18 Burst results for "Dr Cheryl"

"dr cheryl" Discussed on THE EMBC NETWORK

THE EMBC NETWORK

04:30 min | 6 d ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on THE EMBC NETWORK

"All right. Well, we are here to, and it was a pleasure to learn so much about the, about skateboarding, the thing I love so much and learn the history. So thank you for that. Well, just behind me, here's the movie poster, and this is a shepherd ferry and his team created this poster. And it's from one of the old photographs that Bill Golding had taken. And it's a dope ass poster. We'll find a way to get one to you, Paul, if you're in town here, I'll try to chase you down. Absolutely. I appreciate that. That'd be awesome. Yeah. Anything, anytime I can learn is, is someone I'm happy about. So, Well, we're going to do another LA premiere and I'll make sure that everybody on here is invited and connect everybody. And we'll get you guys, get you guys the VIP. Absolutely. Looking forward to it. Cause I can definitely, this is a film that I could watch over and over and over again. And I have seen it. I've seen it twice now. And, uh, each time, you know, saw something different and each time was just as emotionally connected to it. So, you know, if you get a chance to go out and see the premiere do go and see it, it is a worthwhile thing to, to do, and it will really give you an education, uh, on that thing. That is the passion known as skateboarding and you'll, you'll walk away with an entirely different impression of what it is. Awesome. So, you know, James Paul, Jean, I would like to thank you for your, for your time and for, for sharing your sport with us, Ricky Aaron, thank you for helping to pull this together and, and, and bringing Paul and, and Jean to share in with this. And, uh, James, thank you for letting me be a part of your experience. Uh, and I'm, I'm happy to bring this to a bigger audience and, uh, I'm happy that you're bringing it to the world for those of you out there watching and listening. Thank you for joining us again. You are listening to shatters that matters. Let's talk about it. And I am your show host, Dr. Cheryl Bryant Bruce. We look forward to having you join us every week. We're here and we want you to join. We want you to, to watch, like share and comment. So again, and there they go. Um, those are, those are my little doggies. They're Rosie and Mitzi, and, uh, they waited till the end of the show. So we appreciate them too. So again, come back and join us. We're here every week, 7 PM, Monday and Wednesday, that's 7 PM Pacific standard time. And, uh, we are pretty much anywhere that you can look we're on YouTube, we're on Apple, we're on Roku or on Spotify and a whole host of other places, but definitely you can see us every week on, on YouTube. Uh, and it lives there in perpetuity. So you guys will be able to, to watch this and, and see yourselves and share it with your friends. Thanks for joining us. Shatters that matters. Let's talk about it. What's going on. This is Paul Rodriguez, also known as P rod professional skateboarder, and you are watching chatters that matters much love. Hey, uh, this is Jean Livingston from Rialto and you're watching shatters that matters. Oh, yeah.

A highlight from Chatters That Matter Dr Cheryl BryantBruce Presents N-MEN THE UNTOLD STORY with James Sweigert, Paul Rodriguez and Jean Levingston

THE EMBC NETWORK

04:30 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Chatters That Matter Dr Cheryl BryantBruce Presents N-MEN THE UNTOLD STORY with James Sweigert, Paul Rodriguez and Jean Levingston

"All right. Well, we are here to, and it was a pleasure to learn so much about the, about skateboarding, the thing I love so much and learn the history. So thank you for that. Well, just behind me, here's the movie poster, and this is a shepherd ferry and his team created this poster. And it's from one of the old photographs that Bill Golding had taken. And it's a dope ass poster. We'll find a way to get one to you, Paul, if you're in town here, I'll try to chase you down. Absolutely. I appreciate that. That'd be awesome. Yeah. Anything, anytime I can learn is, is someone I'm happy about. So, Well, we're going to do another LA premiere and I'll make sure that everybody on here is invited and connect everybody. And we'll get you guys, get you guys the VIP. Absolutely. Looking forward to it. Cause I can definitely, this is a film that I could watch over and over and over again. And I have seen it. I've seen it twice now. And, uh, each time, you know, saw something different and each time was just as emotionally connected to it. So, you know, if you get a chance to go out and see the premiere do go and see it, it is a worthwhile thing to, to do, and it will really give you an education, uh, on that thing. That is the passion known as skateboarding and you'll, you'll walk away with an entirely different impression of what it is. Awesome. So, you know, James Paul, Jean, I would like to thank you for your, for your time and for, for sharing your sport with us, Ricky Aaron, thank you for helping to pull this together and, and, and bringing Paul and, and Jean to share in with this. And, uh, James, thank you for letting me be a part of your experience. Uh, and I'm, I'm happy to bring this to a bigger audience and, uh, I'm happy that you're bringing it to the world for those of you out there watching and listening. Thank you for joining us again. You are listening to shatters that matters. Let's talk about it. And I am your show host, Dr. Cheryl Bryant Bruce. We look forward to having you join us every week. We're here and we want you to join. We want you to, to watch, like share and comment. So again, and there they go. Um, those are, those are my little doggies. They're Rosie and Mitzi, and, uh, they waited till the end of the show. So we appreciate them too. So again, come back and join us. We're here every week, 7 PM, Monday and Wednesday, that's 7 PM Pacific standard time. And, uh, we are pretty much anywhere that you can look we're on YouTube, we're on Apple, we're on Roku or on Spotify and a whole host of other places, but definitely you can see us every week on, on YouTube. Uh, and it lives there in perpetuity. So you guys will be able to, to watch this and, and see yourselves and share it with your friends. Thanks for joining us. Shatters that matters. Let's talk about it. What's going on. This is Paul Rodriguez, also known as P rod professional skateboarder, and you are watching chatters that matters much love. Hey, uh, this is Jean Livingston from Rialto and you're watching shatters that matters. Oh, yeah.

Ricky Aaron Paul Rodriguez Jean Livingston James Bill Golding James Paul Mitzi Rosie Jean Paul Cheryl Bryant Bruce Twice Wednesday 7 Pm Monday Apple 7 Pm Pacific Each Time ONE Youtube
"dr cheryl" Discussed on THE EMBC NETWORK

THE EMBC NETWORK

50:44 min | 6 d ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on THE EMBC NETWORK

"This talk show is brought to you by MrFudgeMonkeyz and MrFudgeMonkeyz's channel! Hey, hey, hey everybody! It's Dr. Cheryl Bryant Bruce, MD. You know me and you are listening to Chatters That Matter. Let's talk about it. This is our runaway hit talk show that features interesting and exciting guests to educate, entertain, and inform you. We talk about anything and everything as it relates to health, and since every day everything in some way relates to our health, that means we talk about anything and everything. Just a quick one. I just want to put in the disclaimer that anything that you hear on this show is informational and for your entertainment only. It does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship between yourself and me, and so if you hear anything that interests you or that you feel applies to you when you're watching our shows, then please by all means take that information and take it to your physician because your physician knows you and I don't. So we do not have a doctor-patient relationship. Now tonight's show is going to be a very interesting show. I'm interviewing some really, really exciting guests. Tonight's show is on skateboarding. Yeah, that's right, you heard me, skateboarding. Now you know that for the past few weeks we've been doing our shows as they relate to the 50th anniversary of hip-hop and relating that to mental health and wellness. What does hip-hop and skateboarding have in common? Well, they actually do have something in common. You see, skateboarding is to sports what hip-hop is to music. These were both two genres that rose up out of a need and everybody said they were a fad, that they wouldn't last, and yet both skateboarding and hip-hopping have swept the world, taken it by storm, and have become legitimized forms of sports and music. Not only that, they're frequently interrelated because a lot of hip-hoppers are into the skateboard scene and a lot of skateboarders are into the hip-hop and rap music culture. And I think that the reason for this is because they rose up out of the same need for the people to be able to express themselves in a different way that was very, very personal. So with that, we're bringing to you someone who is telling the story of the skateboard revolution from the beginning of it to today. I would like to welcome James Swigert, producer of the movie N-Men The Untold Story. Now, you heard about Dogtown down on the Southern California side of things. N-Men tells the story of skateboarding and how it started in Northern California. In addition to James Swigert, we also have someone that some of you may recognize, if you're at all familiar with the skateboard scene. His name is Paul Rodriguez, better known as T-Rod. And then we also have Jean Levinson, who is a not so familiar face, but is equally involved in the skateboard movement and what it is today. So without further ado, welcome gentlemen. Hello. Hello. Good to have you. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Okay. Well, let's get started with James Swigert. James, do you prefer to be called James or Jim? Oh, James is fine. Okay. So I've seen the movie. The movie is fantastic. And for those of you who have not seen it, which you probably haven't, because it hasn't hit the major featured theaters yet, but it has been sweeping the film festivals and taking all kinds of awards. So James, tell me how N-Men started and what made you decide to do this project? Wow. Well, first of all, thank you for having me. This is great. And I'm looking forward to hearing from your other guests here as well. But I grew up watching the N-Men. They were an older generation and they had actually formed in 1975 out of a resentment to the Dogtown's Z-Boys. It was the Zephyr team that was in the magazines. Craig Stesic was writing about it and taking these amazing photographs. And he really kind of turned them into myth and legend. And I was going to the skate parks and to the local scenes in Sacramento where there are paved embankments and was watching this crew doing the same tricks, front side airs and that sort of thing, the same stuff we were seeing in the magazines, but they were getting no coverage because the two magazines and all the photographers were in Southern California and heavily covering the Southern California scene. And so out of a little bit of a resentment, the crew up in Northern California said, if they're boys down in Southern California, we're men up here. And so they kind of formed this crew and it was that started in 1975, just soon after the Z-Boys really kind of came into the magazines. And it was kind of this scene that was very underground. They were just hardcore pool skaters. And when the parks opened up, they were doing tricks that we were seeing in the magazines. We're like, where did you guys learn how to do all this? And they had been skateboarding vertical and pools for years before that and we had no idea. And so it was really exciting for us to see that firsthand in Northern California. Steve Caballero, very, very young Stevie Cab was skating with the end man at Sierra Wave where I first saw those guys skate. And so fast forward to years later, I had always kind of wondered what had happened to that crew. And after moving to LA working in film and television, I think it was 2005, I went on Facebook. It was like the first social media thing. And I said, God, I wonder if any of those guys were still alive because they were so crazy. So I searched and I searched for Randy Caton because he was kind of the guy, one of the players of the crew. And I said, if anybody's going to be on social media, it'll be Randy. And sure enough, there he was. And it was like, oh my God, the end men have never stopped skating. And now these guys are in their 50s, 60s and 70s. Some of them still skating pools and still skating huge pipes and ditches and illegal stuff. And so I reached out to them, reconnected. And when I realized that three of them had become world champion skateboarders and Don Bostic, who was the Godfather of the crew that ran the little skate shop where we bought all our gear, he went to create the X Games for ESPN. And he created World Cup skateboarding and he's still very active. And he and Tony Hawk and another group lobbied the International Olympic Committee to put skateboarding the Olympics for the first time. And it was in Tokyo in 2021. And anyways, in 2005, I approached him. I said, I think there's a story I'd like to tell it. And they were the guy, the John O'Shea, one of the co-founders of the crew, he's, he wasn't so excited about me telling about all their illegal activities. And so right after the breaks till 2011 and around 2011, the end man had become kind of mainstream enough to where he gave me permission to tell their story. And I spent 11 years because there was no documentation of this crew. And so I had to go into attics and garages and basements for 11 years. That's my dog behind here. But I go into all of these, play all over Northern California to find never before seen photographs and footage of the end man. I was able to compile a really beautiful documentary that you were able to see. We've had, like you said, some great awards in LA Independent Film Festival. I got Best Director and then the film won Best Picture, which as a documentary, that's pretty sweet. So really, really stoked to have stayed alive long enough to see this one through and, and I'm happy, I'm super happy to be able to share it with the world. And, you know, the description that someone gave is, is it's a beautiful and heartbreaking story of unity. And, you know, because this crew was, it was started by a black guy in Sacramento. It was started by a very diverse group of skateboarders and, you know, black, white, Latino, Asian. And in 1975, like some of the young kids that come to see the movie, they're like, wow, I didn't even know there were black skateboarders in 1975. That's dope, you know? And so we're pulling the covers off of a part of skateboarding history that really hasn't been covered. And, and, and, and so really, really proud to be a part of it. And I was happy to share the premiere with you and your brother, who's actually one of the members, full disclosure, one of the original members. So, yeah, thank you. Yeah. And I mean, actually the thing about it was it wasn't just, it's not just showing that there were black skateboarders, because I mean, Kurt was one of the, the, the first he and Doug were amongst the first black skateboarders, but the In Men wasn't just white and black skateboarders. It was I mean, talk about diversity and men did it, including women, they brought women, women in. And I guess one of the biggest awards went to a female. And then also Judy was a part of, of the In Men. And I mean, you know, she's world champion material. So really did diversity. Well, so what exactly was it about? In Men that made them so unique. Now, Paul is part of the Southern California scene out of which Dogtown came. And in the movie, you go into the fact that, you know, because Dogtown was down South skateboarding was really highlighted down South. But yet we have several of the big players from the Southern California skateboard team that come in on the movie and they talk about how tough the In Men were and what an impact that they, they had on skateboarding. And I actually didn't direct that question to Paul. You know, you're one of those SoCal guys. What was your experience of the In Men? Well, to be honest with you, that was a lot before my time. I'm actually learning about the In Men right now. To be in full disclosure. Yeah. I actually am not familiar. I do know Don Bostic though. Yes. I met Don Bostic through all the different contest circuits throughout my, my skate career and whatnot since I was a little kid. But to be honest with you, I'm, I'm taking this opportunity to learn. I actually am not familiar at all. Okay, perfect. And you've been to some world competitions, correct? Yes. Okay. And of course, you know that Don Bostic was the one that put that whole thing on the map because prior to In Men and Don Bostic, there was no world competition because skateboarding wasn't even, it wasn't even recognized as a sport. As a matter of fact, it really had kind of a bad reputation. And James, you can, you could talk to that. Tell us about what that was all about and how it became. Well, yeah, you know, in the early days, and I'm talking in the 60s, the late 50s and 60s, there were skateboarders, there were clay wheels and metal wheels and we would still our sisters roller skates and make, you know, and, and, and there were actual production skateboards back then. And the Skateboard Hall of Fame up in Simi Valley has an amazing collection of some of those early boards and go see Todd Huber up there. He's, he's, he's the curator of a really an amazing collection, but, but in those early days, you know, it was very rigid. It was all about kind of sidewalk surfing and that whole vibe. And there was actually early world championships. In fact, Don Bostic went to the 1965 world championships. But again, clay wheels and metal wheels and stuff, it was a different game. But in 1973 it was, it was the advent of the urethane wheel. And that was the game changer because the urethane wheel could roll over a lot more challenging surfaces like pavement and granite and, and stuff that, that, you know, it was just kind of found surfaces around the cities and, and, and, and the suburbs. And so that urethane wheel changed the game. And that's really what the, you know, the Z boys were the first ones to kind of rip that surfing style on these little embankments and just really kind of employ that, that aggressive surfing style into skateboarding. And that was really when it really started to change. But, you know, and, and I think I can speak for Paul and myself, I've been to the Nike campus and seen the banner of Paul up there. So it's like, but, but we had, you know, we had blast skating. Cause you could go anywhere with those urethane wheels. They just really were much more merciful on, on the concrete and asphalt and the pavements that were out there. And, and that, you know, that that's what really changed the game, you know, but, but going back to what you were just talking about, kind of the dog town thing was, was, was very public. The end man thing was very underground because they, when you see the movie, you'll see how they would steal pools. They'd sneak into people's houses. They had this like aggressive pool seeking program that like, if you're, if newspapers piled up on somebody's porch for a couple of days, someone in the end man crew got a wind of it. And they knew that those people were out of town or on vacation. They jumped the fence. They pumped 10,000 gallons out of the pool in seven, seven hours and skated until the people got home or the cops chased them out. And, and then they move on to the next one and they just keep them going. And, you know, Those stories, those stories are hilarious to me at this point in time, because my brother was a skater. He was one of the original and men. And at that time, my brother, I guess when he started skating was like eight years old. So he was very, very young and my parents were very, very protective. And I just, I find it so funny that all of this was, was going on because, you know, they embraced the whole skateboarding thing and encouraged it with him. Now I was locked in the house, practically encouraged it with him. And I just thought to myself, Oh my God, if they only knew what's going on, I couldn't help looking over at my dad, like every couple of minutes to see what his reaction was. And there was just like this kind of expressionless thing going on. And I was like, Oh, I wonder what's going on in his head right now. Cause, and then, and then they were colorful. They were powerful. Tell us about the personalities, the, the characters tell us about Doug and John and, you know, these were not your choir boys and, and how did they get into skateboarding and what did it do for them from a mental health standpoint? Cause you really delve into that in the movie and what, what brings people to skateboarding? Yeah. I mean, I think that in this, you know, what I'm trying to do with this movie and that's something it wasn't just Dogtown and it wasn't just Venice and Santa Monica. This explosion with the urethane wheels happened everywhere. This is just one of many stories that's that's out there from Miami to Seattle, to Maine, to New York, everywhere. There was a big explosion. So this is just one of the many stories that are out there. But what was kind of cool about this was the time I was able to take to tell the story and do all the interviews. I was really able to get I have a young editor that helped me cut the film and he said, wow, and he's a skater. And he said, wow, I've never heard people speak about skateboarding the way that these guys talk about skateboarding, you know, and, and, you know, skateboarding attracts the outlaw skateboarding attracts tough, tough people. You gotta be tough to take those falls over and over and over again. You know, there's a great line in the movie you know, skateboarders are some of the toughest people I know. Right. And it's true. And it's true. And a lot of them, not all of them, but a lot of them, you know, survived. Really. I was a latchkey kid. I came from a broken home, John and Doug, they came from rough upbringings. And so this was not unlike, you know, like you said, you know, we're talking about music and I love the way you compared skateboarding to hip hop because there's a, that's also true. But the thing is, is like, man, when you don't fit in and you don't have the support and the family structure, you're, you're hungry for that belonging. Right. And it's the same reason people fall into gangs or fall into sports or whatever. I just need, I want to get validated. I want to feel like I belong. And, and when you don't have a lot to work with, and I bought skateboards and trucks and boards from my paper out money from Don Bostic shop, and then you go seek out the people doing what you're doing, you know, and if you showed up, like I said, male, female, it didn't matter what color you were. If you showed up and you went and charged hard, you're part of the crew. You're part of the crew. And if you're cool and you've got everybody's back and you're, you know, you're not a cook, they'll let you know where that next little embankment is. They'll know, let you know where that ditches and that next pool that they've discovered. And, and then you just, you, and then you become a part of it. And it's like that sense of belonging, I think is, is, is that sense of tribe is I call my movie. It's really a story about tribe, right? Finding your tribe and, and this tribe has been going since 1975 and they've never stopped. The Z boys were together for three years, you know, the dog town guys still skate and Jim Muir has got dog town and all of that, but that crew didn't stick together. Like the end man and the end men are just literally like this. And it's just grown into this big all encompassing family. And, you know, I I'm bummed that, you know, uh, Paul and John, uh, is it Jean or John? I don't know how to French him. I'm sorry, Jean, Jean, I'm sorry. You guys haven't had a chance to see the movie. I would have sent you the link ahead of time. If I knew you were going to be here, because you would be able to kind of see what we're, what we're talking and totally relate to it too, because there's another great line in the movie where one of the end men says, you know what we were loaners that formed a group of loaners, you know, and skateboarders get that like skateboarders get that it's like, cause it's an individual expression sport, right? It's, it's like, you can do this, you can do the contest thing and you can go mainstream and get sponsored and all that, but you don't have to, right. You don't have to, to hang out like, like you can literally go to some of the best, you know, Clover pools in California. And you could be skating right next to Tony Alva. And you can be, cause we were like a couple of weeks ago when we did the, the premiere, Caballero came up, Alva was there. I mean, we had guys coming out of the woodwork. We had like, uh, Mike Smith who invented the Smith grind. He showed up from out of the woods. Nobody's seen him in a long time, you know, and, and Christian has slowly showed up and, and these are guys, I mean, I rode their skateboards and they came to the premiere of my movie, which is mental, you know, it's like, it's, it's so, and I love to hear you elaborate on this too, Paul, cause it's so accessible. Like, like if, if, if Paul's skating somewhere, like his biggest fans can walk right up to him and, and, you know, Leo, Leo Messi's kind of hard to get to, you know what I mean? But it's like, that's the beauty of skateboarding. It's so accessible to anybody. And it, and it, all you gotta do is be a kid with a hunger and a desire and show up at a skate park. And there's going to be dudes like us. That'll be like, Hey man, you know, try lean in, try leaning back a little bit when you make, you know, it's like, we'll coach you into that. And I see it happen all the time at the parks from guys that are 60 to 10 year olds, you know, Paul actually, um, in an interview that he did with Bloomberg, um, he had a, a statement that he made that I think kind of just resonate with every skateboarder. Uh, Paul, you said that skateboarding was your addiction. And, um, I think that every skateboarder I've ever bumped into seems to have that same sense. My, my brother is almost 60 and he's broken up, backs, hips, everything just messed up. And, uh, he's, he's waiting for surgery. And still when Inman came into town, uh, he still tried to get out there and skate. I don't know how much he actually did when you guys went out, but I know that he tried to get out and skate because I know he came back hurting. So Paul, talk to us about that whole I'm addicted to skateboarding thing. Yeah. I mean, it's, it's, it's as simple as that. It's just, as soon as I set foot on a skateboard, that was it. I knew that was for me. I knew that I couldn't get enough. I knew that nothing else mattered to me, but getting on my skateboard, you know, I would be at school and I would be in class and the teacher would be talking. It would just be like on the Charlie Brown cards. Wow. Wow. Wow. And I'm just thinking about skating, skating. What am I gonna do when I get home? What do I want to try? What do I want to practice? And, um, for me, I'm just grateful that I found something that is very productive to be addicted to, you know, there, there's a lot of things we can be addicted to in this world. I'm just grateful that what I chose to be addicted to was something very productive and, um, something that, you know, I didn't know at the time, but it was going to bring me a long way in life. Um, I just got to give glory to God because at that age, when I started 11 years old, you could be very impressionable. You can go any way, you know, you can be taken down any avenue. And, uh, I happened to find skateboarding. And once I was there, I was locked in. I had the horse blinders on. I didn't care about anything else, anyone else. I didn't, I didn't want to go to any parties. I didn't want to hang out with a girl. I just wanted to skateboard all day, every day. And I just, it just felt like this matter of importance to me. It just felt like it was like I had to do it. I don't have any other better way to explain, but it's just. What was the draw? What was the draw? What need did it fill? Um, well, I'm gonna say a few things. So, you know, I grew up in the house, the only child, you know, and, um, I dabbled in playing baseball as a kid and like team sports. But what I loved about skateboards, I didn't have to wait on anyone. I didn't have to make sure like, Oh, all my friends can come out and play. Like, I can't play baseball by myself. I can't go out and play basketball by myself. I can shoot hoops and what not, but it's not the same. Like I can't play without other people. Um, and skateboarding was like, I can do that. I don't have to wait on him. I can go outside. I can work on my tricks. I can do everything. Of course. I wanted to go out and skate with my friends. I wanted to be around people, but if they, if, if, you know, one of my friends was grounded that day, I didn't, my whole day wasn't ruined because you know, I had something I could still do. Um, so that was something that felt very, like it is very free, a lot of freedom. I can go inside. I can watch the skate video. I can go in my little backyard. As long as you have a little patch of cement and a skateboard and some, you know, decent pair of shoes, you didn't, it was, first of all, it's not an expensive thing to get involved in. Right? Like, you know, certain things you have to get money. Your parents got to sign you up to little league. You got to get a ride over there. You have to pay to get in the league. You forget about surfing and snowboarding. That stuff's expensive. You know what I mean? So like skateboarding is like, you, you know, you can muster up some, like I used to save up the lunch money that my mom would give me. I would save it up. I wouldn't eat at school. And after a few weeks I would have enough money to go buy a little skateboard. I'd have enough money to buy some shoes that were on sale and I was good to go. You just need a patch of concrete, um, and a skateboard and you're going to have a blast, you know? So it's, it's very accessible. That that's, that's really cool about it. A cool thing about it. And something that you're saying there, I find very interesting because a lot of the kids that get into skateboarding, as James said, uh, they're coming from single parent homes or, you know, they're coming from poverty, they're coming from the streets, whatever, but that wasn't your background. You're, you know, you had a famous father, there was plenty of money, but you said I saved my lunch money. I, I, it was your own. It was important to obviously for it to be your own thing. Yeah. Yeah. Um, for whatever reason that I, I still can't put into words very well, but it's just like, like you guys said earlier, it was an addiction. Um, I was compelled to do it. I had to do it. Um, you know, and I did have friends who, who weren't as fortunate as me who had to also do the same thing. And it's just like, I didn't at that age, when you're 11, 12 years old, you don't understand the economic differences between friends. You don't understand certain social barriers or whatever. You're just like, yo, you want to skate? I want to skate. Let's go. Let's go skate. Like, you know, um, it was your destiny here. Yeah. It was just so pure. Yeah. I thank God for that every day, but it was just so pure. I met some of the best people in my life through skateboarding. I met so many amazing characters, interesting characters, funny people come from all walks of life. And the thing that I learned is like, it just, I never was conditioned to look at life through color barriers, religion barriers, economic barriers. It was just, if you skate, I skate, we skate, we got some income we're brothers, you know, whatever it is. And that's been my experience how cool that was at the time. I didn't realize how important that was. And, you know, now being an adult and being a father, like, and seeing where the world is at today, especially in this country, all the things that are trying to divide us all is like, to me, like, it wasn't, I never had a mind that thought like that. It was just, let's, let's get to it. You know, let's go skate. Yeah. And I mean, I really think that it's interesting because skateboarding does seem to do that. And like I said, and, you know, initially I compared it to hip hop because hip hop does that for music. I mean, you can go to Australia and there's going to be some little Australian kid out there that's doing hip hop and you're going to find, you know, the same kid out there shredding it on a skateboard. Yeah, absolutely. It's, it's a I like the idea like in hip hop this, they speak on this concept too, is making something out of nothing, you know, ideas that you have in your mind and you manifesting it and bring it to fruition in real life. Yes. That's also really cool. Like, you know, skateboarding, like I say, you just have to have a board and a slab of concrete. You can go out, you can look at a set of stairs. You can look at certain architecture ledges or whatever the case may be, and you can have an idea in your head. And if you have the creativity and the willpower to try over and over again, bring it out into the real world. You know, I feel like hip hop is very similar in that, in that aspect too is like, you know, it was a craft you have, you have a beat, you know, especially early on, you know, they would take beats from songs that already existed and then put their own ideas over it. You know, it's like, you can't stop. You can't stop powerful creativity. Right. Very, it's very cool. Absolutely. And then, you know, skateboarding is an interesting thing because when skateboarding first came out and again, people who, people who were skateboarding, you know, people looked at them like the stoner crew. It's like, oh, these are the bad kids. They're not going to amount to anything. And if someone's skateboarded chances are nine out of 10, that the parents might not be supporting it. It might actually be seriously downing it. You know, you need to get a life. You need to plan to get a job and so on and so forth. So I'm going to ask you a very personal question here for all of the parents out there who think that you can't make a living as a skateboarder. Can you tell me what your net worth is right now? Oh, my net worth. I mean, yes. Uh, it's, it's pretty good. I'm not the richest man in the world, but, uh, I'm not for, I don't want to really say the number, but what I can say is thank God. Um, I have been able, I'm a millionaire, uh, to skateboarding and that that's something that I never even knew was possible, uh, when I started. So it's, it's possible, but I will say, let's still say I'm one of the lucky few in skateboarding. Skateboarding is still not, it's not something that, you know, if you want your kids to get into it and think that they're going to be instant millionaires, if they make the pro ranks, that's, that's not at all the case. You have to have business savvy. You have to be willing to do like things like this, like interviews on the radio, go to podcasts, go, go, go that extra mile. A lot of my friends who are phenomenal skateboarders, they're very introverted. They don't want to be seen. They don't want to talk. They just want to put their tricks on the camera and that's it. And, you know, it can be very limiting if you're not willing to have a hustler spirit, so to speak or an entrepreneurial spirit. Yeah. So, you know, I got very lucky. I came up in a, in a good time. I had good management and I also, I got to give a lot of credit to watching, you know, seeing my father's career before me, you know, my father's was a well-off successful standup comedian. And so I had exposure to seeing someone living their dream and doing it to the fullest as a kid, you know, like, as we mentioned here before there, a lot of kids came from broken homes, came from rough situations. They, they wanted to, where they found skateboarding as a place where they can belong and can fit in. And, but they didn't necessarily have the mindset of like, let me take this to the biggest level. Let me, let me try and push this. You know, they may have just saw it as like a place of like social status or social, like comfort, you know, and I thankful I had that as well, but I also had big dreams. I seen someone close to me living their dreams to the fullest. I was like, well, I want to take this to the biggest level, you know, and I want to do it as big as I can. So it's not for everyone. There's no right or wrong. And you have, and I mean, you've, you've made a decent income, but it hasn't just been with skateboarding. You diversified their shoes. They're, you know, they're all kinds. But I think the important thing, you know, the important thing I hear you saying, Paul, and I think that in the same thing with, and I love that your dad was your inspiration. That's beautiful. I like props, but the thing is, is like Paul didn't do it for the money. You know, I made this movie. I paid for every single penny of this and I spent way more money than I should have spent on it, but it was my passion. It was my passion. And I wanted to tell their story because these were my friends that never got their recognition. You know what I mean? So I spent, I could own two houses in LA for what I spent on this documentary, but, you know, hopefully like what goes around comes around and it's like, I was able to leave something behind that, that communicates a lot of love, a lot of heart, a lot of soul and its history. It's 50 years of skateboarding history that nobody knows about, you know? And so, but I, you know, it's like if a kid's doing it, if you're looking for the money you're doing it for the wrong reasons because skateboarding hurts too much. You're not guaranteed to get money, like, you know, getting into any of the traditional sports, basketball, baseball, football, like, you know, even the rookies in those leagues are instant millionaires, but in this, in this world, it's not, that's, it's not guaranteed nor likely, you know, we've got to have a different mindset and goals and aim for that type of thing. But for all the parents out there throwing rocks at it. I don't want to steal your show here, but since Jean and Paul haven't seen this, can I share pictures of your brother real quick as a little guy? Yes, please. Yes, you absolutely may. Hold still. I'm going to show you one of the most amazing. And when I tell you, I was going into attics and garages looking at old photographs. I want you to see this picture of Curtis taken by a man named Bill Golding, who basically had these photographs sitting in a box in his garage for 30 years. And he gave me 500 plus photos to share with the world. But this is Cheryl's brother, Curtis Bryant, aka the natural, insane air looking right down the camera. 1977. Wow. And he was a man look at him just like eyeballing the lens, right in the camera and chewing on his tongue. That was his signature. I mean, when he started to concentrate, he would chew on his tongue. So that is just like prototypical Curtis right there. One more just for the books, because he's a he was a ripper and we just he was just a total natural. That's a pleasure point skateboard from Santa Cruz area with some like park dancer wheels like Del Mar. This is a this is Sierra Wave skateboard park in Sacramento. Yeah, from 77 in Sacramento from 1977 until 70, late 78, when they bulldozed it for the insurance stuff when all the parks closed. I think that there is just something in a person that makes them a skateboarder because my brother and my son were never around each other. And my my son was never exposed to skateboarding in any way. And then all of a sudden, one day, he picks up a skateboard or a board, and he becomes my brother. I mean, it was just like the love, the passion, the skill, all of it, and the addiction, the addiction. So Jean, you know, the addiction, tell us about how did you get to skateboarding? I just, I got into it actually, when I was a kid, my mom bought me a Pikachu skateboard from Walmart. And then a Pikachu skateboard, one of the cheap $30 ones from Walmart. And I just started skating. So when I was a kid, and then I would just play sports like basketball and football, but then I went back to skateboarding as a teenager. I still skate to this day for fun. But I used to be pretty good. I used to do stairs like, like 510 stairs, kickflip. I never really hurt myself doing it. But I just would skate for fun with my friends. And sometimes even to this day, me and my friends still go to skate parks. And I'm like almost 30. So I still I work a regular job, but I still escape from time to time. It's still, it's still really fun to learn new tricks. What was the draw for you? The rush is just skating down the streets getting to your destination. The the wind through your face, we're going up and down the curb. Like street skating, sometimes we my friends go into schools, and just get like ledges and some stairs here and there. I got on a Saturday or Sunday. And they just go to skate parks and just go around and just try to learn new tricks. And we just get on and off. So we're constantly always kind of doing the same stuff. But it's always fun. I'll probably be skating until I'm 16. Yeah. And I you know, my brother is is almost 60. Like I said, he's broken up and he's still skating. And how old how old is our oldest skater from the because we had some some that were up there, James? Well, I'm a I'm gonna be 60 in a few months. So gee, I still is like 70. Right? I surf a lot. So I stay young, you know. But between surface, I'd rather fall in the water than on the concrete, but I still skate. The oldest skateboarder in the movie is Cliff Coleman. And Cliff Coleman was the guy from Berkeley that invented the Coleman slide, which is what you see a lot of the downhillers doing those. But he was in Telegraph Hill in Berkeley in 1976. They have photographs of him just doing these like nasty 40 foot slides going 40, 50 miles an hour. And he started that whole idea of sliding to slow yourself down to get around corners. And that's that's called the Coleman slide. And that was started in NorCal. So but yeah, Cliff is Jamie Hart won his world championship against people like less than half his age. He was fifty nine when he won the world championship in the downhill slalom. Cliff Coleman, also a world champion. I think he's now seventy seventy three, seventy two, seventy three bombing hills. These guys are hardcore. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. That's what I'm hoping for. You talked about the passion, James, of the skateboarding. Let's talk about the passion of those of you who are bringing the story to like let's talk about the photographer that made this possible. Yeah, Bill Golding, incredible. Bill took those two shots that are shared with you guys. And Bill was his son, Mike, skated with the end man in the early days in these ditches and pipes. And Bill was an amateur photographer and actually a really good photographer. But he followed them around and took all these photographs. And when, you know, fast forward 30 some years, when I'm thinking about doing a documentary, you know, the end men were a little embellished a little bit about what was available to me as far as I started making a documentary without any documentation. So I was kind of an idiot. But the you know, they're like, oh, no, there's tons of photos. There's footage. They couldn't find anything. And so after I started filming interviews, we put a private investigator out there to try to find some of these photographers. And sure enough, two and a half years into filming, we found Bill Golding. We're like, do you have any of those old photos of the original end man? He goes, I got them all. They're sitting in a garage in a box. I'm like, holy shit. So we were able to, you know, I wouldn't have a documentary if it wasn't for Bill Golding. And so the kind of the sad part is, is that Bill passed away a couple of years ago before I finished the film, but not before we could actually put a rough cut of the film in front of him. I mean, literally in his last days, his son was able to show him a rough cut. And we, the segment where we featured Bill was already edited and it looked great. And so he got to see his part in the movie and we left it pretty much untouched from when he saw. And so that what you saw Cheryl at the, at the premiere was literally what Bill got to see. And he was so stoked that his photos would be shared with the world because otherwise they would have just disappeared, you know, gotten some garage sale or something. But now we were able to actually put, you know, like 400, some of these vintage, you know, NorCal skateboarding photographs in this film to, to really help tell the story. Now I want to talk about why people should see this movie and why this story needs to be told. This is a, this is a documentary, but it's not your typical documentary, you know, it's not just going through and giving you the dry facts and, you know, sure there are some great scenes of people just shredding on a skateboard. It's great if you're a skateboarder to just observe that and hear the history, but what makes this film something that anyone, I mean, anyone who didn't know a thing about skateboarding would enjoy and could relate to was the stories that were behind it. The stories of, of, of real people with real issues, real things to work out, you know, building their self-esteem. Some of them did well, and some of them faltered and some of them struggle and continue to struggle. But the Inman was a success story because even those who struggled are supported by this big family. And of course, we, we lost John, but you can't go giving it away. All right. Can I ask one question? Where does the name Inman come from? Northern California is essentially the, the, the idea behind it. But when you see there's a, there's a lot, there's a lot more behind it, but yeah, I don't want to give too much away. Okay. Yeah. No, but I mean, you have to see it. You have to see the movie. I think to answer, to kind of go where you're going with that, Cheryl is, is it's a love story. And that's why, you know, I've had so many friends bring along people. Like there was this Korean woman, she's not a skateboarder. She was brought by a boyfriend to the premiere and she's like, wow, I thought it was coming to see a skateboarding movie. I had no idea. I was going to laugh and cry, you know? And so it's, it's really, it's, you know, I mean, a lot of the stuff that Paul and Jean are probably used to, and me is skate porn. We call it skate porn because it's just like, Oh, it's all the latest tricks. And the guy's doing them edgy, you know, it's like it's, and it's just guys, you know, pulling my finger and farting and doing goofy, you know, jackassy kind of stuff. But this film is a human film. It's a film about, uh, humanity. In fact, you know, what I would like to do is I would like, and it is a love story. It's a love story between a bunch of people and their skateboards. Like Paul was just talking about that addiction, you know, there's healthy addictions. Right. And, um, and, and it's a love story about Doug and John. Like not, it's not like a, like a gay love story. It's about two best friends that started something in motion and they had no idea. And they both had to, you know, struggle with their own demons, but you know, the actor Josh Brolin, uh, is a friend of mine and he gave us the voiceover for John's voice in the film and Josh Brolin on as an executive producer, but I'll just read really quickly with a note. He sent to me, we look back on our lives and it's moments like these that shine being involved in something moving communal. And that reminds us of our intrinsic through line humanness. The idea of success eludes me. It's an inside job and what you have filmed and structured in this film says everything about you. So again, I am honored and I'm truly grateful to be associated with something so human as your film. And it really was just very, very human because like, you know, like the lady said, I laughed and I cried, but there was something deeper, you know, you watch a, a love story or, you know, any story and it can move you to tears, but there was just something deeper in, in this, you know, it, it resonated with your, your very soul. And it was inspiring, you know, it made you, it made you laugh. It made you feel alive. It made you want to go out and do something amazing because you can, and just, it was very inspirational in, in many different kinds of ways. Yeah, it's a very different, it's a very different kind of skateboard documentary for sure. And, you know, one of the things that was super cool for me is when I started kind of digging to see if I had a story there and we, you know, we found the photographs and that was great, but I think it, it really came alive when, because otherwise people are like, I've never, you know, a bunch of my friends are younger generation dog town guys down here. I surf with them and stuff. And I would ask them, you know, have you heard of the end men? They're like, no, who the hell are the end man? Never heard of them. And, and, and, and I was a little like, is this even a thing? And then when I got Tony Hawk in the movie and Tony Hawk talks about them and validates them and talks about their contribution to skateboarding, including the, Don Bostic creating the X Games for ESPN, you know, the snowboard and skateboard events. He created that because he was the one doing it up in Sacramento. And then when Steve Caballero came in and vouched for him and said how significant they were and Tommy Guerrero and Eric Dressen and, and, and, and, and Mark Gonzalez and like all the, and Steve Olson. And when Tony Alva comes in the movie and says the end men were as great as, if not better than the guys like Paul, the younger generation guys are like, who? And then you're like, wait a minute. There's no higher authority on 1970s pool skating than Tony Alva. And he's like a dog town guy. And anyway, it just, it was when the, when the pros came out and really kind of, kind of legitimize the story. That's when I, you know, that's when I was like, it was a dream come true. I was literally like, I can die, go to heaven now. I'm good. Like, yes. You know? And, and again, this was me being of service to my friends. Like I wanted to, their story to be told and, and just like Paul had that drive. I know that you have a hard stop. So I want you to tell me to tell us how people can see this movie for sure. Right now we are doing premieres. We've been doing the film festival circuit and premiering at little Philip festivals around. We're doing a Boise premiere, not convenient for probably the five of us, but Boise, August 1st, they're opening a new brand new skate park in Boise, Idaho. They got a cool skate scene up there. We're opening up at the, the old school Egyptian theater downtown Boise, August 1st. We're right now in talks to get it on one of the major streaming platforms. That's probably gonna happen in the next few months here, but it'll definitely be accessible for rent and download and purchase for streaming within the next three to six months. You can find us on Instagram, the website to go watch the trailer is N man, the movie.com. So check out the trailer on the website and then stay tuned there and follow us on Instagram and elsewhere for kind of updates of where you can check it out. But thank you so much for having me, Dr. Cheryl, appreciate it. And Paul and honor, Jean pleasure to meet you. Stokes, stoked to be a part of this this podcast.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:14 min | 3 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on WTOP

"But which state does the FBI actually prefer? We'll talk to this is cbs news on the hour presented by indeed .com. I'm Christopher Cruz in the Washington bureau. It's happened. Donald Trump has been indicted on multiple federal criminal churches. He broke the news himself tonight in a post on his truth social website, then release the video. So I just want to tell you I'm an innocent man. I did nothing wrong. And we'll fight this out just like we've been fighting for years. It would be wonderful if we could devote our full time to making America great again. Sources said that Trump is due to be arraigned in Miami on Tuesday. The US Secret Service will be meeting with Trump's staff and his security team to develop a security plan for his travel and court appearance in Miami, which is expected to be very tight. Secret Service will also be scrutinizing the courthouse in Miami, conducting a threat assessment and also coordinating with various law enforcement agencies for the security. Pat Milton, CBS News, Washington. Thanks for watching. In parts of the Mid -Atlantic and the Northeast have been dangerously bad the past few days, Philadelphia Health Commissioner Dr. Cheryl Bettigal says smoke from the Canadian wildfires is making it difficult for some people to go outside. These levels of fine particulate or PM 2 .5 pollution can have health effects on any of us and are particularly dangerous to people with lung or heart conditions to young children, older adults and pregnant people. Supreme surprise the nation's highest court today ruled that a Republican created congressional district map in Alabama states the Federal Voting Rights Act. CBS News legal contributor Jessica Levinson says Chief Justice John Roberts voted with a majority. What he really said today is that section two of the Voting Rights Act that guards against vote dilution among other things on the basis of race still has teeth that still has a place in our country. There's a movement underway to slow the nation's worsening fentanyl related overdose crisis. CBS's Jim Cressula has details. At least twenty states have decriminalized fentanyl testing strips which can help people who use drugs avoid exposure to the highly potent synthetic opioid that's ravaging the US with overdose deaths. The strips are still technically illegal in some states under drug paraphernalia laws decades old. The main suspect in the disappearance in 2005 of American student Natalie Holloway was handed over to US law enforcement agents in Peru today. He landed in Birmingham, Alabama this afternoon. About a month ago both countries agreed to the extradition of Euron Sloat he's wanted in the US on charges of extortion and wire fraud. Hiring is a lot easier with Indeed. Their powerful platform makes it easy attract, to interview and hire candidates all in the same place. Visit indeed .com slash credit. It's 1003 on WTOP on this Thursday evening, June 8th, 2023 right now in Washington 68 going down to the 50s in the suburbs. Mhm. Yeah.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"Can find out more about Cheryl and her work through the links in the show notes at revision path dot com. Revision path is supported by brevity and wit. Gravity a wit is a strategy and design firm committed to designing a more inclusive and equitable world. They're always looking to expand their roster of freelance design consultants in the U.S., particularly brand strategists, copywriters, graphic designers, and web developers. If you know how to deliver excellent creative work reliably and enjoy the autonomy of a virtual based freelance life with no non competes, check them out at brevity and wit dot com. Brevity and wit creative excellence without the grind. Revision path is brought to you

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:56 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"Don't imitate, don't duplicate, create prosper, the God given guests in you. And don't take no for an answer. And sometimes you gotta wait. I have some patience. God knows if I can wait 50 years for the wind of change. You all can wait 50 weeks. 50 days. I still make people today. I didn't know anything about it. I said, I'm sorry. I'm sorry you didn't read the article 35, 40 years ago. You know what? I didn't read it because the books used to come in the mail and if you didn't see your picture in the front of the book with an award, you toss it to the side, but I was right there writing. The articles in the back of the book. And I shout out and thank everybody. I always thank you, thank you, thank you to my allies in this season, both Allen and Brian Collins have been a blessing for me and I just want to make sure that I thank them openly and I thank them for their favor and their grace. I always thank everybody who's helped me. Yeah, Michelle spellman, calm, acknowledge her in my lectures. First black graphic design, I mean, first black female art director time in, I didn't know what I was doing. You know, sports illustrator and I didn't know what I was doing. She gave me my first job for timing, and the next thing I knew, timing, corporate was my client, and I had shown a lot of design. I think Michelle. I always think phone. Hip hop graphics. Listen, folks at general Miller to McDonald's, one of the best best jobs I had while she was art director wisely. We helped each other. As in seminary and Michelle Washington remembered me when they were doing those design before, they won't give us any design medals and stuff. She wrote one of those profiles from you? Yeah, design journeys. I remember that. Yeah. So we helped each other we did what we could. I gave everybody work. Then I've had some I've had some wonderful allies in this season. Professor sansom and all of my professors that UT Lorenzo and take canales and Kelsey gray and Sean Adams and Bruce, I'm thanking everybody like I'm getting an Emmy here, you know? You know, and when I met you with former president Giuliani, to come on out of here, get out of the Woods. I'm going to take you to Chicago. Regina Roberts came all the way. All the way came all the way over here, my boxes, Phillips said, Cheryl, how many times we got moody's boxes? I sent him time to figure out where to go. I saved everything. The whole show and Miller. I don't dare pull up all my work on the Internet. Y'all got a sample. So many people, all of them awards people, all of the Smithsonian, and there's so many people to thank. And so many people to remember, you know, my allies and everybody who's asked me for lectures, you know, there's so many people to think. And so I've had grace in spite of. So expect the grace. Express favor. Live well, life will be well to you. This is the last time we're going to have this conversation. I want to shout out. I want to shout out to Pratt. We're keynoting their graduation.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:49 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"Listen, hello, baby can design, you hear me? This is my youngest. I'm at our Texas. And I don't know the statistics. I don't keep up with it. But she must be one of the first, one of the first young black designers to have gotten as many grad school acceptances, top ranked schools. And you will have to interview her to ask her where she got accepted. But I'm not saying she's the only one. I don't know if she is the only one. She's the only one I know out of University of Texas honestly designed that got grad school acceptances, top ranked schools and money. She selected Pratt. She's got some intriguing work that she's going to be doing and finishing out. So you have to go interview her. And what was it like? I was one of our senior design teachers at in Texas. And so she was competitive and boy, she was racking in those admissions and scholarships. So I'm like, oh my God.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:24 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"On and honestly. I can only tell you if you want to get lost, you better get your little continuing ahead. Oh, God, a YouTube university. I always love going to YouTube university. And you have to use anything you want to know. That is so true. That's so true. I also like the verb terrance molines group. They throw up their tips and they keep it moving in that group, okay? So you want to learn some technology and what's going on. They're really working those programs and talking about mid journey and all these Dolly and rainbow this and but you have to show up to these things. You have to participate. You have to always be inquisitive and be excellent, like Oprah says you got to do the work. Yeah. Now you and I have talked about some young designers that you have been mentoring. You talked about. Or I've seen pictures, at least I know, but you and I have talked about. Simon Sherwood, Taylor birth weight. How has your mentoring been going? I mean, I know you're everywhere in terms of social media and of course, like you said, you want to be on the metaverse. In the real world here, how's your mentoring been going? Oh, well, listen, apples don't fall far from the tree. Apples don't fall far from the tree. They each, everyone that's in my tribe, they have their gifts. I think in my life, I've inspired them to touch their gift. And the proof that they are of my tribe, they're all winning awards too. You know, the family, family that praised to get the stage together, you know? So my tribe, their war winning. They're doing the same thing. They stop by every now and again, and say, auntie, you know, they know, don't call me a whale on them or anything.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:29 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"And he shows you old school time Carnegie, her balance, all of that, that crafting. He had a well to studio and you had to have equipment for that stuff. I still have that equipment man. We had to have ellipses and drafting tools and, oh, jeez, all the stuff by hand. I still have it all packed away. Okay? I'm looking for a museum installation. Okay. So I'm going to design studios still exist. Can you believe it? I saw Tony shop pivot. He did not linger and holding on to speedballs, bebop is an ink and draft into, say, there was a process of how you did this stuff. You drew it out, you had your tissues, and you had to have that camera. This thing hit New York City so fast. I went in there one day and he had number Macintosh. So what I'm sharing with you is University of Texas, I saw his starting a master's at AI. A master's program, AI, next year is going to launch. MIT has a 6 week has a 6 week continuing red. You resist this if you don't resist it if you want. Resist it. And see where you'd be right there with Uber eats. All right. And I've been through too much technology to know. Don't resist. Learn it. And while you're learning it, they will figure out the copyright stuff. They will figure out the legality. They will figure out, but it's going to do you no good if this technology doesn't have some content experts. And so I'm like, learn it. And figure out your code of ethics for using it and compete. Don't resist. Or you'll be on your bike ride around with Uber eats, still looking for paste up deliveries to grunge downtown. Yeah, this is it. I'm curious about NFTs. I have several collections on foundation. Philip is doing that part of my practice. I think there is something there. You know, you got to watch out for moving west for gold because the only ones that make gold are the ones who make the shovels.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:53 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"And so now with all the boards, we have a group text. And I said, I told you, it was a famous designer. But more than anything in the whole wide world, I wanted to be with you all. So, you know, I'm a soccer mom. I'm a basketball mom. I'm a baseball mom. And never looked back about the design business, but I always wrote, phone ranked constantly, you called me, oh my God, can I have a copy of the thesis? Can I have a copy of the thesis? I have a copy of the thesis. Oh my God. My phone would has never stopped ring. Because of the thesis. Now I'm with the awards. They come with me. They want the rusty with me. Got a chance. I'm so proud of they treated us so well. I'm so proud of president crystal Williams. President of rod school design first African American president of top rank art school. They just treated us so well and the kids were so proud and they go like, yeah, mom, we know you are famous designer. So what I wanted to miss all of that for the sake of these crazy people in the industry, slaying dragons. All right. No. I have my teenage prom date is my husband. And we have two kids that have grown up to do their thing and well, and they know that I was telling the truth. Your mother was a famous designer. And now she's in kindergarten with you. It's a blessing to be here. So it's a blessing to be alive because a lot of these peers of mine dead and gone. They're giving these awards posthumously. That's not fun. I mean, thank you for the acknowledgment, but there didn't go. I gave him the comb.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:49 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"Earned. And what it does now is gives me for those who want me. Say, I'm on invitation only now. Invitation only is, that a lot of things are going on now. That I'm not invited to say, well, I don't have to be invited to everything. But the ones who invite them really, really want transformation and not performance. You don't call me if you really don't want to change. Your situation. So that's a design model. Less is more. I don't have to be everywhere. Because I don't trust everywhere to take care of my heart. Hello. And with that said, every place that's acknowledging, everyone that's inviting me, they really want me. And for what I've been through, all of the horror of disappointment and rejection. Why would I want to beat my head against performative projects where you just want my name? Right. I don't need that Maurice. And especially on this side of history, I get more done. I get more done with people that want me that really want transformation. I get more done in one year than most people get done in ten. You call show me, you want to get down call and share them more. You want to look like you want to look like you're getting it done. She's not the one. Because I'm really going to do it. So don't call me unless you really want to hear it. You really want to do it. Because I've always been truthful to this. Yeah, I mean, I would wager, you know, your years of experience definitely has given you a sharp eye for discerning that, you know? Oh, God. Yes, I can tell performative request a mile away. Yeah. Starts with the ones that don't ask me. I'm like, oh, I see you. I'll see you. I'm not even on that distribution list. Okay. Yeah. All right. I feel like we're sharing an inside joke with that, but I know exactly what you mean. Yeah. So it doesn't mean I have to be everywhere. Yeah. It doesn't. It's just that where I am. In genuine places. That won't grow. I shout out University of Texas Austin design. Listen, I have to shout out to them.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:56 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"People don't know I was recruited to risky and I was also invited to wellesley. So I had a choice, go to visit for when I graduated high school after Martin Luther King was assassinated. We were in a season of reparation and all the Ivy League schools and New England schools came down to all of the urban towns. And they came to New York that came to Philadelphia that came to D.C.. They wanted, you know, they scooped up most likely to succeed SAT scores. We all got everybody got invited to go to college, or at least to apply. And so I was invited to risd. And I was invited to wellesley. English lit and writing. And I always say now, well, I went to risd. Ended up with ended up provider, and I got something I got something to write about. So I got trained. I got trained in scholarship and design and art design. And it's equalities and inequalities is my topic of conversation. So graduate degree number one gives me something to write about and graduate degree. Number two has given me the skill set to do it. And so we lean into that. And that's how this has happened because I will tell you what I'm doing now, the only thing that being a designer and being having gone to all the design schools and all of that, just Googled it. You know, the only thing that Denver has done for me in my work has identified the problem. And gives me my content for my purpose for when I write for. So I named theological work as being trained as a scholar. It has equipped me in ways that design school could never. And I just think about those years of, oh my God, what am I doing? Why am I here? Why am I here? Why am I in some of that? And I got your middle down, town going. I got AIGA. I got all this stuff that's now an articles and so forth and so on. And I'm like, why I was there was to prepare me for this moment. That keeps me relevant and pertinent. I write

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:25 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"So my lived experience, my lived history, I've been an eyewitness to a lot of things. I've known a lot of people, so writing that out in different forms, which is really my scholarship and revelation. I'm creating footnotes. And then I'm documenting those notes in places where if you're going to really going to do the work, you'll find your own millicent. You'll find Sharon Miller found this out, you're going to find Sharon Miller's research. And so I'll be lucky if I get maybe three books out. But making sure the ingredients for you all to write, that's been a big part of my work, which is I'm in a sacred project of collecting black graphic design history that's in collections with Stanford University and Cooper union, her blue ballin center. It's sacred work because I find deceased this black designers and the states, I'm working with families that know that their loved one had some crazy kind of career and it's all in a box in the attic or in the basement and they don't know what to do with that ephemeral. And usually I show up giving them a place to have their work preserved and cataloged. So with that, that's really important. Because we can't write a history if it's all oral tradition and lost. And dry rotting in somebody's attic or basement. And I'm meeting so many families, like I have a daughter, I won't call her name. I have one on meeting this afternoon. I worked with seldon Dix's daughter. I worked with Dorothy Hayes, niece. They all tell me these incredible stories. And trust these sacred boxes that I will take care of. And thus far, Stanford has received the concept of this without charge, that's what they do. They bring in collections. They preserve art. They preserve that, I think they have MLK papers. This is what they do. And some people say, well, why didn't you take it to an HBCU and blah, blah, blah, blah. Sister Stanford will preserve the work freely for us. And so I've given everyone an invitation, some people have wondered my motive of my motive is, okay? Well, you keep that stuff in your attic if you want. Or you have an opportunity for somebody to come back, pick it up. And you have a name and a catalog, annotation, you have your own numbers, you don't come underneath Cheryl Miller and it's not I'm not the umbrella. You have your own node. You have your own archive. You have your own collection. And it's being preserved. And so, you know, we started with, I don't know, somewhere between 40 and 60 invitations. And it is sincere and it's real. And I think the ones that are really moving me are the ones of the states where the designers did. And I can't tell you, like my conversation with Dorothy Hayes is nice. It's just thank God for you. I inherited everything. My aunt left me everything. And I haven't had a clue what to do with it.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:12 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"AIGA medalist Cooper Hewitt national design awardee inductee into the one club creative Hall of Fame. I mean, the list of accolades goes on and on and on. Longtime fans of the podcast remember that I first interviewed Cheryl back in 2018, and I'm so delighted to have her back on the show. So sit back and enjoy our unedited interview with one of our true

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:24 min | 5 months ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Revision Path

"The tenth collectivism initiative from revision path and state of black design created to help connect black designers searching for their next opportunity with the companies that want to hire them. So if you're a black designer and you're looking for a new job, go to the tenth collective dot com to sign up for free or check out the link in the show notes. We are here to help you find your next big opportunity today. You're listening to the revision path podcast, a weekly showcase of the world's black graphic designers, web designers and web developers through in depth interviews you'll learn about their work, their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals.

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Get Out There and Get Known Podcast

Get Out There and Get Known Podcast

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Get Out There and Get Known Podcast

"So one of the things too is that she went from selling T shirts at think at one point in time started out as a paralegal legal secretary. Then start selling t shirts on the weekend and then she really got into this online suite so we saw each other are now because of in i would say this guy doesn't waste anything so all the things that she's done in her career she has used right right but the last thing that she started really using was her mouth. I'm other stuff. You were doing the You did the what i call. The uber to my business development of business coaching really helping helping women get started right and they were getting deciding. What kind of business. Just whatever it. Whatever their business ideas like helping them to really kick started and get it launched and get it off the brown just just really developing the confidence to get started and then s where the light bulbs when off because whenever she would speak it would be that people were were magnetized by what she was saying and then she realized the gift that dad gade you in this like i need to really ship. So give give everybody because everybody doesn't really flow onto their destiny like all at one time right. It's just like give us some clues that you were getting along the way that this might be something or did you see. Maybe someone else doing it in like that. Might be something that i might can do. So give us like the pivot points where you saw things stolen. Yeah so really. At the time. I was in search of the word freedom. I really did. I want a time freedom. I want financial freedom and i want to create a freedom and and what i mean by that is. I was working a fulltime job. I'd been doing that for fifteen years as a legal secretary in corporate america which meant i came when they said come. That's just what a job is and left when they leave and put in a us least one vacation day or whatever it might be. If my kid woke up sick. I had to call and get their permission to be out. And i just kind of over that i really wanted freedom time freedom to say i'm gonna come and go when i please. I'm gonna take occasion. When i want i want i want my kids to school building at nine and be there at three to pick them up. That was one piece of the financial freedom was added in have letters behind money. So my story apart. My story which. I don't run from is that i didn't go to college. I went straight from high school into the workforce..

america
"dr cheryl" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"To try them out today. Yes allows powerful carful explanation while tetons from doing body and other creating sailor energy. So let's talk about some of the best foods for helping. Heal the gut and also the foods that you know stephanie. Gophers from the food foods land bright restrict our ability to produce key talents and more inflammation got. Also foods helps us. Yeah so when when patients or people when we talk about what. We are most afraid of in terms of health conditions. The things that you see even the heart disease is the most common. That's not what tops the list. You tend to see cancer and alzheimer's disease. And then you see then you see cardiovascular disease great news. Ketogenic diet helps us to address all of those and so foods that we want to utilize first of all Less food less calories and that's a big stumbling block for people you know. We're moving into holiday season. It can be natural to want to over indulge and we have patterns. We come home. Maybe stress at work or stress with the family or just relaxing. And so it's a comfortable time to eat to eat more calories than we should So one of the nice things about being in ketosis or ketone bodies themselves is that they make us less hungry. It makes this the chiba at all. Every single one of us has thought. I should reduce my calories. I should be better about this and had a failure along the way. And that's because simply get hungry and we were driven to go look for alary so when we have kitchens in our system we are less hungry some birds that help us with that first of all you can take exoti- capetown's but we'll we'll talk about bad abbot some bands that help us with that coconut oils. A great goto. Those medium chain triglycerides are fundamental and our ability to make more a key towns and so we get those from coconut oil. It's a great thing. They start utilizing more of the diet. Whether or talking your protein sake and tablespoon and there in the morning or we're talking about saute some vegetables Giving it more substance giving it more fat can really be useful in terms of helping the gut and one of the things that we're learning. And so of course it goes without saying we need to get out sugary foods. We need to get rid of sugar. We need to get rid of the white flour. If it's white it probably needs to go. Those are going to be things that spike insulin. Those are going to be things that keep you from. Getting in kito says i while we know that it's high fat diet. I never liked to see the vegetables. Go so it's still a nice strong focus on greenlee things Having spinach around throwing some stews or throwing a shake you gotta keep the fighter nutrients and then from there what we're learning. Is that when you do that. This is moving into ketosis. Having a qatada diet is one of the best ways to restore a healthy gut lining in fact. They're even saying that. Some of the data around seizures is not just because of the intake. Fats so when i think of seizures i think of. Where's this happening. It's happening in the brain and the brain is eighty percents that so change the diet to better bats better fats in the brain. This must be how seizures work at or seizure. Control works from the diet and it does impart but we're also learning. Is that diet. Changes bluer in the gut. It produces something called ackerman and that akron has been found to be part of the anti-seizure potential that same achromatopsia creates a thicker lining on your gut creates this mucous lining that helps to protect the gut and buffer. The got making sure that proteins don't come into the body that shouldn't making sure the gut lining is soothed and working well so nutrition moves into our system and so a lot of the benefits of those ketogenic foods like coconut oil. Like good healthy nuts in the diet that can provide healthy fats to us like avocado wonderful source of healthy They're not only changing our fat biochemistry but changing our microbiome and that does a couple of things for us. Changing that microbiome. One way we reduce inflammation in the system and changing those bats also changes the inflammatory load because it works on this little part of the cell and we know the peroxy is an anti inflammatory pathway. This is why you've been taught about fish oils as being anti inflammatory. This wild why we've been taught about something like cla helping metabolism because it's a fat that works on those paroxysms ketogenic diet healthy fats. Also work on those barracks zones to create anti inflammatory fats. In our body anti-inflammatory prostate prostate landon. Which helps our brain helps. Our weight helps our energy. And so when we can incorporate these foods enjoy our diet a very powerful tool to help us with most pathologies out there. Yeah so good. So you're saying let's get these healthy bats the narrow lots of vegetables. Let's keep the carbohydrates so the grains the sugars things like that. Let's keep those out. They spike insulin. Osu wanna keep her insulin down. Low amnesty less often right. And so there's a big a big thing like if you eats once or twice today as opposed to three to five times a day using the same amount of calories. You actually have twenty five to fifty percent less insulin. That's released when you do that. And and there was a big study. That just came out that really confirm the low carbohydrate hypothesis sometimes were taught that the data is back and forth. I think it's a little less back and forth. And sometimes the media would like us to believe really every time they set up a study to try to prove that high fat diets cause you to gain more fat. So that's the bias. They're trying to show that it does that in when you have bias in a study you influence it so even with the influence. It's failed to show that high fat diets are the diets that keep us from releasing insulin. Guess what else keeps us from releasing insulin. Not but he tones. I used to think well the only good key tone is the one we make because it must come from fat cells and so if you're making your cheap then you're breaking down your own fat and that's the benefit that i was wronged. Yes there's benefit to that. Of course that's how we lose weight but exotic key towns helps mimic what our own she toned bodies do when i take some heat towns. I'm going to be less hungry first of all because my body says Food is scarce right now We're hunting we're gathering. Don't disrupt the hunt and the gather with billing more hungry so those kitomura a single to my brain to eat less then..

three twice fifty percent today once twenty five eighty percents one stephanie five times a day alzheimer's disease One way first exoti single one single kito capetown
"dr cheryl" Discussed on Z104

Z104

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr cheryl" Discussed on Z104

"August. There were 838 walls throughout the army worldwide, according to ABC News. More than 1000 are listed on the Army's deserter rolls. Former army MP Maggie has well doesn't think they've all left by choice. Seven years ago, she founded the Facebook group, Warriors, aftermath and recovery to support families of missing service members. Caswell says Army investigators often don't try to understand what soldiers may have been going through when they disappeared. So you have to think like them and to do that, you have to know their state of mind, and you have to know them as a person, and that comes with getting information from friends from co workers from family members. Um, all kinds of things. And so this is not something that the Army does now under pressure from families and lawmakers. The Army says it will issue new guidance when soldiers failed to report for duty. Their commanders should consider the missing and take immediate steps to find them. The service also plans to start tallying soldiers who disappear for unknown reasons. Army leaders haven't released more details and refused an interview request. Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said in October that the loss of Vanessa G. N had been felt widely. Her loss has been felt in our formations. Across the nation at large. We must be accountable. We must act. This year. It's serious of events has hardened, are resolved to create enduring change. Well, advocates say the new policy represents progress. They also question its staying power. Some doubt the army will ever come forward with specifics. Diana Dana's. They're putting a rule in place that they kind of have to do because they looked terrible. It always looks terrible when it's more important to you to find a rifle than it is to find a person. Meanwhile, the other services haven't announced any changes to their policies. Some congressional leaders are calling for an audit of all the branches to find out how they track and look for missing service members. I'm Carson frame in San Antonio. This story was produced by the American Home Front Project, a public media collaboration that reports on American military life and veterans. Women who do not fit female stereotypes are less likely to be seen as victims of sexual harassment, and if they claim they were harassed, they are less likely to be believed. That's according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Dr. Cheryl Kaiser of the University of Washington and a co author of The study, published in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, says sexual harassment is pervasive and causes significant harm. Yet far too many women cannot access, fairness, justice and legal protection, leaving them susceptible to further victimization and harm within the legal system. Kaiser says the research found that acclaim was deemed less credible and sexual harassment was perceived to be less psychologically harmful when it targeted a victim who was less attractive or did not act according to the stereotype of a typical woman. Meantime, preliminary research shows that antibodies to SERC ov to have been detected in new moms early breast milk called Kill Ostrom. The research was led by University of Massachusetts Amherst breast cancer researcher and a University of Massachusetts Medical School obstetrician gynecologist. Scientists say the antibodies were detected and 14 of 15 women who had tested positive for covert 19 before giving birth. The lead author of the Not Yet peer reviewed research says the immune response was detected and colostomy of women who had their first positive test and symptoms more than four months before delivery as well as those who had their first positive test out delivery and we're asymptomatic. Breastfeeding by women infected with SARS. C O V two is endorsed by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and available evidence suggests breast milk rarely contains live Corona virus and is not likely to spread the disease to babies. The extent to which the covert 19 antibodies found in colostomy provide immunity to babies is not yet clear. And Dr Jerry Burns has grown comfortable with her newly named syndrome. There is almost nothing like having a cup of hot cocoa on a cold and rainy afternoon..

Army harassment Dr. Cheryl Kaiser ABC News Maggie Facebook Dr Jerry Burns Caswell American Psychological Associa asymptomatic Centers for Disease Control an Ryan McCarthy American Home Front Project Diana Dana University of Massachusetts Am San Antonio World Health Organization University of Massachusetts Me Ostrom