36 Burst results for "Dr David"

Boston University's infectious disease specialist says "people are letting their guard down"

WBZ Midday News

00:48 sec | 3 d ago

Boston University's infectious disease specialist says "people are letting their guard down"

"After months of a steady decline, BBC's Mike Macklin spoke with an infectious disease expert. About the trend, While other states like New York and Connecticut seemed to have the virus under control. The death toll here remains stubbornly high Boston University infectious disease specialist Dr David Paymer. Says people, especially young people are letting their guard down. Societies opened up a little bit more people are starting to be forced to eat indoors and then I think people may have just grown a little bit tired of following. You know all the measures that would have been in place since March. Neighbor says with some of the nation's best hospitals here, we should be seeing fewer deaths. But the success of the fight against the virus still depends largely on the will of everyone to do their part. In Boston, Mike Macklin W

Mike Macklin Mike Macklin W Dr David Paymer Boston University Boston BBC Connecticut New York
Fresh update on "dr david" discussed on KMOX Programming

KMOX Programming

00:04 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "dr david" discussed on KMOX Programming

"I believe by Dr David Crane and Blue Tail. Don't quote me on that. But I'm pretty sure and his dad had played professional football and is a big big guy. And very active And because of all his sports, he was basically bone on bone in his knees and went to see Dr Crane again. I believe it was. It was Dave, who pulled out his stem cells injected them back in. I was years and years ago, the procedures were even better than they were back. Then back when Mark was still living here, and it was like a miracle. That he would have trouble getting up out of a chair. And then, after a few weeks, he was able to exercise and jog and place boards, and it's just unbelievable. So if you have bad knees or hips, especially any trouble areas, at least go in and see if you're a candidate for the stem cell injections. Blue tail medical group dot com. This sounds lover Show Brought to you by Ryan Kelly Thie home loan expert dot com You're listening to the lover show back as DVDs. Man could be more of a Monday just got scared, but I thought the time it archaea changed like when's it so That's next Saturday night? Correct. A day after Halloween. On Sunday night. Sunday morning. Okay, Saturday nights last Sunday morning. That's always today morning. Look, I went to law school. I have a full understanding now have a full in no, No, This is different. Have a full understanding of how for the 12 01, a Sunday morning. But it's still centered Still Saturday night, and we're falling backwards. So you get an hour of sleep, which is the suck. Except for that one night. Yeah. You sound like Borat or something has a question for us. Yes. Oh, Dave's in my office is right next to the bathrooms in particular the men's bathroom. Perfect view of it. Sneaking peeks. And you do you have a straight? Yeah. Has like a straight. I have a straight line of hearing. Unfortunately, sometimes I hear things they do not want to hear. Like nothing like I just hear things that I know. I'm not meant to hear an earlier today, days went into said bathroom and I could hear him talking with a co worker. And I was, you know, Sometimes your brain just goes in a direction and I was like, so they're standing. They're urinating, probably looking into each other's eyes. Having this conversation may not like staring into each other's eyes, but The whole men's bathroom situation is predicated on the honor system of like, Well, don't look down like and then I got to thinking like why? Why do you guys go in there? And you can't really cover yourselves up. When they could just build stall through. What's the point of not having the souls and if they had stalls everywhere would you guys be like, Oh, this is so much worse. It's just easier to use the urinal. You don't know the answer. I think every guy does right. It's because they could put more urinals and they can put stalls so they can keep you Khun have a faster moving, like, turn around and have 10 stalls for them. So you give 10 years older, three stall space, So they put in urinals because then you can keep people moving in and out fast, especially at stadiums or concert venues and things like that. So that's My understanding of why the euro kind of big like it begs the question. Why don't you have a urinal at your home? Yeah. Or like here, haven't I guess you're not worried about the lines. I've never I just made a joke about it, but I've never seen into the men's restroom here. How many urinals are there? 14 Three. Probably one more places to go. Then we do. Buy one. We have two stalls and one handicap stuff. But these were pretty small bathrooms here. If you were to go if you were to go into like a A stadium. I bet too. The places that boys can go. Oh, they do have much quicker than women, but I get it for a stadium. I guess like like here. I mean, have you ever been in the bathroom is like well with Linus like you guys to get rid of one urinal to normal solving ahead. He gets all the fun. We could have three stalls just like you guys do and it would be most most of the time when I go into the bathroom here. There's no one there so I could go pianist. Oh, but I don't agree on the right train. Some guys do. Just go even even honest. Even if the urinals are open. They still go in the stall is just It's just odd to me that it's like this is the men's restroom. And no matter what there's going to be a Europe it's weird. It is a little odd, and I don't look I don't look if somebody is trying to have a conversation with me. Probably not looking at in the eye. I don't look at him. Somebody will do. You're right. You're some people Dio do you look Face. But look, I just usually keep straight ahead. Moving next? Yeah, all right, So we're doing our thing. Here's how we do it. You're that close. Holy cow could just have a divider in between. That's still really close. It's like this, So I took an elevator. It's like an elevator. Do this. And if it's if I really want to talk to him, like, okay, look in the next segment hears. I want Todo. And you can't see this right now. But I'm looking off into space. Okay, It would be so creepy to be like, you know, saying some do And the whole thing is like not most guys just there's just like it seems like there's no privacy. And if someone wanted to just be completely weirdo, there's no protection they had and they have. Yeah, I've Had that happened many times when I look at another man It's weird. It's weird. It's just one of those things is weird. But do you think of it? Because I, you know, I really think about it. You have the option to put a space between you. You do? Yeah, but like Dave said here, there's only two I bet it gets disgusting that you keep bringing up state and everyone's drunk. You go in. Let's say it's a three Urinal bathroom and you go in and you're the only one in there and you go to the middle one..

Dave Dr David Crane Blue Tail Football Mark Ryan Kelly Thie Europe Borat Khun Linus
How Boston is handling COVID-19 as it gets colder

WBZ Programming

00:35 sec | 3 d ago

How Boston is handling COVID-19 as it gets colder

"Disease disease specialist, specialist, Dr Dr David David Haber Haber says says people, people, especially especially young young people people are letting are letting their guard their guard down. down. Societies Societies opened opened up a little up a bit little more bit more people are people starting are starting to be forced to be forced to eat to indoors eat indoors and then I and think then I people think may people have just may have grown just a grown little bit a little tired bit tired of of following. following. You know You all know all the the measures measures that that have been have in place been in place since since March. March. Neighbor says Neighbor says with some with some of the nation's of the nation's best best hospitals hospitals here, here, we should we should be seeing be seeing fewer fewer deaths. deaths. But But the success the success of the of fight the fight against against the virus the virus still still depends depends largely largely on the on will the will of everyone of everyone to do to their do part. their part. In Boston. In Boston. Mike Macklin Mike Macklin W. W. Visi Visi Boston's Boston's news Radio. news Radio. Five Five people people have died have died out out

Mike Macklin Mike Macklin W. W Dr Dr David David Haber Haber Boston Societies Societies Neighbor Disease
FDA approves Remdesivir as first treatment for coronavirus

WBZ Overnight News

00:24 sec | 4 d ago

FDA approves Remdesivir as first treatment for coronavirus

"Has approved the first drug to treat covert 19 rendez severe. It's a drug, which President Trump received during his treatment of Corona virus. CBS News Medical contributor Dr David Again check mark next to the drug thing. It's FDA approved. But I have over the last several months been able to and use this and patients in the right setting with Kobe 19 affection and this will continue.

President Trump Kobe FDA Dr David CBS
FDA Approves First Treatment for COVID-19

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:17 sec | 4 d ago

FDA Approves First Treatment for COVID-19

"Thie F D A is approved the first drug to treat covert 19 robbed a severe CBS's Dr David Egas says the drug cut the time to recovery by five days in a large study, But it's not the be all and end on a drug that has benefit when used early, But it's not dramatic benefit, and it's

CBS Dr David Egas
"dr david" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

05:39 min | 4 d ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Dr Marcus Hey guys. Oh Jeez were we lucky to snag this Guy Dr David? Sinclair is the New York Times bestselling author of lifespan why we age and why we don't have to if he has no me and you are a member of DSM. Or if you followed this podcast for any length of time, you know that I'm obsessed with biohacking with. Exploring human potential and longevity those sorts of things. Dr. David Sinclair is a tenured professor at the Harvard Medical School and he is considered the foremost expert in longevity science and He is the godfather of biohacking and he is just generally the most well respected person in this entire field and I feel so so blessed to have gotten him on the podcast. He was an incredible interview, Super Humble Very, very nice guy and I think you guys are GonNa get a lot out of this interview. It was longer interview. So we broke it up into two parts. This is part one. It speaks for itself. I'm not going to go too much into what we talked about make sure you listened to it in its entirety and make sure you tune in tomorrow for part two. Okay. Guys I. Hope you enjoy. This episode is brought being brought to you by the Dental Success Network Demo success network dot com slash free forty-five. We'll get you forty five days free to the most positive and educational. Network in all of dentistry including. As one of the divisions of Diaz, N is one of the largest bind groups. In all of dentistry, we have over one point, two, billion dollars of collective re revenue with the nine hundred plus dentists that we have in the network. So we have a lot of leverage with vendors. Additionally, we have an incredible continuing education library. So make sure make sure you go over to Donald Success Network. Ford, slash free forty five for forty five day test drive hope to the network enjoy this episode and we'll talk to you guys soon. Okay everybody well, I just have to welcome. An extremely esteemed guests. I'm a huge fan of this gentleman here It's a little surreal that I'm actually speaking to him today but for those of you that don't know specifically exactly what Dr Sinclair is all about I'm going to read a little bit of his bio. Dr Sinclair Dr David Sinclair has a PhD in molecular. Genetics. He's a tenured professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School. He has published over two hundred scientific papers is the CO inventor on over fifty patents and patent applications. He has cofounded a dozen biotech companies is in New York Times bestselling author of this book right here. Read it twice now Lifespan why we age why we don't have to He has been named on Time Magazine's list of one hundred most influential people and top fifty people in healthcare. So welcome to the Webinar Dr Sinclair. Thank you so much for being here I. Know How busy you are. Going to be thankful. Yes. Of course. So first of all, I want WanNa acknowledge you for making science cool and for bringing your topic to the masses you know of getting out there i. know it's very difficult to manage schedules and getting out there and being on big podcast like Joe Rogan's and you've been on my good friend Louis Houses podcast a couple of times. We have some mutual funds and Peter Tia and Louis and and everybody thinks the world of you and and everybody says that this persona that you present on these podcasts is just really who you are as well. So, I wanNA acknowledge you for. For making science, cool and bringing in bringing this really important stuff to the masses in this world of Click. Bayden and stuff. That's not really important that people said tend to to focus on is a really refreshing to have something like in the world. Thank you say that yes, of course. So I've heard, you mentioned for a long time that you are interested in longevity in the science of longevity from time you're just a child what got you interested in in in this bridge science from the beginning. Well, I think I'm pretty normal most kids including me. Around the age of four or five, get a huge shock that the older people they love. And the pets they love ah going to be gone. Sooner than later and It was a real shock to me. I can remember being told this. Brutal fact by my grandma. Who held my punches and? She said I'm going to die GONNA die you're GonNa die and then you're GonNa die. That's how things are shaping up through world. War Two. And the aftermath in Europe and to her that was just a fact it wasn't anything to be afraid of. but to a four year old, it's shock and so I think that probably a stuck in my mind. I've always thought about trying to help humanity. With my life devoted to making the world, a better place that's really were always wanted to do. And now in high school and more in college I realize that. We aren't really talking about the real cause of sickness and disability on the planet a way we're trading vigil diseases but. Kids don't get typically don't get dementia or heart disease and. I wanted to figure out why at an and we know really the aging but what we didn't understand and still. Don't fully understand. What is causing aging, and then why does it end up with these various diseases?.

Dr Sinclair Dr David Sinclair Dr. David Sinclair Harvard Medical School New York Times Dr David Dr Marcus Donald Success Network Time Magazine professor of genetics Louis Houses Joe Rogan DSM professor Diaz Europe Ford Bayden Peter Tia
Remdesivir Fails to Prevent Covid-19 Deaths in Huge Trial

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | Last week

Remdesivir Fails to Prevent Covid-19 Deaths in Huge Trial

"It comes to preventing Corona virus deaths. A large multi national clinical trial shows one treatment. Rendez severe doesn't work. CBS NEWS Medical contributor Dr David Vegas. My God is it will still be continued to be used in many patients until we have something significantly better, but it's a very important study to realize that this drug is not dramatic in terms of treating covert 90 Grand desert here is one Of the drugs President Trump took after he contracted Cove it

Dr David Vegas Donald Trump Grand Desert CBS President Trump
Johnson & Johnson pauses trials for Covid-19 vaccine over participant's illness

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Johnson & Johnson pauses trials for Covid-19 vaccine over participant's illness

"Johnson and Johnson halting Phase three trials of its covet 19 vaccine. Johnson and Johnson says it's halting its phase three testing. Clinical trial pauses are not uncommon. CBS's Dr David Egas thie action comes after one participant had an unexplained illness. The question now was the illness caused by the vaccine. The data Safety monitoring board will look at the data and determine whether this patient had a side effect. First of all that was related to the vaccine. It could have been a patient who received the placebo. 60,000 people are taking part in the study. This is the second phase three trial that's had to be put on hold. Steve Futterman CBS

Johnson CBS Steve Futterman Dr David Egas
25-year-old man first in U.S. to catch COVID twice, study says

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

25-year-old man first in U.S. to catch COVID twice, study says

"11, and we have the first documented evidence of a covert 19 re infection in the US. The study published in The Lancet shows, a 25 year old Nevada man was infected with distinct variants of the Corona virus on separate occasions, 48 days apart. CBS News Medical contributor. Dr David Agus. This is very important because it means if you had the virus, you are not immune going forward for any determined period of time, and everyone needs to use caution. The man tested negative between the infections in April and June. Wendy Gillette

Dr David Agus Wendy Gillette United States CBS Nevada The Lancet
Johnson & Johnson pauses trials for Covid-19 vaccine over participant's illness

The Inside Story With Marty Griffin

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Johnson & Johnson pauses trials for Covid-19 vaccine over participant's illness

"And Johnson is halting phase three trials of its covert 19 vaccine. Here's correspondent Steve Futterman with Mohr Johnson and Johnson says it's halting its phase three testing. His clinical trial pauses are not uncommon. CBS's Dr David Egas thie action comes after one participant had an unexplained illness. The question now was the illness caused by the vaccine. The data Safety monitoring board will look at the data and determine whether this patient had a side effect. First of all that was related to the I mean, it could have been a patient who received the placebo. 60,000 people are taking part in the study. This is the second phase three trial that's had to be put on hold. Steve Futterman CBS NEWS

Steve Futterman Mohr Johnson CBS Dr David Egas
New numbers come out on COVID-19 related deaths in Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

New numbers come out on COVID-19 related deaths in Washington DC

"Of of today, today, Maryland Maryland has has counted counted more more than than 4000 4000 confirmed confirmed and and probable probable deaths deaths from from the the Corona Corona virus. virus. 4003 4003 to to be be exact. exact. Virginia Virginia has has counted counted 3361 3361 deaths and in DC 637 people have died from Cove in 19 as of today, and the day A number of new Corona virus cases in our region has trended up since late September and early October in D C. Maryland and Virginia. What could the reason be for that? Dr. David Marco's e, an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, tells DC ist. It's hard to put a finger on it. But he says it could be a residual effect from Labor Day travel, He says there has been an increase in the spread of the virus among younger people, thanks to things like birthday parties bars in college. Forms. Asked if the outbreak at the White House will lead to more Corona virus cases around our region, Marco's, he said. It's too early to tell

Maryland Maryland Virginia Virginia University Of Maryland School Dr. David Marco Maryland Associate Professor White House DC
WHO doctor says lockdowns should not be main coronavirus defence

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO doctor says lockdowns should not be main coronavirus defence

"Organization, Dr says world leaders should stop locking down their countries and economies as a primary control method. My power has more Dr David to borrow from the World Health Organization appealed to world leaders yesterday. Telling them to stop using lockdowns is your primary control method of the Corona virus. He also claimed the only thing lockdowns achieved was poverty. HHS assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Bread Jaguar says communities seeing surges in Cove in 19 cases should take three steps steps to to slow slow the the transmission transmission of of the the virus. virus. One One Closed Closed bars bars and and limits limits eating eating in in restaurants restaurants to to have have people people avoid avoid crowds crowds and and three three get get at at least least 90% 90% of of people people wearing wearing masks masks went went out out in in public. public. Mike Mike Power, NBC news radio.

Mike Mike Power World Health Organization Lockdowns Dr David HHS Assistant Secretary NBC
Questions remain about Trump’s health as he returns to the campaign trail

The Morgan Show with Morgan White, Jr.

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Questions remain about Trump’s health as he returns to the campaign trail

"President from plants to take to the campaign trail next week with three scheduled rallies after his White House doctor effectively cleared him to travel less than a week after he left the military hospital, CBS News Medical Contributor Dr David Vegas. This coincides with the president having no symptoms from covert 19. Mr. Trump plans to be in Florida on Monday, followed by later trips to Pennsylvania and Iowa. And he was in full political mode on Saturday at a location where that is usually not done. The White House the president's first public appearance before an audience since being diagnosed with covert 19 was A house as a nonpolitical event on the South Lawn. But it turned out to be a shorter version of a trump campaign rallies. Sleepy Joe Biden's betrayed black and Latino Americans. If you think he can run this country, you're on the audience, made up mostly of conservative African Americans was packed closely together, some not wearing mask

President Trump Mr. Trump Dr David Vegas Joe Biden White House CBS South Lawn Florida Pennsylvania Iowa
Facebook removes Trump post falsely saying flu is more lethal than Covid

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

Facebook removes Trump post falsely saying flu is more lethal than Covid

"Trump that suggested the flu is more lethal than covert 19. He downplayed the virus again when he returned to the White House from the hospital last night. And said, We shouldn't be afraid of it. CBS is Dr David Vegas. I have seen cases where you get continually improving from this point, but I've also seen cases where there's a low, you know, he feels well, you take off the decade Ron the steroids, He's not going to feel well and there will be a crash and that energy we're seeing now will go away. White House correspondent Stephen Portnoy staffers

White House Correspondent Dr David Vegas White House Stephen Portnoy Donald Trump FLU CBS RON
Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

"In this mini episode, I speak with Dr David Perimeter Dr, Lisa, Mosconi Dr Dale, Br Edison about why Alzheimer's is a preventable disease and the lifestyle factors that can set the stage for Alzheimer's years from. Now, we also talk about this disticts of Alzheimer's disease and its impact on women, and what you can do today today to prevent cognitive decline in the future. Let's listen in starting with interview with Dr. David Pearl Mutter, a board certified neurologist and four-time New York. Times bestselling author, we do know that a for the most part Alzheimer's is a preventable disease. This is a disease costing Americans two hundred and thirty billion dollars affecting five point four million of us. That is dramatically exploding in terms of its incidence and prevalence globally, and yet you know the notion that our lifestyle choices are not relevant is it does take my breath away. You know it's all about living a life that is less inflammatory and that certainly transcends are narrative as it relates to Alzheimer's but. Involves Parkinson's and involves coronary artery disease diabetes and cancer, and all of the chronic degenerative conditions, and you know what really is so very important and I think sort of stands in our way of getting this information to really have traction is the time table that this is effective over for example, you tell somebody wear your seatbelt that'll be good for you. They get in a car accident they're wearing their seat belt and they say, Hey, I get it that worked yesterday I was in that accident worked. But the inflammation issues that are relevant in terms of causing the brain to degenerate or narrowing the coronary arteries. These are issues that are beginning to take shape ten, twenty, thirty years prior to actual disease manifestation, and therefore it makes it very challenging for the consumer to connect those dots. Let me give you an example. In the journal Neurology, which is arguably one of our most well respected neurology journals on the planet period viewed. There was an interesting study that was published and it measured in a group of several thousand individuals who were in their forties and fifties. At the time it measured markers in their blood of inflammation and the study then came back and looked at the same group of individuals twenty four years later, the study again was just. And what it found was really quite remarkable. There was very direct relationship between risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and having had higher measurement of blood inflammatory markers twenty four years ago. So what does it say? It says that if you? Elevated Markers of inflammation in your blood today, you are setting the stage for Alzheimer's years from now and so that your lifestyle choices today whether you choose to eat low carb high carb high fat low-fat whether you choose said integrity vs physical activity the amount of sleep that you get. Hopefully that is restorative the amount of stress in your life, etc. these are all extremely important variables. Which you have control that clearly are connected to your brains Dini. This is not live your life come what may and we have a pill for you. If you're suddenly cognitively impaired is the other story. The story is that you make lifestyle choices today that will dramatically impact how your brain works to three decades from now

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Disease Dr David Perimeter Dr Dr. David Pearl Mutter Neurology Dr Dale New York Br Edison Parkinson Times Lisa
Solving The Stress Cycle

Food for Thought

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Solving The Stress Cycle

"Navigating stress can be challenging at the best times and now in the midst of a global pandemic with concerns for our health and finances were all facing a new set of worries stresses ingrained in our world and day to day lives, and while this might sound overwhelming if we learned to understand it, we can then hopefully break the stress cycle. So. This meets food for thought sees Pharmacist Tunnel for Dr David Hamilton and I explore what stress ready is how we can control it and intern combated Hello David Hi there how are you today of? Thank you for asking I am very very well thank you how about yourself a really good. been working on morning on the bookwork in. Mathematics in Part Team University degree in Maths and physics. So I I was working or not this morning as well. So it's been. A multi tasking morning. Feeling that sounds incredibly strenuous. So just destroying your mind further today. I'm talking about strengthened kindness and self esteem missiles, things today, and let's start by a stat that I wanted to bring up. So research has shown that if adults in the UK. That work seems to be riches convenience through what you just said the biggest stress factor. Now, do you think this could be where businesses are perhaps maybe going wrong in terms of health of their employees and how they looking after them Yeah I think different companies have different different ways of looking at us, I think some companies. Don't really either notice or it's not so much of a big deal. The stresses experienced by employees it is other companies the new of a s really much. Something that they really have ongoing programs like stress management, Magma volt in a couple of companies. Where we've actually look to closing the culture of kindness really as an antidote to stress I think, varies from one company to the next and I think it's just the. You. Know. How How. Much I. I guess the the company not really notices a what's happening with employees in Ho what the Anita? Exactly exactly and I know you do a lot of work as well in the area of even being kind to one enough and the fact that. I the way we speak to one another as well as noticing the effects of stress because there's different types of stress isn't that that can affect us and how we talk to each flea could be a factor the definitely I mean but we have you know what you call acute stress the stuff that just happens. Because of something, maybe even something not necessarily this happened but your your perception, your perspective on on something here the way you look at something for example, and then you get a law of was what you might call episode stress. You may get a lot of a stressor, a succession of them and I think if these we hand and then stress becomes almost a hobby is. Something that you've experienced a law. Then we call that chronic stress and so and that's when I think that's when you stop to associate when people talk about the impact of stress on our health. I think in general we we're more more thinking of the impact of chronic stress can along term stuff that that really does occupy much of our psyche, but really has stone physiological effect.

Dr David Hamilton Pharmacist Tunnel Intern Part Team University UK Anita
Trump gets experimental drug aimed at curbing severe illness

Hefren-Tillotson's Your Money and You

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump gets experimental drug aimed at curbing severe illness

"To receive care at Walter Reed Medical Center in Maryland in what his doctors have described as a multi pronged treatment for covert 19. Aside from rounds of rim disappear, the president was also given an experimental treatment made by Regeneron. They're polic Lo Antibody cocktail is currently in clinical trials. But Dr David Nance NASA. Rather he is the chief medical officer of UPMC senior communities, says it follows a concept that has seen success with other diseases. I think the decision making here is that we know the track record of this group of compounds overall eyes generally pretty good, and we know that it looks promising for Cove. It Details Katy K. Television that with the uncertainty of the president's condition and a treatment that looks promising using the medication still in his child phase was a reasonable and reasonably safe risk to take.

Dr David Nance Nasa Walter Reed Medical Center President Trump Upmc Katy K. Television Maryland
Explaining President Trump’s path to recovery

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Explaining President Trump’s path to recovery

"CBS is Dr David Egas tells us about drugs that have been prescribed for the president has received two treatments specifically for Cove in 19. That is an antibody cocktail to monoclonal antibodies by company called Regeneron. It's a one shot that last for 21 days, as well as began really receiving daily read disappear. An intravenous antiviral medicine both work in different ways on the virus, So in a sense, they could be complimentary. Although he's been no clinical trial today, using the two of them together,

Regeneron Dr David Egas CBS President Trump
Trump gets experimental drug cocktail for COVID-19

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:21 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump gets experimental drug cocktail for COVID-19

"Says the president has received a single dose of an experimental antibody treatment, CBS News Medical Contributor Dr David Egas clinical trials. They're not formally finished and there has not been in a FDA review. Of the drug yet, but certainly it showed encouraging results in the clinical trials to date, his doctor says. Mr Trump is fatigued and has a low grade fever.

Mr Trump Dr David Egas CBS President Trump FDA
Global coronavirus deaths surpass 1 million

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:23 sec | Last month

Global coronavirus deaths surpass 1 million

"One million deaths worldwide. Covad 19 death toll reached that grim milestone on Monday. Here's CBS's Dr David Vegas. This includes over 200,000 United States over 140,000 in Brazil. Over 95,000 in India over 75,000 in Mexico, 42,000 United Kingdom and I could go on. It really is him every country on the

Dr David Vegas United Kingdom United States CBS Brazil India Mexico
"dr david" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:59 min | Last month

"dr david" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Oh my gosh is awful and there's you know there's a lot of similarity with this site kind storm is starting to be kind of tossed around that I that stage I said I. Really Hope that some researchers somewhere will will look at the research that we've done in. We'll see the papers we published in the approach taken We'll. We'll learn what we've learned about sight kind storms and then I hope they will also look at how we do drug repurposing and how they can systematically look for drugs. It could work in new ways and I kind of went back to focusing on the road for about thirty more seconds and I was like wait a minute. Maybe we should just do and you know Mitt why here I am hoping that some researchers somewhere will just do what we've been doing for the last eight years maybe we should do it, and so that Monday I reach out to my team and I don't remember there was a meam around that time. It's it's big bird and he's like on a horse we ride at dawn, and so I sent that out to my channels like we're we're taking. This thing on we ride at dawn and so yeah, we shifted a lot of our focus had been chasing after Cova. Yeah. From what I know you you harness I think over thirty people to effectively just go fulltime hardcore into reviewing southlands of papers that had been out there around this to identify these drugs. Yelich. Similar to what you identified as a shortlist for things to try for Casamance like okay. Can we come up with our own short-list for covert? That's right and so it's about utilizing all of the data available to try to figure out what drugs have already been tried that looked promising in need to move forward to clinical trials, and also what drugs maybe haven't been tried yet. But based on the research we've done in the past and other side kinds from disorders and what we're seeing with this one what other drugs that we should be trying, and so it's been this kind of dual effort to look at what's being used and also think what else should be used an amazingly We've got this huge team of volunteers, most of medical students. From Penn but also around the country that have been going through the thousands and thousands of medical research articles in pulling out data from these these papers Amazingly we found that over two hundred, fifty different drugs have already been given to covid nineteen patients and you know in the news, we hear about the same three to four drugs every day. But actually literally over two hundred other drugs have been tried and the problem is that many of those drugs are not getting much attention because you know we. Focused a lot of effort and resources on a few few drugs, and so what we're trying to do is to try to keep an eye on all the drugs being tried get a sense for which ones look promising and which ones do we need to actually focus more attention on so that we said that we're not just you know putting all of our eggs into a couple baskets. She's I mean. So powerful in a moment best traditionally, there's been not just in medicine, but in science, there's been this. Silencing effect that tends to happen where have amazing researchers, amazing labs, amazing teams around the world going deep into very narrow problems and focusing only on this one question, and they're very particular ideas that they're. They're having to test them, which is necessary because a lot of times it takes a huge amount of time resources and yet when they do that, they're also not communicating you know and so little discoveries and things that have been tried all over are being. Exist in their own silos and there's no sharing and no ability. There's no sort of like medal ends at looks down on all of this until somebody doesn't Meta analysis and and says, okay. So across the board, what are we learning and it sounds like that's sort of what your doing in the context of trying to find drugs across all these different research labs yellow that had been working and sharing the information in a central place for everybody will say, oh And just accelerate the whole process. Yeah. We're doing basically real time meta-analysis the meta-analysis you describe typically you do that three or four years after the first or the first few trials are done and you look back and you say when you combine it all together, this is what it really looks like. But what we're saying is that we don't have time to. Look to wait three to four to five years to look back wounded do a real time analysis. So in real time, we're looking across the whole board and the only way to do that is with a lot of people and so thankfully, we've had a bunch of volunteers on board and then I've been able to a number of my members of my lab. At Penn, I run a center. It's called the Center for Science treatment and laboratory, and it's funny just because storm is something that we talked about a lot within casselman Aziz but of course up until recently, this is not something that really had been thought about beyond castle means I mean, there are other side consumed disorders as you said, it was. kind of this moment where I found I found myself saying, I, really hope someone follows our approach in a really hope that they can redirect their lab and then just saying you know what if I had if I was still hoping that someone would find a drug for me for castleman disease I wouldn't be here right now and it's only because I turned that. Into action where I said Okay I'm hoping for this to do something about it that I'm even even alive in. So it's a cytokine storm disorder for I'm benefiting from a repurpose drug and we identified it through this really systematic approach. What if we just kind of wash and repeat all three of those things Cova decide to cancel him disorder where there's a Great Opportunity. For Drug repurposing. But we won't find that drug unless we take early systematic approach. So you're making great strides and meanwhile all these people are in this with you. But when you zoom the lens out in your own life and your personal life you were sitting here, we're having this conversation. You are alive with energy like you're fiercely committed you're taking. That does that you've had since you were a kid and going all in on this you're smiling and radiant, and yet you know this thing that you have you still and nobody knows what time we're guaranteed but you having been through what you've been through. You wake up every morning fiercely aware of your own mortality and an of the lack of promise that. You'll wake up the morning after we talked to the very beginning of this about overtime and how over time in sports this time that you didn't acute have you don't know how long it's GonNa last, and if you make all the right moves you win or move onto another over time if you make make mistakes the game's over and the reason that. That analogy of fitting for the way that I feel right now and how I live my life is that like all of us I don't know what tomorrow will hold but but I had this awful disease that has shown to be relentless in in many other people in also in me. In so so I can really sense that the clock is ticking down but for me, it's really helped to focus me even more mean I've just I've never had a problem with getting focused on things, but it really does help me to say what are the most important things that I need to work on in that I need to focus my attention on because I don't know about the future and I think that there's to your point. There's kind of this macro feeling that I've gotten the cove is kind of reminded all of us that were actually all in overtime me no. We don't like to think about how we're all in overtime but I think that Cova has made us realize that like, oh my gosh. This fires could just hit one of us or someone we love out of nowhere and that is terrifying, but it can also be really clarifying and it can help you to say okay if that's the case if I if I'm in overtime than maybe I'm GonNa make some decisions that are different if I'm feeling like I'm in the first quarter in the United got the rest of my game to play, which is I think for me was really Clear when I think about Caitlin is relationship where when we broke up, I was like, well, we're twenty five years old if it's meant to be, it's meant to be and so now I'd say that you know if it's something that I think I need I wonder that that that should be done then there's no kind of let's wait to see if it happens. I mean, I think clarifying a really powerful..

Cova Penn Mitt Casamance Caitlin Center for Science casselman Aziz castleman
"dr david" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

04:39 min | Last month

"dr david" Discussed on Good Life Project

"I've heard you describe your life as two half times in five overtimes. . Interesting you know because it sports reference comes easy you. . Grown up as a kid in around. Raleigh . North Carolina, , it sounded like your life you pretty much live. . It was like football as your religion almost. . That's right. . Tell me I. . Mean What? ? What was it about that? ? Because a there seems to be interestingly some foreshadowing in terms of conviction and devotion and work ethic that showed up there and relentlessness. . That has transferred later to July but some curious what were your aspirations back then early on I had this dream of of one day playing college football and I don't know if it was because I was so close to the NC state football team. . My Dad was the team doctor for NC state and so I'm I spent so much time there and kind of just idolizing. . The players and I love the sport I loved the athletic. . I also always really really liked the strategy part of football. There's . a as you know there's so much more going on between snaps during snaps than you necessarily can see, , and so I just I loved the game and I think is an and now I look back many years later I think that. . It also is probably just a reflection of my personality that I locked onto something and yes, , there are things about football that I love. . But but it was also the thing that I was locked on doing in the goal that I had set and so I just put everything I had into it yet. . So your doctor was the teen by for my Dad yes that's your dad. . Yes. . What did he share any of the experiences because I know it's interesting because you know football has had an interesting reputation and a spotlight over lives really decade from. . A medical standpoint I'm curious whether as you were coming up and playing at higher and higher levels, , your dad being the doctor who was working a lot of football athletes whether you guys have ever had conversations about that will also my dad actually included me with him for like everything I mean I was on the sidelines with him for Football Games and I was in the locker room with him before games at halftime and after games, , and so I I was very much with him throughout and but I have to say that this is like the. . Nineties thousands when when we really just didn't know what we know now I mean, , we thought concussions were a temporary thing. . You just kind of worked through over a few days. . We had no sense for for the long term impact them and says, , I look back on anatomy that I mean it was almost like we we were playing this sport and we didn't know the risks <hes> and. . You had aspirations beyond I. . Mean Highschool was one became but also it sounds like you had aspirations for sure college. . was there an inkling in your mind that said I want this to be my career or was it just <unk>? ? Did it never sorta like get to that level? ? You know I the goal that I had was to play college football that was growing up that was that Was the goal it wasn't to play professionally it wasn't even certain things to do in college. . It was just I want to play college football, , and as you know that that kind of singular focus than change once I. . got there. But . really for me, , it was played college football. . Yeah I mean I'm really curious about what you said also that you kind of obsessed with not just the. . Physical aspects of the game but the strategic aspects of it you ended up playing qb playing quarterback, , and so it's almost like you're there's a huge leadership aspect to it. . There's a lot of complexity and there's a requirement in that position to process vast amounts of information and a lot of complexity that's changing in real time and also not just think about it but make decisions and take action. . It's something that <hes> I loved about the game was the exactly all those things integrating so much information acting on it and and something I enjoy. . But I don't think I've realized just how important those sort of skills would become as I've moved on in dealt with other challenges in life so you end up actually In Georgetown Lane Football, , what we actually studying there. . So I planned to go when I chose to go to Georgetown one of the main reasons that I wanted to go there because they had a really strong pre med program and I wanted to do a health sciences major because I was really interested in sports medicine it was okay. . This is kind of a way to to Meld my interest in medicine with interest in sports and so I was from the very beginning interested in going into medicine. . But as you know everything really changed once I got there in. . My interest in sports medicine really really shifted. . So

David Vega Belga Covid brain cancer Georgetown Ron
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:17 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And so we set up the technology, being sure that we could still operate under those circumstances. North Dakota access is big offer everything. Yeah. I May Hook you up with the governor of North Dakota because they've been trying to figure out how to help the Indian nations there, and they have a big alcohol and substance drive, and this may might be something of interest to them I at least with the First Lady of North Dakota herself a recovering person. They're always trying to come up with novel and interesting ways to to approach this. The, other thing about smart recover you mentioned you know John Kelly always very careful to use the word mutual aid society, so we're not biasing one over another. Just we know Ryan's working than what everyone fits for you good, do it. The ones that work is the one that will work. Back I want to get back to something at the beginning About the debit card? Yes, that's EXAC ruined. Go the debit card because I felt like I've seen I. Don't remember where I read this somehow early on in the monetary reinforcement literature. I remember seeing that debit were better About that. Yeah, so the researchers found that money is a more efficient reinforcer than anything else like gift cards. Just because you can use it anywhere you can use. You know anytime and. So then the question is wait. You're giving cash to people who are going to go buy drugs Zach ethical. and. What we did was we identified a debit card? SMARTCARD system now it looks like a regular visa debit card. It's not identifying. Nobody would know that you have a problem with substance. Use Disorder by looking at the car. But you can use it almost anywhere, but not quite so for instance you can't use it at a bar. A liquor store an escort service. You know all the things that provoke risk for relapse. You can't spend more than the daily spending limit. You agree to with your coach. You can't use it after retail store hours close. You can't convert it to cash at an ATM or gas station. So. We have a whole bunch of protections built in. It's not perfect, but it's really really good so somebody who gets this horrible craving and they want to go to am to some ATM in dangerous neighborhood with a lot of drug deals. And spend two hundred fifty dollars on drugs. Suddenly they are blocked and we got the alert. That they're in trouble. So we can get somebody to do an intervention. Before the relapses started and that is a beautiful thing. And its technology that I didn't even know existed, but you put that together with the other stuff that we've been able to integrate and you now have. Instead of a rickety bridge across a giant chasm where the steps are so far apart. Many many people fall through. We now have a safety net. Like a trapeze artist flying through the air, and if they fall, we can catch them before they get her and that was the idea behind this product. Democrats longtime. That that was the advantage to them, but I think I interviewed even somebody Gary on this show years ago, who created these things or was advocating for the I can't remember who it was, but. That's reason they they work so well. Cravings brought up. That was the other thing I want to talk about and I feel like. This can be a controversial statement. I'm going to frame it in a way that it won't be too. Nutty which is I, feel like our professions gotten too hung up on cravings. In craving, everything's about, is he? Having craving was craving scale, Bubba Bubba I have always found that the more difficult patients were the ones that had it all together and didn't have cravings that somebody who wouldn't do their work. who would be relapsing in two weeks while somebody who cravings I could look at them and go. Yeah, that's this disease is awful. Let it reminds you to go check in with your whatever we just wanted to check with your coach. The get on the whatever it is they need to do. Let that motivate you, and if it becomes so overwhelming that you aren't going to be able to make it, let me know. But but we seem to be just focused on people having cravings, and I think a huge huge mistake. Where do you think? Yeah so craving really got legitimized when the DSM five the American Psychiatric Association's Bible of diagnosis included craving as a criterion for diagnosing substance use disorder. Well, that was fine. That was scientifically valid the problem. Is a lot of people. Don't really perceive their cravings. They respond to cravings. How do we know that we can brain image their blood flow in their reward center, and see that even a fleeting picture of their favourite drug stimulates the brain to activate. And you can flash that picture faster than their conscious brain can detect so they don't know they saw that now. What's an analogy to that in in real life? If you're driving along the highway at sixty miles per hour, and in your peripheral vision, you see a billboard advertising a casino on the way to Atlantic City. You get a craving to WANNA. Go to that casino and get high. and. You don't even remember that you saw that billboard. That's how quickly the brain response and producers craving, and so if you, if you treat people based on the notion that craving will be you know my clue my key. You may totally miss that. `vulnerability will, but but I see. In your broad out the what I think. Most clinicians use as craving as a sort of a hunger when you're Craig which I agree your contract which you're pouring into, it disturbs thinking. Because as because that's the that's the real when they don't feel the craving, but they get the thought to go visit Julie. WHO's Julie Well? I used to buy heroin from her but I. Don't know she. My friend just had I just needed to go see her. They don't. They don't have the the hunger part. They don't have the I. WANNA use bar. They just have the disturbed thoughts so. Don't put that into the graving category. No? They don't that distorted thinking. It's much harder to tease out. It's one of the things that cognitive behavioral therapy is very good at teasing out, but that's a rigorous protocol, and and that's why we use that in firm, clearly laid out by expert psychologists in text material with exercises to get the patient to think these things through step by step. But when we combine that with rewards, and this is what the research has shown over and over again. That's when you get your best outcomes. Because now you're stabilizing the motivational system your exercising the cognitive.

North Dakota Julie Well North Dakota access Bubba Bubba John Kelly Ryan Atlantic City Zach Gary heroin Craig DSM American Psychiatric Associati
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:13 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The next time to work up to twenty bucks. So. This is a system that gets. People started where they're at. Engages them without a lot of demands or expectations now it's a little controversial to some people. It's called harm reduction. Your goal is I start with harm reduction workup absence when somebody's ready for that. And our algorithm allows that flexibility, so we observe the progress every few days with another task, we will get the appointments. Somebody's attending and our time it staying for the duration are they're doing their cognitive behavioral therapy? And we increase the rewards. And that worked for this woman some. Go Go back to the harm avoidance for a second. I've always. Sort of elected I I've never said harm avoidance. I understand harm avoidance. It has a place, but I always said I'll work in abstinence only, but I ended up getting my ex certification, so I can prescribe suboxone it, but during the training for this accurate. I particularly these days. My God, we have no option but to start with harm avoidance of just such a massive problem. We have to start somewhere and it ended in tally rate I. It's just ridiculous. Everything's ridiculous, so we have to. It's like a segue ambulance drivers now. We got save lives I. But but to to that point about harm reduction during my training for the expert of -cation I using the term right is X. certified or something. Yeah, your your waiver to prescribe Buprenorphine, which only you know, maybe certain tens of thousands of doctors. We need all doctors. You have to be able to treat this problem. But they brought up naltrexone in its various You know implantable injectable whatnot, and they they they're. And I'm just truly my hand before the tell you. The story is on a fan I'm a phantom trucks and abuse it alive if he's a good effect. And the lecturer and the little team that was presenting the stuff to us said well trek on. Yeah, good on further that Oh my God. Great, they're using this. As part of the harm avoided strategy, and it should be in the lineup. You know for skilled people to use. Anywhere now. We don't recommend it for anybody. Because we lost to patients to follow up and I thought, wait a minute. You are not able to contain. Keep your patients in. Follow up, so you're blaming the medicine and I know they're tougher patients when they're not on their opiates. I know there, but I know how to do that and I'm imagining with your guys ability to monitor and stuff something like naltrexone should be an option for the right case. Am I am I? Yeah, I think that's exactly right. That's what the science shows. So the NIH did a big multi side head to head study of Uber Nor phen- or suboxone is the most common generic and and vitriol the. Month long trucks on and. Dr! I worked on that product for ten years I was the vice president of the company that developed it helped. Get it through the FDA and get it into. Widespread use and what they was when somebody gets onto each of these medicines, they have about equal success. Over the long term. Both of them work, they work differently, but they work at the center of the brain where it really matters and they both work to stabilize the addiction. Now for Deborah trawler, naltrexone detox I so some people don't want to go through that, but other people do. Or other people have been on. Buprenorphine. They WANNA come off it, but they know they're going to be feeling. Withdrawal and craving and they want to get onto. The vivid trawl Naltrexone to stabilize them for a few months at that point, so it's really something that should be part of every providers toolkit. You wouldn't treat cancer with just one chemotherapy. That would be crazy. It's crazy and it's I. Know What they're doing is the patients are better patients on be Norfolk than they're more difficult about tracks and that's our job is to deal with it. Deal with those difficult to avoid it so I always. Get upset by that part of the deal, but we. We did a study with buprenorphine with suboxone in inner. City Cincinnati on this was funded by the governor of Ohio at that time governor John Casick who ran for president. And they funded us to provide this to buprenorphine patients. Who should have good outcomes anyway? In what happened in that Comparative Comparative Study is that the people who also got our incentives. They actually had twice. The rate of absence from opioids core as the people who only got the FFYNNON counseling right so even with a good drug. Saying it's not perfect. People are still able to get high and US opioids on top of it. And that means they can get into trouble. So when you add the incentives, the see these things enhance the efficacy and the persistence on medications for addiction treatment, and so that actually led to US getting a million dollar grand prize from the governor for our success there. Let's do Lamar on vivid trial, because I feel like it's not used enough, and I've seen some miracles with stimulants and anything. K., usually, and I've seen some really interesting results with alcohol but people I. Don't yet know how to. Ask Priori figure out who the cases are. That are going to respond I ended up just getting to it as part of my struggle to help them with their sobriety, but there are definitely let issues alcohol because it's the more vivid example people that just sometimes can't stay sober Kansas over in. I'll be damned. If not treks on doesn't make it possible. is their way to identify those people ahead of time. Yes, so if somebody.

Buprenorphine naltrexone Naltrexone US Comparative Comparative Study NIH cancer FDA vice president Norfolk lecturer Lamar Kansas Cincinnati Ohio president John Casick
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Agen so that you can use the benefit of the fellowship of AA. The social contacts the acceptance the N. even works with one of the important things today and type of programs do which is to help. People overcome to shame and the guilt. And the feeling that there's something morally wrong with me, which is not the case? The research shows very clearly the. The range of people who come down with addictions is entirely across society. You have good people and you have bad people. You have people who have everything for them, and you have poor people who have nothing on anybody's physiology can become addicted, and the opioid epidemic has proven that to most of us because you get these drives in your system, the withdrawal transforms. You're thinking and you start thinking about the drug more than you think about life. We've been able to find that. You add these motivational incentives now. It's really just a foundation. It's not recovery. It's not treatment. It's just setting the stage for someone to now be motivated to want treatment to want recovery to want the twelve step fellowship. And then you have to God that as well so we do the drug testing. And we do it remotely. Which is another cove? It a benefit that we already had established. And we do valid rigorous, truly random, truly witness drug testing. And we reward for initiating the effort to become absent, but then we have somebody who's motivated to want the help to be absent, so they wanna ask their counselor or their coach. How do I do this? I WANNA get those rewards. I don't know how to care myself and why I get these thoughts. How do I block them? How do I protect myself from the people who want to sell me drugs now? That I'm home. I'm not working. There's nothing going on on board all day long and so it turns out. This is extremely valuable during the covert era. So. Are you doing a buffalo swab or something about swab? Yeah so we ship our members. We call the members because they're doing this on their own accord. They're not mandated to this. They're not patients coming to strictly through a medical system. And our members. We ship them a palm sized. Saliva Drug Test Kit. or a palm size, Breathalyzer for alcohol, or even a palm sized smoked. Alizer for smoking. and. They carry these with them. WHEREVER THEY GO, they're A. Traveling salesman, driving on the highway, and they get a text alert in the next hour. Pleased to drug test, so they'll pull over at the next stop, and they'll put their cell phone right on their dashboard of their car, and they'll put the the APP. Up in the APP will be set up to the video selfie camera of their smartphone. and. It'll give them instructions as they do this. They'll put the swab in their mouth. Collect their saliva. put the swab in the Little Cup. They show the Cup to the camera and we watch. We have even beings in customer service that watch. The test desktop display that it's a valid test, and which of the different categories of substances are absent or clean, and which, if any are positive? That is thirty. So? We're able to see for sure somebody off their opioids and separately we can see. Are they on their medication? If it's Buprenorphine or suboxone, we can see separately that they are taking that, but they're not using the opioids substances. What do you test for that profile? In addition to Leeds Buprenorphine, Methadone separately we test for Benzodiazepines, marijuana cannabis the amphetamines stimulants, so there's. A bunch of different substances we can test for. Those amphetamines are difficult to low false positive with both those right. Well actually if you use the latest immunoassays. They're actually very specific, so we get good results on these. And, we can if somebody wants to appeal. Our customer service actually can send off a sample or send them to a lab to get a urine test to do conservation. So we work with our members. Our goal is really to help them demonstrate that there's seeding. So it's it's. It's not a punitive approach. It's a reinforcing approach. And do they do? They have contact with a treating professional along the way here? Well, it's really interesting. We have rehabs that are.

salesman Buprenorphine Little Cup marijuana Methadone cannabis
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:39 min | 3 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Everybody Dr Podcast keep supporting those people that allow us to keep bringing you these pods. Thank you so much again for all the feedback. Don't forget the other podcasts, Doctor Dot, com and the screen. We're trying to be regular strain there. You can check it out. Deduct TV. And we have a call in show and some. Interaction with the streaming commentary on facebook and Youtube. And twitter and it's kind of interesting, so check that out. If you don't mind my guest, today is Dr. David Gas friend He. The website is dynamic health dot. COM dynamic dynamic ugly spells out D. Y. N., A., M., I. Care underscore buddies that what says and and. Care Health there you got dynamic care health, one word DOT COM. Yeah, thanks that as the healthcare. Dot Gifford. Thank you for joining us. My pleasure. So this intrigued me a not just because it's is an opportunity to talk about advancements in the treatment of addiction, but at a time like this when we're having to deploy technologies, it seemed particularly appropriate time to examine what's out there. Yeah we were a little ahead of the curve. But it's because the treatment of Alcohol Drugs Tobacco addiction is. So we got into this because we have members of the family that suffer from addiction. WRAPS ELDEST SON. Said Dad. Why is it your specialists in this field? If worked in forty years and yet, we just don't have great treatments and I. Said Oh we have treatment that would be the envy of anything modern medicine except nobody will use it. And he was shocked, said why not and I told him about financial incentives to motivate people to switch from instant gratification for drugs to instant gratification for healthy behaviors, and it's the best evidenced most effective and least utilized approach. We have in the whole field of addiction treatment. And he said why aren't people using it? And I told them all the obstacles, and he said, but don't realize that with technology. You can solve every one of those obstacles nowadays. Let's talk about how. So you can download an APP from the apple store or the android store, and you can sign up your son or daughter or spouse, and they can.

Dot Gifford twitter facebook Dr. David Gas Youtube
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

13:19 min | 5 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Is it splits into re layers. And he later they get bigger and bigger as you get closer to humans and older humans. They're the biggest but ultimately Bay You can watch their growth progression over time it and but but Craig talks on the work and the three layers are incredibly interesting. The first layer is the posterior insult which is responsible for home. I getting a strikes while interro session feelings of our body physically right to when you feel your we gotta go when I when we say I have a gut feeling it is registered cortes. Exactly and that was I thought. One of the coolest parts about is basically saying hey gut feelings are real guys like let's pay attention to this. There's a neurobiology here. It's interros option in it's registered in the Post cheerier insular then the second layer the middle layer is responsible for introspection. So it's looking looking inside ourselves at ourselves. More metaphysically not physical body but how we think how we feel and why And doing deep dives are ourselves and then the third layer is the anterior insular in the anterior is possibly at least for me the most interesting because the answer insults responsible for embassy in this and it shows us that entity is not something that is required like. It's not something. People are not capable of some people. Think I cannot be epidemic. Well too bad buddy. It's literally hardwired into your break. Even psychopaths have that they still have it. They just haven't practiced you know it's really again. That's where the Eric Kendall side comes in right so it's about interest inch water. We practicing if we don't you know you remember the saying if you don't use it you lose it. That is how the brain works. If you don't work out your muscles if you don't train your brain your memory your remote your emotionality your sensitivity your empathy as much as we train the parts of our brain that our society tells us we care about their focus on productivity. If we don't focus on the other stuff than we forget that it's there and eventually just kind of becomes dormant. It's always there though because it's literally represented physically hardwired into parts of our brains. Some of US feel like we cannot feel our bodies will. That's just because you haven't practiced it. It just takes time in practice to get us back to that state so again. That's part of why we created Apollo. Was that if you can provide. Somebody was something that can tap into that system from what we call bottom up from the body first then you prime the body for change and then the mind follows and so you know the the you know what Dr Damasio Calls Descartes's error that we made a mind body. Dual ISM is fundamentally flawed that the the brain is not just embedded in a body. It has an automatic nervous system that's also embedded in the body feeding it information so in a real sense. It's it's the human mind is a brain body exactly and I think one of the most fundamental parts of we were talking about. What can we do now right Especially people who are stuck in apartments ord who are stuck really struggling What can we do now is? We can recognize that one of the most fundamental things that is causing us what we call. Jeez or discomfort or symptoms of any kind is the fact that we deny the inherent intricate connections between the mind and the body. It's one of the most fundamental self deceptions which leads to a self misunderstanding. And sometimes for some people self hatred self avoidance all of these things that that prevent us from prioritizing going inside ourselves to figure out what are we really capable of you know who are we really We have to be curious to allow that curiosity to to be nurtured within ourselves. By you know reminding ourselves in. It's just us you know there's nothing to be afraid of. This is our opportunity. Any opportunity is is like an opportunity for us to be grateful for making it to this moment and then using that energy to help us make the most of that moment in that moment as Rhonda's says be here. Now Yeah right be here. Now is famous book by Ron Johnson. And you just back to the insular cortex again there's another interesting aspect to the front to back or anterior to post. Your structure is dead in our. You know. I think a lot of people know that on our Cortex we have. These essentially among these are representations of our body along the surface of our CORTEX. Birds Motor Motor and sensory function on the opposite side of her body. But we have something similar apparently in the insulin where there's little among Carolina's or they're they're much much vaguer and they go from vague to more vivid according to buy Do you make any thunder. What to make of that? It's just fascinating to me. It's just like there's there's days feelings and then their feelings that are more vividly located in our body. Is it just that just our constructed? Well that's a really good question. Dr Drew I don't know if I have an answer to that I could. I would hypothesize from from. I'm guessing it's just evolution. They probably the more. The clearest stuff is just the more evolved stuff and we don't move cast off or w mechanisms we just built stuff on top of them so I I think that is a very valid hypothesis. I think that there is a second hypothesis which is equally valid which is that the degree to which inexperience meaningful directly influences. How intensely or how a tightly it's encoded into our memory and when we're talking about emotionality or emotional content experiences in a lot of ways the emotional content is that is that other dimension that we oftentimes forget about or ignore. That really is what ads profound meaning to our experiences in our lives and so I think that I going. Actually this ties into psychedelic Work which is that. I don't know if you know Franz volume wider But Dr Volt wider is one of the leading researchers on Suicide and the mechanism upbeat in the brain. And I WANNA I WANNA get into that now so perfect transition and so. I think one thing that's been really interesting that also ties back into our study of mental health in Western. In general Western medicine is Serotonin and the SEROTONIN RECEPTOR. System and in psychedelics one of the major serotonin receptors has become a prominent a prominent interest. I should say is the five. Ht to center part of the reason why this receptor so interesting is because it was found several years ago that this receptor is the receptor that is bound by LSD and Md May and suicide by Franz will wider and some other scientists I believe all of them. I think Europe and what's even more fascinating. Franz Vala wider took it a step further. I think it was in twenty seventeen and he said if all of these I want he's I want to know what the cascade is. I want to receptors are activated. I maybe there's one receptor that is not dopamine secreted or increased by PSYCHEDELIC medicine And powerful positive experiences we know that lots of neurotransmitters change when people have these psychedelic mystical profound transformed experiences. What if there's one Trent neurotransmitter receptor? That's at the top of that chain. That ACTIVATES DOWNSTREAM CASCADE. Turns all the other stuff off. So he thought we'd know. Lsd suicide in India may bind five eight she to a. Let's just block five. Hd Two eight people so he gave people in a double blind randomized placebo controlled experiment LSD instill sided and also Tanzer and kit or placebo and Catanzaro is orally active chemical. That doesn't really have any effects other than it blocks five. Ht and what's so interesting. Is that people took Catanzaro in LSD or cancer and still and importantly these people did not know they were taking concern these people Kapeta completely attenuated or blocked shift in meaning from the experience of taking psychedelic medicine and basically when that block in meaning changed. They didn't experience any strange experience at all. They had no as we say. State of consciousness from just blocking one receptor. What's so fascinating about? That is is that when you really getting back to a reductionist perspective when you really look at. What makes a PSYCHEDELIC experience powerful? It's the emotional. Meaning fullness of that experience and how much of it is sort of brought forth or manifested in that status safety That is curated by ideally therapist or a clinical team and or in some cases a shaman. And so that safe experience allows these meaningful emotional things to come up and if we don't perceive we don't allow our brains perceive a shift in meaning then effectively the entire psychedelic paranormal or altered. State experience is completely eliminated. So why ask so? Interesting is because meaning is now located to one receptor and Wade out the way that we know that is because Essex Arise have a very interesting side effect. So s arise or selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitors. There used frequently and prescribed for depression and anxiety. they are one of the most over prescribed drugs in the US. And what is really unfortunate about them? Is it as a side effect? An unintended side effect of taking them. They cause a feelings of numbness and the most common representation of feelings of numbness is inability to orgasm achieve peak. Pleasure states so not only do. They numb us to negative emotions. Which is what we're trying to do by giving them the prescribing to people who have severe depression or anxiety but they also tend to almost positive emotions their nonselective. And how do they work? Well they fled the serotonin receptors in our brains and really our whole body. But for the purposes of depression anxiety in our brings a flood the receptors and the increase the amount of Serotonin receptors always. Now but psychedelics. Don't do that psychedelics. Act by creating a burst of activity at that receptor which creates a profound and radically meaningful entrance. Formative experience could be positive or negative by increasing. Im- literally going from new meaninglessness or blunted meaning to excessive meaning everything's meaningful ecstatic me. Ecstatic me the flowers. Meaning never seen the flower and look. I never felt the flower to look like that before right and so and but why is that important? It's important because it shows us that the amount of meaningfulness of inexperience is tied to this receptor and is modifiable right. So by the way that we that we perceive experience for example by perceiving a challenge with gratitude as as an opportunity to grow from rather than why me all of a sudden that challenge takes on entirely new meaning which allows us to become that much closer to achieving fuller version of ourselves through the process. South growth by overcoming that challenge. Talk talk more about How that's used. I'm assuming you're making the case for therapeutic context for its use some sort of meaning making with another person right for for that strategy just described. Yes really just by itself. Just you're saying just e just as Pharmacological Event. That's all it's needed. I mean I think that the most promising Sing that we can take from. All of this body of literature is that we can do it by ourselves by bringing ourselves into a present mind. Body balanced Homeo- static state whether it's through the practice of breath work meditation as we talked earlier. Mindfulness Yoga by feedback Psychedelics Apollo whatever maybe using the proper way We have the ability to access the.

LSD Franz Vala US depression interros insular cortex Catanzaro Post cheerier Craig Dr Drew Europe Eric Kendall Lsd Pharmacological Event Dr Damasio Rhonda Ron Johnson Carolina dopamine
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

11:58 min | 5 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"I'm safe enough right now to pay attention to the feeling of this gentle vibration on my leg or my arm. That means that I'm not actually going to die. I'm not actually under threat in this specific moment and that's exactly the way. The deep breathing works when we take a deep breath intentionally. It instantly tells our brain as we pay attention to the feeling of air coming into our nose in down our our our windpipe into our lungs that we have the time to pay attention to that feeling and so we have to be safe enough to have the time to pay attention feeling. We can't be running for a lion in that moment. And so that instantly a sub totally subconscious safety signals the brain that every time we breathe there. Every time we practice soothing touch or empathic listening any kind of soothing technique it constantly serves to retrain pathway. So that we feel safe in situations we used to feel threatened in and over time we start to be able to change more effectively. Does that makes sense. I Yeah I WANNA get in the way then all this stuff. So I'm I'm guessing. It seems like attentional mechanisms have a large role to play here and I adamantly used to talk about habits like two years ago we started talking about habits and how there wasn't enough conversation about habits and how habits are formed and how are sort of crystallized and you've moved from one habit to the next star. I want you to get into the weeds a little bit about that but before we do. I'm interested in the in the vibration. So I'm guessing. We're activating the DORSAL. Lateral free puddle. Cortex so we can start to feel felt in the insular. Cortex is sort of the mechanism. You guys are activating so I can't tell you for sure because the device has meddle in it and so he can't put it into FM Mariah machine. But I go I can tell you we've done. Eeg Studies Graham And we've done. Ekg What we do is we have like a time. Sync functional neuroscience lab that. We've done this working. So we basic what that means in fancy terms in less THAN ANTI GERMS IS. It means we measure brainwaves. We measured heart heart rate pattern through. Ekg We measured respiratory patterns through Respiratory Band Sweat Responses Pupil Elementary I movement and reactively and physical movement and sometimes a couple of other things all in tandem all same time when people doing different tasks and so it allows you to put together not just once one set of data but a signature of the body's doing at any given moment in response to positive stimuli threat stressful cognitive tasks physical tasks whatever it may be and so what we perceive to be doing and the reason we think it works so well the way does is because I actually mapped out the touch. Pathway I and my my work at the University of Pittsburgh it starting in two thousand fourteen. I was researching. How what makes people stop ruminating and I was working with. Is What again. He's not gonNA stop brooming. Brooding brooding thoughts negative intrusive thinking and what was really interesting to me about that. Was that my colleague who worked with a bit of time. Dr Greg Siegel at the University of Pittsburgh is a psychologist cog nurse. Client is WHO's very bellred will publish. And he actually discovered that rumination as a trait something that net negative intrusive thoughts at many of us half if you have them all the time. You're much less likely to recover from mental illness particularly depression and so I started researching at all. What stops rumination. I've ruminate right. We all do what stops rumination better than anything else. Somebody giving you a hug or walking into a room when you're having a bad day and at your favorite song is playing right that kind of thing just radically changes perspective and attention away from the negative intrusive or the source of the negative intrusive thoughts to something in the environment. That reminds us that. We're safe enough to to calm down to be present in the moment and so the pathway that activates is actually seems to be the insulin. I knock the prefrontal CORTEX I so we built interesting. And that and that's the pathway of touch it goes through a spinal column track called laminated which is which was discovered by a number of folks was most well characterized by a neuroscientist. Need Bud Craig. Who does incredible work mapping out the pathway in monkeys primates and showed that this pathway specifically conveys lambda one in the spine spinal column emotional context of of of touch and we basically sought out to to figure out if touch activates this pathway. In the way that but is that but Craig is saying in all of these incredible publications. Can we create a technology that reliably activates that pathway interrupts rumination response by boosting? Send signals a safety by sending these rhythmic patterns basically music that I compose from neuroscience for your skin instead of your ears and will that remind the body that it's safe enough to start enter a meditative state or effectively deep breathing state or a calm clear focus state and that's effectively from all the literature that we read and everything that we've put together that's effectively what we were able to do. We haven't shown we haven't shown the exact locations that are turned on yet but it works just like human touch and that's the way even touch works is. It's it's goes to the emotional insulin. I that the insulin it block inhibits tippety. That's overreactive to fear and threat. And then it's activates. The prefrontal court pre prefrontal cortex in the frontal cortex is responsible for that sense of strengthening and identity and agency in autonomy. It helps us make better decisions in situation so if anybody's interested in Bud Craig And this is not sort of saint hard called. How do you feel an intercept of moment with your neurobiological South? Where he really maps out. All these these ideas and I was recommended this book by Gary helped me. I'm blank on the name of the neuroscientist of Physician Dr Geek out over We've had in here with Sean. Carroll can help me. I'm trying to look it up on this isn't spark talking about I pattern here twice. She's also a musician. Interest this contest interest interest biscottis Interest recommended bud stuff to me and I ran through some article that she sent me and then I got the book. This is not gonNA faint of Heart. This is very difficult. Neuroscience but man is impressive and the fact that the inflow was crossed over with the model for track and The Atlanta one was really surprising to me. And do you have a philosophical interpretation of what it is about billing and touch? I guess it's interests of dealing and dealing in the sense of scanning our are Gropius after system. Bits all feeling right yeah. That's a really great question. I mean I also thought that was fascinating and I'm so glad familiar with literature because so few people are and I know it I I knew the real Iran to it is headed instinct from the pain and addiction world that we were not paying enough attention to the inflow cortex I just knew that was the answer and and She directed me in this direction. That was out there. It is there it is. That's what I'm waiting for about doubters. Young Yeah I love it. That's exactly what drove me into this into this area of the brain and so interestingly I think what where I sort of answered found the answers to my questions was looking at the evolutionary neurobiology of emotion so more. I'm sorry you're not geeked out of Diane please more so I think it's basically that you know going back through ancient primates. If you you know from humans all the way down one of the major things that you see changing the brain two of the major things I should say are the structure of Cortex so the CORTEX is that outer like five or six layers of the brain. That is really responsible for storing all of our memories and experiences over the course of our lives. It's incredibly complex in humans and thinking and reasoning and all that and we have a layer we have a middle layer that I kind of perceive an integrative layer that the great apes don't have Right And I think you're referring to classroom So another another area. That was actually. I think of the brain. That's very very hard to see was discovered. I think by Christoph Cockayne Francis Crick who worked with Eric. Kandel who air can dell discovered the mechanism of learning and memory for which he won the Nobel right at the semantic level. He he is. He's got some great books out there too right and so I think what's really fascinating so maybe taking a step back. What's really fascinating about the evolutionary evolutionary neurobiology? To me starts with Eric handles work because Eric Hand del decided to go back and say are a if I were going to figure out learning memory. Let's go back really far first and see if other animals even like ancient sea snails. That are three hundred million years old. Make Memories in similar ways and respond to threat and safety signals in similar ways to humans and ultimately that's what he found and that that basically the way that in a police lia three hundred million euros see snails neurons function to to grow in response and change in response to the threat and neutral and Different kinds of positive stimuli are relatively the same as the way that we do it. Some of the neurotransmitters work slightly differently in snails us but overwhelmingly the functioning of neurons. Same Sorry you go ahead and so taking that one. Step forward right that that shows us is made worse special as humans. But we're not that's actual our brains may be working away. That's more similar than we think. Fear Way we learned fear the way we learn to respond to positive things. Our Environment and neutral experiences environment is the same as the way that most animals do and so that part is important to recognize some knowledge the similarities as much as it is the differences so then we moved to the differences in the differences. Are The classroom. The the a thick the hugely fit cortex that's fully developed in humans. The emotional system right the insulin. And so what's really interesting is as you map out the growth of the insulin. Over time and by time I mean from starting with ancient ancient apes and end reptiles all the way through Great Apes Bonobos and then to humans and children and all the way to adult humans. What we actually see is that the insulin grows significantly the the insulin. Being the what we call the LIMBIC CORTEX the entire emotional cortex in there. Some other parts of the two. But it's again part of this. What we call the cortisol structures of the brain that are essential to identity and the insular expands into three layers that are relatively the same in great apes and the nobles as they are in humans and although very similar in animals that are more advanced that have community in their lives like dolphins elephants animals. We tend to think of as having more human characteristics in their communities more selfless characteristics and so was really interesting..

Bud Craig intrusive thoughts University of Pittsburgh Eric Hand neuroscientist of Physician Dr prefrontal court Gary cortisol Mariah machine Dr Greg Siegel Atlanta Iran Gropius Carroll Diane Kandel dell Sean Christoph Cockayne
"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

11:32 min | 5 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Let me just dispense with all the usual rejoinders. I hope everyone is doing well through this trying times. The Chinese curse or something I think of often which is may you live in interesting times? I think we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA do well with this but it's not gonna be without pain of all sorts economic and physical for those people who actually get the infection so we are recording this obviously in the shadow of the krone outbreak. We are all quarantined away and by Zoom. I Have Dr David Ray-ban David welker program. Thank you for having me. I really appreciate it and and so good to be here and huge fan. Run my childhood all my God. That's that's a big deal. Because you're about to geek out of all your training so let me let me and it's a perfect time for us to be talking Hopefully people can gain something from our conversation for the time so Dr Ayman Has Spent Fourteen years researching treatments to combat the negative effects of stress on physical and mental health? And I don't know about everybody else. But I'm feeling it right now. He's a board certified psychiatrist also a PhD neuroscience where he's a translational neuroscientist and inventor specializing in treatment. Ptsd depression anxiety substance use. We're GONNA talk a little bit later about his research with hallucinogens. Which was the original reason. I Sought out Dr able to be a guest on the show but with all this going on in the world and by the way he's working with maps jail and their see another under really leading researchers on psychedelics used. Md Ama in therapy these things. We'll talk about it but right now it is. The it's the Apollo and wearable technology that uses neuroscience touch and vibration to combat the negative effects of stress. The website is APOLLO NEURAL DOT COM. Apollo twitter is add. Apollo H. R. V. That about summarize it that sums it up Dr Drew All Right. So let's talk about stress. Let's talk about the spent half my day. Talking people off the ledge. It is stressful time. Likewise Yeah Yeah I think I think this is one of the most stressful times We've had in the last few decades. I think that it's important to acknowledge that it's important of knowledge what that stress does to us It's you know it. Increases Heart rate increase. Their reading rate it makes us sweat more makes us our thoughts moon faster and I think most importantly that stress over time it impairs our body's ability to enter recovery states. So what I mean by. This is and this is really critical. I think for all of us understand and I wish I had been taught us in medical schools something. I figured out my later. Reading and studies of the autonomic nervous system which is the balance of the stress and the threat in the safety response system and basically the sympathetic system is responsible for helping us maintain survival in situations that require fight flight or freeze responses to get to a place of safety while we're under acute survival threat Many of us feel that way right now. We feel like we're under a survival threat that we have to constantly protect ourselves. Be Hyper vigilant. Anything around us. They could possibly result in US getting sick. And this what this does is it shuts down our recovery response system which requires safety to actively. This is the system. That's responsible for recovery sleep creativity. Reproduction Digestion Empathy all of these things that our bodies do that make our lives enjoyable and warning and fun and so what happens. Is it up to us to remind ourselves in as many ways as possible One of the best ways used breath work training meditation. Yoga mindfulness biofeedback and things of this nature. Some other techniques include things like Apollo in psychedelics But ultimately it's up to us to figure out how to build strategies that strengthen the balance in our bodies balancing our minds between these two nervous systems to remind ourselves that we are safe. Were not in an acute survival. Tried to scariest things are were actually okay and we actually are in a place where we have time to spend with our families. That's something that who would have thought we wanna know what had happened right. Everything's kind of slowing down. There's there's many different ways to look at this situation and I think that's cold was calling it a four sabotage tab and we all these years that we're going to have our but pay our debt to the Sabbath for a few months. Well although I a couple of things I We have I started actually spoke to Stephen Porges and Alan Shore Gary if you can give me the show numbers on those. They're out from behind the pay wall now so you can listen to them. As importers of course the polly Bagel theory and really elucidated some of the mechanisms whereby the person pathetic system which is part of the automatic nervous system gives us our free response and how it can be a problem sometimes particularly for those of us that had trauma early on in childhood and Dr Alan Shore Young Guy that worked on this when the earliest research well co-leaders it'd be information of all this gary deal. Those numbers chance scary. There lost Gary goes show. Sorry Yup I am here. Alan shore is episodes. Sixty five possibly more. But I'm not that's I what I'm seeing and I think that was an important one. Okay and then. Porzingis was sixty three ninety and more recently three ninety five but back to the the fourth Sabbath I. He actually part of the problem with Uh spending a lot of time together is everybody is in that automatic heightened state. I've noticed actually in a time when we all should be coming together. I'm I'm witnessing and I'm hearing about lots of ability and conflicts just the time when we should be killed during our time together. People are too geared up right. And that's and that sort of the. That's a threat pathway. Really taking hold right and it's up to us to to remember that there are two. There are multiple choices with the way we approached this threat The way we're approaching it with constant fear and hyper vigilance were constantly overwhelmed and surrounded by overwhelming stimuli news People talking about people dying and the contagious of the of the illness. All these things are are really scary to be surrounded by anybody hearing about that stuff. All the time would be expected to be stressed in irritable. That's not unusual so it's important to remember that when we're surrounded by all that stuff. It's normal to feel afraid scared irritable but I think the opportunity here is that is the opportunity to be grateful for recognizing that this could be so much worse and that this is hopefully justo based on what we're hearing. This is hopefully just a warning sign for us to get our butts in gear and really start taking care of not only our house but the health of our communities and health of the world is a whole because this is really a sign of is the as you said in some ways right. It's a four Sabbath. We've been neglecting a recovery. We've been neglecting our day of rest. Now it's also neglecting our health health ourselves our communities and our our earth hole. And so you know I think I am when I'm really hoping is. This is a wakeup call. All of us to take a step back and say what? Can we do to be grateful for this time to use it as best as possible to improve? Our health decrease our chances of getting sick to build resilience and to just you know really think sex think again about what we want out of our lives. Yeah it's funny. I was thinking about this today. I noticed In where are you where you calling us from? I'm calling you from Monterey California Monterey so I noticed in in New York City today I've got a lot of people I love the city and it's it's the population that's getting sick. There is are people that are sort of chronically. We're making a big population or chronically. Ill people and we you know sort of these horrible living environments that maybe aren't even working and exercising and I don't have a lot of engagement and sort are really feeling worthwhile about themselves and so are taking care of themselves why these people are getting sick now. Right and I I don't know what we do about that. Because that's a population. That's hard to get mobilized. That's the really tough problem and I think you know I. It's not. There are no easy answers to that other than creating better education as much can and I think honestly it's people like you and I and the healthcare you know the senior healthcare providers the the people who are in a lot of ways elders in our society nowadays right that are the people who have the most education that have the most of the story can step up and say you know we would understand how you got to wear you got and that's not your fault but here's how you can get to a better place that you would rather be. Let's figure out where you would rather be. We're not gonNA tell you should be. Let's ask you where would you rather be? Let's figure that out most of most of these people that we're talking about are chronically. Ill would rather feel better most of the time. And so it's The practice I think what we actually using Substance Abuse Disorders nowadays In for the last three years which is motivational interviewing. It's helping to understand. Just empathy helping understand where somebody wants to go with their lives. And then what helping them understand. What they you get there and over time as we start the brain is not as complicated naked out. The it's really a practice makes perfect system and the more we gradually practice Small Habits and and small positive changes those lead to bigger positive. Changes OVER TIME. At practice makes perfect system. Kicks in we start feeling a hell of a lot better pretty quick until Apollo is sort of a way to tap into that by helping people feel safe enough to make change. I think part of the thing that we oftentimes forget is that threat in constant fear. Make US afraid of everything including change itself and so how do we embrace recovery and embrace positive change in our lives when the the constant threat makes us feel like we have to have tunnel vision on the same habits? We've always hat and the literature. Echoes Scientific Literature shows that without a doubt. It's always harder to make change Michael. You're stressed out It's hard to meditate already. Haven't it's harder to learn meditative you already have a diagnosis of PTSD right. And so what what Apollo and the reason we built Apollo for this purpose was if we could prime the body to feel safe and present and in the moment I remind by sending a signal just like somebody holding your hand on a bad giving you a hug on a bad day at tells the brain or reminds the brain. Hey wait a minute..

Apollo Alan Shore Gary US Apollo H. R. Dr Ayman Dr David Ray-ban APOLLO NEURAL PTSD twitter David welker Alan shore Stephen Porges Scientific Literature Dr Alan Shore Monterey Porzingis Michael
"dr david" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:01 min | 7 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on Kickass News

"The difference between how our bodies digest fast carbs versus low carbs and why fad diets that cut out. Carbs altogether might not be such a good idea. Either David outlined the long list of diseases that can be traced to heavy consumption of processed foods. Some of the tricks that the food industry employs mislead consumers about what's in many processed foods and he even suggests changes that he'd like to make two nutritional labels that he helped create when he was head of the FDA under presidents Bush and Clinton he also expresses his concern over Americans. Heavy reliance on processed junk foods at a time when fresh meats and produce are in short supply he shares what he's telling former vice president. Joe Biden member of his campaigns corona virus advisory team and he gives his own health recommendations for keeping your family safe from Cova. Nineteen coming up with. Dr David Kessler in just a moment David Kestler.

David Kestler Dr David Kessler Clinton Joe Biden Bush vice president Cova FDA
"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

04:18 min | 9 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"In them up pretty warm up pretty good well. It's kind of exciting. The other thing is that the the less of a barrier. You have to being able to do that so in other words when you're saying incorporates with all this stuff you're gonNA have. That does make sense like as soon as you have to start manipulating nip relating stuff for importing stuff yourself or whatever all of a sudden that becomes a lot harder in less. You're less likely to use it just like I have. The meads needs rule. You know if you if you can't grab it in do it without giving it much. Thought you probably won't do it. SO THAT'S I. It sounds like that's pretty cool. What you got going there? Count excited to see what you come up with. I've even Lately grabbing some stock photos of people with bad teeth. They're not actually patients. So I can play around with it and use that as an illustration Asian total of four patients And kind of see. You're not worried about hip or anything like that. These are just stock photos of people and and fix up their teeth and short terms. I thought that's cool. And then you can. Actually you can actually email adobe stock and say look. I need to know who this person is because I can fix their teeth chase them down explain them so are my go. Hang yourself is a podcast. I just started listening to today. I saw the someone had posted it on on facebook and the podcast is called American glutton and it's focused on a guy by the name of Ethan he was he's been in a bunch of movies you've seen. He was in a bunch of Kevin Smith's stale. But yeah it's I don't know I don't know what that is his Moraga moment. Oh yes you're right. That is him. You're so good you're so good you remember everything you have mind like a steel trap that too it is man. That's the guy he's also. He was in that football movie. The High School football movie that I can't remember the name of Yup. No titans remember the titans. That's what it is that when he was in American history X.. He played a great big fat skinhead. Dude he is not agree. That Guy Anymore yes he. He's in he's always been in a bunch of stuff. Anyhow he is now I celebrate his entire catalogue. was there. Yeah you have. He is turned himself. Oh for into kind of a bad ass at this point. He's but he's it's interesting because I really really liked the first two episodes of this thing he's He's like a total total gym rat. Now he's he's really into fitness. He's really into eating differently in better. But what's interesting is that he. He also has a background in recovery. Like he used to have trouble with alcohol and drugs and silver that way too so I just find the whole thing interesting. It's good podcasts. As well produced it'll be interesting to see where he goes with it. But it's like I said it's called American glutton so far so good it's interesting to see a guy who's making a big change. He's being really public about it so they're not messing around there. So just it's cool. I really I really have enjoyed it so go check it out again. American glutton and you can. I'm looking at his instagram right now. It's the their instagram is. The American glutton in podcast so go check that out as well that was going to be the original title of the Dental Acts Pot. Yeah actually it still would have been pretty appropriate. You know. Just say okay so totally Jason Access. I know Jason and a couple a couple of days we're GONNA be leaving for Arizona Um so that's GonNa be kind of exciting. I'm ready to be there so if you're not making it. The Voice of entry. Sorry about that will let you know how awesome it was Next week and I think that's all we have. I think I think it's time to go. I think it's time to call the end of this show. Thank you all for listening. Tele friend questions or comments INFO dot com joined the dental hacks nation. Even if you do like yourself you can still join the din lacks. It's nation leaves her view on Itunes or apple. PODCAST or whatever you WANNA call. We haven't had a review for months and months and my self esteem kind of wrapped up in that stuff. So do do all those things. Do all those. Yeah mine's not so do whatever you want to keep doing what he doesn't care. He's not here. I do care so okay. Thanks for listening. We'll catch next week.

titans Jason Access instagram meads Kevin Smith adobe facebook football Moraga Ethan High School Arizona apple
"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

08:36 min | 9 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Are sowing grain. You don't understand and it's actually the Bikram. Method is really actually pretty easy when we start fresh in schools and so we're having fun seven different devils nice degree. Okay and I thought I'd be dead and gone but that's cool that's awesome Melendez moving forward. Okay Dow Schools in Canada. I know you worked on Minnesota. They're pretty hard nut to crack. You know we're working at the. GR play in their University of Minnesota's actually gonNA look at it. Let the program. That's great because it's right next to three. I'm excellent sided about the kind of works. Yeah literally like three three exits down or something. Yeah yeah these doctors are there so giving time to push this thing forward and and and I and try and change the course of history here. That's cool. Yeah that's exciting David. Five time or more. You're part of the five-time lifetime club the five year. You're you're kind of dental hacks legend for being. I'd be so proud David Golden Rings. You don't get anything for it. Yes you say you get a pat on the back. Are Eternal gratitude. David thank you for being on again. This was terrific. All right thank you guys. Aw Hey everybody for back that was near you Dave Clark of the Dave Clark Five. That'd be interesting. got a different take for the dental hacks loves a deep cut cut cut. Yeah it was fantastic. It couldn't wait for his tire and he was shopping at the he did. He like many multiple people. He broke into into their interview. I think he did with Artie. And I think he did with I might have done with Marcos too. So that's pushed Gordon. Chris was there any. Push them right out of the chair just right on the floor. It's that's not happening man. It'd be a word Edri's I know I know right right mortal Kombat. He's fan though and I'm a fan of him. I'm a fan of that. That guy tell you he's pretty passionate about it. Interesting cat take this. It's interesting that he is sort of stepping aside. I is not doing as much teaching as he was which is interesting. He talked a bit about that. How the how? The second generation of teachers like Archie Bunker and some of the other guys are actually. He thinks that they're they're doing it even better than he can. I don't believe that David. I don't believe it just saying that right now. I've asked me to proctor those events when I tell you I'm nervous. Well it depends on teaching. You probably just help with the hands on stuff right. I know but still. It's it makes me nervous. The clinical guy. I'm always afraid that somebody's GonNa jump up and point it made. He doesn't belong here that I don't know I get it. I understand and I helped. I helped teach one of their courses in Tacoma with Dr Kim I actually enjoyed it. I didn't lecture. She wanted me to do some speaking. I'm kidding I feel too much pressure. It's the one with a lance chairman and there and he was kept yelling focus. Yeah Yeah I guess bogus bogus. That's the that's what they do. They have their. They have their their main teaching hands on thing. It's a global microscope in this cool like studio got multiple like like A. TV's and stuff so you can actually see her working on the stuff in the scope but then also these giant TV so you can see what she's seeing in scope but what's anyone whose scope user realized that a Lotta Times what you can see what's framed in the ocular. ocular is different than what's framed on the cameras a lot of times you know. She's working along and the cameras pointing to where so you know they'll they'll say focus. They'll say you you know center or whatever and it's just it's a microscope thing but it is funny because we the yell about it. It's the demo. Microscope jokes buffed Areas they are the funniest so now is time for the segment on the show. Where my voice does this funny thing and I say go hack yourself I say well I never? How did we start this whole thing? How do we start insanity lines you? Is this real life use. You named it just like everything you name Mary. Jason has has a a superpower for naming stuff so you named the go. Hack yourself thing. I don't really know what we've been doing it for a long time. They'll have have to look back. I bet you hundreds of episodes have yourself so hoping for a big company to snatch me up and Jason you ransom stuff or you. That's it it we need you. We just want you to be hours and we're going to pay you a lot of money to do it. That's what we're waiting for so you companies are here and that invalid a dental hacks dot com. Just you know small fee for a small or a large fee as the kate if he if you see with average Dennis makes in the ADA magazine. I I make slightly below that I I can be had for slightly several Standard Asians actually on the bell curve. Yeah Yeah Yeah I looked like I got to the top and slid down on the east and the West end of that bell curve. What we're we're saying is we can be bought for cheap really cheap if you're looking for that table dance just if I get a job? He's already got. He's got the Yoga Pants on. He's got the Yoga Pants on already. All Right Jason as tradition dictates you go hack yourself I well well is is my reputation. Precedes me of always in the mood. To spend some money on something so Whatever Lewis Shiny object POPs cross my news feed on facebook? I'm going to buy that But now I was Some of you know I had some interviews with with the The people at the design summit several months ago and have been Kinda chatting a lot with a lot of the people from the Gallard Group of the re-engage which is a highly edifying group if you can ever get in there But a lot of people are using the facial facial treatment plan aimed at the Christian coachman. DISD APP yeah starting tomorrow. I am doing online certification with the DISD APP. I've been using a little bit in the office Evidently they are going to have an integration with and Byzantine to be able to a show people what the outcome is going to be with the design. And then talk about the restorative aspect of that afterwards so I know we have some other good friends out there that use some tasty generated a softwares and things like that But Yeah I WANNA try it out. Learn as much as we can it's a great illustration tool to show patients I've been using it to show patients and I'm not a big Guy Not a big cosmetic guy but I've recently recently had several people. Ask about it and it's just nice to be able to pop it in there and say this is what you would look like with these veneers or if you wanted to do If you wanted to do some bike later on here or this is something I can do. and really you could do that with with The happened kind of change the shape of their teeth. So so I'll give it a try. Hopefully it's GonNa work interested in learning. I think it's really cool is it is it. Is it IPAD based is it like is it an IPAD APP or is it on on a on a laptop or what I think probably multiple it's IPAD base and it. Actually you can so with the I.. Terro I can actually set it up to integrate it with you era so I can take a picture two different pictures. They video their teeth. I can take a facial scan. Don't you have the facial scanner and you can you. Can you can import import all that stuff and put it together in. DSD'S ZAN and a lot of it has pulled in natively so if you sat there I'd tear correctly. You can take pictures. Then you can pull the shore scan and natively from the terrorists that Ardour at automatically populates it. T- Regan just check a box. That's really cool and So that's it's GonNa be something if you really going to be doing. Three D design on them and Work.

David Golden Jason DISD Minnesota Canada University of Minnesota Dave Clark Five Melendez Dave Clark Tacoma Archie Bunker Artie chairman facebook Marcos Gordon Chris A. TV
"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

08:24 min | 9 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Problem you go online and they become experts in that more than the dentist. These patients will literally come into. Your office happens. All what time are you blasting. Are you disclosing. I think you might want to use the new HD matrix because. I saw it on Youtube. So this taking this directly to the public was an accident for us but they're looking for Not just a matrix are looking for a provider. WHO's taking some time and has that training meaning and it's it's fairly straightforward? But it's something that we want to be able to expand the numbers of doctors that when patients go to the Internet first certified provider. There's only I don't know how many thousand doctors have had our certified across the road across the globe and we need numbers recertified in black triangle. Self do So that's the first initiative that we did with three M. in these in these regional classes at three am has strapped their mighty jet engine on our little tiny Subaru Subaru. Forester and together. We want to train the planet and they're really committed to research and an education which is great. If someone understands the value of of the black triangle. Stephens says look I wanna be that guy wanting to be certified. What's your what's your best bet? What how can they do it? They can get signed up for a learning centre course in Tacoma Kalma UK England or or Sweden Sweden. She's there she's GonNa listen to this in Switzerland and the Swedes. They're so mad as Switzerland in the same place they left us. They're going to hear this. They're going off these people Volvo Volvo. Sorry okay so but the frequency Mr Henderson. And how many regional certification classes are we going to have next year just for so. But it's a straight up certification class closer to your town and it's Palm Springs Baltimore Scottsdale and Sweden no saginaw egging on those will be expanding so they can either do that. Certification course or regional courses or great. You're not gonNa have what was called Black Triangle certification courses because there's more tense reading it directly off the sheet here where are they here okay. Williamsburg Virginia Baltimore Baltimore. Newport Beach Chicago your grand rapids with the Rhode show man. That's that's close. I thought Chicago's very concerned. I think all good podcasting when hands on what you've read it sorry. Jeremy does reading. So are there specific when you take it into coma is it built into to the interior course or is it. Is it a separate cert worse. Yeah the there's an overall certification with different levels depending on how many days come to learning center but Black Triangle certification advocation is part of the overall certification current. So you can get it either way. Okay this is the first time we'll be doing certification training outside of the confines on finds earnings back because we have to scale this and let you have the opportunity to touch it and feel it and through the learning curve and make a couple mistakes and then get the confidence. It's just so people understand when we say that that sounds harder than really is. It's it's it's easy if you're twelve years old but you can hands on stuff really well. Well really well and it's it's a matter you just need to. It's not it's not gonNA wreck your life. It's just a it's a chance to to the concept. Sound cool on a podcast but you really have to touch it before he makes perfect sense. You know what I'm saying. Yeah I think that's why that's why we talk about it like this way. So find a certification course or go go to the go to Tacoma in figure out and in all this stuff on the website. We've got a flyer here. We can put up on on the show notes and stuff like that but it sounds like this is moving in this direction succeeded. The other thing that's really really needed because three is really invested in this method and so- worst case scenario if you can't get to Regional Class or one of the the Black Tigers certification courses learning center in Tacoma. Some of these three. I'm reps are actually trained and they have Komo kids. They'll come into your office by your pizza or whatever probably sold turn hair. Yeah and and they'll actually do a lunch and learn right in there with the matrices. The heater Peter to whole thing. So it's a good chance to play with a couple of times before you do it on a patient so that's another option. So that's that's another way we can get into the you know what I think really great. Except you had really sort of blown out extravaganza of of certification black transaction molding and Alan Alan. Meade taught the course. That'd be good. I mean what are you seeing me teach a course. Yeah I think all your people would love to see you Allah here's the thing about how he's pretty secret right beside all these other issues that we're not GonNa talk about God issues. He is first cabin. Clinician uses a microscope. Nope you really cares. I've been to his website about his value system and he's really good at bio Claire. And he's really he's really got great hands. He's fun to listen to. I think you should do in. DC This guy buttering me up. He should do a dental hacks thing. I mean it's part of it's a personality hold out for more money continue. I do before we go though before we go. You do have to talk a little bit about the dental schools because you have sort of an interesting like like bio clear clears working. Its way into the schools. Tell us where you're at with that. Well I want to talk a couple of stories. We're at the learning center and we had a Dallas Dude. Come I think it was Ashley and actually if I'm wrong. Correct me. So she came to school and you got to realize that we still have to basically cut GDP prep to pass the boards right so the Dow schools like wag the dog. WE'RE NOT GONNA change until they changed the boards but the board people say. Hey we're just testing to suit the schools. So we had some schools changed Roseman. Dental School in Utah stopped cutting mechanical mechanical retention whatsoever to cut the Clark class to the injection molded with heated global and pace for post one full. And so they don't. I don't know how to cut a board. Prep they don't know how to cut a slot prep or GD black prep. So Ashley from Roseman came to a learning center class and we have to one of the exercises that we re PREPA. GB BLACK PREP. She'd never seen a fifty six her. She'd never seen anyone caught a slot to a tooth with what we do a dentist. We cut slots. What's and the the the instructor started? Carve to the to the fifty six K now. I'M GONNA extender isthmus up here in the middle of the tooth and I'm gonNA bring it over here and cut my mechanical retention on the book. uh-huh she was horrified. She said what are you doing to that tooth. And it'll hit us at that moment. This is the first dental student had really gone through bill and have been taught that we should never have any mechanical retention. Prep and that that that shape she'd never seen it before we kind of pension so this is the first. It's time we moved away. So it's it's real. I mean it's like they've that's kind of that's kind of what you're hoping for. I think yeah. That's pretty exciting. It's different and it was another interesting. See Store so Roseman again. Rose Mandela's tops. I want to adopt the method boy. They met a lottery system Sur. Sure from the old guard but the dean was says. We're not going to cut a caveat from eighteen ninety eddie the dean says we're just GONNA it. It's a brand new dental school. So they're they're brave first adopters Dave Howard Benjamin Waller they were the first instructors to teach it there and so we had a student from Roseman hair at the three booth and her dad was a dentist right so she's a third year student. Whatever and then the dad was present next door and so ten g's teaching her dad rep injection moulding? And he was like goes. She looked at her dad. She's a third year student Roseman. He's a dentist back to Dennis. Looks Dad it says you're never gonNa get it that she gave up. Wow Dad okay okay. Work the story is we talked about. Oh I made some mistakes in the beginning is because these these these neural pathways. The shortcuts.

Roseman Sweden Tacoma Dental School Switzerland Ashley Youtube Chicago Subaru Forester Palm Springs Baltimore Scottsd Alan Alan Tacoma Kalma UK England Williamsburg Volvo Regional Class Mr Henderson Stephens DC Newport Beach
"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

08:11 min | 9 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"About people. People going to a place and stuff being for sale. My wife is is notorious for this right like when we particularly we were first dating. We'd go you know any any trip. If we took she would spend more time looking at trinkets and crap in in like the gift shops. Then then we're in in what's really funny about. That is that she doesn't really do that so much anymore. Now a little bit but not so much but like they're selling stuff just because it's a place that people go like this stuff they're selling really really doesn't have any intrinsic value. It's not it's not like when we went to Maine that they were selling lobsters out of the back of the. You know just the same trinkets getting where else but interestingly interestingly dental meetings Kinda do that to you Minnesota The star of the North Meeting. I told you a story once for There was a guy I booth. WHO's doing gangbusters? He had these like knockoff. Lego kits right and I think allegedly they were for dentists. That would have kids in their waiting room so I mean that was probably that was the come on but like if you bought them there. You could walk away with the box of legos. And they were stupid. Inexpensive in this guy was people were just slinging cash at this guy. He was crushing it. And I'm thinking to myself that's how to do it because his you got people that show over the place. A lot of the team members don't get to buy anything they go to dental meeting and they they line up the colgate booth or whatever to see the to see the movie or whatever but they don't really they get to they. Don't get to buy anything but shoot. They get by the Lego setting like that. So what is it that we're going to sell at the next dental meeting that we show. What are we going to sell? Jason and I think we should do like a calendar of podcasters podcast. So yes I wish. I'd thought of that. My Gosh actually. It's good that's excellent stuff every pay to have a secret episode secret secret. You guys stay tuned for that. That's that's GONNA be. We are big thing. Our Big Push in two thousand twenty. The podcast of the month club this branding of stuff that you don't need that you'll pay. I'll tell you what man man I tell you why you know something that you do need air air that does yet you also Dr David Clark. Everyone needs a little bit of Dr David. Dave Clark. I mean let's be honest. We all do the hair. Loan is glorious. Let's just start with that. We actually sat down with him at the Greater New York dental meeting. He was fun. He's really fun as always he's entertaining and funny and we talked a bit about what what's up with bio clear and interestingly you you took off of bio clear well for one thing. They're they're doing the roadshow thing again this year so you you took one last year you went to see them live and in person in locally. Where'd you go was a DC as in Where was it it wasn't? DC pledge never to get back to see again are smarter than I ever knew. I'll tell you you know what I'm going to be proctoring Beth classes in Williamsburg Virginia Williams for that's right isn't in different Williamsburg proctor proctor. lipscomb yes I'll be wearing a three corn- corner. I don't know two three coins. God will I a he. He talked a lot about bio clear and we talked about sort of the big. Push the take me making this year is they are basically going to make a certification for black triangles so black triangles. Those are those are the negative space. You get a lot of times when you finish Ortho in adults and they got funny shaped teeth and you got these black triangles so that so now teeth are straight. They've got these kind of black spot between their teeth because because they their gums aren't where they're supposed to be or whatever and they have come up with basically bio clear. Sort sort of well suited to to do Restorative solution for that like a lot of people do lou period on his patients and want to go to a period. Yeah no no. That's that's not going to happen so now this really good this really good procedure and so what they're trying to do because they're going to be pushing out a lot of I think they're gonNA to be kind of direct to he says it was it was unintentional but but all of a sudden directed patient is getting another. They're getting traction with it so they're going to get a bunch of certified read bio clear dentists. That know how to do these. These black triangle treatments they should be pushing the orthodontist buried on. Let them know that. Hey in your Area Thatcher Jason Lipscomb can fix his bike triangles for you. He talked about that too. He also said like one of the one of the things that that dentists need to do. If they're we're going to be doing. This treatment is literally let other general dentists who haven't been trained in it know that you're of steeler patients if the if the orthodontists into you're literally going to say we will not do this. I on the other hand will do that. Also that right now. I won't let us not to steal your patients. That's just the kind of Guy I am. Eero right away away. I know I don't know I guess point though. So you kind of become the black triangle specialist in your area. It's a good call. I like it. It's kind of I think to do the certification. You'd after go to Tacoma. I don't think that's a roadshow thing but keep your eyes peeled. The the website for the road show is up in the show notes. You should go check it out there. I mean they have a chameleon locations as you're it's crazy they're going all over the place so if you're if you've heard US talk about bio clear and you never really got out to Tacoma you. There's a ton of local places where you want us to travel quite so far it's inexpensive you get a day's worth see out of it and you get to realize that. Yeah you can do this in your practice so she could check out the ugly roadshow check out the black triangles else. Check it all out. Check it all out and while you're thinking of that why don't you sit back. Take a listen to Dr David Clarke talking with us at the reader New York dental meeting dental hacks nation. I am excited. Tell you about a course coming up later this year at the Cosmonauts Center for excellence given by our friend Dr Corky wilhite courses called the ultimate aesthetics course and tear composite is it compositions now. Corky gives several different courses that cosmic in this one hasn't been offered for a little while. This is the ultimate aesthetic. This is where corky really shows. Shows you why he's an all star in the CD and this is the one where he shows you why he's such a good mentor. Composite is the most versatile restorative material available for making minor or four major changes in dental appearance with proper technique the function in longevity of composite rivals porcelain while providing the benefits other procedures. Can't match this comprehensive course course half of which is hands on will teach you a systematic step-by-step technique as well as diagnostic and marketing tools. To help you achieve predictable success with interior composite composite restorations. So if you want to learn how to do direct composite aesthetic dentistry. This is the course in Corky is the guy to take it from once you go check it out the dental hacked dot com slash ultimate sex. No spaces ultimate aesthetics. You'RE GONNA find out more about the course you can find out more about Corky who's an awesome guy. He's been on the show multiple times. And you'RE GONNA see. White husband is the place to go to learn cosmetic dentistry with composite. Simple as that. They're doing amazing things over there in Chicago. Thanks a lot for supporting show cosmonaut great. So how many interviews. So far for you to they've been twenty five ish minutes at a time two four. This'll be eight. This'll be eight. Yeah we're just get warmed up. I'm just getting warmed up so I think we should just roll because you have a lot to say okay if you say well okay before we roll what what do you is there anything. We shouldn't talk about yet. Because timing's not now no. Yeah yeah there's three things. We don't talk religion politics collusion exactly. We.

Dr Corky wilhite Jason Lipscomb New York Williamsburg colgate Tacoma Dr David Clark North Meeting Maine Minnesota Dr David steeler Chicago US Dave Clark lou period DC Dr David Clarke Eero
"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

08:50 min | 9 months ago

"dr david" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"PODCAST my name is Alan Meade. Name aim is. Jason Develops Come D. S. T.. I think he's had this discussion before. I think it's todd but I think we should come up with better. TRAI would begin. trae would begin. Do I feel the dental hacks day after all. Well I feel like I feel like maybe you could change just because 'cause like narrative boot as a tribute to one of our favorite podcasters and ethnic educators is say the best song doc in the world suggest. Oh are you today just fan. No not really. I know we know them. Somebody out there some Some middle aged fat guy out there has some nerdy white guy. Got That for sure. I like Jack Black though. He's good. So Jason What's going on in your neck of the woods. Anything crazy anything fun in the exciting gearing up for VOD yeah that's a UH venereal optometrist's of Venerable Vinod Venereal Veneta venerable optometrist's of Denver. I don't know gone to that. Yeah I mean it's it's pretty specific pretty specific kind of thing but we don't. We're not plugging it anymore. We're not we're not actually recommending. Because if you actually hear this is actually going out the first day of voice dentistry if if if you want to you can come even if you hear this and you're like Oh my God. I didn't know they were doing this. You can still come for Saturday if you decide to come for the second day I will screw it. We charge you full price because you the country has someone jumps in their cars catching the second day cody is last week. I do I you if you do. That managed voice dentistry in Scottsdale Arizona. I WANNA which Scottsdale checking. The weather is better than where I am right now. showed say it's probably better than ninety nine point nine percent of the country. I would say so so too I would say so too. So why would you not go Well I mean you know. I don't know maybe they don't WanNa see amazing podcasts. Being maybe they don't WanNa see an amazing cast of speakers and characters actors. I don't know maybe they're just not into that and maybe they're not in a fun. Maybe they don't like about maybe they don't like being around fun people in doing fun things. Maybe that's what it is. I I haven't been very nice this year. I think it's my fault. Scared of this dividend staying away because of you well along knows but maybe maybe that's it maybe Sir Teddy Bear in person. He is a huge teddy bear in person literally literally a huge teddy bear. It's kind of freaky actually long. gangly the arms the body. He actually has little little ears on top of his head. They're cute and he is very covered in hair so he's literally a teddy bear. One of those. It's like sickly bears that you see run around the words in the day. The ones the ones the roadside attraction where where they've sort would've lost their will to live kind of thing and they. You know people throw a little little bread Adam. Dec- fell do something. Yeah that's the kind of bear that Jason is. You think they should respond to stimuli stimuli of it is because there's virtually almost always like dentists we know really. It's Kinda crazy so jason. I have a question for you. Okay I've heard on the dental hacks nation in lots of other facebook groups and stuff. There's a lot of of people selling like toothbrushes or selling products like that out of their office and I have to tell you for all the products that dentists can sell outsell many products. Actually I will say that I wanNA say like the only thing we actually like sell. That leaves the office like that. Might be clear heck seen rinse at at cost so they don't have to go to the pharmacy. But I mean like toothbrushes and in all kinds of crazy stuff that that you sell sell stuff out of your office is in the parking lot of the back of my car is at no. That's a whole other kinds of sale. You don't have to worry so much about sales tax and stuff like that when you're that's a whole LLC that sure is at sure is now now. We sell what we sell L.. We sell like toothpaste like Clerks seen we sell Sonacare there's times we we give away. SONACARE is for patient specials So I mean it's it's not necessarily a hard push. Yeah I've been known to tell people like hey if you you want a good deal get your bed bath and beyond coupon that comes in the mail every I know go get you. Go Get your water pick you know. I said there's a little bit. There's a little bit of a to where we're Amazon Walmart's GonNa GonNa under like you can't give any better deal than that you know on some level. I don't know it's an some people accuse us of selling stuff and being like profiteering. If you were to see me in my office I give away the fricken store pretty much every day about at ninety times a day. I think I think a lot of dentists do that. I think a lot of Dennis do that. And that's that's another reason for me to not have stuff to sell because you know what I'm I'm the softy. I'm the guy who's going to give away more than likely in you know okay so like the classic thing when a patient comes in your team has explained explain you that the patient doesn't have doesn't have insurance which the team doesn't really understand because I think the team I don't know if all the team members could could could pay for the kind of stuff that we're asking people to pay for. I guess but they. They explained you in. No uncertain terms. Patient has no insurance doesn't have any money to blow and so I tend to start giving stuff away away. Then which is I mean I get Kinda the thing but I mean I go to my optometrist's office I don't have insurance. I don't have I don't have you know but somehow yet AH I. I ended up buying stuff on amazing how that works actually trade services my. I don't actually now that I think of it the guy that does my eyes. I do his teeth so there you go. I T. I mean one of the previous offices that I was partnered in now that I've heard that his wife is selling like like Cosmetics and stuff out of his office and I don't know that crosses the line a little bit. That's that's sketchy to me. Let's let's go to me unless unless she's doing something completely separately. Yeah I mean it's if it's in the opposite in the waiting room and there's a push to to buy that type of stuff and that doesn't bode well for the world dentistry. In my opinion I I'm with you. I'm with you. I don't I know there's a lot of offices that are are pretty serious about their selling stuff you know like selling they they want each patient comes in. You need to work on and that would be really uncomfortable for me as an employee that placed place to feel like I got to sell stuff that would kind of suck. Actually I you know I wear. I wear a yoga pants in there and I keep the tag on there. Because it's you can have those in the display window. You can get them with. Bananas can just see that you walk into the room and the the the your thighs rubbing together a little bit so it makes just enough noise for them to understand that. That's what you're wearing and of course they ask you questions about it. So what are you gonNA I do. Of course you're going to let it this way. Because I've got a new shipment today. facebook live later on facebook live channel facebook live. And it's going it'd be great. We've got this this limited edition print that's coming in later on and you're gonNA love it ladies so hot I'm GonNa do my facebook live between hygiene checks checks in my restorative appointment. You can't miss it and I will. I will show you all the new patterns all the sizes so hot. I've often said that if somebody came in and sold Lula Ruad a dental dental meeting or had a booth or something like that day would make billions of dollars dollars if you have. People are in their contained. They're ready to buy something you know. There's something weird.

facebook Jason What Sir Teddy Bear trae Alan Meade Vinod Venereal Veneta todd Arizona Jack Black cody Lula Ruad Denver Adam Amazon Dennis Walmart
"dr david" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"dr david" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"My name is dead dodie in you're listening to the every man podcast this episode thirty one with dr david rock i think that if i had to come up with one single reason to do a podcast do the every man podcast it might be this episode i feel like this episode is exactly what every man and every boy and probably every woman and girl also need to hear really really need to here there is some fundamentally important life changing culture changing information that's gonna come up in this podcast and it is from the mouth of dr david rock dr rock is the head of the neuro leadership institute is the director of the neuro leadership institute he coined that term neural leadership he's written books your brain at work quiet leadership coaching with the brain in mind he can be found on line he writes for bunch of different administrations uh and he is just isn't incredible man and he's a part of our every man community an objest so it's it's more than grateful and more than happy it's it's that he is heading up or has headed up or has has dove into the science of and the neurobiology around much of the reason for every man's existence and today we're going to talk about some some very specific things and that is what happens in our brain win we feel things when we have emotions what are the best ways studied proven scientifically proven ways to feel and manage and let ourselves have our emotions how do we do that better and um it has incredibly big consequences four men in our society and i would say men in a lotta societies around the world to and above the core message which it you'll hear is that repressing emotion is maladaptive re.

director dr david rock