35 Burst results for "Dr David"

In 1st, US surgeons transplant pig heart into human patient

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

In 1st, US surgeons transplant pig heart into human patient

"Doctors doctors transplanted transplanted a a pig's pig's heart heart into into a a human human patient patient in in a a medical medical first first fifty fifty seven seven year year old old David David Bennett Bennett was was dying dying too too sick sick to to be be eligible eligible to to receive receive a a human human heart heart transplant transplant in in a a last last ditch ditch effort effort doctors doctors at at the the university university of of Maryland Maryland school school of of medicine medicine in in Baltimore Baltimore gave gave Bennett Bennett a a heart heart from from a a genetically genetically modified modified pig pig prior prior attempts attempts at at such such transplants transplants have have failed failed but but in in this this case case the the pics pics genes genes have have been been spliced spliced remove remove sugar sugar in in itself itself is is responsible responsible for for the the normally normally quick quick rejection rejection by by the the human human body body doctors doctors say say the the patient patient is is doing doing well well three three days days after after the the seven seven hour hour surgery surgery while while it's it's too too soon soon to to know know if if the the operation operation will will really really work work Dr Dr David David Klassen Klassen with with the the United United network network for for organ organ sharing sharing said said the the Maryland Maryland transplant transplant can can be be characterized characterized as as a a watershed watershed event event a a tentative tentative step step forward forward in in a a decades decades long long quest quest to to one one day day use use human human organs organs for for lifesaving lifesaving transplants transplants I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king

David David Bennett Bennett University University Of Of Ma Bennett Bennett Heart Heart Baltimore Dr Dr David David Klassen Klas United United Maryland Jennifer Jennifer King King
As immunity wanes, New Mexico pushes vaccines and boosters

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

As immunity wanes, New Mexico pushes vaccines and boosters

"New Mexico's top health official says it appears the state is seeing decreasing immunity from covert nineteen vaccinations with the infection rate remaining high in New Mexico more than seventy two percent of adults are fully vaccinated and there are indoor mask mandates but cases are not trending downward there were nearly a thousand new infections reported in a day fifteen people died Arizona health and Human Services secretary Dr David scrapes suspects waiting them unity as part of the problem more than twenty five percent of the new coded cases this month our among vaccinated residents the highly contagious delta variant is another factor doctors grace says he was feeling sort of bullet proof when he first got the vaccine but he doesn't feel that way any longer he's practicing more caution and encouraging booster shots I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr David New Mexico Health And Human Services Arizona Grace Jackie Quinn
Dr. David Azerrad Explains How Race Became a Central Piety

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 3 months ago

Dr. David Azerrad Explains How Race Became a Central Piety

"So how did race become the central piety? And talk about how the Civil Rights Act was in some ways this just kind of obliteration. Of the American way of life. Well, first of all, let me tell you, you gotta meet Caldwell. I mean, he's even better in person. He's just such a well read person well traveled. He knows so many things he's pleasant to talk to. I mean, I think the world of him. So he's even better in person than he is in print. You know, look, I used to be like you. I used to think that basically there was civil rights 1.0. Yes. You know, the I have a dream speech, we shouldn't discriminate. And then there are civil rights two racial preferences, affirmative action, disparate impact, quotas, timetables. That's bad. And that we should defend the civil rights 1.0 and oppose the two. The more I read, the more it seems to me that that you can't hold up that distinction that two was almost baked into 1.0 that 1.0 almost immediately. I mean, in a sense, let me do this way. 2.0 proceeds one. We started having racial preferences at elite universities in America in the 1950s. The EOC from the moment they had to enforce the 64 civil right act started using disparate impact analysis, which basically says that a nondiscriminatory standard of employment does is problematic if it produces unequal group outcomes. So as a matter of history, it's very hard to distinguish the tube. Now someone could say, and I wrote a review of Chris's book, and I said, Chris shows that we immediately went to civil rights two. Oh, but he doesn't show that we can not today have one. And so this would be my challenge to your audience and to all well intentioned Americans would say look, I don't like racial preferences. I don't like quotas. I just want the MLK line. I think we should judge people based on the content of their character, the CV, their test scores, their accomplishment, not the color of their

Caldwell Chris America
The One Unforgivable Sin in America? To Deviate From the Accepted Script

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 3 months ago

The One Unforgivable Sin in America? To Deviate From the Accepted Script

"Say, let's be honest. No one gets canceled for abandoning their children. Betraying their country, or committing any number of indecent immoral or criminal acts. No, today in America, there really is only one unforgivable sin and that is to deviate from the accepted script when speaking of protected protected identity groups. It is to say something whether intentionally or not that either offense protected identity groups or that the elites find offensive on their behalf, and before that paragraph, you wrote something that just like clicked and it's so true because we did a whole we did a whole segment with your colleague, doctor Khalil Habib on Nietzsche, and I kept trying to find where it is, but you could just share with the audience, Nietzsche said that every society has something you don't make fun of. A piety that you don't, can you explain that please? Yeah, at the heart of every society is something at which it is your categorically forbidden to laugh. And so if you think about it, you know, humor, comedians at their best are subversive. Because look, I see humor comes in one of two varieties. Either it's kind of slapstick absurd you fall on a banana. Or you make fun of things you're not supposed to make fun of. So look at the recent brouhaha with Dave Chappelle. You know, he is touching one of the pies that the claims of the transgender are sacred and holy. You know, even in his first show, you may be too young. I don't know if you remember that Dave Chappelle show when it was on. I do. He did, there was one skit. I won't say what it was, but it was incredibly politically incorrect. But it was hilarious. He was quite subversive. I mean, he made fun of black people, not in a malicious way he's black. But we're not allowed to laugh today. You know, you know, how many women does it take to change a lot to screw in a lightbulb? That's not funny. That's kind of the view, and then you could say the same thing for days for black people, you name it. So the central piety in America is pertains to the protected aged identity groups. We're not allowed to laugh, we're not allowed to contradict them, the claims made on their

Khalil Habib Heart Of Every Society Dave Chappelle Nietzsche America
Dr. David Azerrad Defines Identity Politics AKA Oppression Politics

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:12 min | 3 months ago

Dr. David Azerrad Defines Identity Politics AKA Oppression Politics

"David, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks for having me, Charlie, good to be with you. So there's a lot I want to unpack, but let's start with this idea of identity politics, which you correctly and very wisely frame more as oppression politics or kind of the elevation of certain groups that are deemed to be oppressed. Let's put it that way. Why do you put it that way? I thought that was really smart. Because identity politics is misleading because it would imply that everyone is entitled to have an identity of which they're proud and that they want a defense. So you would think, oh, we used to have class based politics. And now we're going to have identity politics. But it turns out that in the realm of identity, Baltics, not all identities are created equal. They basically come in two varieties. It's a mannequin framework. You have the people who claim to have been and to be oppressed, you know the roster, right? So called people of color with blacks always first and foremost hence the shift to bipoc, black and indigenous people of color to emphasize that black is the most depressed ahead of the so called white adjacent Asians. You know, they're having problems with the Asians because they do too well in America. Then, of course, LGBTQ, women, sometimes immigrants, Muslims, but the holy Trinity is really the first three. And then you have the bad identities, you know? I don't know if this is used to you, Charlie, but you seem to fit the bill of people who are a problem in America. Oh, I am. I mean, I don't know if you identify. Yes, I do identify as a male. I will not pronounce or whatever the traditional western heteronormative patriarchy would say they are, but I'm the worst. I'm also a wasp. So. Yeah, that's not good. And then you could do something about your sex and transition, but your race you're not allowed to change. That's right. You're part of the curse, the white race. So, you know, even oppression. I mean, I don't look, I don't exactly know what to call what to call the current dispensation in America. Identity politics isn't good, CRT is too abstract. What the hell is critical race theory? It's basically

Charlie Kirk Charlie Baltics David America
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Calling you two. Black traffic join, go your cares, and visit block traffic dot org. What would a better anxiety to me is a very complicated landscape and I agree with you. It needs much better more accurate nomenclature associated with it. But I wonder if you're really talking about dysregulation. Actually affect this regulation. And might that be a more better and more accurate global term for this, what you're talking about. I know the absolutely that's a great term because I mean, again, when people are getting excited, they still tend to think anxiety is a psychological construct, correct. Because survival mechanisms you know, it's been with so many people with anxiety and it so clear to me that it's many, many, many different things. It's experiencing lots of different ways by lots of different people. And probably has multiple components to it. But the thing that's driving something I would call anxiety is the dysregulation. The affect is dangerous affect is too prolonged affect is too intense, affect is unable to be managed, and then anxiety ensues. Right. Well, they consider the neural neural science of the brain because what happens as you know, chronic pain is a neurological disorder. We know between 6 to 12 months that these Patrick is memorized, we all know about phantom limb pain. And I call it phantom brain pain. These obsessive thought pattern to keep spinning away. You're going to love the stuff on the insulin cortex. It's all happening there. It's all going on there. Right. So here's my thing. So going back to my original thing about being a spine surgeon, so I'm excited to talk to you because as I talk to somebody who that always stands when I'm saber calling understands it better. But I understand it. I don't understand it better. I understand from my perspective. Experience. Yeah, yeah. Well, but I mean, the problem is this is what this is what medicine has to figure out quickly because we're really harmless society, but not addressing this constantly. Listen, listen, a score didn't come on until the late 1990s. I've been screaming about that for 30 years before that. I was like, what do you mean childhood experiences have nothing to do with what we're seeing here? And we went through some horrible stuff in the 60 70s and 80s with what was happening to kids. So we're talking about a pandemic. We've got a pandemic of adverse childhood experiences now. So the thing is this dynamic healing movement is try to create safety versus threat. And I don't know, it probably will not change in my lifetime, but you can't have doctors not talking to their patients. It makes no sense. If you can't feel safe with your doctor, who can you feel safe with, is really going to the direction he had not only do people not feel safer the docker, they actually feel threatened. Yeah. And so the dollar places in life that you can go to feel really safe. And the doctor's office used to be one of those places, and that just isn't true anymore. You know, I used to trauma creates distrust dysregulation and inability to go back into the frame of closeness because they expect trauma there. And they're unregulated stuff. And so I used to conceive of my one of my primary functions in dealing addicts and alcoholics who, if they were bad enough addict or alcoholic that they needed to see me, there was a 100% probability of severe adverse childhood experiences. I always saw one of my job is just to get them to understand that they could be safe in the frame with the caretaker. That's it. Right. Just sit here with me and be okay. And that I can experience them on a deep level, which is sort of a next level to all this, which is really be listening with your whole body, not just with your ears and to reflect back to the patient so you can literally metabolize and digest some of what's going on with them. Bigger topics. Yeah, I love what you're saying. I mean, I'm excited about what you're saying because surely that's my energy. It's just trying to get these concepts out into the world. And I'm still trying to stop bad spines. I'm with you, and I'm running out of time, but I almost wanted to go through spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, this disease. So people even understand those terms. I mean, essentially it's slippage of the spine, disks that rupture and curvatures and things. All normal. All our normal part of being an upright human being upright primate. And we pathologize it massively because people have pain in those areas, but the pain is probably generated from something different than the spine. Well, but again, the better term as you know with the scoliosis or disc generation or whatever is disciplined normally aging spine rise, right. And so the word disease, of course, doesn't elicit comfort by any means. So yeah, so the book do your own sponsor, you break the decision making down and do the anatomy and the state of the nervous system gives you four quadrants is easily able to put yourself in poor quadrants. There's a chapter on how to self assess the state of your nervous system, and it's not just a psychological test. There's recent trauma in your family, are you sleeping, et cetera? All.

neurological disorder Patrick spinal stenosis
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:33 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Because you're not smoking anymore. Go to breathe, fume, BRE, a THE fu M, again that is BRE a THE. If you dot com slash drew, use the code drew to save 10% on your order today. Again, one fume plus four pack of core studied to curb cravings and get you on the path to recovery from nicotine and smoke, nothing can be more important for your health. I'll tell you one more time. Breathe, fume, beer, THE, FU M slash drew. This podcast is sponsored by better help. And I think you know I've talked about this before, I've referred patients. I refer family, I've been very pleased with the professionals and the services they provide. You can start communicating another 48 hours. It is not self help, professional therapy done securely. Broad ranges of expertise, service available for clients worldwide. You can log into your account anytime, said the message to your therapist and you will get timely thoughtful responses. Plus, you can schedule weekly, video or phone Sessions. There's none of that uncomfortable passing people in the waiting room or even if you're uncomfortable and face to face and the doctor's office better help can connect you via electronic media, a better help is committed to facilitating great therapeutic matches. And it's more affordable than traditional offline therapy, financially, it is also available. Better help wants you to start living happier today, visit the website, better help dot com slash drew that is better help HELP and join the over 2 million people who have taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. In fact, so many people have been using better help. They are recruiting additional therapists in all 50 states. Again, our special offer for the Dr. Drew podcast listeners is to get 10% off your first month at better help dot com slash drew. And of course, you've heard me talk about the AMC and emergency medical flight, even with comprehensive coverage, you can get hit with copays and deductibles, protect your family, protect your finances with an air med care network membership. As a member of a MCN, if an emergency arises, the expense of air medical transportation is covered when flown by an AMC and provider completely. Membership costs as little as $85 a year, covers your entire household every day, even when you are away from home that's pennies a day. We all know things can happen, of course, and AMC and membership is protection like no family should be without. For a limited time as a Dr. Drew podcast listeners, you will get up to a $50 E gift card when you join, simply visit air med care network dot com slash drew and use the offer code drew..

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:31 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Of course, of course, you say, so it's exciting to me like what you've also seen is that if you there's so trauma work, of course, interviews at the nervous system approach to calm it down. Do you know there's a doctor navio on a San Diego that's actually taken 13 chronic diseases, both mental and physical and broken it down to mitochondrial dysfunction. And so what's happening is that it turns out that chronic mental disease and chronic physic disease are have the same problem. In other words, it's inflammatory. And so anxiety depression OCD bipolar Parkinson's Alzheimer's cardiac disease professor disease hypertension and obesity are all chronic inflammatory disorders. It's interesting. I used to push off that inflammatory diathesis or notion. And now I've embraced it wholeheartedly. However, however, I'm going to say that when we don't we know what we're talking about, we don't fully understand it yet. And when we do, it's going to be a lot of really interesting mechanisms. And I think a lot of it is going to be in the endothelium. And the endothelium is interaction with the immune system and the lipid system. Right. And there is a lot of ink being spilled now on the sigma one system in the brain, which is an anti inflammation inflammatory system. And Rowan behold medicines like fluvoxamine and prozac one of their main mechanisms is who knew sigma one activation, you know, right? And so that may be part or a big part of their antidepressant properties, who knows. But I think it's going to be a pretty complicated multi layered kind of thing once we fully come down and mitochondrial function and it's going to be a lot of things involved once we fully understand it. Right. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, as you know, Steven portis, what I'm embarrassed about now is that he's one of the taught me or reminded me about cytokines and the immune system and that's part of the threat response. And one of my rheumatology friends told me 30 years ago, this is all inflammatory. I go, what are you talking about? I mean, I really totally blew this off to about two years ago. And inflammatory. But my other friend who's sort of a genius and you would love to have him on your show, doctor David clawson. He's a viz. And he steep heart is suit harder. And a few other people in this roundtable that we have a couple of times a month. Our geniuses. And DR has an echo taken in cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, from high school and college and put it into clinical practice. And the stuff you've come up with to integrate this is unbelievable. So he's between harder, we just have a very integrated approach about how this chronic disease works now. And the essence of the problem is sustained exposure to threat. And the essence of the solution is learned how to create safety. And those are just their techniques. And it's not mine over matter because you had conscious brain is hardwired and very strong compared to the conscious brain. But there's ways of stimulating the vagus nerve to do it decrease inflammation. Oxytocin was social bonding. We have found that the social bond and community is a major factor in decreasing chronic pain, lack of a collagen pain. And in Sue Carter, Steve Harvey says why if this taught us that oxytocin is powerfully anti inflammatory, which I had no idea. You know, I'm listing the candidate systems for this inflammation. I've never really thought about this as clearly as I'm thinking about it right now. I just list it as you were talking. The candidate systems that we believe, I think you would believe, too, are involved in this inflammatory response. Let me just list them. Cytokines, cytokine activation, sigma one, endothelial function, lipid metabolism, immune function, which is a giant category. Mitochondrial function. NAD metabolism. Autonomic function, oxytocin, cortisol, other hormones, O2 delivery. I mean, it just goes it's a huge landscape, but that's just me off the top of my head, right? Right. Well, let me tell you one other thing also that doctor Claus and I know I'm trying to oversell this guy, but I mean he just talked to us. I'll talk to him. I'll talk to him. Fascinating. He's pointing out already. Oh, it's already emailed out. Emails out. The request is out. What's happening is what DR saw. He doesn't quit thinking out of the box. He just keeps stopping and thinking about things. But what he's also pointed out that with this generation and osteoarthritis et cetera his point is cortisol is a stress response chemical, but is basically providing fuel for fight or flight. So it can be both anti inflammation and inflammatory. But if you're in a sustained threat, your cortisol is robbing cell of fuel included glycoproteins intended to ligaments. It's robbing fuel from the brain, the neurons in the brain and the glial cells. And so it turns out that a huge part of this issue that we got enamored with the inflammatory conversation for about 9 months. The air brought up the metabolism and it like you just pointed out metabolism, elevated metabolism, a long period of time that fuel has to come from somewhere and going back to early conversation. You can't heal if you're in fight or flight because you're actually catalyzed or robbing your tissues of fuel. You're not regenerating. You can't do it. Right. That's right. I think you're right. I think you're absolutely right about the multiple factors that play into this. But here's the thing that I'll just sound a little ridiculous here in a way, but I'm your solution's actually sort of simple and what we found out is that there are techniques. You can't do it mind over matter. There are techniques to regulate your body's physiology. We have control that you feel safe. So the bottom line is you teach people tools to feel safe versus ongoing threat. You can increase your resilience of the nervous system. I mentioned doctor navio San Diego the amount of chondria. And again, another incredibly fascinating human being is that he's a physician. He's also an internist. Bri he spent his entire life looking at the mitochondria. And I don't know how they figured this stuff out in the mitochondrial level which are pretty small organelles. But he's pointless is that when it comes to regeneration, he puts a picture up of a house that's just burned down, and he points out you can't rebuild that house.

chronic mental disease chronic physic disease OCD bipolar Parkinson's Alzhei chronic inflammatory disorders inflammation inflammatory Steven portis David clawson Sue Carter Rowan obesity San Diego depression Steve Harvey Claus navio San Diego
 Los Angeles OKs one of strictest US vaccination mandates

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Los Angeles OKs one of strictest US vaccination mandates

"New York is working through challenges to various vaccination mandates with some employees choosing the door rather than get their shot a U. S. district judge has rejected a court challenge to New York city's vaccination mandate for school staff the judge cited the harm that could take place to school children the lawsuit was one of several challenges to vaccination mandates in the state which included one statewide for hospital and nursing home workers Northwell health is New York state's largest health care provider since they terminated fourteen hundred employees for refusing to be vaccinated they're given everybody ample opportunity Dr David that Nelly as their chief medical officer I will continue to give people opportunity get vaccinated then and

New York New York City Dr David Nelly
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Right if we denied we have a choice. If we deny that we have power with our words and the words that we use being one of the most fundamental choices than anything we do in any given moment that we're denying our own free will and denying ability to achieve joy and filming in our lives and therefore the lives of everyone else around us naked creates resistance to create suffering and suffering is so familiar that we basically gravitated to right and so it's about understanding which is right there in front of us the power of our words in our choices and saying i want that power. I want that responsibility. I want to know that. I can change my life with my decisions and my thought process in my choices and bad could not be more. I guess you know. Healing and empowering ben. Any what is more powerful than ben knowing that shouli knowing in your heart and seeing the outcomes as he practices right as in practice gratitude feeling more gracious because you get gratitude back when you put it out and then you feel like you're able to live more of grace that's smooth less resistance less suffering because you have spent so much effort being gracious i ate and everything just seems to flow from there beautiful i so there's a franciscan friars like a father tomase. My spiritual father and his name is richard. Roy and i sent him an apollo. I mean i've bought so many. I think i've broken even just getting. I just keep getting gifting them because as we're talking who doesn't want this but i was like i want to see what happens if richard rohr has an apollo and just to echo what you just said when i hang out with him. The way that he talks to people is first of all. It's imitable me and it's gorgeous. So what he would say to. You is just like look at you caring about others and imagining what it might be like to be stressed and helping alleviate that stress but he doesn't everybody we're at a hotel and he was like every time i stay here. You're always here in the lobby. Helping people feel welcome always with that smile on your face. And he's an old man it he gets away with it more than. Maybe if i did it. 'cause that's like a trope that we're comfortable with the kind old man but i've done that for my nanny. I'll just go lucky. You caring for our baby. As if she is your own driving her putting her in a car seat feeding her. Thank you so much. What a huge heart. You must have just saying like md. You might say it just saying a big truth. It melts people's hearts. I'm just trying to echo. You said like we have so much for agency not just to control our own lives but to literally bless other people's lives and it doesn't take any effort or barely any effort. What did that make you think of. I saw you going all over. I actually on your own for the last one seconds hilarious trying to get it to restart and what's going on. Just cut out all you need to know. Is i agree with what you just said. And not only. Can we impact ourselves but we can impact one another. And i think that's what we've done with this conversation and man. I'm excited to know you dr. Dave thank you for taking the time likewise my pleasure. Thanks much and thanks for making this. What i'll say at the beginning but it's apollo neuro dot com slash weird is For ten percent off. And i've been sending everybody there because people ask what it is and i can't wait to tell them so happy for everything you're doing and i hope we get to meet in real life one day likewise. Wait thanks man. Would you say we have the guests sign off It's just a way to be. I guess inclusive would you say the catchphrase which is keep it crispy. And that's how we'll say goodbye keeping crispy thanks crispy..

shouli richard rohr ben Roy richard Dave
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

09:37 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Becomes much more interesting choice. Unless we stop at the divergence where the where the where the road diverges in yellow. Would right leslie. Actions stop at that point and ask question the opportunity to even take a different path doesn't seem to spray it doesn't it doesn't necessarily be become as noticeable in as is what the hell is. Water said the fish. You're not even aware that you're making a choice. And that is speaking of reminds me from the jesus. Tradition of wide is the path that leads to destruction. A narrow is the path that leads to life. I know a lot of people have misappropriated. I would say that into a teaching about the afterlife heaven and hell only a few people get to go to the the golden city where all the right people give each other eternal high. Fives that is such a prostitute ization of a really beautiful thing which is similar to what frosted saying which is like notice. There's a burn talker one of my favorite bands They have lyric in their song. I'll do better in the morning and it goes my brain always i- only do what i have done is one of the lyrics. I'll do better in the morning and it goes. My brain always breaks things into two. And i always pick the easy one that seems to be talking about easy. As the wide one that leads to destruction or you could say unconsciousness or just leads to doing what you've already done so when you think about a beautiful afternoon chances. Are you probably doing something you haven't done or thinking something you haven't thought and isn't that a small awakening like going like shit. I've been playing the same record every morning right. And and it's also stopping to remember that when we're seeking a beautiful afternoon for instance. It reminds us that or beautiful day or whatever it might be that were seeking. Aw right were seeking inspiration. That is packed. Inspiration the path to and inspiring moments to combine the zoo or really what we all want an what we all desire because aw is what inspires us to be not only present but to also recognize all the possibilities about what needs to be given everything that we possibly capable of that. We don't necessarily take the time to acknowledge notice on a daily basis and so failure to your previous point. Failure is not something we necessarily wanna just sign on the dotted line for every opportunity to fail. There is at least but we do want to make sure that we're not afraid of right. We wanna make sure we're approaching life in the way our lahar individual lives in a way that we know that failure like stress is inevitable. It's a part of gross. If we don't we learn some best lessons learner lives through failing or through making mistakes. The trick is to not ignore because of the shame and the guilt surrounding those mistakes or the loss that we have ingred over right. The trick is to not ignore those mistakes and the lessons. They teach us if you make a mistake at fail. Something at the very very least it is our responsibility to without shaded gills as much as possible. Look back and without judgment. Look back at that situation. Just be like oh okay. What did i do wrong here. What could i have done right. What could i change to make it. The least judgmental statement. What could i change next time. I do this to make sure that. I get the best possible outcome. That's closest to my goals and that is really what this is all about in the more that we go through that process which is a repetitive process. Ideally one that continues to evolve over time so they don't make the exact same mistakes over and over and over again that process results in getting that much closer to those awe inspiring moments. That really help us understand what we're really capable brighton. Y is really possible with this time. Where and think you into all which is you could almost grace. It's like it's something is given to you. That's bigger than you. That that you just you you appeared oxley disappear but are also very clear to yourself. I i think that's beautiful. Can you share. I bet some people are wondering what are some of these. I'm particularly interested in how to stop judging as much I'm a comedian. I make my living. Judging doesn't necessarily mean negatively judging. But i compare things and and this'll trip you out living with vow. I'm noticing how i'm sort of unconsciously or you know we're doing a consciously i guess because i'm talking about it but sort of modeling for her how to do it. Meaning i have this friend of yours I'm making these examples. But this is your joey from. That's like your dumb friend from friends. This is your phoebe. That's sort of the your ditsy friend like because that's what creative comedy people tend to do. We make archetypes. And then we just pay attention to the evidence that reinforces them So what are some of your practices that help us judge last or just some of your practices. That help you engage with your gratitude with your compassion. Some some practical steps. That people can take a great question and i think you know this is really where the and most fun. Actionable suss comes in ensue. At the risk of sounding repetitive repetition. Of course halloween one best right but the risk of sounding repetitive. I what we're talking about is that is being more press and doing everything we can to bring our cells into a more present human being kind of listening dominant state where were don't feel a responsibility to do anything. We don't feel a responsibility right shit immediately or right up received wrong situation which is in ecology or psychiatry. Often called at the writing reflects where somebody says like. They're feeling like shit you. Then you're like oh. I have an idea of how you could fix that right. That's usually not what they want. Anyone who's married knows that when your partner comes to you instead telling you how. How crappy does the that the last thing they typically want to here. Is you immediately. Try to figure out how to solve problems for. Yeah right your heart rate up. Shut the fucked up. It's not fix it. it's a feel it. Yes right and they wanna be heard right. That's what they actually want anyone who's struggling anyone suffering with us or another person they just want to be heard and they want the acknowledgement that they know that you're hearing them without waiting to seek and so and that is true presence right so the way that we do that is we. Help people recognize that our minds literally can be anywhere that could be passed. There could be in the president or they can be in future and typically for most of us in day to day productive work life. They are in the past the future. Our bodies are always press so there the both of these things are connected on. Our bodies are always in the here now so all the exercises that we do that. Are you know they have lots of names like vegas toning parasitic toning or anything. That are all meditation. Mindfulness yoga movement meditation exercise apollo soothing touch soothing. Music therapies blow tanks. The list goes on right in all of these techniques are simply put rounding the mind which could be anywhere back into the present by it. Rav rings ourselves back into our bodily awareness back into the present out of the past and future be reminders. That were safe enough to be present in that allows us to be in that sort of listening dominant presence that facilitates that non judgement. That you're talking about when we're not in the We're not thinking about the past and we can be president something then we're not judging based on past experience that's what judge realis- acknowledge it also to add that when re this is not salute gonna come automatic right. It's not going to be like. Oh i've just decided that this makes sense ought to do it. And i'm never gonna feel Never gonna judge again. It takes practice and when we start to feel that judgment coming in when we're in a presence state we've grounded ourselves done the breeding. We've done the cells touch we've gotten the hugs or turned the apollo line. Still feeling judgmental over yourself situation that creates the opportunity to draw wariness the judgment to not judge yourself for judging right and then to express gratitude for recognizing what you're doing and then to say. Thanks but no thanks. This isn't useful to me right now. And then you bring yourself again back into the president and the more that you do this more that we all do this. We literally are re-training those those old neural pathways as wide roads. Right around taking the path towards said earlier taking road that's been familiar and constantly traveled that we've been taught to follow and it's helping us recognize okay. Maybe there's certain times at this road is really useful but most of the time if actually taking away for me just being mean dealing president connected to myself on his around me.

golden city leslie oxley brighton Water vegas
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Or not. I was actually your what you were saying reminded me. I don't think he's looking at. Because i'm pretty sure it out please. It's not robert. Frost cone right to roads diverged. The yellow would. I took the road less traveled. Yeah right. it's that idea that that there are always multiple paths and if we wanna bring breakdown simplest path that robert frost the as robert frost does right. There are always two roads one of which is the familiar road and one of which is the unfamiliar road. Travels it's your thoughts are traveling on the road. It's your neurons traveling. It's you on the road exactly and if you choose to take the road that you've traveled over and over and over again whether it's serving you or not then you are creating your reality around that practice of just following along not and not a not really questioning. Use this road. That's my pats. Is this my whereas if you stop. Stop before and saying okay. There's two pads. This is the path that always taken and ask the question. Is this pack. Getting me to where i actually want to go. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't but if it's not been the road. Less traveled certainly becomes much more interesting choice. Unless we stop at the divergence where the where the where the road diverges in yellow. Would right leslie. Actions stop at that point and ask question the opportunity to even take a different path doesn't seem to spray it doesn't it doesn't necessarily be become as noticeable.

Frost cone robert frost robert leslie
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"That makes you feel like associate pathak murderer. It is playing with all the cards. And if you dare just to go in the shallow end of your unconscious and and be as frank with your self consciously as your unconscious is sending all the emotions and the thoughts knocking to your door. Real progress seems to be made. Would you agree with that. We have to have courage to get fierce and go. Who am i really. What's going on here. I don't like. I don't like baseball. Like i had one of those when twelve dad. I don't like baseball. I just like attention. I liked the uniform. You know these sorts of things without a doubt. And i think that it has a lot to do with With the idea of wanting to know right wanting to know particularly about the unknown and rather than embracing this idea of what we saw many of us were taught which is that. I must know why. Right i must understand everything about myself and how i fit into society or this particular instance of of human culture that i grew up in. Perhaps there's something more right. It's the idea that perhaps there's something more. Perhaps there's more to me than i'm not aware of that. I by embracing what i don't know as equal to what i know in terms of importance allows me to embrace self-discovery without judgment right. It's getting back to that full circle of of were taught to judge so we will and the other part of it is that we're creatures of habit as well right so the more we do anything the more familiar it seems and that thing could be destructive and harmful to us like an addiction and we still find comfort in it because it's familiar Migdal on the center of our brains the core part of our fear response which also was involved in managing appetite. Hunger and food drives as well as sexual drives is basically detecting At its most fundamental core. Is this familiar or is this. Unfamiliar familiar at times of stress is what we cling to because anything that's unfamiliar as you might imagine at a time of stress or where our body perceives us to be under a potential survival threat even though we may actually be very safe but were to over stimulated to overwhelm Responsibilities too many infanta leising comments from our parents. Thank you write any number of names or too much news right. Any number of these things can start to trick our bodies into thinking that we're actually in survival threat. When we're not and so. In survival states or any state of chronic chronic stress our bodies automatically cling to the familiar and reject automatically unfamiliar and they reject the unknown and anything that has to do with uncertainty because we deemed that as being potentially threatening. It's unknown threatening so you so by using techniques like we talked about earlier. The debriefing the self touch the meditation. Mindfulness practices that. We just talked about things like apollo that deliver soothing touch to the skin they actually quiet the amid right they remind that part of the amid july that is blasting off being like unfamiliar unfamiliar uncertainty danger right. They remind that part that actually. If you have the time to pay attention to something familiar feeling of someone loved one. Giving you a hog or all of your hand or the feeling of apollo gently vibrating on you or the feeling of deep breath coming into your lungs than you can't possibly be running a lion in his moment. And all of a sudden and within a few thought cycles of which are predominantly subconscious the entire stress response de escalates and then we triggered the recovery spots turn on and that diverts resources back to things that we consider to be important which are being able to control our attention regulate our emotions divert to still take reproduction. Nudity creativity it all the other stuff that digestion right good quality sleep and wrestling recovery..

pathak baseball frank wrestling
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

06:20 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"There's a lot of ways the upon abused you using rebuilding recover after any intense physical mental or emotional or even to some extent spiritual strasse wherever the stress is coming from Rebuilding recover we found in studies as well as in the real world Rapidly bring the body back into balance and it is kinda like what you said right is almost like swatting for adults. Because we'd like to. We like or like an adult slough right. It's like we'd like to think of ourselves as as far different and far more advanced in grown up and mature than we were we were children but sometimes it just takes texts were parent or a funny look or word tone from a parent or family member to remind us that were still just babies dr game. We are one task away. Somebody can go and your and you can be triggered by that this big i. I'm saying facetiously big strong man and you have your charleston a car and you shouldn't be so fragile pow and you know what else and i'm just saying this to another human not apollo specific. I had to go thank you. Have you ever played that game with your response you go. Thank you spiritually speaking you go. I'm not better than people i am. Vulnerable and knowing my vulnerability is a better strength. It's a better strength instead of eating or drinking it. Away or watching john wick and i've all of those things just watching a violent movie and trying to cathartic car size your shame and your and your dread but just to own it and say but that's what the apolo seem to be doing to. It's okay that you're feeling this way. And i joined it in that mantra-like i want to think i'm better than people and that's separation and there's actually a beautiful thing in going. No i just like everybody. And i'm breakable. Just like everybody. And it's exhausting pretending to be superman when really dr dave. We're all batman or our parents are dead. We live in a cave. We dress up and fight as best we can. That's why i've always hated superman. And i'll always love batman please continue. I didn't mean to interrupt. But i'm just so excited to talk about this with you know that was great. I think that you know you really brought up a lot of a lot of great points there right and i think that the first point that i'll take on as you know one of the things that came up when you started talking about your experience this morning. Which is that wet. That stress itself is inevitable. Right can't stop. None of us can just run away to the point where stressed doesn't happen anymore. Can't find they're always be things that make us stressed out or the challenge us in another way of thinking that challenge us to overcome something or to be growing become better and stronger versions of ourselves stand ultimately when we start to feel emotions. We are often taught that certain motions are acceptable and certain emotions are unacceptable breakage. Thank you in that judgment that were taught to apply to ourselves in those experiences. Actually the single biggest misstep that most of us can avoid that. We don't necessarily know how to navigate because we weren't taught at if we weren't taught that you expect yourself to figure it out but it is. It is navigable right. It's not uncharted territory. People everything that we think facing for the first time others face before. And i think from if we look at the buddhist traditions or the ancient hindu yoga traditions as well as the ancient judeo christian traditions around healing and achieving higher states of consciousness in and wellbeing They all kind of center on one thing which is to do everything we can to be present with our emotions when they come in and to just acknowledge them and sit with them without judging right served them to sit down and give them to you have and as you said and this is something that i use with every single one of my clients and i've used as myself as well in my own. Healing journey is to express gratitude and thanks to ourselves and four. The feeling that we're feeling this moment in what happens when we do that. And we express thanks or gratitude for that experience rather than judging it is all the sudden after you know five seconds ten seconds a minute or do go by the intensity around that ceiling starts to kind of dissolve it we start to naturally get a sense in understanding of wears coming from. What is this signals as emotional signals trying to tell me what is the message behind this signal that i'm receiving from something that's either happening because of a way that i'm looking at myself for a wave or something getting the environment and try to we try to figure out where that's coming from and ben solved the problem. We're really get to the root of what that emotion is trying to tell us to do and when we when we allow judgment in oftentimes just because we've been taught to when we allow judge in what happens is our mind starts to instead of being present with that experience our mindsets go back into the past to the to the associations with that emotion like oh. I'm feeling sad. I was told when i was young. That sadnesses not acceptable right. And then then you start getting to the shane right. There's something wrong with me for feeling sad or something wrong. feeling angry. and then it's become self deprecating in highly self critical like Why me why am. I always ingrid right. Why am i always that. And then that starts to attach the motion the signal to our identity. And then that causes perpetuate over time into the future and so we can stop that entire cycle by just taking a step back and recognizing in the moment bringing our minds back into our centered into our bodies which happens with soothing..

john wick dr dave charleston ben shane ingrid
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

06:08 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Hundred percent satisfaction guaranteed go to dot com slash. Weird that's mandy dot com slash weird and show your support of the show. Speaking of which we have to live shows coming up both at largo. October seventh is my stand up. Show which is fantastic. Thanks to everybody who came out this month. It was the highlight of my month. As always is an october eighteenth. We're doing another live. You made it weird at largo. And i can't announce the guest. It's not confirmed yet. But it's going to be a hoot for tickets to both of those go to largo dash. La dot com all right. Everybody enjoy dr david. I really really really really really really really really really really loved this conversation. And i hope you do to get into it. My name is katie is recording and is it okay to call you doctor. David mostly call dr raymond or dr dave. So i'll say whenever it works. I don't wanna off route with dr david. I'll go doctor dave but we were. It's rat robin robin raven. I went rabin katie. And i were just talking about this. I was like he's rabin. I know rabin vestige traditional hebrew pronunciation but were americanized sow. Silent has changed everything. I mean you're talking to a over here. Maybe we should edit that out. I don't know if i want people knowing my mother's maiden name katie. You can edit that out or you can just bleep at. That'd be funnier Just bleep it as if anyone could spell at good luck but they changed all sorts of stuff. Obviously how so. Thank you for taking the time. I'm really excited to talk with you if it's okay we're already recording in the show on your only or video audio. I like that. You're blurring your background deep throat. It's very like where are you right now. Is they're just a pile of naked bodies behind you if they actually. I'm in my office in my house. In upstate new york but be backgrounds because we we just got here in the background is little baron and it has a window behind it that throws a lot of light and so it makes the Next according during a little weird. If i don't blur it because it adds too much too much light washes me out. I understand. that's why my blinds closed. We don't have to take too much of your time. But i want to introduce the the weirdos. That's what we call our listeners to you i'm wearing my apollo today this very likewise i'm constantly who same color i just want to thank you for it. It's i hope you get this all the time. So won't say it too much but like without going into too much detail. I was having a really great morning. I was on clear and focused hanging with my baby. That's a setting on the apollo. And then i got a text from my parents. And that's and that's all the takes dr day like we are so i'd love you to speak to this. We're so fragile. We're so strong. And we're brave. And we're so courageous. We do amazing things. And we are so fragile. It's a both end situation. And for example the way i can be brave i do stand up i can perform for ten thousand people and my nervous system is is down for that. It is okay with that but the temperament that made me into a comedian is so hypersensitive that text from my dad. That wasn't oculus. Put me into a state that i would like into. Concrete as opposed to flowing and open and spacious and light i became solid and rigid. And you know when your teeth. Just start to hurt and it's actually worse because you know they didn't mean to upset you like if they meant to upset you be like oh i guess we're fencing now like having a good healthy sparring mattress mean. It wasn't that it was like it felt so unconscious. Don't like and then and then kicks in is the shame that you're so easily triggered. I don't know if you can relate to that tara. Barack this great buddhist teacher of ours is like it's not the feeling most of suffering is the shame that you're feeling the feeling and i pride myself on being together person a with it person and strong person. If i'm being honest i'd like to think of myself as strong. And then i was like boom one text i turn into concrete and i get upset. Here comes the compliment though. Although i wanna talk all about stress i wanna talk about what was going on in my body all all the different things that my brain thinks is happening even though it's a tax from six thousand miles away which by the way is what i did. I put my hand on my chest to love myself. And i said you are safe. I got you like grown-up pete has you. Don't wake but on. Top of that. Dr dave and i've said this in every time we've done a little shoutout for the apollo. There's something i could do. I and i hope i did it right. I put it on after all the trauma. I put it on rebuild and recover and it just training. And i feel it training me to go like shh. It feels like that it feels like someone going easy easy my darling. Oh i know i know and just like deep breathing or just like someone rubbing your shoulders or something like that. I started to be able to drop the stress. So why don't you talk a little bit about what was happening to me. Maybe how stress impacts you and your life and then what the apollo and even some of the thought techniques. That helped me on wind chirping. And i'm so glad that it's helpful for you. It sounds like you used it exactly the right way. Oh com in one of many bright ways. There's a lot of ways the upon abused you using rebuilding recover after any intense physical mental or emotional.

dr david rabin dr raymond dr dave rabin katie katie baron dave David new york Dr dave tara Barack pete
"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Your wrist or your ankle that helps. You helps your body rather recover from stress. Apollo can help you relax. Sleep focus and be more productive. Wearable hug for the nervous system using touch therapy to help you save and in control and i can attest to. That is absolutely what it does. It delivers gentle soothing vibrations. Like a song. There's different programs that you run each one's a different song that you're nervous system can here in its own language and it trains you to recover and rebalanced after stress. There's the energy and wakeup which we talk a little bit about in episode which is like a shot of espresso. it is no joke social and open clear and focused which is one of my favorite in the morning. When i'm sitting down to work rebuild and recover is wonderful after a workout or after a particularly stressful situation. Meditation and mindfulness has made my meditation practice. Easier and way deeper than it's been in years. It relaxing unwind is what i put it on when i'm watching tv and sometimes it's so relaxing. Actually we watch less tv. Because i'm let's go to bed. And then i get in bed. Sleep and renew. Apollo neuro actually trains the nervous system to cope better with stress. Over time. the more you use it better works. And it was developed. As i mentioned the our guest today. A neuroscientist and board certified psychiatrist. Who's been studying. The impact of chronic stress for nearly fifteen years oppose effects on stress sleep. Cognitive performance and recovery have been proven and multiple clinical trials and real world studies. So this isn't a crystal orb mood ring. This is real science. And it's made a real impact on my life. So for ten percent off to apollo niro dot com slash weird. Apo l. o. N. e. u. r. o. dot com slash weird. And give it a try and show your support of this. Podcast also brought to us by our friends at ever lane. Ever lane is an ethical and wonderful and wonderfully transparent online clothing company. That's encouraging all to go on an adventure. It doesn't mean you have to go into the jungle or a mountain. Maybe you're just reading a new book or trying out a new brench patio spot. I ever lane whatever. You're up to has premium essentials to outfit you in comfort. They have some many versatile items that you can dress up and that you can dress down. I've been very vocal about how much i loved their denim jackets. I got one in blue. And i got one in black. I've worn that jacket. Fancy fancy things. And i've also just dropping off at school. It is a wonderful thing to have this company that i know is ethical. And i know makes high-quality wonderful clothing. That looks great and will last for years to come. They do extensive research and vetting to use ethical factories that provide fair wages and reasonable hours to the skilled people who craft their clothing the timeless design and use the finest sustainable materials. So you can wear them for years to come and most retailers hide their markups but not ever.

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"You made it weird with the meat. All what's happening weirdos. This is dr david rabin who blew my mind many many times. Dr david is a neuroscientist. He's a board certified psychiatrist. He's a health tech entrepreneur and inventor who has been studying the impact of chronic stress in humans for over a decade. he's also the co founder and chief innovation officer at apollo neuroscience which developed the apollo neuro. Which if you've been listening to this podcast has absolutely changed my life. He's an interesting fat. I'm gonna say fascinating man very interested in consciousness very interested in everything that i love talking about and honestly this episode was like a dose of free therapy for me and i hope you get as much out of it as i did. Because we're talking about some pretty broad. I guess i should say issues. That i hope you can relate to. Obviously we talk a lot about the narrow in this episode. If you guys are interested in the apollo neuro you can get one obviously quite easily by going to apollo neuro dot com slash weird and getting ten percent off and showing. Your support of the show is probably helpful to know going in that it is a wearable piece of tack. Wear it around.

dr david rabin Dr david apollo neuroscience
The Role of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Chronic Diseases

Physical Activity Researcher

02:35 min | 4 months ago

The Role of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Chronic Diseases

"Have done research white widely on different teams on sedentary behavior. What what is the thing at the moment that you get most excited about while i get some way. We've been researching copied for more than ten years now and I think what Really defined our research program is that we attempt to align epidemiological research with experimental research. And now as we move into real life interventions and to try and link all that evidence onto give out in what we call in ten triangulation of the the data and i guess what excites me. The most is that over that Appeared of time. We had started to gather evidence to really support the Up approach in the management and prevention of taught to beattie's of reducing sitting on and moving more frequently throughout the day we are highlighting. How shot change could lead to improvements in glucose management and also reduction in Some of the mighty complications of top wti light co. cardiovascular disease. Yeah yeah and you mentioned that you are trying to align the epidemiological and experimental research. Is there some mismatch that you wondering. Where does it come from No i guess on what we have let from a most recent iteration of the us Physical activity guidelines which was a really comprehensive Review of the evidence Specifically was a subcommittee form to look at the influence of and terry behavior on chronic diseases. And i think what what's important is that Within that review that identified that there is now strong evidence linking high amounts of seeking to an increased risk of talk to dr babies incidents and i. Now it's our job to stop to understand. Well why is this link between fifteen time and taught to diabetes and that has laid off seem to i a number laboratory based interventions here at the baker. And now i'm in an exciting development. We're now pushing this out to a long term intervention in the office workplace for people with diabetes

Beattie Cardiovascular Disease Chronic Diseases Terry United States Diabetes
When's the Best Time to Get a Flu Shot?

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

When's the Best Time to Get a Flu Shot?

"To spread. Healthcare workers say This is not the year to skip your flu shot. Giant grocery stores began giving out flu shots early this month, weeks before the October start of the flu season. Samir Belisle runs Giants pharmacies this ball. He's expecting a potential onslaught of people wanting covid boosters and flu vaccines. If you have the patient in the chair, it's just another shot. So it's more so. The influx of individuals Loudon County Health Officer Dr David Good friend says, Wait a few more weeks to get your flu shot. So your immunity doesn't window by the height of the season in January and February, having to deal with flu and our doctors Offices on top of Covid. It's just something that is an added burden on our health care system. Barnett w. T. O P. News Liberty University is seeing an uptick in covid cases.

FLU Samir Belisle Dr David Good Loudon County Giants P. News Liberty University Barnett
Case of 76 Who Died of COVID-19 in Veterans Home, Lands in Court

Red Eye Radio

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

Case of 76 Who Died of COVID-19 in Veterans Home, Lands in Court

"At a Massachusetts veterans home are trying to get criminal charges against them. Dismissed after a deadly covid outbreak last year. Lawyers for Holyoke soldiers Home Superintendent Bennett Walsh and former medical director Dr David Clinton argued the state had managed burden of proof. Prosecutors had argued the decision by Walsh and Clinton to cram residents who tested positive for Covid 19 with residents who didn't was negligent. But they claim they're being scapegoated by the state and Walsh's lawyer says his client early alert to the state led to the deployment of the National Guard and help save lives. 76 veterans died in the home at the beginning of the pandemic last March. The judge didn't issue a ruling. Another court date is set for October. Rob

Bennett Walsh Dr David Clinton Covid Holyoke Walsh Massachusetts Clinton National Guard ROB
Google and Apple Shake up Health Initiatives

Daily Tech Headlines

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Google and Apple Shake up Health Initiatives

"Insider sources say apple will scale back. Its internal app. called health. Habit used by employees to track fitness calls talk to clinicians and manage hypertension health. Habit is part of apple's larger apple health organization and reportedly was seen as a potential model for a consumer product if successful internally. It's unclear if health habit. We'll continue with the smaller team or just be shut down in a memo to employees. Google knows it intends to break up. It's health division planning to split its various projects across other parts of the company. Insiders sources say google health. Chief dr david feinberg will leave the company to be the ceo at the electronic medical records firm. Turner

Apple Hypertension Google Chief Dr David Feinberg Turner
Doctors Are Relying More on Monoclonal Antibodies to Fight COVID

Seattle's Morning News

02:01 min | 5 months ago

Doctors Are Relying More on Monoclonal Antibodies to Fight COVID

"For Covid 19 is showing a great deal of progress. David Begnaud reports from hard hit Louisiana monoclonal antibodies, lab grown proteins that help the body target and eliminate covid infection, according to Dr Thomas Galit, chief medical officer at ST Francis Medical Center in Monroe, Louisiana. They have become the most effective therapy yet has done a great job of helping high risk patients stay out of the hospital. The therapy is becoming more available at hospitals and clinics around the country. But it is only administered after infection within 10 days of the first symptoms and before those symptoms get to severe what type of sickness do you usually say that's too sick to receive if they are having profound oxygen requirements continued high grade beavers dehydration. Since July. The first we've given about 1700 doses. One of those doses went to 42 year old Scotty Johnson. We were there when he got his infusion three weeks ago in Monroe, as Covid was attacking his body. It feels like somebody's choking you. You start coughing, but nothing comes out this week. We followed up with him and we met his wife, Meg. They both got the antibody treatments right around the same time. I just really start feeling good about Three or four days ago, probably, but I feel like I'm like 90% now, while Scotty did not get the vaccine bag did my wife got anybody treatment? On Thursday. I tested positive on Friday. On Saturday, she was back up cleaning the house and doing dishes and like it never even bothered. While the antibody treatments can be effective, they are not a substitute for vaccines, says CBS News Medical contributor Dr David Agus. There's no question the vaccine is better than an antibody. But in the case where your immune suppressed and you can't make a good response to a vaccine, they're lifesavers. So this is an important part of our arsenal. But it certainly is not the only weapon in our arsenal. Vaccines are Front line. No question about it to fight a virus in today's world, and that

Covid David Begnaud Dr Thomas Galit St Francis Medical Center Louisiana Monroe Scotty Johnson MEG Cbs News Medical Dr David Agus Scotty
NIH Director: Unvaccinated Are 'Sitting Ducks' for COVID-19 and Delta Variant

Here & Now

02:01 min | 5 months ago

NIH Director: Unvaccinated Are 'Sitting Ducks' for COVID-19 and Delta Variant

"Sitting ducks. That's how national institutes of health director francis collins is characterizing unvaccinated people in the us as the delta variant continues to spread here. Is this weekend on fox news. So i will be surprised if we don't cross two hundred thousand cases a day in the next couple of weeks. And that's heartbreaking considering. We never thought we would be back in that space again. But here we are with delta variant. Which is so contagious. And this heartbreaking situation where ninety million people are still unvaccinated who are sitting ducks for this virus. Sitting ducks presumably. Meaning they will catch it. We know the delta variant is more infectious but is it also lethal and if it is for whom dr david doughty is an epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist at johns hopkins university. Dr doughty cds reporting record hospitalizations among eighteen to twenty nine year olds thirty to thirty nine year. Old forty to forty nine year olds. Basically all adults under fifty now while deaths among young adults from kovic are still uncommon. Are death rates going up in these groups. So yes robin deaths are going up. They're going up more slowly than hospitalizations. But we know that that's usually lag hospitalizations by two to three weeks for some so. We're expecting to see deaths climbing in the next two to three weeks as well and by saturday the number of pediatric hospitalizations also hit record highs. This is according to the department of health and human services it spike to over nineteen hundred. What are we seeing in that group when it comes to mortality rates. I think what we're seeing across. The board is that among those who are unvaccinated. The risk of getting sick and dying is as high as it's ever been right and so in groups like kids where vaccines are not yet licensed. We're seeing as you've said the highest rates of hospitalizations and deaths that we've seen since the beginning of the pandemic

Dr David Doughty Francis Collins Dr Doughty National Institutes Of Health Fox News Infectious Disease Johns Hopkins University United States Robin Department Of Health And Human
COVID-19 Surge, Driven by Delta Variant, Hits US Hospitals

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 6 months ago

COVID-19 Surge, Driven by Delta Variant, Hits US Hospitals

"There's been a dramatic increase in the number of covert nineteen cases in the U. S. compared with the prior week and it's being linked to the more contagious delta variant state local and federal authorities have been urging people to get vaccinated because there's been another spike in virus infections Dr Rochelle Wilensky heads the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention our seven day averages about eighty nine thousand four hundred sixty three cases per day this represents an increase of forty three percent from the prior seven day average nearly ninety thousand cases a day a Florida hospital chain is suspending elective surgeries some Georgia hospitals are said to be turning patients away in Houston Texas chief medical officer Dr David person KTRK urges more people to get vaccinated you need to consider that you represent a potential danger to yourself and others in most particularly your own family I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr Rochelle Wilensky U. S. Centers For Disease Cont U. Dr David Ktrk Florida Georgia Houston Texas Jackie Quinn
"dr david" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

03:26 min | 6 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Organism. <Speech_Male> Human or animal <Speech_Male> when they're when <Speech_Male> they're really gonna in <Speech_Male> a near death <Speech_Male> situation <Speech_Male> probably gets <SpeakerChange> a release <Speech_Male> a tremendous release <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> t. No <Speech_Male> they've <Speech_Male> endorphins <Speech_Male> studied. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> they've looked <Speech_Male> at all that bruce <Speech_Male> grayson university <Speech_Male> virginia <Speech_Male> handbook of <Speech_Male> of near death experiences. <Speech_Male> Two hundred <Speech_Male> peer reviewed papers <Speech_Male> this time pin <Speech_Male> von lommel cardiologists. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I mean there are <Speech_Male> so many david <Speech_Male> so many peer <Speech_Male> reviewed studies where they've <Speech_Male> studied that in the cardiac <Speech_Male> arrest ward <Speech_Male> where from <Speech_Male> physiological standpoint. <Speech_Male> They can measure all <Speech_Male> those things <Speech_Male> they've measured <Speech_Male> in the best they can <Speech_Male> none of those <Speech_Male> Last-gasp <Speech_Male> of a dying <Speech_Male> brain thinks they just. <Speech_Male> Don't <SpeakerChange> hold up to <Speech_Male> scrutiny. Yeah <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> well. <Speech_Male> Yeah i mean <Speech_Male> okay i <Speech_Male> mean like i say i'm open <Speech_Male> to that except accepted. <Speech_Male> Seems <Speech_Male> you're in firmly in a <Speech_Male> dualist camp if <Speech_Male> you're accepting this <Speech_Male> because now you got something <Speech_Male> non physical <Speech_Male> thing of which is <Speech_Male> you your <Speech_Male> mind or your solar <Speech_Male> your spirit which <Speech_Male> is going up <Speech_Male> into space somewhere <Speech_Male> coming back <Speech_Male> down a new person <Speech_Male> to an animal or <Speech_Male> whatever <Speech_Male> i mean that you know <Speech_Male> so okay you <Speech_Male> gotta you gotta buy <Speech_Male> in all the way you can't <Speech_Male> can't go have asked <Speech_Male> on this. You buy into <Speech_Male> a whole dual a scheme <Speech_Male> and all <Speech_Male> the all the typical <Speech_Male> problems that have <Speech_Male> been around for five hundred years <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> how to explain how dulas <Speech_Male> them even <Speech_Male> makes how it's coherent. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I guess <Speech_Male> that's that's the trade <Speech_Male> off rights not it's not <Speech_Male> just a good <Speech_Male> story you've got you've got <Speech_Male> a boatload of problems <Speech_Male> if you wanna sort <Speech_Male> of accept the dualist <Speech_Male> a start <Speech_Male> that that's <SpeakerChange> all i <Speech_Male> would say at this black <Speech_Male> right and you <Speech_Male> are going to have the last word <Speech_Male> on that because <Speech_Male> you have been extremely <Speech_Male> generous <Speech_Male> with your time <Speech_Male> invokes. <Speech_Male> Our guest has ban <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> very excellent. <Speech_Male> And not <Speech_Male> back down from <Speech_Male> anyone. Dr <Speech_Male> david's christina. <Speech_Male> Be sure <Speech_Male> to check out his website. <Speech_Male> I really <Speech_Male> really appreciate <Speech_Male> the fact that <Speech_Male> you came on. <Speech_Male> You tackled everything <Speech_Male> head on. <Speech_Male> Yeah <SpeakerChange> stephen <Speech_Male> scrubbing dot com. <Speech_Male> If you're if <Speech_Male> they're not able <SpeakerChange> to see the actual <Speech_Male> website <Speech_Male> dot <Speech_Male> com so and that <Speech_Male> is note worthy because <Speech_Male> you are buried <Speech_Male> in the <Speech_Male> google search. <Speech_Male> I mean you will not <Speech_Male> find <Speech_Male> its. You'd better <Speech_Male> type it into the web address <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> there's a whole <SpeakerChange> bunch of other <Speech_Male> stuff. <Speech_Male> We won't even go <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> no more of <Speech_Male> I mean you will not <Speech_Male> find <Speech_Male> its. You'd better <Speech_Male> type it into the web address <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> there's a whole <SpeakerChange> bunch of other <Speech_Male> stuff. <Speech_Male> We won't even go <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> no more of <Speech_Male> me and the whole world so if <Speech_Male> you find me that's me <Speech_Male> that's there's no other <Speech_Male> day inscription <SpeakerChange> on <Speech_Male> the whole world. So <Speech_Male> that's that's good <Speech_Male> but the the cancel <Speech_Male> culture thing <Speech_Male> is definitely <Speech_Male> on your <Speech_Male> back. Buddy i mean <Speech_Male> there is a target <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> What can you do. <Speech_Male> What can you <Speech_Male> do been fantastic <Speech_Male> having you <SpeakerChange> on. Thank you very <Speech_Male> much <Speech_Male> alex. Thank you appreciate <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> thanks <Speech_Male> again. Did habits <Speech_Male> for joining me to <Speech_Male> dance. Kept go the <Speech_Male> one question. <Speech_Male> I'd have to tee up <Speech_Music_Male> is what <Speech_Music_Male> do you think about the unabomber <Speech_Male> serial <Speech_Male> killer or singularity <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> whistleblower. <Speech_Male> Let me know your <Speech_Male> thoughts. Check <Speech_Male> out the skeptical forum <Speech_Male> fewer and fewer <Speech_Male> people there. But <Speech_Male> that's okay be <Speech_Male> the one who reignites <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Music_Male> or <Speech_Male> track me down anyway. <Speech_Male> You like <Speech_Music_Male> lots more to come <Speech_Music_Male> until next time. <Speech_Music_Male> Take care <Speech_Music_Male> bye for <SpeakerChange> now.

"dr david" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

06:00 min | 6 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"So i was getting ready to publish this interview. That i have coming up with dr david kirby who actually co wrote a book with the uni bomber ted kaczynski and i was wondering. Does anyone even still remember that whole thing. And what that's all about. And then i found this. Ted kaczynski the harvard lsd studies. Let's see yeah. They cooked his brain and then he disappeared worked as a professor to earn enough money. So you could buy a cabin. Implement his plan to kill everybody. Who was involved in technology so we stop this takeover of the human race which probably is true. That's one of the things it's disturbing. It's like well thought. Out and also the argument is sound. Technology will inevitably lead to better technology which inevitably leads to artificial intelligence which is inevitably going to take over the world. Okay in his letters. I loved your rug. And i got a heat onto rogan for the same thing all the time i mean i. He's got some important facts wrong here right. It's not the ted kaczynski's brainless fried by lsd. Whatever the hill that means it was that he was covertly recruited into an m. k. Ultra program in 'em. Kelly was doing all sorts of stuff. So yeah there were frying people's brain quote unquote with lsd. But sidney gottlieb was trying to give lsd everybody if you go talk to the people at stargate remote viewers he's lying. Let's give them some lsd. Let sure as heck wasn't the only thing they were doing because the other thing they were doing is they're trying to build them in cherry and candidate kind of people which they obviously did with sirhan sirhan. And if you don't think he can do that with hypnosis just go watch. Darren brown who happens to be dorky atheist but he can still demonstrate that. A good hypnotist with a good subject can do that kind of stuff. So the fact that ted kaczynski comes back after his first semester at harvard and is a changed man so says his brother is what's really going on and then on top of that the other thing he gets wrong. Is this ultimate doomed. Gloom technology stuff. That's going to take over the world. I don't know maybe but i'm not convinced. But i hate this kind of reluctant acknowledgment. That well ted kaczynski did have it right fucking now. The stupid serial killer didn't have it right but credit to joe rogan for putting it all on the table. Where would we be without the new king of media more influential than cnn. Fox msnbc any of them thank god. joe rogan. Is there at least putting this stuff on the table but if we want to begin to go level three than well. The here's a clip from the upcoming interview. The pushback isn't your intellectual interest in technology or the ill effects of technology. It's that you kinda promoted a serial killer in the process of doing it. Yeah absolutely and i was always sensitive to that. You know i mean i've always spoken against it. It's not like i'm endorsing. What he did. But on on the one hand we have that situation on the other you know we have. We have to deal with the arguments in the manifesto and there are very strong arguments against industrial technology. Yeah but david..

ted kaczynski dr david kirby sidney gottlieb harvard Darren brown rogan sirhan sirhan joe rogan Kelly msnbc cnn Fox david
LA County Has 5th Straight Day of 1,000 Cases

AP News Radio

01:05 min | 6 months ago

LA County Has 5th Straight Day of 1,000 Cases

"With Kobe cases back on the rise in the United States there are warnings against older people attending large indoor activities and a new push to get people vaccinated that's pop star and actress Olivia Rodrigo singing about happy and healthy the eighteen year old will join forces today with president Biden and infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci to record videos to encourage young people to get vaccinated on the other side of the age spectrum health officials in Mississippi are recommending people sixty five and older avoid large indoor gatherings in a state where just thirty one percent are fully vaccinated Dr David Doughty at Johns Hopkins University says it's time to talk about you know re implementing some measures to to start the spread and Chicago Friday will restrict travelers from Missouri and Arkansas because of spiking coded cases in those two states I'm Jackie Quinn

Olivia Rodrigo President Biden Dr Anthony Fauci Kobe Infectious Disease Dr David Doughty United States Mississippi Johns Hopkins University Chicago Missouri Arkansas Jackie Quinn
US COVID-19 Cases Rising Again, Doubling Over Three Weeks

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

US COVID-19 Cases Rising Again, Doubling Over Three Weeks

"The number of new coronavirus cases per day has doubled over the past three weeks data from Johns Hopkins University shows case numbers have gone up in forty eight states Maine and South Dakota are the exceptions vaccination rates are lagging there is the delta variant and there were fourth of July gatherings Dr David Doughty at Johns Hopkins says it's reasonable to be a little more cautious to start to talk about you know re implementing some measures to to start the spread and this is no we are near the peak virus numbers Dr dowdy was asked what this surge means hospitalizations rise I will probably see deaths go up although not to the same extent because we we have more people who are vaccinated but parts of the country are running up against deep vaccine resistance I made Donahue

Dr David Doughty Johns Hopkins University South Dakota Dr Dowdy Maine Johns Hopkins Donahue
Covid's Delta Variant: What We Know

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:55 min | 7 months ago

Covid's Delta Variant: What We Know

"That the delta variant of the coronavirus Is the most transmissible of the strains observed to date in the U. S. The variant, first identified in India now accounts for one in every 4 to 5 new coronavirus infections. And there's growing fear that if more people aren't vaccinated, the variant could cause a widespread second surge of the virus nationwide. CBS News Medical contributor. Dr David Agus joined us earlier to talk about the Varia. That's a remarkably infectious virus where it is very, very easy to spread. And what we know is that two shots of Moderna advisor Offer excellent protection against it in most people, and so the problem is one shot or prior covid 19 infection Do not protect you against this variant. We have a divided country ever vaccinated. Half not so half are susceptible and we are very worried about it Spread right now about 30% of new cases are this particular strain the United States and that number is growing but certain areas of the country 70 80% of countries, others. It's very low, So in those lower areas, the trajectory is upward. And I am worried about what's going to happen Behaviors before that wouldn't cause virus spread. Now will we have to be aware So for the folks who have been vaccinated many you're looking at booster shots to offer even more protection. Do we know whether or not booster shots will protect us even more so against the variant? The clinical trials are ongoing. Now you get almost 90% protection with two shots. Advisor Modernist. I do not think booster shot you're needed there and booster shots, if they've done before six months can have significant side effects. What we're worried about is the J and J vaccine, which has slightly less immunity to start then the two RNA vaccines and there may be a booster shot required there, especially in the elderly. We should have the data on that from the CBC over the next week or two, so I wouldn't make any move until over the next few days. We have that data. You get a booster shot too soon. There are significant side effects, and I wouldn't advise any sense

Dr David Agus Moderna Cbs News U. India United States CBC
The Real Cause of Alzheimers and Dementia

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:05 min | 7 months ago

The Real Cause of Alzheimers and Dementia

"Wanna jump right in and talk about alzheimer's because you wrote a really interesting instagram post. I think it was a few weeks ago. And you were saying. Alzheimer's reversal is is real. It's not just a theory and you were hinting at a new study. Small one but something exciting. That came across your desk that you wanted to highlight and make your audience aware of so. Why are you excited about the study. And what did they cover inside of there. Well i'm hoping you'll share that study with a link. This is work that i've been aware of actually for quite some time. I know you know dr. Dale br edison and he recently published a book. Called the end of alzheimer's. The plan in the first book was invalid. And this one is the plan and i. I wrote the forward to that book and in that ford. I think it really did capture my excitement about the work that he's doing even be beyond how he's broken the mold beyond alzheimer's and let me explain in a. We live in a world where we try to really pigeonhole are diseases to think that they are caused by one thing and therefore we can fix them with a remedy and there's such an effort underway to Find an alzheimer's drug that works just last month. Eli lilly announced the results of a trial. In which they're monoclonal antibody mab was found to reduce the rate of decline of alzheimer's basis by an astounding thirty two percent When they made that announcement the stock value went up. I think twenty billion dollars. Eli lilly but what does that mean. It means. it's slow the decline by third means. People are still declining going to get worse than we know where it ends up generally So it really wasn't a stabilizing alzheimer's or can you imagine actually improving their situation. Because they're looking at one thing. This is a monoclonal antibody that is targeting the so called beta amyloid protein. That's absolutely the cause of alzheimer's.

Alzheimer's Dale Br Edison Alzheimer's Drug Eli Lilly Ford
Top Fat Burning Foods: Apple Cider Vinegar

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

01:32 min | 7 months ago

Top Fat Burning Foods: Apple Cider Vinegar

"Guys. Dr david jokers here and today. We're talking about the ten best fat burning foods and so we can actually use food as medicine to help our body burn fat. Help build lean body tissue muscle and bone help improve our brain and really transform. Our over off zeke. And here are my ten favorite foods and so let's jump right into this so the first woman to talk about is apple cider. Vinegar and apple cider. Vinegar is an ancient elixir that that people have been using to help with acid reflux acne to help improve digestive function for thousands of years. It's basically fermented apple and what happens. Is it forms into some cdc acid in this acid when you consume it you you can consume it. Diluted like a tablespoon or two and some water you drink that it actually helps to stimulate your digestive juice production so stomach. Acid bile pancreatic enzymes and the better. Your body produces digestive juices the better. You're able to metabolize food. You're consuming the less stress puts on your gut the better nutrient absorption. You're going to get and it helps to kill off bad microbes so pathogenic bacteria yeast parasites. They don't stand a chance against vinegar. So putting apple cider vinegar on your foods and in your water throughout the day can be a great strategy to help your body burn fat. Help preserve your lean body

Dr David Jokers Apple Zeke CDC Acne
"dr david" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

"Boys and girls welcome to another edition of the business of sports with Andrew Brandt. We were talking interested a really wanted to have this gas for this week. And what's going on in the NFL and specifically The Situation off with Tyrod Taylor and the Chargers no better guess than my friend. Dr. David shall David is the former Dock of the aforementioned Chargers then San Diego where he still is dead and now of course and involved with a lot of other sports organizations Scott profootballtalk.com pro football on Twitter kind of a go-to guy for injuries. So we're going to talk globally about injuries, but we'll start with tie rod, but first David, welcome to the podcast. I am always interested in medical things never get to it as a full issue on the podcast. But here we are. Well, that's probably good that you don't get to it as a full issue. Right? I mean you kind of don't want to hear about medical and then when you do it's usually bad news, so it's not it's not a fun topic, but I'm honored to wage. But you asked me to come on in a big fan of yours and as you know kind of in some ways followed in your Footsteps in a weird way, right? I mean, obviously I fed into this through National Football post's an outfit that you started right and and and essentially it's the it's the X right the X front office guy took the ex-doctor. So I've often described what I do is the medical Mike Pereira, but it might be the front office Andrew Brandt might be the the medical Andrew Brandt, you know, whatever wage it's it's an interesting history that people don't know even knowing me from ESPN or Russ Tucker or Sports Illustrated or TV started my media when I left the Packers wage what you just mentioned National Football Post put together by some insiders that we just said no one's doing this. No one's sort of bringing us behind-the-scenes just standard media and that grave Had your your local mate Jack bechta agent out in La Jolla Mike Lombardi Matt Bowen, Joe fortenbaugh and myself and we've all moved and maybe not bigger but better things not better but you know, it was quite a time and you jogged my memory. You were part of that way back in the day. It's I was quite a way to transition from inside to to outside. Well, I got agent okeydoke done that so I finished up with the Chargers in Jack County me do something right something and I was like, I'm not a media guy and I said I said, I'll tell you what, why don't your guys ask me some questions and I'll just answer them..

Andrew Brandt Dr. David Chargers Mike Pereira Jack County Tyrod Taylor NFL Twitter Football Mike Lombardi Matt Bowen San Diego Jack bechta La Jolla Packers Russ Tucker ESPN Joe fortenbaugh
"dr david" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"dr david" Discussed on Good Life Project

"I've heard you describe your life as two half times in five overtimes. . Interesting you know because it sports reference comes easy you. . Grown up as a kid in around. Raleigh . North Carolina, , it sounded like your life you pretty much live. . It was like football as your religion almost. . That's right. . Tell me I. . Mean What? ? What was it about that? ? Because a there seems to be interestingly some foreshadowing in terms of conviction and devotion and work ethic that showed up there and relentlessness. . That has transferred later to July but some curious what were your aspirations back then early on I had this dream of of one day playing college football and I don't know if it was because I was so close to the NC state football team. . My Dad was the team doctor for NC state and so I'm I spent so much time there and kind of just idolizing. . The players and I love the sport I loved the athletic. . I also always really really liked the strategy part of football. There's . a as you know there's so much more going on between snaps during snaps than you necessarily can see, , and so I just I loved the game and I think is an and now I look back many years later I think that. . It also is probably just a reflection of my personality that I locked onto something and yes, , there are things about football that I love. . But but it was also the thing that I was locked on doing in the goal that I had set and so I just put everything I had into it yet. . So your doctor was the teen by for my Dad yes that's your dad. . Yes. . What did he share any of the experiences because I know it's interesting because you know football has had an interesting reputation and a spotlight over lives really decade from. . A medical standpoint I'm curious whether as you were coming up and playing at higher and higher levels, , your dad being the doctor who was working a lot of football athletes whether you guys have ever had conversations about that will also my dad actually included me with him for like everything I mean I was on the sidelines with him for Football Games and I was in the locker room with him before games at halftime and after games, , and so I I was very much with him throughout and but I have to say that this is like the. . Nineties thousands when when we really just didn't know what we know now I mean, , we thought concussions were a temporary thing. . You just kind of worked through over a few days. . We had no sense for for the long term impact them and says, , I look back on anatomy that I mean it was almost like we we were playing this sport and we didn't know the risks <hes> and. . You had aspirations beyond I. . Mean Highschool was one became but also it sounds like you had aspirations for sure college. . was there an inkling in your mind that said I want this to be my career or was it just <unk>? ? Did it never sorta like get to that level? ? You know I the goal that I had was to play college football that was growing up that was that Was the goal it wasn't to play professionally it wasn't even certain things to do in college. . It was just I want to play college football, , and as you know that that kind of singular focus than change once I. . got there. But . really for me, , it was played college football. . Yeah I mean I'm really curious about what you said also that you kind of obsessed with not just the. . Physical aspects of the game but the strategic aspects of it you ended up playing qb playing quarterback, , and so it's almost like you're there's a huge leadership aspect to it. . There's a lot of complexity and there's a requirement in that position to process vast amounts of information and a lot of complexity that's changing in real time and also not just think about it but make decisions and take action. . It's something that <hes> I loved about the game was the exactly all those things integrating so much information acting on it and and something I enjoy. . But I don't think I've realized just how important those sort of skills would become as I've moved on in dealt with other challenges in life so you end up actually In Georgetown Lane Football, , what we actually studying there. . So I planned to go when I chose to go to Georgetown one of the main reasons that I wanted to go there because they had a really strong pre med program and I wanted to do a health sciences major because I was really interested in sports medicine it was okay. . This is kind of a way to to Meld my interest in medicine with interest in sports and so I was from the very beginning interested in going into medicine. . But as you know everything really changed once I got there in. . My interest in sports medicine really really shifted. . So

David Vega Belga Covid brain cancer Georgetown Ron
"dr david" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"dr david" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"Welcome back to. I don't have enough faith to be an atheist with Frank Turk my guest. Dr David Orlinsky author of the Devil's Delusion Husian deniable Darwin and human nature of on the other books before we get back to Dr Berlin Ski WanNa Mention. I'll be at the University of Maine in or Ono. That's up near Bang. Hang or this Wednesday night for. Don't have enough faith to be an atheist that's November thirteenth. I believe check our website cross examined Dot Org for events as always any college event. Event is always free to the general public. They'll be time for Q.. And A. so come out to. I don't have enough faith to be an atheist this Wednesday night. If you're a maniac if you live up in in Maine okay back to my guest. Dr David Berlin Sqi. Dr Berlin ski before the break. We were talking about some of the motivations that people might have for getting a little bit annoyed eight if you criticize the theory of Darwinism seem to me you you you had mentioned money and prestige. There's a another category that I think our friend. Christopher Christopher Hitchens made quite clear with regard to the issue of sex he didn't want God to exist and he thought maybe a suggesting that he does exist and that maybe maybe Mac Revolution wasn't true would be to give into a cosmic North Korean dictator. which by the way is great imagery? If you're an atheist I like the way hitch instead that but it seems to to me. There are other motivations as well people in fact you right I want to say this is in. This is in the devil's delusion you right. Let let me find this quote. Because it's very very telling what did I do with it. You write about someone's hair here. You say arguments. Follow follow from assumptions and assumptions follow from beliefs and very rarely perhaps never do beliefs reflect an agenda determined entirely he by the facts. UNPACK that further sir. Well I think the way we form beliefs is still in the twenty first century. Rather mysterious steriods. We don't really understand how you in beings come to the beliefs that we hold it certainly not driven by the evidence. Let's put that myth aside. Nobody is driven by the evidence to form the beliefs they do or have In the evidence isn't relevant. It's just not probative determined took Bishop Barclay has an interesting point. He says that the only thing that can influence a belief is another belief he had a particular philosophy philosophy of mind in view he thought the mine was the only real thing that existed in the universe but the observation is quite distinct that we're influenced in a way that we have never successfully described by our other beliefs and it is kind of a closed circle of beliefs influencing -fluenced beliefs where it meets the real world where the real world penetrates our system. It's not entirely clear. It's very hard to make that case. Ace you'll certainly notice you yourself. I gather us something of a polemicist or at least you participate that the number of times where somebody it comes up to you after discussion and says as opposed to I found your talks interesting everybody will say that as a gesture of politeness but very rarely allie will. They say I've changed my mind or your views have provoked me to change my mind. That doesn't happen a lot. So we're dealing with the situation and to seemingly in which many many positions of frozen and all that you can really hope to do was take a hammer and give the ice of the self possession of Good Shaw Shaw whack. Sometimes it helps. Sometimes it doesn't help but anybody who participates in in public debate knows as as much that the beliefs of very sturdy creatures that are resistant to change Well said you remind me Philip Johnson's Use of the wedge sched- Penetrating petrified wood of naturalism. visit me for interrupting you talk you know. Years and years and years ago I worked at McKinsey is a management consultant and I came across an essay but one of the senior partners extremely smart guy very very impressive. Carnevale's was his name any any said. How do we get something done? He was talking about working in a bureaucracy. And he says you can't take a chisel you can take a hammer. You can't take assault what you have to use his plane. And you'll have have to be extremely patient. And you have to plan that would sandpaper sandpaper sandpaper. And you have to be prepared to accept up. Small changes very wise declaration. I think in philosophy in theology and modern scientific polemics you have to be is prepared to accept small changes things change incrementally. They don't change dramatically unless it's one of those rare cases in physics where decisive experiment. Burma Dora magnificent theory appears everything changed. Nineteen O five with special relativity because then we understand it was right but that's the exception option for most of the time things changed a small way. In fact you have written. I believe it's in human nature that that ideologies change around the edges. They do not cave in the center so it does take a while for minds to change and I think they are changing in the realm of Darwinism. Because as you well know they had the Royal Society had the conference in November twenty sixteen looking for a new theory of Mac doc revolution. Did you happen to attend that. No one in London it was. Yes Sir Stephen Meyer. Doug axe went and a few other folks from discovery. Every institute was invited but decided just to inconvenienced cross likely than my apartment in general. Well you're you're in the United States now for our listeners. Look for Dr Alinsky on the Ben Shapiro show because he's about to record an interview with Ben Shapiro. Ben is a wonderful interviewer. He knows the issues surrounding intelligent design and Mac Revolution because because he demonstrated that quite well in his interviewer. Stephen Myra colleague of Dr Berlin Ski so listeners. Look out for the interview with Dr Berlin Ski which I assume will come out in the next few weeks. That's why he's in the United States right now. I've made a secret vow to lapse into Sullivan. Irrelevance tomorrow refused ingle go question. Please flees he. I think you're incapable of doing that. Sir so I've seen interviews with professor of philosophy who had master that. This was the old days where you can get away with it. His name was John Herman rental junior and I remember Some somebody ask question. He always came to class smoking. A huge cigar often a cigar for about five minutes and then he gave What I thought was one of the great answers in all of pedagogic history said? That's a stupid question. There are stupid questions now. Now let me ask you this question. First of all. I know everybody. Who's listening right now is GonNa want me to ask Dr Berlin Ski? What is religious beliefs are not going to ask him that? And I'll tell you why because he's asked. The same question is book human nature and I want you to get that book so in the back of the book there is a interview that he does and he'll ah you can see his answer there. So let's just leave it at that but I do want to ask you this Dr Belenky if you suggest that maybe there's an intelligent designer route. They're given the evidence the evidence we see four intelligence. How do you deal with the so-called God of the gaps fallacy when atheists or Darwinism say? Dr Dr Berlin Ski. First of all you're not a biologist and secondly you're committing the god of the gaps fallacy. How do you respond okay? What's next the god of the gaps fallacy has entered into the English language as discussion stoppard's like a door stop? Stop you put him under the door on the hope the doors gonNA stop swinging. The fact of the matter is wherever you look at the gap. Some imagine the number line which is filled with a lot of little Gaps wherever you really look the gaps on getting smaller. They're getting more numerous and they're getting larger. So to the extent that that argument points to a real fallacy I don't a fallacy there If you say God did it. That's what explanation of Abia good explanation about explanation but it's not a fallacy. Nothing fallacious being advocated to the extent. That argument is invoked the count responses well lot of gaps. We need a big fella to to deal with them. That's right and I think some of the arguments that you've made Stephen. Meyer is made and others. Doug Acts The folks at the Discovery Institute when you're arguing it's possible there's an intelligent designer out there. You're not arguing from what you don't know your arguments on what you do know. And you've pointed out and then to die deniable Darwin Win that Hayley's arguments still good that a watch implies a watchmaker when you find to watch you. Don't you don't say lack an actual explanation you go. There's got to be a watchmaker out out there. And there appears to be anyway so many aspects of biology not to mention physics and other areas. That appeared require an intelligent. 'cause there's intelligence Algiers agency in there. You've made that case in several ways in deniable Darwin and the Devil's delusion so friends you need to get those books. Let me ask you this to you. Also so say this point out at the hypothesis that were nothing. More than cosmic accidents has been widely accepted by the scientific community. And you mentioned that Richard Dawkins Bertrand Russell Steven Weinberg others. They have this belief as an article of their faith. Now why why use the word. Faith there they revel full in this belief they can't get enough of self abuse but there is a wonderful new word phrase. That's entered the English language. It's called Humble Brag and I think it perfectly describes this Dr Johnson at a a wonderfully witty way of putting it he he said you can depend on that. Every form of self-criticism is oblique. A form of self-praise. It shows that you have something thing to spare. Money is exactly what Bertrand Russell and Richard Dawkins Christopher Hitchens old all doing. They're covering themselves ignominiously with the blanket of their own insignificance. But they're if they really meant that they would not be covering them so fly covering themselves so flamboyantly really. They mean that they're pretty special. Anyway even if they are a very little cosmic significance but the whole thing is is rhetorically an exercise in any number of dissimulations mutilations. It's not meant seriously. It's not meant seriously. Well the the issue here though for them well. Let's let's go back to Einstein's question. Why is the universe so comprehensible why is it? Can we even do science. Or it's a good question Russian and I have no idea why it so but it is so to a certain extent the fact that we have magnificent scientific series and I would add a Magnificent mathematical theories as as well is a great Is a great gift. But it's an unexplained gift I mean after all if you look at the species dogs Dogs are in their own way. Quite intelligent animals. They get five very very well alliance or Mousse whatever you want but this particular aspect of cognition this particular. ACQUAINTANCESHIP with the universe is not a feature of the dog's mind but entered into feet cheaper of ours and we don't quite understand why it's there. What good does it certainly has? Nothing left survival. In fact it may lead to the opposite given the existence of nuclear weapons it may lead precisely the extinction of the human race nonetheless. We have an earthly capacity to form these profound these deep these rich these intricate a good scientific theories when they're just gifts and.

"dr david" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"dr david" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Here is one of Dr David warm flesh. So you have a if a book coming out in its cold moon in illustrated history from ancient myths, the colonies of tomorrow, actually less. This is the woke ride. Here is solid Brock. You can use it as a paperweight as a door stopper by you could read it too, because one of the things about this girl here in the twenty first century Hebrew, all don't like get actual hardcover books so much has came here about the topics on the podcast. I might tell you, if you little stories from the book, but is the illustrated history. And now the whole idea as part of a series from sterling crass, and every, every little sections called her a moment has a. Has beautiful picture. And. Techs to go along with it. So here I randomly opened up to this. So this is from one of the early entries telling about a period of lunar geological time called the Eric tasks, tinian period, named for the Tostes crater instead of having a picture of the creator. I gotta take a painting of air tasks in ease for whom the craters named giving a lesson to student era. Tostes was the ancient Greek scholar. Vaki was the chief librarian of the great library in Alexandria, really cool. I didn't even those the kind of things that this is all about, right? Things that you don't even know about the b basically everyone knows that there is a moon. Louis look up at the sky, and there is a moon. What's the history of it? You know, like where did I everyone of those craters is named for usually the name for person from history, especially in the near side of the? Day goes back. Wait ancient times in the far side. So you get names like cratered, so cough ski for people came later because nobody saw the far side until ninety fifty nine. So if though there's tons of craters, there's thousands of craters up there. Do you have a favorite crater on the moon? I liked the starkest crater because the name for stark is one of my favorite people from ancient times news, actually the first half of my book is a lot of ancient history before we get up to approaching space age. And he's kind of a hero, maybe for the first third of the buck, he 'cause he makes use of the moon and he uses for something cool. He uses it to figure out that the sun is a lot bigger than her, and that, if the sun is figure than earth, and it doesn't make sense that the sun goes around her that earth must go remers son. Now's twenty three hundred years ago, and he did it using the moon using a coin held front of his face. And using little crow. Tractors native sticks? Get the angle to the

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