18 Burst results for "Dr Daphne Miller"

How Your Health Is Connected to Soil Health

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:46 min | 1 year ago

How Your Health Is Connected to Soil Health

"A functional medicine doctor Dr Hyman this is on treating the body as a system rather than treating the individual symptoms in this mini episode Dr Hyman Explores how this application of systems biology ends beyond our bodies inner workings to its interaction with the natural environment. Here's Dr Hyman in conversation with family physician and founder of the health from the soil up initially Dr Daphne Miller you're describing this sort of broad range of things where you're seeing the harm that our current agricultural production system does to the workers right because of toxic chemicals because of poor working conditions because of being almost indentured servants and human rights really is a huge issue there and the same time that your were hurting the soil that we grow our food in so our soil is depleted aren't food is depleted and then we are growing is commodity products that are turned into processed food corn wheat and soy that ended up causing all this chronic disease on the other end of the spectrum and it's this huge problem in everything's can elected and that is some of the beauty of your work where you actually are connecting the dots between all these things that don't seem connected like what is the the crow biology the soil has to do with us and you talk a lot about this and you're working I I'm fascinated sort of dig into this because again a get a little bit deeper right away about how the microbiome which is his brand new topic in medicine didn't even exist and we were in medical school connects to the microbiome of the soil and why that's important I mean for example you don't wash your organic vegetables right eat the dirt right so talk about how you came to understand that and what the science is behind that and and and what we need to do to change. What's happening I I want to say that I really appreciate what you said before for in terms of getting the big picture there because there's actually a lot of people in medicine who still don't that this really is a story on the on on helpful side of exploitation of workers exploitation of soil and then exploitation of our own bodies we who are the recipients of that food in that system and I think that's a very important notion to grab onto so we can't heal communities unless we actually take care the farm workers and take care of soil but the microbiome is this wonderful way of tracking that connection it's kind of a nerdy side intifida way of telling that story that you just told because in fact that what's so so unbelievable doing this work is that it tracks through many levels from the microbial to the cultural so micro to macro from legislated to cellular and the the story of how our internal microbiome all these you know billions of Tyrian Fungi Nemo toads how they are linked to soil is still trying to be understood in told it's not the sciences in its infancy and we know of course at our microbiome is a unique microbiome you know each one of us has an unique microbiome fingerprint it's anger print it's not the same microbiome a- soil but we know that there is a lot of cross talk we evolved as these single L. creatures out of soil we all grew up in the dirt right time gathering and and over Millennia what's happened is that aren't microbes have found their distinct niches but that they in fact do communicate and this research is slowly slowly coming out and food is probably one of the really important shuttles that you know goes back and forth in terms of informing the two microbiomes and influence facing him in different ways but it's not to say that our microbiome is the same as soil microbiome there's cross talk which is there absolutely genetic crosstalk conventional medicine encourages the diagnosis of disease followed by standardized treatment however naming disease becomes increasingly me wingless as we understand our inner workings and biological systems within the context of our entire organism Dr Hyman further explored this topic with his mentor and other a functional medicine Doctor Jeffrey Bland using the lens of functional medicine the things that you helped us know and understand really just getting people I said do those simple things that make profound differences changing the information and that you know food is information everything is information you exercise information sleep is information botts our information yeah these are all communicating with every cell and every system in your body every second and when you understand that enormously empowering because then you can do something about precisely we have now understood starting to understand I don't want to say complete understanding but we're starting to understand that this outside world the things that we eat had come from the soils and the environment from which nature nurtures have an inborn communication connection to our bodies receptor systems that signal through every DNA Aliquo all that creates our function now that is a paradigm shifting concept that were connected into the soil into the air into the water into the sun in ways that are directly it kind to these biological processes we call intracellular signal transaction for which we are involved matrices not can disconnected from the world but in in regretted part of the network of the world into our

Dr Hyman Dr Daphne Miller Family Physician Founder
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"On, and I think we have to start to think about how those systems interconnect and not just think about conservation and fighting climate change as its own set. Problem. But it's all one problem. And I know that you know, that is not the way that that politicians are used to thinking, and they sort of set up their platform in one place and it's dangerous to connect the dots. Too much. I mean, they have the same problem with you know, segmentation that we have in silo is station that we haven't medicine, but if we could start to open our minds to the idea that we cannot bring the world along to start to change our practices and protect the planet, unless we all have a minimum level of health and welfare. And so on I think that will be very powerful a bit crazy that we're the wealthiest nation on the planet, and we see abject, poverty and loneliness and just you know, who it's driven by poverty and lack of education. I mean, it's just it's just a horrible landscape that we haven't mixed me in some ways. Being ashamed to be American. When I go to other countries, I see how they take care of their citizens. I'm like, wow. This is quite different. And I think there's you know, the conversation starting to happen to connect the dots, which I think is a good thing. And I think it's people like you call on these things out as people who are talking about. How do we rethink IRA culture? How do we think medicine that are going to start to push the envelope? And connecting the dots is really how we're going to do it. So you've been a huge advocate for helping to understand complexity of even push me to not be so simplistic, which I appreciate and, and I think that that there's this ongoing conversation that's going to continue to happen that you're part of. And I can't wait to see what your new books gonna share share with us about all the people who are doing the right things and helping us change the world self. Thank you. Thank you Daphne. And should get. Her book pharmacology that's with an offend the jungle effect is a fascinating read about food from all over the world. She's if you're a doctor healthcare provider, you should definitely check out a work with soil, and you should get on a farm. You get your hands dirty. And also if you like this podcast, please share with your friends and family on Facebook and social media leave a comment we'd love to hear from you. And hopefully, we'll see you next time on the doctors pharmacy..

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"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"When you so often people want to go, you know, to these treatments that are way too powerful for what their their health needs are and not allow room to see how their own immune system, and their own resilience might actually get them through something. And yet at the same time, you know, if you have breast cancer or colon cancer, something go see the colleges and get on that chemotherapy, by the way. Most of those chemotherapies guests from climb medicine from soil blew my sin. Yeah. Which is one of the most effective tools that we have is from a streptomycin fungus. So our soil is also this incredible reservoir for a lot of our modern medicines. And so we have to protect that diversity in the soil even for that. See how it all works together crazy way. It is fascinating the the complexity I I don't know. I actually the exact statistic on this. But I heard that there's like if you pick up a handful of soil. There's more microbes than there than there are like, you know, galaxies and stars in the universe. It's like some astounding amount of downing amount. Yeah. Even even in soil. That's not so good. It's pretty great. Great. And so in what what if you could share any other stories of people who've inspired, you people are doing things differently or people who give us hope because you know, this is on the margin. But who can you call out that's doing something? That's really shifting the way we do things. I think that I was just came here from New Orleans, whether they're having their this massive aquaculture conference, basically everybody who's farming fish in the world was there. Wow. And. You know, that's a fraught with. There's there's. So problems, and yet, you know, there's some very hopeful stories coming out every place from New Orleans. And so on people who are building is kind of interesting aqua Pontiac, you know, close system fish farms that are growing plants and producing healthy, actually, pretty nutrient dense fish are not polluting the environment are using no chemicals at all and are allowing oceans to regenerate themselves. So that they don't, you know, become the place where we need to get all our fish from. So, you know, a lot of the stories that I'm seeing that are hopeful actually do involve technology, and they do, you know involve a little bit of innovation. But at the same time respecting mount natural systems, work and using them. So it really is this fusion that you know. So you're hopeful for medicine, you're hopeful for. I have kids. So I have to be hopeful. Right. But yeah, there is a lot of terrifying. Horrible things going on there. I have to say that the the green new deal, which is getting a lot of blowback and ridicule and so on I actually think that there's a lot in there. That's so important. And it really is the first time that lawmakers have proposed this idea that environmental health is intimately linked to public health and our health, and you know, kind of moving the arrow and the other way and saying that we cannot save the environment unless we are all thriving and have a minimum wage and have healthcare and so.

New Orleans streptomycin
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Yeah. So how does it? How does that insight about feeding protecting conserving affected your practice of medicine because oh, I talked to my patients about those same three ideas all the probably apply to like the patient comes in. Let's say with an autoimmune disease or digestive problem or. Those are the three ideas. I go to I I mean, we're we're we're kind of all pretty terrible at doing that for ourselves all three of those things in terms of trying to use nourishing ourselves in. It turns out that a diversity of foods is probably the best diet for us. Just like a diversities grape for the soil. I mean, the best marker everybody's trying to describe what's a healthy diet. Is it this diet is that diet? Well, I can tell you from traveling all over the world jungle effect. There's many different ways to eat. Well, there is not one healthy diet at all. And with all the radar and there unhealthy diets. There are unhealthy diets. But you know, trying to you know, make diet rules is generally, not so helpful. But this idea that diversity in trying to eat really, a rainbow of plants, and grains, and potentially even animals and so on and having them match. What comes from the? Round you know in terms of being in season and working together. And so on that that's probably the best kind of diet, you know, eight hundred species of plants as hunter gatherers, so yeah, we had a big diversity of and now we've basically eat more threes. Plants corn soy wheat. Yeah. So unlit Westberg lettuce in there. So. Yeah. So I work with my patients around those same concepts and the same with protecting..

autoimmune disease
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"And then when you follow it down the chain. What are the implications of this, right? How do we change what we're doing? So that we actually can get right on track. And, you know, very intrigued by what you showed me before we started the podcast, which is that you're working on a new book about hopeful stories in in food. And I don't know if you could share. Any of them? But I would love to hear about it. And and I want everybody by book when it comes out. It's gonna be awhile. What's really interesting me is this regenerative food movement, which is still a little bit fringe in the sense. Just in the same way that integrative medicine still, you know, fringe. But it's farmers who really are coming forward and saying there are principles of soil health that are super important not just for protecting soil and for protecting the environment. But also for protecting in nourishing humans and the principles on on the surface, actually, pretty simple and straightforward. It's kind of the same principles you'd use in terms of protecting your own body. I mean, I I always say that's three things feed protect conserve, which is, you know, basically that you need to give the soil the right kind of nourishment and turns out that the best nourishment for soil is a diversity of plants. There's that diversity thing. Again, you have to protect soil by keeping it covered. All the time. Just like we have these little fine hairs on our skin in are actually play a really important role in terms of skin. Help that when you do things like retin-a or whatever, and you know to try and get rid of wrinkles. You're actually destroying that top layers skin and eventually is not so good for you. It turns out was soil as well. You need to keep it covered all the time. So we're trying on comm tell California eighty ninety percent of the soil in the winter. When we have our rain is bare and Brown, and you need to have cover crops are just you know, every day of the year. There needs to be something basically growing there. And the reason you need that is because those that organic matter growing above the soil is what feeds diversity under the soil all of those microbes that are very important for processing the organic matter turning it into soil also harvesting carbon from the air, which is a whole other reason that we combating climate change in from. Atmospheric carbon and nitrogen, which is probably you know, way more of an issue in terms of climate change than carbon. So feed protect and also another part of protecting is not using chemicals that are going to be destructive to the life in the soil. So, you know, minimizing antibiotics minimizing pesticides, herbicides, and the reason I say minimizing is because as a physician, I know that sometimes you need those bills and the idea is to use them, you know, really as the treatments of last resort. Once you've tried things that are much gentler and much more using your natural ability to heal and using food and so on and it's the same with the soil. There are times we're farmers absolutely need to pull out the big guns when they're having some kind of horrible blight or so on one could argue you don't get those blades often when you're using these systems so feed protect and then the third one is conserving and. You know, the discussion in regenerative agriculture is really about. How do you take all of that organic matter and all the waste from animals and the water and recalling because it's fertilizer and move it back into the soil. And so that you have these closed regenerative systems, and so feed protect conserve on one level, very simple, really very simple concepts. And yet they really are the underpinning of our health and of soil health and atmospheric health as we're learning because in fact, agriculture seems to be this very important way to draw down carbon..

Brown California eighty ninety percent
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Declined ninety percent last hundred years, and organic is better, and they're more nutrient dense, but even still we're not agree with that that that I what where did you get that? References. Might be referring to piece it was actually done right here in Austin at university of Texas and his name is Ronald Davis. I think, but if you read that study he does not say that it's because of the soil. It's because we've changed our varietals of fruits and vegetables, so dramatically we are now choosing seeds basically for their ability to produce a lot to be able to travel long distance and to not go back on the shelves. So the kinds the varieties of carrot that regretting are different than they were in the thirties and forties. But I have not seen a lot of evidence that our soil in US has been depleted enough to actually change the nutrient content of our food. I would sure was usher Cheyenne's. I'm sure I'm sure I literally just gave a talk about this. Yeah. But it might you might need to go back and look at the actual research because. Is it is? I will be amazed. There were scientific papers. I'm not making. A lot of people read those studies, and they blame it on the soil and believe me, I would love the the studies are of the soil looking at this nutrient content. Oh, hi, see. So not translating it into the nutrient content of the food. We'll the food Justice nutrients from the soil the app, but there's they're not the same. Of course. So you can actually have a big shift in the nutrient contents of the soil and end up with the exact same nutrient density and the food because they're these plants are actually unbelievably microbes in the soil, and the plants themselves are really efficient at scavenging nutrients, but isn't the problem in most of our soil's countries become more sterile that's become like dirt instead of soil or eight. I it's hard to say, and we are at a point where we're that certainly might happen in the future. And there are parts of the world where massive amounts of soil depletion have gone on. But it probably is incorrect to say that we are at that point in the US. We still are at work towards it richest soil in the world in it's more a matter of starting to use the right practices now to really protect it. And but but but to say that that that food is less nutritious because of the soil in US is not exactly all right. We'll we'll we'll dig those studies up share them. And we continue the conversation. I think that the the concept of doctor being ecologist is a really kind of new idea. Right. And I think that that scientists are catching up with that. I recently got a new textbook called network medicine about the body as a network as an ecosystem and how we need to rethink science, and how research things and the complexity of human body and these biological networks that are driving. Health and disease. We don't think like that is being okay, I'm this specialist, and I take this disease or this silo problem instead of really understanding how everything connects together, and that's. Sadly that is true. I'm finding with a lot of the students in young doctors that I work with the there really is a very different way of thinking. And I'm hopeful for the future of medicine. Specially if I can get a lot of them into those soil pits. Yeah. I think that's right. I love you having doctors go out and work on a farm fact, I I actually took a course in biological agriculture. When I was in college and got to grow food and learn about food and learning about ecosystems and learn about sustainability, and you know, I was kind of a weirdo. But it was it was a really important part of my education because I begin to understand that relationship. But I think you're your emphasis on the idea that farm is medicine as well as food as medicine as well as parks or medicine is a really important contribution to our conversation because the average person's not thinking about the average doctors, and I'm thinking about it..

US usher Cheyenne Ronald Davis Austin university of Texas ninety percent hundred years
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Your doctor, and you treat patients and the the insights that you've had about disease are quite unusual for a physician, which is that you moved from the reductionist view of disease to a more on deep. Interesting thing that disease is really complex at there's a complexity biology that we we are complex adaptive dynamic system, that's constantly changing in that things like, redundancy and diversity are important for health. And it's not something. We learn about how do you? How do you kinda hold that in medicine? What do you do that? I mean, I I wish that everybody who decided to become a doctor or nurse or nurse practitioner or just at you know, any kind of healer in healthcare spent two years working with ecologists, and our farmers or some. Someone who works with natural systems. By the way, we are one. We are one and being able to actually see it, you know, sort of display itself, you know, because it's it's actually hard to understand our natural system. A lot of it's tucked inside of us and quite invisible. And we have to take other people's words for it. But when you were when you when you're in nature and understanding how complex those systems are the trophy levels and unintended consequences, and how everything interacts it gives you an enormous amount of humility and respect for these, you know, these structures and makes you realize that, you know, the the true meaning of first do no harm. Yeah. So the, you know, the biology we have is really complex like you said. And I learned a fact recently the Cup blew my mind, which is we all are in biochemistry and all the pathways. We'll be think we learned all the pathways that we didn't. There's thirty seven billion billion chemical reactions in the body every second that's thirty seven with twenty one zeros. It's hard to take Fettes. It's hard to fathom and the complexity of that and everything cross talking everything else where an ecosystem. So in a sense doctors need to be colleges is what you're saying. Right. Right. And so when we do these soil labs for health practitioners. That's exactly what we do. And they start the lab in a soil pit on a farm in the central valley in California, which is by the way in ecology or ecological niche where you know, are a lot of our food comes from. And it's a it's a very challenging place. It gets seven inches of rain a year, and has that amazing topsoil, which is what is generates our food is incredibly thin, and it's getting and we dig these soil pits. So they can see the soil layers and get in there and start to experience like this is this is what's pumping out nutrition, not only for the United States. But for the world, I mean, grow so much of you know, the almonds and other stuff that gets exported to other places, that's the true nourishment. Not not just the corn. And the saw, but is really where are. Are nutrient dense food is gone. And for them to start to understand that this is something that a we have to absolutely protect and that we need to get involved in working with farmers to make sure that we can increase. This lifeblood, you know for our country because right now, we're underproducing the amount of you for even with the current population. We have in the US we're not producing enough fruits and vegetables. I mean, I don't know if this is right. But I heard or read once that if everybody in America eight the five to nine recommended servings of fruits and vegetables a day that we'd only have enough for two percent of the population. It might not be that low. But we're we're probably in terms of just what we're producing the US. It's we're we are falling short by about two-thirds just for like, the Harvard recommended. Yeah. My two seven Ajay and even with imports were still falling way short. And so we are not nutrients secure as a nation. We're producing tons of sugar in the form of corn. And soy and and so on. Way more than we need not enough of a lot of the macro micronutrients. So that's and by the way, you know, the soil that you talk about is the source of the nutrients in our food, so Eun if you're eating the best organic food on the best Ganic soil, the.

United States California Fettes Ajay Eun Harvard Cup America Ganic seven inches two percent two years
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"It's the same thing you remember, I talked about from the macro to the micro. We're losing diversity on the planet of our animals, and our plants, and we are also losing diversity of our microscopic creatures of our of. Are fungi and our bacteria and our Nemet odes. And so on that's happening in lockstep with the macro loss of diversity is an important point emphasize is happening in the soil, but it's also happening in human microbiomes, apps, and the diversity of our gut bacteria is dramatically different than it was one hundred or a thousand years ago. Yeah, I mean, it's happening on plant microbiomes, it's happening everywhere. And so it's all from the same cause, which is you know, it over exposure to bacteria sides, and and anti-biotics and basically us growing very few types of crops. So that we're just getting too much homogeneity in terms of our plant kingdom and pollution, and you know, inequality on wild areas and all of these things, you know. Yes, all the chemicals antibiotics that pesticides, herbicides and so on. But that is probably more. The reason why we're seeing asthma and allergy than just cleanliness per se. It's loss of diversity. And that's really important concept for people to have because the way you protect diversity and maintain that health resource is different than just getting dirty. It's really about thinking like an ecologist or a conservationist and trying to think how do I preserve natural niches? Reserve them on farms. How do I preserve them in urban areas? How do we build cities that actually have places for butterflies and different kinds of insects to flourish in different kinds of plants in different kinds of animals, and so on so it's it's a bit more of a complicated concept, and I the danger of us just talking about high. Eighteen I think you're right. I think that's a very important point eight is the complexity, and you know, you bring that home also to medicine, right? You're not just a farmer gardener,.

asthma thousand years
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Cultural, you know, so micro to macro from legislative to cellular and the the story of how our internal microbiome all these, you know, billions of bacteria and fungi nemo toads how they are linked to soil is still trying to be understood in told it's not the sciences in its infancy. And we know, of course, it our microbiome is a unique micro by each one of us has an unique microbiome fingerprint. It's a fingerprint. It's not the same microbiome soil. But we know that there is a lot of cross talk. We. We evolved as these single celled creatures out of soil. We all grew up in the dirt right time gathering and and over millennia. What's happened? Is that different microbes have found their distinct niches, but they in fact, do communicate and this research is slowly slowly coming out and food is probably one of the really important shuttles that goes back and forth in terms of informing the two microbiomes and influencing him in different ways. But it's not to say that our microbiome is the same as soil microbiome authors cross talk, which is there sort Sort of. of genetic cross talk and not as one of you know, there is some interesting studies coming out, and in fact for mental foods, which probably are the most important intermediate. Because in fact, what these foods are fermented with is soil bacteria on the food, and then, you know, different forms of usually fungi and yeast that for mental controlled food rotting, right? Writing and the sauerkraut showing that you know, it doesn't change our microbiome, but it can temporarily affect it and going through the conomy they improve the economy, but they improve the situation in Justin Sonnenburg lab at Stanford is is I think about to publish a paper. I know that they're in the final parts of the study looking at for mental food, and it's health of patients with different kinds of bowel symptoms. And I think it's actually I b s at they're looking at and what they're finding is that probably more effective than, you know, the probiotics that people are trying to sell, and it makes sense because these foods, actually, you know, they co evolved with us things that are invented in a lab. So. Can you point out is that kids who grew up on farms or ranches, don't get the same problems with allergies and asthma? Their immune system is developed in different ways that there's less problem with these kids health, and they don't have ADD because they're out nature all the time. Right. So yeah, there is a, you know, people are referring to it as the farm effect. But there is a big multinational collaborative called the gut. Brielle collaborative. That was started by researchers in Europe, but there's actually research happening in the US now between the Amish and the Hutter right two different farming communities, and what they're trying to understand is why it is that children who are raised on sustainable farms have much lower rates of asthma and allergy as compared to children who are more conventional farming systems where they're using more chemicals. And so on and children who are raised in urban areas and. The thought is once again that it is this microbiome, and you know, one could argue that the soil is probably the mother microbiome than inoculating, these sustainable farms, but they're finding you know that even the animals on these furs, I probably influencing kids and dust in the hey, and potentially even things that we typically think of as allergens in the city, but for some reason on these kids who grow. Hey, don't get hay fever. I mean, this is something that's been noticed globally that you know, developing countries there. They don't have as much, asthma or allergies or autoimmune disease all these inflammatory diseases that are rampant the United States really don't exist there in these in the same amounts, and the hypothesis is the word just to clean, right? The hygiene hypothesis, it's actually a little bit more complicated punchline. Yeah, good. Okay. It really has to do more with diversity. So we were plenty exposed to bacteria and bathed in bacteria and fungi. And so when you rid a sample this room urban environments in general, but what's happened?.

United States Justin Sonnenburg allergies asthma Stanford autoimmune disease Europe Hutter
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"To understand why that was in realizing that there were a lot of factors, and that, you know, diet was not the only one, but it was certainly a very powerful one. So that book was about me, traveling back to bear traditional and central villages and trying to understand what those diets were like and literally bringing those diets back to my patients and having them start to implement them. And as I did that work and started to actually bring it into communities and work with patients around it at suddenly dawned on me that I was completely had missed the boat. And that in fact, the diet was only the surface. I it was is the shiny thing that we look at. But it was really the whole system. That was underlying that diet the way the foods were produced how what seasons they were produced in. What was the socio cultural Millea that was growing that food what were the agricultural traditions that were being used to produce those foods what were the traditional seeds that were being used to grow those specific healthful foods, and what is the soil like, right? And so I realized I kind of had to do the whole project all over again. But not just look at what? Is up on the table. But really understand how those foods are produced in how they linked back to our help. And so that's how far Mukalla g with enough was born and most of the project happened in the US. But it's really something that's made me kind of jump professions and away from medicine to agriculture, and I feel like I have Bruce former doctors farmer, I have more colleagues now, you know, in you grow food than you know, people in prescribing prescriptions, exactly grow your food. So that is a long winded explanation for why I'm here frustrating. You know, and you're you're describing this sort of broad range of things where you're seeing the harm that our current agriculture production system does to the workers right because of toxic chemicals because of poor working conditions because of being almost indentured servants and human rights really is huge issue. There. And the same time there were hurting the soil that we grow our food in. So our soil is depleted aren't food is depleted. And then the food we are growing is commodity products. That are turned into processed food like corn, wheat and soy that ended up causing all this chronic disease on the other end of the spectrum, and it's his huge problem in everything's connected. And that is some of the beauty of your work where you actually are connecting the dots between all these things that don't seem connected like what is the micro biology the soil have to do with us. And you talk a lot about this. And you're working I I'm fascinated sort of dig into this because one can get a little bit deep right away about how the microbiome which is his brand new topic in medicine that didn't even exist, and we were in medical school. Connects to the microbiome of the soil and why that's important. I mean for your help you don't wash your organic vegetables. Right. Eat the Dirk, right? So talk about how you came to understand that. And what the science is behind that. And and and what we need to do to change. What's happening? I if I want to say that I really appreciate what you said before in terms of getting the big picture there. 'cause there's actually a lot of people in medicine who still don't that. This really is a story on the on the unhelpful side of exploitation of workers exploitation of soil and then exploitation of our own bodies. We who are the recipients of that food in that system. And I think that's a very important notion to grab onto so we can't heal communities unless we actually take care of farm workers and take care of soil. But the microbiome is this wonderful way of tr. Tracking that connection it's kind of a nerdy. Scientific way of telling that story that you just told because in fact that what's so so unbelievable about doing this work is that it tracks through many levels from the microbial to the.

US Millea Bruce
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"She's helped with an award winning documentary called search of balance, which is a very cool to session of the complexity of everything that is going on in health and in the soil and in in nature, she's contributed to the Washington Post. She's been profile newspapers and magazines. She's consulted for many organizations, including the FAO, which is the food and Agriculture Organization in the United Nations the indigenous terra Madre, slow food international. And she's created this new idea which is called a park prescription where she gets her patients prescriptions to go walk in the park, and they're very specific prescriptions. And it's kinda caught on she's graduated from Brown, University Harvard Medical School. She did her family medicine residency in Salinas, California. And is doing very cool work in the space of food and health and soil and the earth. Welcome daphne. Thank you so much. Thank you. So, you know, I I sort of understood the soil when I read a book when I was still in college called the soil and health by sir Albert appear, you know, the book any reason written about it. And he says something that struck me. And it was a quote that I really held onto which is at the whole. Problem of health in the soil in he said, man, but humans animals, and plants is one great subject. So how did you come to understand that that was true and get started in this work? It was a slow process. I mean, it probably if I were going to say, what catapulted me was really my internship in Salinas that you just mentioned I which is farming areas central valley, California ground zero for the lettuce basket of the US. If you look on Google maps, you see that sleekness absolutely surrounded by agriculture. And really is what that areas what's pumping out all the vegetables for the United States. I mean, we wouldn't have salon tro or asparagus or artichokes or strawberries, if it were not for the Salinas valley in that region. And I was doing my internship there. In nineteen ninety three to date myself and after spending a couple weeks in the hospital. I suddenly realized that most of the patients that I was treating had been harmed in one way or another by our food system. I was taking care of migrant workers who would come in seizing from organophosphate poisoning or with hand amputation 's and sort of on the second level the degree of poverty among the patients. I was treating was clearly a byproduct of an agricultural system that was taking advantage of its workers and not paying them a fair wage and on the flip side treating already diseases like obesity, and heart disease, and and diabetes which were related to our food system as well. And that really is what started me thinking. That our agriculture system was unbelievably unhealthy, and you know, seeing it in the fields as I drove into work, and, you know, smelling chemicals used and and. Girdle is IRS and so on and then seeing the patients, and there was even this was never proven. But we were seeing sort of higher rates of you know, malformations I were it was in the obstetrics ward is a family physician. And so all of this came together for me, then and I started to ask questions about, you know, if our firing system can harm us, so terribly can we flip this on its head and actually have a farming system that not only does not harm us, but keeps us healthy and started to ask medical colleagues in the hospital about this? And they kind of all gave me blank stares, and it really started to inform my work from there. And the first step was really trying to understand what is a healthy way to eat because you know, in medical school. You're not even taught that and so that first project that you mentioned the. Jungle affect was really inspired by patients who come from different parts of the world and described having poorer health than their ancestors, their parents and their grandparents who had lived in one part of the world where they're still were very low rates of modern chronic disease, diabetes heart, the heart disease, depression, certain cancers, and so on and trying.

Salinas sir Albert United States California United Nations Salinas valley Washington Post family physician Agriculture Organization University Harvard Medical Sch IRS heart disease Brown obesity
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"And then during the winter, you have a different master fuel sensor, you know, amp activated protein kinase or amp k which is more of kind of the the enzyme responsible for stimulating the recycling of cellular material. So it's almost like we were designed to build muscle and even perhaps fat in the summer. And then break it down in the winter as as we cycle between 'em tour activation and amp K activision that is the evolution that the body has had to to be able to survive, and you know, now, we have the scientific knowledge, and you know, we've done the research to be able to show that of course, you back into your ancestors. You know, if you go back two years ago like why do you eat too? Why do we brought in the wintertime, you know, raw plants in the summer? Time it's because of what you're talking about. And so the body had to adapt by these mechanisms same way, as you know, why why do we have so call LDL, which is a so called bad cholesterol. You know, what of that evolve? For an you know, why is it bad? Why do we have LDL LDL is the plug that was bad because it plugs up your arteries? But if you go back, you know, years and say, well, there wasn't hospitals or doctors who are you gonna show so you up so if you were under stress, you're about to be, you know, bitten by tagger, or whatever and started bleeding only way you plug the hole was the razor LDL. So it's natural. Evolution just like, you know, people the blacks of Africa who migrated up to Europe, you know, dark skin where so they had their skin. So they wouldn't they would be able to protect themselves from the sun. But once they moved to Europe, they didn't have that. So they hadn't there's an evolutionary aspect of the we four which has to do with Alzheimer's, and heart disease and a whole bunch. Of other things. So the whole I the fact of why we have what we do. And why we've modified where we do. You know, we live in a society where we move around a lot. We can move around a lot. But we should still be looking for the most part of things that are the most indigenous to our to our, but our backgrounds are and digits of the areas from for eating and you just described the two areas exactly we add fat in the summer. So we could burn it off on us. What bear does when it goes asleep? All winter. I have a three books that I think are fantastic for people who really wanna take a deep dive into both eating according to our ancestry and seasonal eating one is called one hundred million years of food by Stephen Lee once called the jungle effect by Dr Daphne Miller, and then once called return to an ancestral diet by Dr Michael Smith. I like all three of those books to really wrap your head around not only how to eat like your ancestors, but also to eat eat seasonally. So I'll put a link to those books if you go to Ben greenfield. Dot com.

Europe Dr Daphne Miller Ben greenfield Dr Michael Smith Stephen Lee Africa heart disease Alzheimer one hundred million years two years
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Would address parasites a certain number of plants that would be anti-tumor genyk, a certain number of plants that might offer some sort of let's say protection from the sun or protection from a malaria or measles or something else that might be kind of passing through the tribe. We do have the ability to be able to quantify kind of using modern science like like, I'm not against the idea of adopting a certain diet. And then getting a blood test or gut test to see how your body is responding to that diet weather. There are any inflammatory markers. Whether they're little holes that need to be filled in with specific nutrients and also using things like heart rate variability testing. See how your nervous system is responding to certain meals, whether it's getting low or high in response to a meal, but then of course, I think there are also those in our community, you know, shamans and healers and physicians who who are able to help people navigate through this or able to teach people how to better listen to their bodies. You know, what one guy who you actually mind you little bit of my friend. Paul check hill often a stand before the selection of foods that are available to him on a table. And he'll pick up a certain dish and set it down and pick up another one set it down and begin to listen to the to the cues that his body is sending him about what he should actually eat. And I've begun to kind of a symbol my lunchtime salad. Similarly, they're always different. I opened up the refrigerator, and I say, well, the the sprouts are calling my name today. I kind of feel like the celery instead of the carrots, and you know, I'd like the almond butter instead of the Dijon mustard. And so I think that there is a certain kind of a horse sense we can rely on. But I think that that should be paired with with some amount of self quantification. I think that combination Ben can can help to guide a person back to their own wisdom back to their the combination that you're explaining and then become aware just the way that you said that I really over the years of working with the animals watching that it's just become aware of what you know. What sounds good or does anything sound good at the moment? All those our our our qs, basically, what what your own body is is telling you, and I think becoming aware of that can really complement these other. The some of the science that we know about an appreciate nowadays as well. But really tuning in getting on wholesome foods, and that that's a huge topic. In of itself of vegetables fruits nuts meat from you know, from likely taught Warren, Angus ferris kind of meat and so forth, and that just becoming aware as talk in the book of becoming aware of what what what is calling you. Or what isn't calling you? And I give that one example in my mind right now of people that are deficient in in vitamin D, which which precipitates uptake of calcium, and and they're they're greater liking for cheese. It's high in calcium some of the experiments that they did on that. All that's become can become an awareness kind of of thing in us. Right. Exactly. Or or? And I also know Dr Daphne Miller gets into this in her book the jungle effect about folks in populations having self selected diets that reduce their their risk for certain diseases that they might be genetically predisposed to like, I think the example you use in your book is is the Greek immigrants to Australia who have a a low level of cardiovascular disease, due to their Mediterranean, self selection of leafy vegetables, and herbs and spices in there are examples in in doctor Miller's book about, you know, the tar Mahar Indian tribe, and how they genetically possess a higher than normal risk for diabetes in how many how many Hispanics that relocate to the US and adopt a westernized diet, actually manifest that that diabetes. But yet in a traditional Mexican diet with slow carbohydrates, Staples like leg, you GMs and ferment did foods and beans, etc. They actually, you know, the. The mazes in the starches that are a little bit lower on the glycemic index compared to the sugars and the process flowers in the US. They don't develop the same the same propensity for diabetes..

diabetes US Dr Daphne Miller malaria tar Mahar Indian tribe Paul Ben Warren Australia Angus ferris
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Variability like wild plants intake like eating a para sympathetic state. And then you choose foods that are nutrient dense and digestible in my opinion. Probably if we were to choose one diet, that's that's pretty close to being a perfect human diet if you could tweak it here. And there for your needs. It would be something very inclusive of a wide variety of food group. Something like the west in price die where you eating there in your eating grains, and you're eating plants and you're eating ferment foods, and you're eating organ meats in reading wide variety of foods and shore before embarking upon a diet like that you might need to heal leaky, gut you money to fix a gallbladder deliver cleanse at Sarah. But your goal should be no matter what kind of diet, you're on to get to the point where you can include as many different food groups as possible than you treat the carb fat protein ratios based on you. So that's that's the first part of the wellness was the diet and micronutrients now based on that who has some questions about diet in general choosing the die for you micronutrients, unless she's run a Mike to some of the folks who have other hands up. We'll just take like two or three questions for each section here. It was going to if you've done something like twenty three me and mine came back like a hundred percent European now how do you one hundred percent hundred? No Asian surprise. Or anything? Very surprising boring. But how would you go about picking like the diet from one hundred percent European do you go back one hundred years thousand years? How do you figure out what they what you're EPA genetic? Mechanisms started kick in after about two or three generations yawn to go that far back. You don't you don't have to do like ten thousand years ago where people eating northern you're you're going on. Yeah. Yeah. We know that folks regionally do a lot of fermentation pickling curing high mount officiant take high amounted like Ermitage like canned vegetable intake, NADA citrus fruits. Right. Not not a lot of starches lower levels of Emily's production the mouth, so it. So it's kind of fun. It's kinda like a little bit of detective work. And there are good books that could walk through the process like Dr Daphne Miller has the book the jungle effect. I was talks about how to eat, according to your ancestry the type of diet she put her patience on based off the air the world they came from. When you combine that with something like a really good sake. Food allergy test, some blood and biomarker analysis to see what specific micronutrients vitamins that you might be deficient in and maybe even gut panel rather microbiome panel where you could look at everything from your gallbladder your liver parasites yeast fungus at cetera than you could start the put the pieces together. You don't have to go that far back in your ancestry. Two or three you're lucky enough to have grandparents still you talk to them about their diet was what their mom and dad eight and you really don't have to go that far back. So that's actually total rabbit hole. That's why I'm not a huge fan. I held. I have a lot of France where like families where like the seems like really trendy nowadays. Like, the nomadic homeschooling, you know, internet entrepreneur working from the road type of life. But I think when it comes to setting up, your gut microbiome your skin microbiome. A more intimate relationship with the actual bio of the environment in which you're living the advantages of having like like home base like a castle that you call home and raising your family in the same place where maybe you lived your parents live. You know, like stinking forward in terms of like a family trust, and maybe amassing land for your children and certain locations. They try to keep I think there are definite advantages to having a local relationship with your local environment, your local family setting cetera. I think that translates the diet as well. So question is, sir. How do you go about testing for leaky gut? And then how you go about fixing it. And also specifically what she watch out for when it comes to insects, and how those reacted the guts and the stomach lining. Yeah. So in terms of identifying leaky, gut you could get basically just a stool panel like Genova diagnostics, for example, the they'll let you go to direct labs or any laboratory testing website..

Mike Dr Daphne Miller Genova diagnostics EPA Ermitage Emily France one hundred percent ten thousand years one hundred years hundred percent thousand years
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Jim out of drummer please e coli which horse alex is pcs end deco alex's it is considering consuming for its potential hormetic purposes uh and it turns out that s you know i wouldn't drink water from a water tank on an airplane for a variety of reasons that go far beyond e coli like for example um floride an medals and chlorine and lord knows what else is lining that tank that who knows when it's been cleaned but e coli is actually really interesting because uh you know it's basically a bacterium though he find naturally within the human body mmhmm that we've always gotti cold out many of us host a population of e coli in our gut that aids digestion in that protects from a lot of harmful microbes and you know in her book uh i believe it was her book pharmacology dr daphne miller rory interviewed even goes into the fact that when you look at listeria any coli and a lot of these potentially pathogenic organisms they only appear to be deleterious win the gut is absent in florishing bacteria like a good range of other bacteria which is why kids grow up on farms and drink rawmilk when you look at their stomachs dixie do have a lot of with steria any coli and a lot of these other potentially pathogenic bacteria but they're they're a symptomatic because they have so many of the other good bacteria that came from the soil and the plants in the pets in the farm animals and all these other things that are round them so maintaining a really strong florishing microbial community in your gut appears to be the the most important thing to do if you are going to get exposed to e coli the pathogenic e there is batty coli you know there's there's there's ecoli that.

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"That the body is storing but there are also some problems with his study like for example one big one was that the group that was eating the high carbohydrate diet um they came in actually weighing a little bit less anyways which means that because we know that the more the eu way the higher metabolic rate is now that it's possible at their metabolic rate was a little bit lower anyways to start with so naked decade easily carry over to that uh that that you know hundred and fifty calories per day usually a hundred and fifty helary's hundred forty ehlers whatever was is not significant it's not insignificant but it's not like blowing my mind i gotta say mmhmm yep exactly so also they they were not the participants to pick just as it the study they weren't in calorie balance so they loss wei and fat through the study and so you know it's it's really difficult to say they're going to be losing weight anyways wants to return to this genetic facto tugboat those twins how much variability there would be dispaced on genetics as well on and how much of a confounding variable that might be there's there's just all you know i was just down in san francisco area this ghanim dr daphne miller and we talked about how shall put like mexicans who have diabetes and america on a traditional tara mahar indian tribe diet and the lose weight when eating or mazen and cornyn and tortillas and in beans whereas show put by you know people who are from a northern european population show recommend sometimes like higher fish oil intake or new fermented food intake romania three intake she recommends lots of fiber and fermented foods for people who are of africanamerican descent so ultimately at any any stay like this these days and mike and is probably better not to eat a lot of sugar yeah and processed carbohydrate.

metabolic rate dr daphne miller diabetes cornyn mike san francisco mazen food intake fifty calories
"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"You can also get you and more savings how caused us if you can uphold like race results are results from strata iran keeper or any of those apps that keep track of how much you're exercising you save money isn't that cool you basically if you think about this the right way you're making money by being healthconscious 'cause that's money you can use elsewhere so how do you do you get a free quote just go to health iqcomben just like it sounds help iqcomben they'll support the show that you're listening to right now and will also allow you to see if you qualify for one of those amazing life insurance rates from health iq help iqcomban this podcast has also brought to you by since i just flew in from new york city nerves speaking something i just used it's called the human charger now the human charger it hits the photo sensitive proteins on the surface of your brain when you put the little ear buds that come along with it into your ear canals that's right you just stick this thing into the orifices on either side of your skull it's painless in i just made it sound really painful dinner at it produces calibrated white light and what that does allows you to produce serotonin and dopamine and nor gentleman and a you've got these proteins on the surface of your brain the very similar to those found in the retina of your eye and they create similar reactions when they get exposed lights you can use this for jet lag for mood boost if you like a shift worker amazing for that as well so you get 20 percent off just go to ben greenfield fitnesscomhuman charger that's ben greenfield fitnesscomhuman charger and enter code banned twenty to save twenty percent all right let's let's go ahead and head over to dr daphne miller's front porch.

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"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"dr daphne miller" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Exactly reis jam offends you know myself just over the last year so i am actually measuring myong likely us just a cage natshe see what spite that what doesn't it's an because again and more you learn the more you want learn on you noticing how everything from exercise and even so good carbohydrates had had you know things like check chick peas or lentils or anything headache spy even a very small amount and it's been really interesting nsc what works might doesn't work so i'm a chef and and so i you know woods each carbohydrates if i could morning noon and nice preferably slathered in fast and quality so an you know i it's it's i find at each in this way it's it's terribly sas fine but you do need to be clapper any duty to try and end an bigger outweighs rhonda's um because you know we this in a world where carbohydrates are just in abundance everywhere you look arm so it's really trying to to find ways of adapting getting a family to seductive i am joined joining the quest as it were to just trying reduced daniel active of sugar road in a because i don't want to give people the impression the the employee carbohydrate m e boon luca on a the the blues zones unity read a book like dan boot nerves obus zones or or reason when i run by by dr daphne miller called the jungle effect.

rhonda dr daphne miller reis headache dan