients that have taken metformin, they also have lower levels of heart disease, dementia, frailty, and cancer. Bananas. It is bananas. Do you take metformin? I do. So I'm going to walk through what I think is your ideal protocol minus the supplementation I want to speak to that. I'll let you add any of that other than metformin if you think there's something else people should do. But okay, so a primarily vegetable diet and a big part of the reason that I think that you recommend a primarily vegetable diet is because of this adversity memetic versus abundance mimetic and that because red meat is so rich in amino acids, it gives a signal to the body that we have in abundance we can grow and so we were rapid growth, but we're also aging ourselves. So we want to create this that little bit of a stressor by or I should say we don't want the signal that we have abundance. We obviously have to eat well for protein. We're going to need to make sure that we're getting all the protein that we need and all of that. And that you advise intaking vegetables that have gone through a hermetic trial themselves. So like with the wine grapes that are highest in resveratrol, they're often dehydrated and ones that have fungus on them. I guess really do well because the Rez rather troll I would imagine is part of their defense mechanism. It is, yeah. And then so any vegetables that have had sort of a hermetic push is going to be a good idea. And you give a bunch of examples that I've heard before, like oranges, I guess, if you drive a nail into the bark of the tree, before harvest, that that helps. So interesting. Olives and olive oil, oleic acid, oleic acid will activate sirtuins, resveratrol. It's not a coincidence that we figured out these kind of foods are good for us separately. But now we understand probably how they're working. So yes, you're right so far with my lifestyle. Utterly fascinating. Heat exposure. Cold exposure. Fasting. That's one that we should probably go into a bit of detail about. So intermittent fasting, being a big one. I know that you're doing omad one meal a day. I had to ask what that meant. The first time I heard it, and you're doing that, you're still in taking a fair amount of calories when you're in good shape. But you're not withering away. So I imagine that you're roughly taking in enough calories to hit maintenance levels. But only in a single meal a day, do you eat like, 'cause I think you eat in a two hour window. I'm not strict about it. I have dinner. And occasionally, I break down, I have a little bit of a snack in the afternoon. And occasionally as needed. Okay, so I have lunch with friends. Occasionally I have breakfast. But my best days, I would say probably at least 5, 6 days a week are not eating. Maybe more than a nut, a few nuts or a nibble of chocolate until dinner. And then dinner is great. It dinner is a big meal for me. How many calories in your dinner? I don't know, but I go to a restaurant and I'm eating multiple dishes. I just don't eat dessert. I still little bits, but that's it. I avoid sugar like it's the plague for the reason we just mentioned. Okay, so you advise people to do prolonged fasting if they can. You don't personally just because it sucks and it isn't fun and you live your life at a very high level and so it gets difficult and I will second that. A 24 hour fast for me is pretty easy. Anything beyond that, my performance begins to decline, certainly my levels.

diabetes dementia heart disease cancer swimming plague
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"And I'm not kidding. If you just do the 5 things that doctors recommend typically, don't smoke, don't over drink, get enough sleep, get a bit of exercise, and don't be overweight. If you do that versus someone who doesn't, you live on average 14 years longer. And that's just the stuff we know of. But there gets to be some really interesting stuff that is just now at least making my level of awareness. And I think that some of this speaks to this idea of the adversity memetic. So when you pointed out that a type two diabetic so diet induced lifestyle induced diabetes is going to live longer than somebody without diabetes, if they're taking metformin. That's insane to me. Here's my hypothesis Neal tell us whether this makes any sense. So insulin seems like the problem child here. And so by elevating my glucose levels, I have to pump all this insulin into the system, the insulin is potentially damaging things. Somehow some way I don't understand the mechanism, but it's overabundant presence causes damage to the cells in some way, shape or form. By taking metformin, it's keeping my blood glucose levels down, which means that it's going to keep my insulin levels down and therefore I wouldn't be doing the damage to the system. So even though I may be intaking the things that turn into glucose because of the use of metformin, I'm actually keeping my insulin response down. So therefore, I never get that thing that ends up damaging the system. And therefore, even though, I started as a type two diabetic, and that's why I'm on the metformin, because of its impact on insulin, I never get the damages in occurring at the level that it would, even for somebody who is not a diabetic. Does that sound about right? Kind of. Kind of. Let's go back to what is metformin. Metformin is a derivative of plant molecule that inhibits the cell's ability slightly to make energy and in response to its mitochondria. Yes. So mitochondria in high school, we were taught that the power packs of the cell. They do a lot more. They make amino acids that make fat. They do all this stuff. But we need them for energy without mitochondria. We're dead. Again, in 30 seconds. And the way and so I'm drawing this because they're like little bacteria in our cells. They float around and they make energy for us. In fact, like 4 billion years ago, actually only 1 billion years ago. Mitochondria were free floating bacteria that were subsumed by us. It's crazy. So we have little pets in our body. And they have their own DNA. Which does get mutated over time. The reason metformin seems to work one of them is that it inhibits the ability of mitochondria to make the energy. So mitochondria are like a hydroelectric dam. There's water, but in this case, it's hydrogen atoms, not water, that gets pumped into a reservoir, which is between two membranes on the outside of the bubble of the bacterium thing. So not hydrogen atoms are really acidic. That's what S it is lots of hydrogen protons. And when you get a lot of something, it likes to equilibrate. Remember that you go from a lot too little. It flows. But there's a membrane in between from the high level to the low level. So internal is low high is outside. And the cell puts this little generator in between that outside space and the inner space. The outer membrane space and then the membrane itself is what we call it. And this little power generator sits there and those protons shoot through a pore in that protein. And at the bottom is a generator. It spins, literally the protein is spinning at thousands of times per second. Wow. And as it's spinning, it's doing a chemical reaction to make what's called ATP. Adenosine triphosphate doesn't matter its name. That ATP is chemical energy that we use to live to make things to grow. And so what metformin does is that it reduces the ability of cells to make that those proton gradients it's called. And so you don't build up as much power and you don't make as much ATP initially. You just have to do with glucose. Why do you give that to a diabetic? Well, what happens is that there's a process called mitochondria. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. And mito is the mitochondria are experiencing adversity or perceived adversities. The mitochondria freaking out. I can't make enough energy. I don't have enough ATP. And what gets activated is a protein called AMPK. AMPK is a regulator of energy in our bodies that senses when we don't make enough energy. And what metformin does is it comes in and it activates that AMPK step. And now the cells are freaking out that they're not making enough energy and in response, they'll make more. And so you have a little drop in energy, temporarily when you take a pill, but then the cell rebounds and starts making a lot more energy. And you actually mitochondria will multiply. You get more of these little bacteria in your cells. So taking metformin causes replication of your mitochondria. Yeah. Okay? AMPK starts. But I still don't know how this ties into glucose. Well, when you, when you activate AMPK, you don't just make more mitochondria, but cells start to put out a new protein that we haven't talked about new to this chat. I'll call glut four, and that's stands for glucose transporter number four, and it goes to the outside of the cell. Right on the very what we call plasma membrane, and it sits there, and now its job is to suck the glucose out from the liquid around. So it's no longer waiting for insulin to come around to push the glucose into the cell. It's like, yo, I need glucose. To help with this energy creation. It does. And so it makes more of this protein, but it also becomes what we call insulin sensitive. So the little bit of insulin that you have around if you're a type two diabetic works better. You get more insulin receptor, which is the protein that senses insulin. So all in all, what happens to that cell just to summarize, because it's a bit complicated, is that by tricking the cell into thinking it doesn't have enough energy, it panics, adversity, and it'll go now and put the protein on the surface to grab the glucose and be more sensitive to the hormone insulin that tells the cell to suck it in. Why is that good? Because then your glucose levels in your bloodstream will come down and you're no longer type two diabetic. There are two reasons I believe why being.

diabetes Neal ATP
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Skin aerobic capacity. It supports normal enzymatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advantage. Dr. Preston You know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from Purity products combined the CO Q 10 with resveratrol. Yeah, There was very little, the key molecule found in red wine, which they're studying at Harvard. And I know that it activates genes for those who've just tuned in to talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, let me tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair. This is what they found Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive. And what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that it extended lifespan. And it appears that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity. You live longer. It increases the activity. Of what we call Holland Jev itty gene. They get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called sirtuins. Now they found two things at Harvard number One caloric restriction increases these longevity genes, these certain elements. Well, So does Reservoir a troll, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol. It's been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans as it does, and these animals and I'm optimistic it will. It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially using nutritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging In our longevity. Wow, President You say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. You call this evidence based nutrition. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why co Q 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957 University of Wisconsin The Nobel Prize for Peter Mitchell in 1978, the University of Texas Medical School. Purdue.

1978 University of Texas Medical Sc Preston 1957 David Sinclair two things University of Wisconsin Nobel Prize Dr. Harvard One Peter Mitchell CO Q 10 Holland Jev Coke Dr co Q 10
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Sixty right and see six. It's called a fuller fullerenes. Sixty carbon molecules that. It's considered a super antioxidant. Writes the same thing. I'm using for my hair for hair growth. But it's little carbon molecule it keeps toxins in the body. It's a very powerful antioxidant. People get what's called a reaction when they first start taking it because it just like claws toxins out of your deep tissue than they answer your bloodstream. So some people get a pretty powerful detox reaction to it but it really is one of the darlings of the anti-ageing in the beauty industry now and it's also a little bit of a neutral pick as well in terms of turning your brain on in longevity clinical trials. It extends life span animals by ninety percent. You know now. Animal trial which prevented the tumors. That typically kill off rats so carbon sixties one so seasick. Sixty that one. Yeah yeah. I've used it before. I've never tried that one. I think everyone on this. Listen i that one. I don't use it orally right now but i use it on. My hair is part of that asano. copper peptide c. Sixty blend that i use. So yeah maybe someone's getting into to bloodstream out. Imagine since my skin nutro through the scall- An-and and are was the second one and you know what d- does is basically it. It helps to protect your dna and increases the help your monaco andrea so it's metabolize normally from vitamin b. Three right but as Dr david sinclair probably the most popular. Harvard anti-aging scientists who is kind of championed. The use of these things. It's kind of like if you if you use resveratrol like blueberry dark and stuff that helps to accelerate the activity of your ser- to genes which helped to protect your dna and extend life and then nicotinamide or or or any of these n. Precursors or issues or anything like that. Those are kind of like the fuel for the show tunes to work so that that's why you'll get some companies like thorn for example. They've developed like an n. N. or i think it's an ours. Their product combined with resveratrol right perfect example stacking a cer- tune with an nfc precursor and so so nasd's up there along c. Sixty other ones glutathione. Right good interesting. Because it's just basically like like an electron lender right you. Have you have all these. These you know the these loan electrons these molecular interlopers. That are kind of neat. Need to be cleaned up and wash out of the body and glutathione particularly. If it's in like liposuction will form or what's called s. aseel form. which makes it more absorbable. i use a brand called alms bio which which combines glutathione with. I think might o q and p q and some other minor condo protections but tastes like it more news cycle. So it's really good that that's an example like a bio absorbable gouda thion. Quicksilver scientific has another really. Good leipus. gouda thi- on glued number three and then co q. Ten co q. Ten and that. That's actually something that is in that. That alms bioglou defy on that i use basically co q. Ten is something that helps to protect the motto. Conrad ubiquonol is the form that seems to be the best way to take it. Like a reduced form of coenzyme q ten. It's better absorbed than than what's called oxidized q ten which is called ubiquitous but if you bickering all basically co q. Ten is one of the best things you can andrea. So that definitely falls in there as well and never conceptualize. Today's nutro pick though. Yeah you could stack all these together. Yeah it's kind of interesting there. Titling eases anti-aging neutral picks because a lot of people don't talk about these like smart drugs but you know if you're if you're salamat condor working well your your brain's going to be operating a little more more cleanly to and then the last one i talked i didn't really. I didn't really known about this much until i was doing research for my last book. Boundless but it's called s. k. q. One it's also an antioxidant. It's a really powerful antioxidant. Basically drags a molecule. Different antioxidant called p q in your mind qendra and that also does a great job of protecting the motto contra kind of like the c sixty or the coq ten or the glued does so a lot of these have activity in the maddock andrea but but tho those are the five of them. Those are the five of them. So so we've got. And i don't think they were in any order of importance c. Sixty nasd glutathione co q. Ten and s k q. And i would. I would definitely agree that like if somewhere to stack those five together. You'd really be kind of staying a step ahead in all anti-aging game so supplement. I hear what you're saying. I you know again like some companies will take that and just like ferry supplement with with barely any of the actual amount necessary. That's some companies will do those like. Oh these five good for your into like one tenth of what they actually use the study. Make a supplement on their say. It's a proprietary blend. So many make sure that you actually look into the studies and dose accordingly in a in. Boundless in the chapter on anti-aging actually have all the doses for all those listed I don't know memorize but you'd be surprised at how many supplements don't actually have the efficacious amount in them Yeah and the last thing. I wanted to mention. Speaking of efficacious amounts Member how. I how. I did that post. That just took off account went viral. I talked about this pre-workout blend using it. Just it's it's like amazing. You and i just i research all things that could technically ally you just like crush a work out without having of calories prior to the workout. So what i tweeted. Was you basically do five grams of creating fifty to one hundred milligrams of caffeine which is the equivalent of small cup of coffee. Although he can just copying tabs preferably time released caffeine tabs from amazon to time release fifty to one hundred milligram. caffeine tabs. One serving of ketone esters relic kitone eight or hvac oxford or any of these companies..

monaco andrea Dr david sinclair aseel leipus Conrad ubiquonol tumors nasd nfc Harvard maddock andrea andrea amazon oxford
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Skin aerobic capacity. It supports normal enzymatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advantage. Dr. Preston You know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you very trust super formula from purity products. You combined the CO Q 10 with resveratrol. Now there was very 12 key molecule found in red wine, which they're studying at Harvard. And I know that it activates genes for those who just tuned it. Talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically want Did it in this formula. Well, let me tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair. This is what they found Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive. And what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that it extended lifespan. And it appears that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity you live longer. It increases the activity of what we call a longevity genes. They get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called sirtuins. Now they found two things at Harvard number One caloric restriction increases the longevity genes. These cartoons Well, so does resveratrol, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans, as it does in these animals, and I'm optimistic it will. It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially using nutritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging in our longevity. Wow, that's impressive. You say that took you. 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. Call this evidence based nutrition Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why co Q 10 research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957 University of Wisconsin, the Nobel Prize, repeated Mitchell in 1978, the University of.

1978 Preston Mitchell University of Wisconsin David Sinclair 12 key molecule Nobel Prize 1957 Dr. two things Harvard Coke University of Dr CO Q 10 One caloric Q 10
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Aerobic capacity. It supports normal and dramatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advantage. You know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from purity products. You combined the coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol the key molecule found in red wine for those who've just tuned in talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, let me tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair. This is what they found. Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity you live longer. It increases the activity of what we call a longevity gene they get Which don they help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called cartoons. Now they found two things that Harvard number one caloric restriction increases these longevity genes. These, sir, to its well, so does resveratrol. At least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans, as it does in these animals, and I'm optimistic it will It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we'd potentially use the nutritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging and our longevity well known that the person you say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain Why Coke? You 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957, the University of Wisconsin, the Nobel Prize, repeated Mitchell in 1978. The University of Texas Medical School. Prue do university in Indiana University of Granada and Spain. Talking about Coke, you 10. Being a powerful antioxidants is major studies major universities right here in the United States and abroad. The bottom line in these studies. Energetic might Oh contra without coke, you 10. You don't have energy. Come by that with resveratrol. I'm telling you pretty darn amazing. The doctor President Purity products occasionally does these free bottle giveaways, But this one sounds really special. Why is today so important? Well, I mean, you really getting opportunity. You've got a chance to see for yourself What I'm talking about. I mean, you hear me say some pretty amazing things. And you say, Well, that's pretty interesting..

1978 United States 1957 today David Sinclair University of Texas Medical Sc Mitchell University of Wisconsin Spain Nobel Prize Harvard 10 two things Indiana University of Granada Prue Coke President Purity one 10 Research
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"807 136333. Now, once again we're talking with Dr Alan Pressman. After president just about everyone would like to enhance their energy levels, fight fatigue and feel stronger. How can purity is Coke? You 10 Plus resveratrol blends do that. I know they called the Coke, you daily super boost formula. But how does it work? Well, it's very interesting. It combined some really amazing nutrient. Specifically, coenzyme Q. 10 and resveratrol and a number of other nutrients will talk about later that support your health and energy, and that's the bottom line. You're looking at what we call the advantage of combining the very nutrient that creates your body's energy Co. Q. 10 with the benefits of resveratrol, the energy, the stamina that comes with it, and it's an unbeatable combination that gives you this advantage. This cardiovascular system benefits benefits to your brain, cognitive performance, your skin aerobic capacity. It supports normal and dramatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advantage is impressed with, you know, I love The fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from purity products you combined the Coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol, the key molecule found in red wine, which they're studying at Harvard and another did activates genes for those who've just tuned in to talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, I tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair, this is what they found. Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity you live longer. It increases the activity of what we call on longevity Gene they get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this G Helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called sir tunes. Now they found two things that Harvard number one caloric restriction increases these longevity genes. These, sir to its well, so does resveratrol, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans as it does, and these animals and I'm optimistic it will It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially use the nutritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging and our longevity. Wow. Now, Dr Pressman, you say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. You call this evidence based nutrition Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why Coke you 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957, the University of Wisconsin. The Nobel Prize for Peter Mitchell in 1978, the University of Texas Medical School Produce University in Indiana..

Dr Alan Pressman Harvard Dr David Sinclair president Nobel Prize University of Wisconsin University of Texas Medical Sc Indiana Peter Mitchell
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"807 136333. Dr Pressman. Just about everyone would like to enhance their energy levels, fight fatigue and feel stronger. How can purity is Coke? You 10 Plus resveratrol blends do that. I know they called the Coke, you daily super boost formula. But how does it work? Well, it's very interesting. It combined some really amazing nutrient. Specifically, coenzyme Q. 10 and resveratrol and a number of other nutrients will talk about later that support your health and energy, and that's the bottom line. You're looking at what we call the advantage of combining the very nutrient that creates your body's energy Co. Q. 10 with the benefits of resveratrol, the energy, the stamina that comes with it, and it's an unbeatable combination that gives you this advantage. This cardiovascular system benefits benefits to your brain, cognitive performance, your skin aerobic capacity. It's important normal and dramatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advance. Age Don't impress. But you know I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from purity products. You combined the coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol the key molecule found in red wine for those who've just tuned in to talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, let me tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair. This is what they found Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your lungevity you live longer. It increases the activity of what we call a longevity. I mean, they get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called cartoons. Now they found two things that Harvard number one caloric restriction increases these longevity genes. These cartoons. Well, So does Reservoir a troll, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans, as it does in these animals, and I'm optimistic it will. It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially using attritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health. Are aging and our longevity. Wow. Now that's interesting. You say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why Coke you 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957, the University of Wisconsin The Nobel Prize for Peter Mitchell in 1978, the University of Texas Medical School. Prue do University in Indiana University of Granada and Spain. Talking about Coke, you 10. Being a powerful antioxidants is major studies major universities right here in the United States and abroad. The bottom line in these studies. Energetic might Oh contra without coke, you 10. You don't have energy. Come by that with resveratrol. I'm telling you pretty darn amazing. Doctor. President. Purity products occasionally does these free bottle giveaways, But this one sounds really special. Why is today so important? Well, I mean, you really get an opportunity. You get a chance to see for yourself What I'm talking about. I mean, you hear me say some pretty amazing things. And you say, Well, that's pretty interesting..

Coke Harvard Dr Pressman Dr David Sinclair President Nobel Prize University of Wisconsin United States Prue do University Spain University of Texas Medical Sc Peter Mitchell Indiana University of Granada
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"So how can purity is coke? You 10 Plus resveratrol blends do that. I know they called the Coke, you daily super boost formula. But how does it work? Well, it's very interesting. It combined some really amazing nutrient specifically coenzyme Q 10 and resveratrol. And a number of other nutrients will talk about later that support your health and energy, and that's the bottom line. You're looking at what we call the advantage of combining the very nutrient that creates your body's energy Co. Q. 10 with the benefits of resveratrol, the energy, the stamina that comes with it, and it's an unbeatable combination that gives you this advantage. This cardiovascular system benefit. Benefits to your brain, cognitive performance, your skin aerobic capacity. It supports normal and dramatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination. And that's why we call it the advantage. That's impressive. You know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from Purity products, You combine the Coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol, the key molecule found in red wine, which they're studying at Harvard and another did activates genes. For those who've just tuned in. Talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. While I tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair, this is what they found. Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity you live longer. It increases the activity of what we call a longevity gene. They get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called sir tunes. Now they found two things that Harvard number one caloric restriction increases these longevity genes. These, sir to ins. Well, So does Reservoir a troll, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans as it does, and these animals and I'm optimistic it will It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially use the nutritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging and our longevity. Wow, Now that compress when you say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry, because it's been so well documented, so well researched, you call this evidence based nutrition. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why Coke you 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957, the University of Wisconsin. The Nobel Prize for Peter Mitchell in 1978, the University of Texas Medical School Produce University in Indiana. Stockholm University in Sweden. The great study recently at the University of an Cockney in Italy on mitochondrial Energy and Coke, you 10 University of Granada in Spain. Talking about Coke, you 10 being a powerful antioxidants articles published constantly throughout the world. The archives of Biochemistry and bio synthesis, the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Major studies major universities right here in the United States and abroad. The bottom line in these studies. Energetic might Oh contra without coke, you 10. You don't have energy. Come by that with resveratrol. I'm telling you pretty darn amazing..

Coke Harvard Stockholm University University of Wisconsin Dr David Sinclair University of Texas Medical Sc Nobel Prize University of Granada archives of Biochemistry National Academy of Sciences United States Indiana Sweden Spain Peter Mitchell Italy
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Skin aerobic capacity. It's important, normal and somatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination. And that's why we call it the advantage that impressed with, you know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from Purity products, he combined the Coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol, the key molecule found in red wine. For those who've just tune in, talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, I tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair, this is what they found. Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your lungevity you live longer. It increases the activity. Of what we call a longevity gene. They get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called sir tunes. Now they found two things that Harvard number one caloric restriction increases these longevity genes. These, sir to its Well, so does resveratrol, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans as it does, and these animals and I'm optimistic it will. It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially using attritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging and our Longevity. Wow, no deck impressed when you say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why Coke you 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957, the University of Wisconsin. The Nobel Prize for Peter Mitchell in 1978, the University of Texas Medical School proved ooh University in Indiana University of Granada and Spain. Talking about Coke, you 10. Being a powerful antioxidants is major studies major universities right here in the United States and abroad a bottom line in these studies. Energetic might Oh contra without coke, you 10. You don't have energy. Come by that with resveratrol. I'm telling you pretty darn amazing. No doctor present Purity products occasionally does these free bottle giveaways, But this one sounds really special. Why is today so important? Well, I mean, you really get in opportunity. You've got a chance to see for yourself. What I'm talking about. I mean, you hear me say some pretty amazing things. And you say, Well, that's pretty interesting..

Coke Harvard Purity products University of Wisconsin Dr David Sinclair Nobel Prize Indiana University of Granada United States University of Texas Medical Sc Spain Peter Mitchell
"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"dr david sinclair" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"807 136333, Dr Pressman. Just about everyone would like to enhance their energy levels, fight fatigue and feel stronger. How can purity is Coke? You 10 Plus resveratrol blends do that. I know they call it the Coke, you daily super boost formula. But how does it work? Well, it's very interesting. It combined some really amazing nutrient. Specifically, coenzyme Q. 10 and resveratrol and a number of other nutrients will talk about later that support your health and energy, and that's the bottom line. You're looking at what we call the advantage of combining the very nutrient that creates your body's energy Co. Q. 10 with the benefits of resveratrol, the energy, the stamina that comes with it, and it's an unbeatable combination that gives you this advantage. This cardiovascular system benefits benefits to your brain, cognitive performance, your skin aerobic capacity. It's important normal and dramatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advantage. You know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from purity products. You combined the coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol the key molecule found in red wine for those who've just tuned it. Talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, let me tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair. This is what they found. Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity you live longer. It increases the activity of what we call on longevity Gene they get Which don they help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increase tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called cartoons. Now they found two things that Harvard number one caloric restriction increases these longevity genes the user to its well, so does resveratrol. At least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol has been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans as it does, and these animals and I'm optimistic it will It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially use the nutritional compound like resveratrol to selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging and our longevity. No Dr Preston You say that co Q 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented and so well researched. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why Coke you 10 Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957, the University of Wisconsin. The Nobel Prize, repeated Mitchell in 1978, the University of Texas Medical School. Prue do university in Indiana University of Granada and Spain. Talking about Coke, you 10. Being a powerful antioxidants is major studies major universities right here in the United States and abroad. Duck bottom line in these studies. Energetic might Oh, contra without coach you, 10. You don't have energy. Come by that with resveratrol. I'm telling you pretty darn amazing. The doctor President Purity products occasionally does these free bottle giveaways, But this one sounds really special. Why is today so important? Well, I mean, you really got an opportunity. You got a chance to see for yourself What I'm talking about. I mean, you hear me say some pretty amazing things. And you say, Well, that's pretty interesting. But until you know until you try this for yourself by taking too soft shells a day of this coke, you super boost formula. You're not gonna really appreciate what I'm talking about..

Coke Harvard Dr Pressman doctor President Purity Dr David Sinclair Nobel Prize University of Wisconsin Dr Preston United States Indiana University of Granada Prue Spain University of Texas Medical Sc Mitchell