23 Burst results for "Dr Dale"

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:24 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"That are listening here in a <Speech_Male> like. I believe this <Speech_Male> you know and i want to continue <Speech_Male> to spread the message if you have <Speech_Male> one. Ask <Speech_Male> for those people <Speech_Male> who are listening today. <Speech_Male> What would that be. <Speech_Male> It would <Speech_Male> be for everyone <Speech_Male> to help. <Speech_Male> Reduce the global burden <Speech_Male> of dementia <Speech_Male> by getting themselves <Speech_Male> evaluated <Speech_Male> and getting on appropriate <Speech_Male> prevention. <Speech_Male> That's the <Speech_Male> way you're really going to see <Speech_Male> a change <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you know you're gonna be <Speech_Male> told by <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> by the establishment <Speech_Male> for awhile <Speech_Male> more <Speech_Male> that you know. This <Speech_Male> is possible <Speech_Male> that don't bother to do <Speech_Male> this. That i don't believe <Speech_Male> it that it's crazy <Speech_Male> usual and you <Speech_Male> know there's a great history. <Speech_Male> Medicine is <Speech_Male> just filled with these sorts <Speech_Male> of things. of course <Speech_Male> similize <Speech_Male> Advocating <Speech_Male> washing hands <Speech_Male> before delivering babies <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> getting into <Speech_Male> an insane asylum <Speech_Male> for his suggestions <Speech_Male> and then dying of an infection <Speech_Male> himself <Speech_Male> says of course all pre <Speech_Male> germ theory <Speech_Male> so people just didn't <Speech_Male> believe <Speech_Male> that there were these tiny <Speech_Male> little things that could <Speech_Male> kill you <Speech_Male> so you know. The changing <Speech_Male> belief is going to <Speech_Male> take some time <Speech_Male> scurvy killed. <Speech_Male> Many <Speech_Male> many people people <Speech_Male> would every century <Speech_Male> people would <Speech_Male> figure out <Speech_Male> There's something which ultimately <Speech_Male> turned out of course to <Speech_Male> be vitamin c. <Speech_Male> But what would happen <Speech_Male> every century. <Speech_Male> The medical establishment <Speech_Male> would say now. <Speech_Male> We don't believe that and <Speech_Male> so then it would take another <Speech_Male> century before they'd <Speech_Male> come back before <Speech_Male> finally people <Speech_Male> realize yes. <Speech_Male> We can prevent <Speech_Male> intrigue scurvy <Speech_Male> with vitamin c. <Speech_Male> This is a <Speech_Male> to some extent. These <Speech_Male> are new kinds of <Speech_Male> illnesses. These <Speech_Male> are as i said. <Speech_Male> Network insufficiencies <Speech_Male> their <Speech_Male> complex <Speech_Male> and so. <Speech_Male> I think functional medicine <Speech_Male> is attacking this <Speech_Male> very very well <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> it's going to take some time <Speech_Male> and so i recommend <Speech_Male> everybody <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Please get yourself <Speech_Male> evaluated. Your <Speech_Male> family members evaluated. <Speech_Male> And let's <Speech_Male> prevent <Speech_Male> let's reverse <Speech_Male> unless let's <Speech_Male> prevent the <Speech_Male> continued increase <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> in cognitive <Silence> decline around the world <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> as i shared in the beginning <Speech_Male> of the interview. It's an <Speech_Male> incredible message <Speech_Male> of hope. <Speech_Male> I just wanna acknowledge <Speech_Male> you for your work and <Speech_Male> your have worked at your building <Speech_Male> your continuing to <Speech_Male> build. It's <Speech_Male> what's needed. It's <Speech_Male> laborious <Speech_Male> but it's <Speech_Male> exactly. The process <Speech_Male> has needed to <Speech_Male> help people <Speech_Male> who are even <Speech_Music_Male> just a little bit <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> minded see that. There's <Speech_Music_Male> a new path <Speech_Music_Male> and approach <Speech_Music_Male> dr present. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much <Speech_Male> for coming. Back on the podcast. <Speech_Male> We'll have a link <Speech_Music_Male> to all incredible <Speech_Music_Male> resources that you mentioned <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i <SpeakerChange> really appreciate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you being. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks so much true. Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> having me on my <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wife. Aida <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and i are huge <Speech_Music_Male> fans of yours <SpeakerChange> so thanks. <Speech_Music_Male> We really appreciate <Music> it.

dementia
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:55 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Blood pressure monitors. Everyone should know where they stand with these sorts of things and then looking at your gut microbiome another critical piece through literally doing things that you can do yourself. You can get a tremendous look at your own health and really signal yourself long before you ever begin to have that brain fog. That's heading also in the long run for the cognitive decline. That is killing about fifteen percent of americans right now incredibly common problem and just looking at alzheimer's as professor christine yaffe has published a few years ago. It is now the third leading cause of death in this country and for perspective. I should say it will kill nearly a hundred times as many of the currently living americans as kovic nineteen has cova. Nineteen as you know is now over. Six hundred thousand. Alzheimer's will kill about forty five million of the currently living. Americans are about six million who already have a diagnosis of alzheimer's disease. So it's an incredibly common problem and again it's just an end stage to the the big picture of cognitive decline. So i think a number of these wearables really really helpful really interesting. Of course you can also look at your vascular elasticity literally kind of gives you an idea of your youthfulness and as you know dr care fitzgerald recently just at a very nice study where she showed reversal of aging where you can really take years off people's lives when you're looking at a menthylatim methenolone basically oh and then again doing a functional medicine type of protocol that she set up In looking at a reversal agent. So we're now going to be doing that same thing and we're working with keira on this next phase to be able to look not only at improvements in cognition but improvements in aging itself..

alzheimer's christine yaffe cova dr care fitzgerald keira
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:26 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"The other thing that surprised me was how much it made a difference to kind of stick with the critical pieces. And how sticking with these and then continuing to optimize turned out to be so helpful. Some people will give up. They'll say look i've been. I've done this for a couple of weeks. I don't see any major changes you know. I'm gonna move onto the next fad you know and so. Many of these fans unfortunately are not scientifically related. It's just you know. Take this bill take this. You hear it all the time. Take this supplement and everything's gonna be great It's the brain is not that simple. You really need to to look more carefully at what's causing the problem. Sure supplements are an important part again. It's interesting the opposite side is from the academicians who say supplements can't be helpful you know. We'll we'll wait a minute You know let's not throw the baby out with the bathwater here you know. We've these things. Do help changer. Neuro chemistry so we are looking at understanding the underlying neuro chemistry. And then going after that going after those pieces and absolutely critical things can be helpful. You know you can't tell me that omega threes. Don't change your neuro chemistry. That's been shown again and again and again you can't tell me that resolve ins don't have impacts on your neuro chemistry. You can't tell me that things like whole coffee fruit extract that increases your beady. Nf are these things are not having impacts on your neuro and you can go down the list list. You know You're an asset teen year l. car Your you know rodeo la. You're the copa understanding how to use these and to target the right things in the right people. These are very powerful. And you just have to know how to use them so these these sorts of things were all kind of eye opening to me but the most important thing to me by far was the happiness the families for example with deborah. She knew watching her grandmother and her father and then seeing what's happening with herself and knowing her own genetics. She turned around and looked at her children. Of course oh my gosh. What's their future. And so now to be able to say for all future generations. They never have to deal with this again. That really makes me happy. It's an incredible work and the peace of mind that you can bring to the table when you really help people understand that. Hey we want to understand that we've been part of the problem not in a way that is blaming anybody but that actually that we as human beings we've created these circumstances that have contributed to the root causes of the disease that we're facing that's actually a good thing because if we created it we can do something about it. If this is a random disease just happenstance falls on us or some mutation and the genetic code of humanity that all of a sudden started triggering up and is now affecting the human population but wasn't really affecting before if it's this random thing that was planted here in some sort of crazy way we can't do anything about it but if we contributed to it. That's a good thing because we can do something about it and that's the hopeful message. Yeah that's there for anybody who's listening now. With many of these stories. You talk about the quantifiable improvements. In addition to the stories of reconnecting with family recognizing faces again remembering important business details.

deborah la
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:36 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Walking into the room and it was a very small room like a very very modest room nice but extremely modest and they told me the price at the time rough range that somebody would be paying on most likely. The president probably former president paid himself when he was there. These are astronomical numbers to have twenty four hour care to have a parent a grandparent. Yourself adam memory care center and not to mention that the the drug ads you helm right. That's been in the news. A little bit You know the price tag. That's been floating around. That potentially could have bankrupted us in the economy. Was i believe it was like fifty six thousand dollars a year. And that's just the beginning because you still have to pay for infusions you still have to pay for pet scans you have to pay for a for a. Mri is you gotta have before and after mri's because of the fact that it causes bleeding into the brain in about seventeen percent of people it causes side effects in about forty to fifty percent of people depending on whether you're able for negative or positive so it really comes with some huge side effects in effect. We'd like to do in the in the upcoming trial. We'd like to use that. As the control of the problem is going to be will then have to be very careful about. Are we actually hurting these people with giving them some cerebral hemorrhage giving them some some edina in the brain Is is that fair to them to given that sort of side effects as a control group where we'd like to be able to do instead and as you indicated that the costs are just astronomical The average person is just the average person. Three hundred fifty dollars before they pass away from alzheimer's disease. Much of which of course is is spent with nursing homes. That can often be your one hundred thousand dollars a year or more. It's really unfortunate. So we'd like to be able to say is look everybody. Please get on appropriate prevention when you turn forty five or get on appropriate reversal when you have the earliest possible symptoms and we can really make this an optional disease. I mean this is the power of podcast and books like yourself. Is that really. Were sounding the alarm that.

adam alzheimer's disease edina
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:15 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"We typically find multiple contributing factors from just the thing pathogens as we talked about toxins reductions in in energetic support reductions in trophic support. And it's addressing those things you're now putting the people onto the correct side of the signal year literally changing neuro chemical signaling from a sanap does classic signaling which is pulling down just as you think about osteo. Class tick activity in osteoporosis. This scenario paralysis. That's what alzheimer's is. So you're now changing from synoptic classic signaling into scenario blast signaling building and maintaining those synapses. Which is just what we wanna do. It's it's so key because as we are talking about this. I think that's an important point because yes we've done so many episodes on imports of diet. We've sent so many episodes on the importance of sleep but specific with alzheimer's what you've shown to your research and work is that okay. There could be people that their diet is pretty exactly where there could be people that their sleep is pretty good. But they have such deep environmental toxicity. Exposures wouldn't have known of if they didn't go to one of the physicians. That's in your network. That's trained in the bredesen's protocol and the recode protocol and then found out their unique stressor. That's maybe one of the biggest ones for the night. It's definitely multifaceted but everybody has a big one or not. Big just one. There's a big few redder. They're the biggest pushes for them. Were there any of the stories. That are a good example of how for one of those survivors What you know. One of those key quadrants was a bigger pusher for them than for some of the others that were there. Is there anyone that comes to mind. Sure you could share. So sally is a great example and sally was trained as a nursing professor and taught for years one of the things that she taught people was to alzheimer's is untreatable. There's nothing we can do about this illness..

alzheimer's paralysis osteoporosis bredesen sally
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:43 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Let's show a bunch of anecdotes because we had nothing back then so we published the first anecdotes. Ten people with nine of them improving in two thousand fourteen. We had another ten in two thousand sixteen. We published a hundred anecdotes In all cases we had we had documented improvement approval in two thousand eighteen so then after we had that we thought okay one hundred. They can't turn us down again. We went back in two thousand eighteen. We got turned on again because again. This is not the way people think about clinical trials. We need to now start giving the brain. It's do it. it is a complicated oregon. And we need to start thinking these as complex network insufficiencies these are network insufficiencies. People are used to hearing about deficiency of vitamin d. or vitamin c. Those are simple insufficiencies. We now need to come into the twenty first century and realize that many of our illnesses are complex. Network insufficiencies and alzheimer's is a great example. This is a complex network that has to do with your hormones and has to do with your trophic factors so we finally. We went to a fourth. Different eye are be that finally in twenty nineteen said okay. We'll let you do a small proof of concept trial which is what we just completed in december of twenty twenty. And which is what. We posted unmet archive this year our just submitting four peer reviewed publication. But it's already public now So that you can read the whole thing in mid archive. I think something very important about this again. If people are not in the world research. And i'm not in it myself. But i talked to incredible people like yourself that are in. It is when people hear about your work you know. I often hear about a couple of things. It's like okay. Where's the big randomized controlled trial right. You hear this all the time even from peers of yours colleagues of yours. That are out there. That's like okay..

alzheimer's oregon
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Even though the alzheimer's isn't coming till the future you are increasing your risk. Starting at that time and then the third of those three is nutrition and so getting appropriate vitamin d inappropriate over the threes. And all these things huge so you look at those groups and you can add to that stress which is another piece of this. It's really a part of the trophic and metabolic piece because of its effect on things like cortisol. Dhea in pregnenolone and things like that but those are the big groups. If you can optimize those four main groups you are going to do a tremendous amount with preventing and reversing cognitive decline and on the other hand simply throwing a single drug at what you can see as quite a complex problem really doesn't make any sense. Are diseases have gotten more sophisticated as our modern world has gotten way more sophisticated. No longer is a single antibiotic or other intervention. Really the path forward. You know the path forward is a multifaceted approach that deals at a route called at a root cause level that really is playing with systems biology. Right so let's make this personalized. We've teased a little bit. That we were going to get into some of these stories. So i'd love to pick one of these stories in one of them that comes to mind is One of the women that was featured inside of the book. Her name is deborah right. And the interesting thing about deborah. That i think is so relevant to this topic of alzheimer's is that twenty years ago. You would ask people and talk about the conversation of alzheimer's and it was getting a lot more attention awareness but still for the most part. Even a lot of clinicians would say well. Don't worry about that. That's something that you really have to deal with in your late seventies or eighties but tell us about deborah and when she started experiencing some of the earliest signs an i'd also love to expand you know in these squadrons that you just broke out inflammation toxins all these areas..

alzheimer's deborah
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Temporal and parietal reduced glucose utilization while the good news is you can bridge that gap with key tones so with the combination. If you can develop metabolic flexibility so that you can now burn both the fats and the the glucose you're in the best shape so we want to do both and so you can see when someone has insulin resistance. They are causing their own cognitive decline by multiple mechanisms. They're creating inflammation because of the non enzymatic glaciation of hundreds of proteins. They're also causing a resistance to so that you now have reduced trophy support from insulin. When we would grow brain cells in a dish which we did for thirty years in the lab. You'd always have to include some insulin there. Because you need that to keep the cells alive it is a very important neurotrophic activity. Things like nerve. Growth factor. Brain derived neurotrophic factor. Insulin are all critical for keeping neurons alive. So you having this second mechanism as well. You're also having a metabolic component there. You're now lose. You not only have the insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance loss but you're having the trophy problems also you have a metabolic problem a trophy problem and inflammatory problem. You're really taking most of the boxes to give yourself cognitive decline. When you have insulin resistance and then i should say the fourth piece of this then is the third be speaking. The low energetics The fourth part of this then is trophy support and those come in three groups so it is growth factors as i just mentioned things like insulin and things like energy. Nba enough but secondly it is hormones. So having this is why estra dial in the past was noted to be a critical support and a sudden loss of esther. Dial as was shown by mayo clinic group years ago. If you have a sudden loss of esther dial in your if at the age of forty or younger and you don't get h. rt..

mayo clinic group Nba
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:03 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Are doing very very well. Because you're getting at what's actually causing. So i do think you know this is documenting. The first survivors the people who are truly surviving. Now we'll see. Is it gonna be ten years. Twenty years thirty years we hope. Of course it's going to be. They'll be sharp until they're one hundred but we don't know yet. The longest ones have been on a little over nine years. As i mentioned. You know a great analogy. That i heard Is everybody's fallen scraped their knee or elbow. And then what happens. Your body is intelligent and a scab will end up being built right and nobody would look at a scab and say hey what is thing. That's there it wasn't there previously. Let's start peeling that off. And in fact our approach right now in many aspects of health but specifically when it comes to cognitive decline in alzheimer's is let's give a drug that starts to remove the scab off which is the amyloid plaque. That's there so the entire focus is on removing something that we see as being foreign that previously wasn't there but we have to realize that the body has a deep sense of intelligence and many things. It does it does on purpose except for rare rare rare genetic diseases which are less than you know a small. Few percentage points of the total diseases that people go through so we have to ask a bigger question. That bigger question is. Why is the scab there in the first place. Why does the body keep on cutting itself so in that same analogy in parallel before we jump into a couple of stories. Give us a couple of the main pillars. You've already mentioned them. But in a way that is translated here survey you can see the different silos in the pillars that can add up to the cuts that end up happening on the brain let. Let's just mention a few them. So you talked about insulin. Resistance and blood sugar so that is often a main one. That's talked about. So how is that related to alzheimer's and our brain health yet. It's a good point in as you know Over eighty million. Americans have insulin resistance. So it's an incredibly common problem and so it is it actually contributes in multiple ways. So if you break down the science what you find is the thing that actually triggers this change so ap amyloid precursor protein sits at the center. This and is essentially A master switch so when things are good much like the president of our country when things are good it sends out signals that say build. New interactions things are a growth period. So your growth and support and that's what allows you to make and keep memories on the other hand. This is this about neuro plasticity on the other hand that same master switch molecule ap which sits in your neurons.

alzheimer's
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Well i can see my father or my grandfather or my mother in this person in this patient and if they made progress maybe i can to absolutely and it's the hope that's exactly right. In in one of the reasons. I was so enthusiastic about writing. This book was because of talking with these people and because of emailing with these people over time and hearing these wonderful stories how they got better and how it really changed. Their views of life in these are people in some cases who were told. They're going to die of alzheimer's. There's nothing to do as as you know in julie's case She went to enroll just waited months to get into see an extra expert neurologist and said look i'm april four four. I'm already suffering very clearly. She had gone down in her scores. She said is there anything you can do. Even just to keep me where i am. And the guy looked at her and said good luck with that basically offering her no hope whatsoever. She's gone from nine thirty fifth percentile to the ninetieth percentile and sometimes ninety nine. She's brilliant great with her scores repeatedly and interestingly she illustrates beautifully. Some of the things that are happening so for example she then had after doing very well had some backsliding. Why was that so you know again. The theory would say you're now protecting yourself from something. Let's see what it is. So in fact she had improved her insulin sensitivity. She had improved her ongoing inflammation. But we knew there was something more. So i kept reminding. Look you need these additional tests et cetera. She finally got them and it turned out to make a long story short. She ended up having Bija which was an undiagnosed chronic infection. It's as you know a malaria cousin and she has done even better by addressing that so you start to address these things and you start getting some improvement..

alzheimer's julie malaria
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"We'd like to see everybody who's forty five years of age or older getting on active prevention. We're really could make this a rare disease if people would start earlier people with sei which is really a second stage Virtually one hundred percent of those people can get better as you go on. Just no difference than cancer as you get later later later. It is more and more difficult to reverse the process. But we do see this in our in our trial. So two thousand eleven. We were actually turned down because it was a multi variable trial. And of course it's a multi variable disease. So the idea of saying will you can only test one thing at a time really makes no physiological sense and just a pause right there just for those. That are not familiar with the process of research and everything. I think this is an important thing because you hear so many times by the way you know. Your new book is called the first survivors of alzheimer's how patients recovered life and hope in their own words. And this builds on your previous books that were there all on the topic of alzheimer's outlining your protocol that you've put together so important thing that's there is that you know there have been over. I believe four hundred different clinical trials that have tried to get to the to to at least have a drug that makes even a small difference right when it comes to alzheimer's and cognitive decline and largely all of them have failed including the most recent one that there's been some controversy about an fda will come back to that and the traditional model of medicine is looking at okay..

alzheimer's cancer fda
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:40 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"The inner workings of the brain and the body with one of the brightest minds and wellness medicine and mindset. This week's guest is dr. Dale bredesen's dr bredesen's is internationally recognized as an expert in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases such as alzheimer's disease. He's also the author of three new york. Times sellers will actually too and soon to be. Three and those books are the end of alzheimer's the end of alzheimer's program and his latest book is called the first survivors of alzheimer's how patients recovered life and hope in their own words. Dr bredesen's has held faculty positions at uc san francisco ucla and the university of california san diego. He has directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before coming to the buck institute for research on aging in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. Its founding president and ceo. He's currently a professor at ucla. In addition to prolifically doing his research and writing in the space of alzheimer's today we're talking about seven stories. Seven stories from seven different patients who are being recognized in dr bredesen's new book the first survivors of alzheimer's. We all know someone who survived cancer but no one has really met anyone. That survived alzheimer's. There's a reason why and dr. br. Edison is here to change that. Stay tuned dr. Bredesen's welcome back to the podcast and i don't have you here sir. Thanks so much drew. I really appreciate it We we really love your podcast thanks. I'm excited about the new book and we're going to jump fully into it and discuss a bunch of different topics you've covered but i want to start with a big picture question that a lot of people who are listening to this podcast watchings view on youtube one. Oh which is is it truly possible to recover from alzheimer's it's a loaded question and some people might even say it's a blasphemous question right. But you're the man to ask. I would agree with you. It's blasphemous but absolutely we've seen it again and again and again As proof for example we just published a our trial proof of concept trial In that trial eighty four percent of the people actually improve their scores so we have unquestionable objective evidence of improvement. And when you say you publish your trial right for those folks that are just new to you right and are not familiar with your protocol program that.

alzheimer's dr bredesen Dale bredesen Dr bredesen burnham institute buck institute for research on ucla university of california Bredesen san diego san francisco new york Edison cancer youtube
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"I want to start with a big picture question that a lot of people who are listening to this podcast watchings view on youtube one. Oh which is is it truly possible to recover from alzheimer's it's a loaded question and some people might even say it's a blasphemous question right. But you're the man to ask. I would agree with you. It's blasphemous but absolutely we've seen it again and again and again As proof for example we just published a our trial proof of concept trial In that trial eighty four percent of the people actually improve their scores so we have unquestionable objective evidence of improvement. And when you say you publish your trial right for those folks that are just new to you right and are not familiar with your protocol program that you've designed. Let's give a little bit of context around this. What was that trial trying to look bad. And what answers came from it. Yeah great point so way back in two thousand eleven we were looking at root causes as as you well know root cause medicine is critical and so we were looking at root causes of cognitive decline in two thousand eleven. We proposed the first comprehensive trial for people with mci or alzheimer's. And let me. just digress. For one moment to say this concept of mci mild cognitive impairment has really hurt people and the field when you say that someone has mild cognitive impairment that is like saying they have mildly metastatic cancer. It is a late stage of the process. Typically they've had the underlying pathophysiology for fifteen or twenty years before they're getting a diagnosis of mci and then about each year. About ten percent of those people will convert to full on alzheimer's which is a which is the end stage of really. What is the alzheimer's pathophysiology and just pause there for a second. If you could rename that right come up with a different term just to show people the severity in the weight that comes with data. Is there any thoughts of what you would wanna call that absolutely so there are four stages you a symptomatic subject of cognitive impairment. Mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's what they should be called is pre alzheimer's. That's the that's the A symptomatic period. Subjective is early stage. alzheimer's disease what we call. mild mild. Cognitive impairment is advanced stage alzheimer's disease. And what we currently call. Alzheimer's disease is final stage

alzheimer's
"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"A lot of time. I mean a lot of time looking for the perfect organic mattress. And i was so happy to find the birch metrics by helix. The birch is made right here in the us out of four just four nontoxic natural materials organic. Latex organic cotton new zealand wool and american steel springs. If feel so great to know that. I'm sleeping on a mattress that uses zero zero zero zero polyurethane based foams that means no off gassing. Have you ever got a new mattress and you open it up and it smells like crap. That's called off gassing. The birch mattress doesn't do that so now. I can sleep better knowing that. I'm not exposing myself to harmful chemicals day in and day out and the best part is.

Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:29 min | 6 months ago

Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"I want to start with a big picture question that a lot of people who are listening to this podcast watchings view on youtube one. Oh which is is it truly possible to recover from alzheimer's it's a loaded question and some people might even say it's a blasphemous question right. But you're the man to ask. I would agree with you. It's blasphemous but absolutely we've seen it again and again and again As proof for example we just published a our trial proof of concept trial In that trial eighty four percent of the people actually improve their scores so we have unquestionable objective evidence of improvement. And when you say you publish your trial right for those folks that are just new to you right and are not familiar with your protocol program that you've designed. Let's give a little bit of context around this. What was that trial trying to look bad. And what answers came from it. Yeah great point so way back in two thousand eleven we were looking at root causes as as you well know root cause medicine is critical and so we were looking at root causes of cognitive decline in two thousand eleven. We proposed the first comprehensive trial for people with mci or alzheimer's. And let me. just digress. For one moment to say this concept of mci mild cognitive impairment has really hurt people and the field when you say that someone has mild cognitive impairment that is like saying they have mildly metastatic cancer. It is a late stage of the process. Typically they've had the underlying pathophysiology for fifteen or twenty years before they're getting a diagnosis of mci and then about each year. About ten percent of those people will convert to full on alzheimer's which is a which is the end stage of really. What is the alzheimer's pathophysiology and just pause there for a second. If you could rename that right come up with a different term just to show people the severity in the weight that comes with data. Is there any thoughts of what you would wanna call that absolutely so there are four stages you a symptomatic subject of cognitive impairment. Mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's what they should be called is pre alzheimer's. That's the that's the A symptomatic period. Subjective is early stage. alzheimer's disease what we call. mild mild. Cognitive impairment is advanced stage alzheimer's disease. And what we currently call. Alzheimer's disease is final stage

Alzheimer's Disease MCI Metastatic Cancer Youtube Alzheimer's Pathophysiology
The Real Cause of Alzheimers and Dementia

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:05 min | 7 months ago

The Real Cause of Alzheimers and Dementia

"Wanna jump right in and talk about alzheimer's because you wrote a really interesting instagram post. I think it was a few weeks ago. And you were saying. Alzheimer's reversal is is real. It's not just a theory and you were hinting at a new study. Small one but something exciting. That came across your desk that you wanted to highlight and make your audience aware of so. Why are you excited about the study. And what did they cover inside of there. Well i'm hoping you'll share that study with a link. This is work that i've been aware of actually for quite some time. I know you know dr. Dale br edison and he recently published a book. Called the end of alzheimer's. The plan in the first book was invalid. And this one is the plan and i. I wrote the forward to that book and in that ford. I think it really did capture my excitement about the work that he's doing even be beyond how he's broken the mold beyond alzheimer's and let me explain in a. We live in a world where we try to really pigeonhole are diseases to think that they are caused by one thing and therefore we can fix them with a remedy and there's such an effort underway to Find an alzheimer's drug that works just last month. Eli lilly announced the results of a trial. In which they're monoclonal antibody mab was found to reduce the rate of decline of alzheimer's basis by an astounding thirty two percent When they made that announcement the stock value went up. I think twenty billion dollars. Eli lilly but what does that mean. It means. it's slow the decline by third means. People are still declining going to get worse than we know where it ends up generally So it really wasn't a stabilizing alzheimer's or can you imagine actually improving their situation. Because they're looking at one thing. This is a monoclonal antibody that is targeting the so called beta amyloid protein. That's absolutely the cause of alzheimer's.

Alzheimer's Dale Br Edison Alzheimer's Drug Eli Lilly Ford
Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:59 min | 10 months ago

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"Our guest is extraordinary. Dr a friend of mine. A pioneer in the field of neurodegeneration. Who's broken ground. That few have treaded on. And it's none other than dr dale bredesen's who you may remember from our previous podcast where we discussed his book. The ending alzheimer's. His latest book is called the end of alzheimer's program which is much more robust programmatic insight into how to actually use the protocol that he uses with patients that i use and how can kill her to anybody at any age in any part of the journey along protecting your brain or fixing your brain. He's been on the faculty of ucsf ucla university of california san diego. He's directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before we coming to the buck institute in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight as its founding president and ceo and he's currently a professor at ucla chief science officer at apollo health which is a great online platform for addressing nerd. Degeneracy so welcome dale. Thanks so much for having me on mark. I really appreciate it okay. So so. let's get into this. Because in almost people worry about heart disease diabetes But it doesn't take away who you are. Alzheimer's takes away who you are. Not gender disease takes away your soul in a sense Your memory which is really what we're made of is memories and and i think that it's a terrifying disease for so many it's it's growing and scope it's affecting millions and millions of american thinking about five million now projected to be about fourteen million and a few years the caregiver burden is enormous. That goes along with this The costs are even more than taking care of a patient with cancer. Heart disease And this is an epidemic really Globally it's you know literally hundred of millions of people are going to be affected by this.

Alzheimer Dr Dale Bredesen Ucla University Of California Burnham Institute Buck Institute Apollo Health Heart Disease Diabetes Ucsf DR Ucla San Diego Dale Heart Disease Cancer
"dr dale" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"And around the world. So question for you i am. You know for better or worse in the private sector and we have certainly embraced the philosophy and the tenants of early mobility in daily awakening and or maintaining wakefulness throughout the day. And so are patients are kept awake to the greatest extent that we're able to do so we obviously physical therapy and occupational therapy but i think we still struggle and terms of that early mobility really maximizing a patient's physical capabilities and even maximizing their cognitive capabilities. Where do we go from here if we don't have right now. The extra resources from the physical medicine side in a speech therapy does a lot of the cognitive work. But it's a small team and they don't do a lot of cognitive therapy from that department. This is something we can do as critical care specialists on our own may be teaching the nurses to do things that are even a little bit beyond their scope or even the physicians to do things a little beyond their scope to kind of bridge the gap until we get to the place where we have the added resources that we need yet. There's absolutely many different models for doing this. So for example some of my colleagues in japan have physician lead will -bility programs. Not nurse led up led but physician led obviously other people from the team are are part of that is well. It's not physicians alone. But physicians play a very big role in the actual mobilization of patients. There's another study for instance that was conducted in the united states. In germany that was in surgical issues that was predominantly nurse based mobility so the two groups the intervention group in the control group both got the same amount of physical therapy but the difference was the intervention group got added nurse face mobility and very improved outcomes so nurses can be highly engaged in doing this and often. It's a bit of a partnership so sometimes our nurses are junior. Nurses may say we didn't learn this in nursing. School are more senior. Nurses may say oh. Yeah this is kind of old hat. But i've fallen out a practice. So we have a partnership of our physical therapists with our nurses to make sure that there's safe mobilization safe for the patient safe for the nurse and we try to recognize that are ot and pt and speech. Resources are relatively scarce resources. Let's use them. On the most complex haitians the most challenging patients and then there are other patients that through nurses and physicians. We may be able to do a lot of this and if we start this early if we don't automatically deeply sedate patients and give them bedrest then it's much easier to mobilize a patient that walked into the hospital a day or two ago if they haven't had that prolonged bedrest in their muscles haven't melted away and they haven't gotten very weak then it becomes much much easier for a nurse to mobilize that kind of asian the challenge that we face at large tertiary centers is often. We have patients that are sent to us from other hospitals where they may have had two or three or four weeks of bedrest and then we're really behind the eight ball because they've had a tremendous amount of muscle loss and we're not going to be able to simply have the patient sit in stand because they've lost so much of the muscle so starting early makes it much better for patients and much easier for all the clinicians and ball. Okay dr needham. We're gonna take thirty seconds and we'll be right back. Hi i'm robert ross. Host of cars that matter you might be wondering what makes a car matter and i have a feeling you already know the answer. Some cars have changed history. Some you can hear a mile away. Some have lines that make your heart skip a beat if a car ever made you twice then i think you know the ones that matter join me as i speak with designers collectors and market experts about the passionate drivers and the passions. We drive cars that matter wherever you get your podcasts. Okay we're back with dr dale needham and dr steven table. So let me ask you a bit about our kovic situation. And obviously we're going to be dealing with covert patients in the hospital probably throughout the rest of twenty one so this is now potentially just a new way of life in your hospitals. Both stephen dale. You're still dealing with flu. Patients that end up getting monja and taking things to another level right so with covid dr. Anita you've noticed some long term both physical and cognitive impairments that you've already seen rear their ugly head in the fight against covid. What have you noticed in. What unique care are you trying to administer. In your icu. For such patients. You know before. Kobe bid with the society of critical care medicine about a decade ago. We got a multidisciplinary group of stakeholders together and created the term post intensive care syndrome or x he. Ics we created that not as a scientific term created that because we needed to raise awareness and educate patients families doctors nurses throughout the hospital and through clinics that many patients survive in ice you day with physical cognitive and or mental health problems. We are seeing these same kinds of things in a critically. Ill patients that have had cove as well. These can be long lasting impairments in one or all three of these areas and it is a very very big challenge. And what's happened. Is that many people that aren't familiar with long term outcomes after intensive care are thinking that these are magically new problems. These are kovic specific problems but many of these are problems that were also round before covid existed in. These are the kinds of problems that created our johns hopkins critical. Care physical medicine rehab program to start. Having patients awake and moving early but to address the huge influx of the difference during the covid pandemic is that in the history of critical care. We've never had this many seriously. Ill patients so what might once have been very rare complication. now that we have so many more patients were seeing that kind of complication in a greater number of patients despite it being perhaps the same percentage of patients so the absolute number has increased and to rise to this challenge. I'm so proud to be a colleague of dr anne parker and dr emily brigham to pulmonary and critical care doctors at johns hopkins. Who have started the johns hopkins pact clinic clinic specifically dedicated to the care of patients who have head covert patients. That were critical. Eeo or not critically on that done specifically in partnership with our colleagues from physical medicine rehabilitation. So they have created a clinic specifically for covid survivors to head that multidisciplinary team together to help improve. These patients recovering. Is there anything that they're doing specifically that's different than they would. Otherwise be doing for a post critical care syndrome individual specific to covid or is it just more of intensive therapy because we have so many people. Now were suffering from this for the most part. Many of the things that are happening would be the same things that are happening before. Cove it but we need to keep watching for. Are there any things that are particularly unique or different so there is an eye out for these things. And what's so great about this kind of clinic where patients come together and so many of them can be seen by the same people is that they can easily begin to see if there are trends. Are there problems with heart function and if there is then there's one or two specific heart specialists that will see. These patients is their problem with balance or with having low blood pressure. When you stand up in a fast heart rate something called hotspot. If there's something like that there's somebody else said. That patient can see so. I think we're still at a pretty early stage. Many of the reports that we see with post covert Outcomes are the same kinds of things that we know about so for instance we published a report of four cogan looking at fatigue symptoms in survivors of critical illness. Patients that have been in an intensive care unit and we found a year later that roughly two thirds of patients report clinically significant symptoms of fatigue a year later so when. We're seeing copen survivors. Also talk about fatigue in the weeks and months after. That's not saying to me that there's something unique to kobe but through these specialized clinics. We can pay very careful attention to see if there are new things or trends and then begin to think about interventions that may be needed..

robert ross stephen dale japan germany two three Anita thirty seconds two groups Kobe twice a year later both twenty one dale needham united states Cove dr. two thirds emily brigham
"dr dale" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Or difficulties with memory and the physicians discounted. These symptoms are so incredibly real if you actually look for them know about them and measure them so a vital part of the recovery process for many patients after critical illness is involving mental health professionals psychologists psychiatrists a counselor somebody to help them work to host dramatic stress disorder and of course our primary care doctors. Who have this kind of skill set as well. We just need to recognize that the entity of post traumatic stress disorder can happen to somebody that was critically ill somebody. That wasn't the car crash somebody that wasn't in military combat. Somebody that wasn't sexually assaulted but somebody who was critically ill and what they're having post traumatic stress disorder symptoms about are things that never actually happened unlike the other people that have talked about. It's the memory of them believing that they were sexually assaulted in the icu or that a dead child was lane next to them. These things are incredibly frightening and feel just like the memories of anyone else of a real event so it really is important to get that help in order to work through these things how much of it is psychosocial that we can work through with therapy. And how much of this is. maybe. A sub clinical or a metabolic disturbance of the brain. That is going to be lifelong. What do you think they'll on something like that. So i think some of the psychological symptoms such as post traumatic stress disorder can be worked through and can be worked through because we have existing therapies that address it they may address post traumatic stress disorder from a different cause. But we have no reason to believe that those kind of interventions are not also effective when it comes to ptsd anxiety or depression after critical illness. The bigger challenge. I think that you highlight as well is the cognitive impairment the difficulties with memory in thinking and there we have much less evidence about interventions that are going to make those kinds of impairments better but it doesn't mean that patients shouldn't seek help because through things like rehabilitation psychologists. We can learn better ways to adapt even if we have more difficulties with planning and executing tasks we can do compensatory interventions. We can begin to make lists more often. Lists are going to help us with memory impairment. We can plan things out. We can write them down. We can organize organizers days in the way to address potential cognitive impairments so there are ways to have a way forward in to improve patient outcomes for sure how does care differ now in the intensive. Care unit. In your icu. And what is recommended for all the ice us now shirt so we routinely have our patients awakened moving whenever possible. That's the default. So there are modern sedation scoring systems. One is called harass score. So our target our sedation. Target for patients who ever breathe into is arrest score of zero. which means alert and com. That's our goal. That's how we come to work every day. That's our default. that's what we aim for. It's not possible every single patient every single day but our default approach is to have patients awaken moving. We're very fortunate that we spend a lot of time with our nurses and our nurses have training in a culture that embraces this over time we are very fortunate that we have occupational physical therapists and rehabilitation doctors and psychologists. Help us with that approach to care but it all starts with the doctor and the icu nurse. That are arranging care. Such that a patient can be awake and not just starting continuous infusions of heavy sedative medications just because there's a breathing tube in place and importantly this isn't just a practice at johns hopkins hospital. The society of critical care medicine in two thousand eighteen released clinical practice guidelines called tata's these are guidelines for management of pain agitation sedation delirium. Immobility sleep had his dis and said that this approach to care is what the evidence tells us. We should be delivering to all of our patients and in fact that same organization the society of critical care medicine has put together. Bundles of practical interventions to practically a help issue doctors nurses and pt's not come together to deliver this kind of based care. So i don't want anyone to think that this is something that only happens at johns hopkins or this is something that that unique to us. There's a large audience. Evidence n clinical practice guidelines that. Tell us that this is how we should be practicing as well as practical resources to help us with this with this bundle of care.

johns hopkins johns hopkins hospital two thousand zero single patient eighteen every single day One stress
"dr dale" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"dr dale" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"As you heard our special guests from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor dale needham. He received his phd in clinical investigation from the bloomberg school of public health and johns hopkins university. He's a professor of medicine at johns hopkins. He holds an appointment in physical medicine and rehabilitation. We're gonna hear more about that shortly. Doctor also serves as the medical director of the critical care physical medicine and rehabilitation program. And he's the director of outcomes after critical illness and surgery group. Welcome dr needham. It's nice to have you join us today. Thank you so much feel very happy. Be here if you don't mind. I'd like to begin at the end recovery. You've taken a solid position that motion and cognitive activity in an icu. Prevent complications and accelerates recovery. How does that work exactly absolutely. This is critically important to patients recovery. Before during or after the covid pandemic traditional critical care has patients deeply sedated lying motionless with many many severe long lasting impairments in their nerves muscles and brain people may come into the intensive care unit primarily for a breathing problem and need to go onto ventilator artificial life support but these people that survive there ice use day most often complain about problems or third thinking or their nerves muscles. Not with their breathing. So it's critically important that we think about the brain the nerves in the muscles in addition to the heart lungs and kidneys when people are in intensive care unit. A stay in the. Icu affects your thinking. Absolutely it does we know that. So many people in the intensive care unit experienced delirium or confused thinking caused by many different things including their serious ailments including sedation. Medications and patients that have longer durations of delirium are much more likely to have long-term impairments in their thinking problems with their memory problems with their ability to plan organize various complex task. Either really important things that impair people's quality of life wants to get out of the hospital and back to home. I grew up in the era where it would not be considered compassionate to put a tube down. somebody's throat and not simultaneously. Sedikh the heck out of them and a combination of pulmonary critical care and physical medicine. Even to this day are probably the only one on in the world. Who has this linked specialty in this amazing time of transition. How do you convince your patience that this is actually a reasonable thing to do to keep you away. Keep them awake after. We've put a tube down their throat. Most patients don't know how critical care is delivered so most patients we don't need to have discussions with them around this other than when we're not giving them deep sedation in in contract with us we can directly. Ask them if they're anxious if they're in pain and give just the right amount of medication to take away any discomfort and allow them to be awake and in fact when we most often ask patients know. Are you uncomfortable. Would you like some additional medications. When patients are not delirious. Most often they tell us no. I do not want your medications that. Give me confused thinking. Let's give a little bit of pain medication. Let's be up and moving so my back doesn't hurt lane in bed. let's turn on tv. Let's engage with family either in person or through video conference. Let's do some things that helped distract them. Were also very fortunate that we have. Dr megan hosie a rehabilitation psychologist. Who will address issues of anxiety through talking to patients rather than trying to give them powerful sedatives that caused confused thinking delirium and long-term cognitive impairments. So did you have a difficult time in the transition. Having been in the icu. Now i'm in my twenty ninth year. There is a culture at least in our main intensive care unit that the culture has always been patient. Comfort is paramount concern in the think the reflects amongst the nursing staff has always been because of the old adage to sedate is really compassionate. Did you have the same impediment that we've been trying to overcome in changing the culture of from sedation to awakening absolutely most people who practice in the intensive care unit telling them that our patients should be awaken. Moving is like telling them. The earth is flat. This is completely different than everything that most of us learned when we are in our training and most of us have seen however if we go back to the early days of critical care win intensive care units were first being created patients were routinely awake and moving at that early stage but then the pendulum swung just as you said with. People think that sedation was going to make patients feel better. But when we began to think that we didn't understand this concept of delirium and we didn't realize that giving patients these powerful sedatives also directly causes this confused thinking and during this confused thinking patients aren't calm peaceful in an amnesic state like in the operating room these patients are having horrible nightmares and delirium feeling like somebody's trying to harm them. There's blood coming out of the walls that rats on the floor that they're dead babies lane next to them in bed. These are all actual memories. Patients have head during their

megan hosie dale needham today needham two years johns hopkins johns hopkins university forty hours twenty ninth year thirty six bloomberg school of public hea forth an hour first no more than seventy two hours four patients dr third thinking approximately one one
Interview With Dr. Dale Needham

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dr. Dale Needham

"As you heard our special guests from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor dale needham. He received his phd in clinical investigation from the bloomberg school of public health and johns hopkins university. He's a professor of medicine at johns hopkins. He holds an appointment in physical medicine and rehabilitation. We're gonna hear more about that shortly. Doctor also serves as the medical director of the critical care physical medicine and rehabilitation program. And he's the director of outcomes after critical illness and surgery group. Welcome dr needham. It's nice to have you join us today. Thank you so much feel very happy. Be here if you don't mind. I'd like to begin at the end recovery. You've taken a solid position that motion and cognitive activity in an icu. Prevent complications and accelerates recovery. How does that work exactly absolutely. This is critically important to patients recovery. Before during or after the covid pandemic traditional critical care has patients deeply sedated lying motionless with many many severe long lasting impairments in their nerves muscles and brain people may come into the intensive care unit primarily for a breathing problem and need to go onto ventilator artificial life support but these people that survive there ice use day most often complain about problems or third thinking or their nerves muscles. Not with their breathing. So it's critically important that we think about the brain the nerves in the muscles in addition to the heart lungs and kidneys when people are in intensive care unit. A stay in the. Icu affects your thinking. Absolutely it does we know that. So many people in the intensive care unit experienced delirium or confused thinking caused by many different things including their serious ailments including sedation. Medications and patients that have longer durations of delirium are much more likely to have long-term impairments in their thinking problems with their memory problems with their ability to plan organize various complex task. Either really important things that impair people's quality of life wants to get out of the hospital and back to home. I grew up in the era where it would not be considered compassionate to put a tube down. somebody's throat and not simultaneously. Sedikh the heck out of them and a combination of pulmonary critical care and physical medicine. Even to this day are probably the only one on in the world. Who has this linked specialty in this amazing time of transition. How do you convince your patience that this is actually a reasonable thing to do to keep you away. Keep them awake after. We've put a tube down their throat. Most patients don't know how critical care is delivered so most patients we don't need to have discussions with them around this other than when we're not giving them deep sedation in in contract with us we can directly. Ask them if they're anxious if they're in pain and give just the right amount of medication to take away any discomfort and allow them to be awake and in fact when we most often ask patients know. Are you uncomfortable. Would you like some additional medications. When patients are not delirious. Most often they tell us no. I do not want your medications that. Give me confused thinking. Let's give a little bit of pain medication. Let's be up and moving so my back doesn't hurt lane in bed. let's turn on tv. Let's engage with family either in person or through video conference. Let's do some things that helped distract them. Were also very fortunate that we have. Dr megan hosie a rehabilitation psychologist. Who will address issues of anxiety through talking to patients rather than trying to give them powerful sedatives that caused confused thinking delirium and long-term cognitive impairments. So did you have a difficult time in the transition. Having been in the icu. Now i'm in my twenty ninth year. There is a culture at least in our main intensive care unit that the culture has always been patient. Comfort is paramount concern in the think the reflects amongst the nursing staff has always been because of the old adage to sedate is really compassionate. Did you have the same impediment that we've been trying to overcome in changing the culture of from sedation to awakening absolutely most people who practice in the intensive care unit telling them that our patients should be awaken. Moving is like telling them. The earth is flat. This is completely different than everything that most of us learned when we are in our training and most of us have seen however if we go back to the early days of critical care win intensive care units were first being created patients were routinely awake and moving at that early stage but then the pendulum swung just as you said with. People think that sedation was going to make patients feel better. But when we began to think that we didn't understand this concept of delirium and we didn't realize that giving patients these powerful sedatives also directly causes this confused thinking and during this confused thinking patients aren't calm peaceful in an amnesic state like in the operating room these patients are having horrible nightmares and delirium feeling like somebody's trying to harm them. There's blood coming out of the walls that rats on the floor that they're dead babies lane next to them in bed. These are all actual memories. Patients have head during their

Dale Needham Bloomberg School Of Public Hea Critical Care Physical Medicin Dr Needham Johns Hopkins Medicine Johns Hopkins Delirium Dr Megan Hosie ICU
Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

"In this mini episode, I speak with Dr David Perimeter Dr, Lisa, Mosconi Dr Dale, Br Edison about why Alzheimer's is a preventable disease and the lifestyle factors that can set the stage for Alzheimer's years from. Now, we also talk about this disticts of Alzheimer's disease and its impact on women, and what you can do today today to prevent cognitive decline in the future. Let's listen in starting with interview with Dr. David Pearl Mutter, a board certified neurologist and four-time New York. Times bestselling author, we do know that a for the most part Alzheimer's is a preventable disease. This is a disease costing Americans two hundred and thirty billion dollars affecting five point four million of us. That is dramatically exploding in terms of its incidence and prevalence globally, and yet you know the notion that our lifestyle choices are not relevant is it does take my breath away. You know it's all about living a life that is less inflammatory and that certainly transcends are narrative as it relates to Alzheimer's but. Involves Parkinson's and involves coronary artery disease diabetes and cancer, and all of the chronic degenerative conditions, and you know what really is so very important and I think sort of stands in our way of getting this information to really have traction is the time table that this is effective over for example, you tell somebody wear your seatbelt that'll be good for you. They get in a car accident they're wearing their seat belt and they say, Hey, I get it that worked yesterday I was in that accident worked. But the inflammation issues that are relevant in terms of causing the brain to degenerate or narrowing the coronary arteries. These are issues that are beginning to take shape ten, twenty, thirty years prior to actual disease manifestation, and therefore it makes it very challenging for the consumer to connect those dots. Let me give you an example. In the journal Neurology, which is arguably one of our most well respected neurology journals on the planet period viewed. There was an interesting study that was published and it measured in a group of several thousand individuals who were in their forties and fifties. At the time it measured markers in their blood of inflammation and the study then came back and looked at the same group of individuals twenty four years later, the study again was just. And what it found was really quite remarkable. There was very direct relationship between risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and having had higher measurement of blood inflammatory markers twenty four years ago. So what does it say? It says that if you? Elevated Markers of inflammation in your blood today, you are setting the stage for Alzheimer's years from now and so that your lifestyle choices today whether you choose to eat low carb high carb high fat low-fat whether you choose said integrity vs physical activity the amount of sleep that you get. Hopefully that is restorative the amount of stress in your life, etc. these are all extremely important variables. Which you have control that clearly are connected to your brains Dini. This is not live your life come what may and we have a pill for you. If you're suddenly cognitively impaired is the other story. The story is that you make lifestyle choices today that will dramatically impact how your brain works to three decades from now

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Disease Dr David Perimeter Dr Dr. David Pearl Mutter Neurology Dr Dale New York Br Edison Parkinson Times Lisa
Gottlieb warns of "very dangerous season" ahead as virus cases rise

Glenn Beck

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Gottlieb warns of "very dangerous season" ahead as virus cases rise

"You're taking to prevent the spread of Corona virus should help during flu season and Margo Moreno reports wearing masks, social distancing and washing your hands will go a long way to keep the flu from spreading to, But with Kobe 19 straining hospitals. Oh, you chief covert officer, Dr Dale Brad Slur says it's more important than ever for Oklahomans to get their flu shot. Each year employee increases the number of deaths in our state, and it also increases hospitalizations, so anything we can do to reduce the number of influence of cases we have in our state is going to be very, very important. Doctor Brad Slur says The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone over six months of age flu cases usually start to increase in October.

FLU Flu Vaccine Dr Dale Brad Slur Doctor Brad Slur Margo Moreno Kobe Officer