25 Burst results for "Dr Bill"

Pfizer Says COVID-19 Vaccine Works in Kids Ages 5 to 11

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Pfizer Says COVID-19 Vaccine Works in Kids Ages 5 to 11

"Pfizer says its covert nineteen vaccine works in elementary school age kids and it'll soon seek emergency use approval in testing kids ages five to eleven Fizer used a much lower dose than the one given now mate senior vice president Dr bill Gruber says the kids still developed virus fighting antibody levels and just as strong as those in people ages sixteen to twenty five whom he says the vaccine protects every match that antibody response we're likely to match the protection Gruber says Fizer aims to submit its data to the FDA bite months set made what he calls a pent up demand among many parents anxious for their kids to be protected and have a normal childhood I see this is urgent Sagarin mag ani Washington

Fizer Dr Bill Gruber Pfizer Gruber FDA Sagarin Ani Washington
Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

"Very very excited today to have dr theodore belfour on the podcast. I heard about dr bell. Four in james ness doors. New book called breath. And we're gonna be talking about all of that today on the show and dr belfour. He's of new york university college of dentistry and a senior certified instructor for the international association for orthodontics in the nineteen sixties. Dr bell was sent to vietnam to work as the sole brigade dentists for four thousand soldiers of the hundred ninety six light infantry from the jungles of vietnam to park avenue in manhattan upon his return opened his own private dental office in new york city and has been private practice for more than forty years and dr belfour specializes in the treatment of the cranial facial system. And that's what we're gonna be diving into today. So dr bill for welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's my pleasure excellent. So what are we. Start by talking about how this all began and go back to. You know what happened. That change the cranial bones the cranial structure our skulls that led to this epidemic of of airway issues breathing issues at all of the health issues. That come with that well How we develop. How would grow and develop is based on how we breathe Aloe and we chew so just looking at how we chew. According to the us department of agriculture today in us sixty three percent of diet is processed and refined foods so without the proper stimulation to the body. We are not fully expressing on jeans when not developed in to offer full potential because that particularly when off jaws do not grow forward enough Do you re trues. Those jaws helps to push the tongue backwards into the airway and down to throw sanal. We have compromised sleeping breathing.

Dr Belfour Dr Theodore Belfour Dr Bell James Ness New York University College Of International Association For Vietnam Dr Bill Manhattan Us Department Of Agriculture New York City United States
Pfizer Begins Testing Its Vaccine in Young Children

NBC Nightly News

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Pfizer Begins Testing Its Vaccine in Young Children

"Pfizer announcing today. It has begun trials and even younger kids starting with five to eleven year olds and later expanding the infants as young as six months. I spoke about it with pediatrician. Dr bill gruber who oversees. The company's clinical trials for children. We've started to vaccinate in a phase. One trial children five to eleven years of age and we plan to move down aggressively to children as young as six months of age. Pfizer says they will test kids in three age groups in the us and europe. Are these children getting the same vaccine. That's currently being administered to adults. Yeah so it's the same vaccine but we take very deliberate and careful approach to assure ourselves of the safety and how well vaccine can be tolerated young children so we moved down into the five to eleven year olds. We'll start with a somewhat lower dose and then we will move forward to mid size goes and then to an adult dose. What's the earliest we could see. Vaccines being authorized for use in children. Our goal is to get this information submitted to the fda as soon as possible if all goes as planned back seen for twelve to fifteen year old. Who'd be ready as soon as the start of the school year. Can we reach herd immunity. If we don't get kids vaccinated. I think adding the school age population based on recommendations from the fda and the cdc could go a long way in helping us reach her protection.

Dr Bill Gruber Pfizer Europe United States FDA CDC
"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"You know all those kind of things are you have to. You're not gonna go back to college to you. Have to be able to use what you've learned to be able to continue on and so i think i think we as we have developed. And i'm just not big negative to tyler but you tyler serves primarily people from that community by vice lucidly but primarily. Okay those people for some reason. Choose not come to you to get. You can't get an more. Because academic standards gladys how it was being like or they can't afford financially you know. Are there have to stay home. Take care of their parents could hope a whole variety of reasons so we need to think about how we deliver services to that community and ut. Tyler is a great example. How we can do it in a pretty traditional setting is neither expensive. Ut ost right and then you think about tyler junior college role it plays and all these guys so yes i think they deserve struggling and thought well and you bring up something. They're going into Something out to make sure we covered From earlier in our conversation with corporate governance which you play a huge role in have for many many years in your career as a member of multiple boards. You know. I gotta believe that. Whenever you i started sitting on these major corporate boards that shareholder value. And you know good economic stewardship were probably the the primary drivers of the decision making around the board table. Now as social issues take much more of a center stage With regard social justice. You mentioned black lives matter whatever the case may be how are and man. You're you're ut where you know. I mean austin is our you know. That's our that's where it all happens in the state of texas my daughter in boulder as where it all happens in colorado Ryland at the university of alabama tuscaloosa. A little different So tell me how corporations and how they're governed. What are the changes. What what conversations are you guys. Have and today dr cunningham that you didn't even have five years ago What is that look like. The first thing i would say is it a fundamental responsibilities. your fiduciary responsibilities have changed in forty years. The aba change your responsibility to shareholders has not changed that you are elected to represent the shareholders six. And you have fiduciary responsibility to care duties loyalty and that has not changed so fundamentally. The governance system itself has not changed. Now what has changed. I think is that i think people take it more seriously than the past and they and they took it seriously in the past but they take it even more serious when there's not as many golf trip. Cinders is me that kind of stuff as it used to be. That right pretty much gone. And today you come in southwest airlines. I come in next week. As an example we will have pre audit meeting and where i will be with the audit committee chairman of the audit committee and we will have a pre-discussion and then that night we'll have dinner of about five to ten directors and the next morning we'll start from eight the morning till five afternoon. We'll have all dinner and meet the next morning from eight to four and we go home and what so. So it's it's more all business and the other thing i would say. Yes every board. I'm on for example. Say how how can we deal with this issue of diversity. How can we make sure the.

Tyler Ut fiduciary aba austin dr cunningham university of alabama tuscaloo texas boulder colorado Ryland chairman
"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"I would have a dinner. Probably four times a year at my house for major with jim michener allow on loved it it in and so i would like some regions bosses and i would invite some potential major donors or major donors and it was wonderful. Jim was great He understood his role he would tell stories and he did so many different things. Other people to talk ballista. So long darrell. Royal was was fabulous. And i got to know i got to know daryl i bet the university of texas about six weeks and i realized no no no no texas interest about five months and i got my football tickets for the first fall and they in the end zone. I was used as a faculty member as a graduate student michigan state. I had great seats. And so i said who's in charge anyway. And i said darrell royal. So i called over there. I want to speak with darrell royal. And they said fine and of course. He was huge person on in texas. Gosh i was nothing. But he was so kind. So i went over to see. Darrell darrell yes cunningham and is a barrel football to get tired and he says well no and i said i'm an end zone and he said well and i said and you daryl. I've done the research on this and faculty on the end zone and these are people who support you. Mile wowed can make some changes here and the next year. He put the faculty members on the fifty yard. Line on the east side. Is that right all of that problem. But all i'm saying is is he was such a and i. I knew very well at lunch together. A lot of times and a lot of things together but henry kissinger is a good friend of mine. I got to know henry on on a trip to europe both ana on a major corporate or together..

darrell royal Darrell darrell jim michener henry kissinger faculty member texas university of texas Mile cunningham europe michigan graduate student
"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"I do my thinking my a lot of this is kind of my man cave if you will but when it comes to writing i have to leave this space and go somewhere else where. I'm going to sit down and do nothing but right now i found that's very effective. Sounds like you discover that as well. I did without any question and i. I was lucky at michigan state. Sometimes of course. I lived in a dormitory with first year with two other guys in a three in a room with three of us in a room that was designed at best for two. Wow that's the way it worked. And that's why getting out of that space was very useful. I also found that. Wow if i got up saturday morning and studied for mike. Eight till noon. Well my pals also left. I do pretty well. And then i said look here sunday. We could do that on sunday. And then the second year instead of moving off campus into an apartment. Which i could have done i suppose. There were three rooms in a huge dormitory michigan state. There were single rooms. Private rooms single rooms and i just happened to fall. Walk down and filed young. Who had that private room. And he was leaving and he signed out. And i signed it so the next three years of michigan state. I had a private room. I had one of. It was great so i could go round and good volvo my pals and come back and closed door and focus right so i was. I had a little man cave there but she state which was wonderful. Nice nice okay. So you make your way to texas and and what is your first. His first school you apply to but you end up. And i want to really dive into How you you're you're you're in. This is one of the things. I want to listen to understand. You are an academic with an incredible business acumen. You know so so so that to me ended up itself is is unique in a lot of ways. So talk about how you end up. In following the academic path to business. And what that looks like once you got to austin. I don't think i would have been happy if all i did was teach at the university. And that's wonderful thing for people to do. But i don't think that would have kept me fully occupied ranch and it's interesting i would say this. There's an awful lot of people university who are involved in outside things as well in fact university recommends or suggests or approved at least of people having one day off to do other kinds of things so so bingos faculty members you were they do ellie right plays so people are do you know. Do art different things. Some people participated in all kinds of engineers law faculty. A lot of people do things outside what we think of as a narrow active community. But i got involved in market research initially doing market research studies for a couple of retail stores. Scarborough's department store a department store austin barking research study for them. Who comes weather. Come you know what kind of ours. You should have a member speaking many years ago to the board of directors of heb when they were trying to figure out whether they should be open on sunday where they should sell alcoholic beverages..

michigan mike austin volvo Scarborough ellie texas
"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"And i would have to teach school one. Junior colleges is to support myself. And i thought to myself look really focus on this. Let's see no work at. She'd stated i get paid. And i have to celia. I have to work. So i'll stay at michigan state. So i stayed there two years two and a half years and all of a sudden found that i was about to graduate and so i went around like Every person does looking for j o b and in texas was in the market. And i was looking for job. And they brought me down and they are job and i accepted school era interview. Let me back. Just a minute Dr cunningham because it's one of the things that you mentioned there the and again like i said there's some some light bulbs went off whenever i started my academic career and i am sure that we're going to have similar stories. But that's a pretty dramatic change. I did not. I mean i graduated. I did well in undergrad. I was. I was a good college student. Terrible high school but i was. I always tell people. I was good at college. And kind of like you talking about that job of showing up on time and not drinking. My deal was within the first two weeks at every professor that i had a sat on the front row and i actually shaved my face in more khakis and a polo to class. And i showed up and i was. I never missed class. Because i knew for me. The academic rigor. I'm just not naturally gifted academically. It's not my strength. i can jump high. I can run fast. And there's little use for either of those but but overcompensate with other things and that's what. I did what was it. They you change. Was it study habits. Was it a schedule. What what changed the the brush as you. I mean you really excelled after that. That's a dramatic change. I did become focused and literally. I was a couple of things. Were very important. I think i went to see. Some people in the university had an area over there to advise people on studying. Having and i went to see them and i advise a couple of things i said one thing though study in a place that is not really normally live. That is getting to get into a place. Where will you sit down. Click start thinking about studying riberio for example and they said don't try to study for more than about thirty minutes and take five or ten minute break come back and do those all seem to work well. Debate and of course. I must say that. I was like a lot of people i i like success. And all of a sudden i became successful and all of a sudden i started getting good grades and all of a sudden you know also i went in the first quarter were under. I got to five half abc's. I'd never done that. Well high school next quarter. I got three bs and a c next quarter. I got a three or four bs and just started. The progression started at by parents. Were thrilled to death. Probably shocked and so the the the opportunity to succeed was very important to me and all of a sudden i was sixteen well and it seems like you discovered a hack there that i've recently discovered so i do a lot of writing and i wanted to be even more and one of the things i've realized like right now. I'm in my little upper room at my house. That had where..

celia Dr cunningham michigan texas professor
"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"Well howdy folks and welcome to episode. Sixty five of the texas titans podcast. This is an amazing episode dr bill cunningham former president of the university of texas former chancellor of the university of texas system member of the southwest airlines board of directors. This is a guy who is one of the most accomplished texans and by the way he came here via michigan but he got here as fast as he could as many many texans like to say and historians remarkable and. He's got stories that involve. Ross perot governor. Bill clements former. Lieutenant governor bob bullock a darrell royal the legendary. Ut football coach. There is just so much history that dr cunningham has been a part as a matter of fact. I want you to go out if you care about texas history and if you just love the romanticism that is the state of texas remember. Texas is not just a state. Texas is a state of mind and an incredible book is james michener's texas which is a historical fiction of the history of texas. It's one of my favorite books of all time dr cunningham and i we actually talk about this book because guess what dr bill cunningham was one of the the main he was kind of unofficially called the vice president of james michener's he talks about the conversation because whenever he was running the university michener was still writing the book so they spent a lot of time together. So there's just even again even though Dr cunningham was born in michigan. There are few people that i have had on this podcast that can tell the story of texas and certainly the states namesake university the way bill cunningham can't so it was a great conversation about leadership hard work being being in the right place at the right time and just learning about other really really amazing texans along the way so this is a. This is one of my favorite episodes. If i sat excited. It's because i am. I'm recording this intro. Right after we hung up and stop the conversation. I was so excited about it and i can't wait for you to hear it so with that. Thank you for continuing to listen to the texas titans. Podcast continue to crush it with downloads. I'm so excited about the growth of the show and that can only happen because of you so thank you for listening. Thank you for hearing these These amazing stories that people are willing to share with me and with that. Sit back and enjoy this conversation with dr bill cunningham here on the texas titans podcast dr cunningham. Welcome to the texas titans. Podcast sir honored with you. Well it's an honor to have you because if ever there was a tax titan in someone that is deserving of that title is you and so now i know you've achieved a lot in your in your year lustrous career but now i want you to run out there and update that link dan profile to texas titan. Because this is the granddaddy album mall. i'm sure eight. Okay well listen. Let's just get started right away with kind of where the story begins. Where were you born wherever you raise. Let's just go from the ground up and just and just see where this takes us earn up. I was born in birmingham michigan. I was raised in bloomfield hills michigan. Which is a suburb of detroit. My dad was an executive with general electric corporation. I was not a very good high school student. I'm always willing to admit that. I was not a bad kid. I never got in trouble with the significance as for sure. But i just didn't study very much. Time came to go to college. And i certainly expected to go to college. And i started looking around..

dr bill cunningham texas titans Texas dr cunningham university of texas michigan Bill clements titans james michener Lieutenant governor bob bulloc Ross perot bloomfield hills michigan president chancellor football vice president namesake university detroit birmingham general electric corporation
"dr bill" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

Health Care Rounds

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

"Mind that kind of trigger some kind of a opportunity for a provider to reach out to the patient and see if there's an alternative method of improving urinary leakage for instance, right so which I think everyone could potentially benefit hypothetically, but you know for a job The center is really the patient. Right right. So frequent listeners to the Pod know that I returned to this theme often, but since you've written so much about it. I wanted to get your your take on what value really means in healthcare. So for me what value in healthcare beings is kind of a combination of quality and outcomes in the numerator / costs and then you can add in overtime. So it depends on you know, if I'm getting a knee replacement that's going to relatively short time. So it may be, you know, just a month or something like that where I'd be looking at quality aspects did the providers follow the recommended treatment Pathways outcomes functionally as my need better is my pain gone away on do not have complications. They have a good experience, but we include, you know quality within quality or outcomes kind of satisfaction things was a decent experience and cost was able to log This with a minimum of cost something like diabetes management might have a longer-term right where I'm worried now more about thinking about outcomes as avoiding the need for dialysis or transplant renal transplant or something like that or amputations long as your future and I'm not shaving that through kind of incremental monitoring of intermediary outcomes, like, you know, a one sees and blood pressures and stuff like that. But again all at the minimum effective us you obviously, you know can't get to zero one of the challenges is just you know, dead patients don't generate charges, right? So that's not a good alcohol know because the outcome is important numerator there and we need to encourage one of the things that struck me about the last time we talked, And I'm paraphrasing here, but we're talking about outcomes and quality and that was your sense that that the payers didn't care. And you said something like to all this investment in quality and outcomes. I think you were talking about a health system and that they had they had much better outcomes when they compare themselves to others but no one was willing to pay for it. Like the the insurance companies were willing to pay for that that quality can can you expand on that notion? Like if we're all after you know in theory, we're all after this AAA more quadruple aim, but the centers may not necessarily be aligned for that to happen the way that we pay for healthcare today. Yeah, I think it's not lying because you know in part, you know, like a CA has said that profit limits Right medical loss ratio limits or confirm rape. So if I now have a limit on my profitability kind of the only way I can I can grow my profit amount is by growing my revenues and the only way I can send it justifiable that is by not worrying too much about utilization. Right? I just have your say if I get the loss ratio that I want one year off and then justify a higher co-payments and higher premiums the next year that grew up my top line that then again I get the same 20% but but the total profits has been increased right? So I think there's not that incentive to actually think about you know, if I can get rid of unnecessary stuff like roll my profit margin would be the other way that things that the prophet could in Chrome. Did I pathetically profit could increase even as your premiums went down if you were very good at that but you know, it's the law you can't do that in in you know, what I think we found is that you know, a hundred percent wage wage changes over the last twenty years have been consumed by health care premiums right in co-payments. So so I think you know why if I'm an inch or why would I may pay more for stuff? Why would I worry too much about this? I just want to kind of continue to grow my my profit. Margin as long as I continue to pass it off to the patients and consumers then wage and and we'll see what my sensor is to really change things. And I did I just had a conversation about two weeks ago with someone at a organization. I won't mention but they kind of threw in the back. They said we work so hard on improving quality Alka comes in just as you said we were measuring guess everyone else had clearly higher performance and no one would pay for the difference. You want it in my job. If you have alignment and maybe you get alignment when you have the you know, like a Kaiser or a Geisinger the sharing, you know sharing risk, right right. Maybe there's some kind of like they're in saying hey if I make it because you know, we proven just endemic and I wrote a paper a while ago. You know that when there's a bad Healthcare outcome as the insurer that that pays front of that additional bill. So the hospital in which it occurred actually they're they're Costco up their reimbursement goes up but their profit margin actually kind of goes down but the but the insurer could kind of eats the whole thing. So if we were truly had incentives that included not, you know, not just kind of a limit on profitability but some kind of a oil change in the premium amount that could be passed up including the co-payments and all that kind of tricks involved in that if we could focus on something Like that to drive down premiums and truly drive down costs and incentivize that to happen and I would think that the insurers would help Direct Care indeed structure their benefits. So X incentivize people like you so hey John you need, you know knee surgery. You can go to any one you want. If you go to one of these five people who have Excel or outcomes, your co-payment is 0 as a thousand bucks, if you go to any and frankly I bet you can say as fifty bucks if you go to any of the other people and it'll come to the one who has the better outcomes, but I think the real Challenge and doing that is knowing what the outcomes are knowing even what the volumes are. We just did a study where we looked at volumes of spine surgery, you know by off by neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons and then so-called orthopedic surgeons of the spine. It's a designation of orthopods and and it really varies the number of spine surgeries individual. Will provider does varies considerably of a portion their practice that is dedicated to spine really matter, you know varies and and you find you know, their places like leapfrog group. This doctor should do X number of chips and they just added hips and knees but of cholecystectomy is and and pancreatectomy is and things like that right.

Pod Costco rape Alka John
Covid: US death toll passes 200,000

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Covid: US death toll passes 200,000

"The US has crossed a grim threshold in the pandemic more than two hundred thousand people of now died from covid nineteen comes as a raw cases are also starting to rise after falling significantly the end of the summer more memoirs will stone certain parts of the country have higher death toll from Cova. Just. Three States Massachusetts New York and New Jersey account for more than a quarter of all US deaths Florida Texas and California also had a large share of deaths. Fewer. People are dying compared to the spring partly because younger people are getting infected but Dr. Bill Pounder Lee at Washington University in St Louis Worries about a surge of cases in the winter we'll see more people die the proportion may be less but the numbers will still be high cases are now climbing significantly in the Great Plains and parts of the

United States Dr. Bill Pounder Lee Covid Cova Great Plains New Jersey St Louis Washington University Massachusetts New York Florida California Texas
"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

Humans Rising Podcast

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

"If they got more peaceful. Yeah. So yeah, this one does start on September twenty ninth and it's on the it's on the website. Great and you do have some amazing guests who will be joining you on that course. So you will get the wisdom of not just Dr Bill, Pettit but some other amazing I don't know facilitators guides all they're going to be co hosts they're going to be sweeter. We had a meeting on Friday of the Co host four women for men and in all of the men are men of color native American from South Africa and to African Americans, and in my next one, my women I'm going to have at least two two women of color. Whether, they're Indian or Spanish Hispanic or African American because. The wisdom, it won't be my wisdom because we're all connected to the same wisdom. There's only. The main computer. But, the the calmer and quieter we are we access. WHAT WE ARE Instead of. Being caught up in the illusion. So you know the the wisdom everybody's everybody's. Everybody's. There is no difference in the psyches in the spirit. Soul is just in the level of understanding of the truth of that. that it appears to vary. Right, and we can see the beauty and others. Everybody everybody is really wanting to understand this truth. Yeah it one of the things that starts to happen is you. Most of us have peoples that are the we us and them. And what you start to see is there's no them's. As only as The US as. Well, thank you so much for joining me today bill and. I. Look Forward to Your corks into future conversations and for those that are listening..

Dr Bill US Pettit South Africa Co
"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

Humans Rising Podcast

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

"Too much attention reversal thinking. So that is beautiful design and it's so different than any other self-help modality. Because, you're not saying, okay when you feel tense, you have to go and meditate for ten minutes or I mean it's not that when those alarm bells go off for you that there's something to do. That right. We'll you know it depends how you define to do? You stop. You remember I said that were either within where either in our thoughts or we're in our life. So. If you if you put it in terms of doing you say, well. As, stopped, paying, you know stop paying attention to you're thinking. Well, that's that's doing. It's hard to do because you're using your thinking to try to do it. You know people ask me they say. When you have don't you worry and I said I don't. But I'm when I'm faced with the unknown especially when it has to do with my children or or acute financial things or whatever I will have worrisome thoughts. But they said, well, what do you do with them I? Thank I. Thank my brain for sharing its comments. You know because I know that the the the my brain, just a computer that has stored information but that's not my brain I'm glad I've got a place that I don't have to learn how to brush my teeth every day or or learn all the things that I've learned in life but every day. But but it's not it's a computer that's all it is and so to me. I just get in my life and. I, I used to if I got in my life and I had gotten triggered by some thoughts and I was only four out of ten. Let's say you know is we judge where we are? I used to judge that Gosh I should know better I I. I've been studying this all this and I'm four out of ten will as soon as I start paying attention to judgmental thoughts, I'm added for a three..

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

Humans Rising Podcast

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

"You'd say you know I, I need to my flight is at this time I need to be there depending on if it's domestic or our Kosta, you know now and a half or two hours before is this time of day so the traffic is going to be a little heavier. It's GonNa take me and I'm going to add another half hour just in case there's an accident or something, and then you can say you know when you need to leave your house, you can you can fit in because you've got the formula and you've got the variables. But most of life caprice. Is Not. By formulas. I ask physicians I ask teachers I ask a policeman I s what percentage of what you deal with every day in your work. was in the books that you studied. To get registered for this job. And what are they saying now they they you know twenty five to fifty percent. Most would say at least fifty percent of what they face every day was never in a book. And so you see that it's about being in the present moment where you have access to wisdom beyond your intellect. My late wife Sue used to say she one day she looked at me and she said Bill. I've just seen something than. I said, what was that honey? This is nine, hundred, eighty five or so she said I see that moment to moment am either one of two places. Either in my thoughts. Are In my life. Profound. That is profound and you know when I find myself in my thoughts and not in my life. Is, when I identified myself as a separate personal entity. and. Worries Right. Well which is natural. I mean, we live in this in this great illusion of duality and. In the moment with that, we do forget that we are a spiritual energy in a form. then then we get afraid. We get frightened. Get. Insecure. Ryan and we need to control life from that vantage point. which is yeah. Most of it is not controllable L.. I have a friend that a physician in South Africa that I've come to have great respect for but. Seventeen years before he was exposed to the principles, he was a family physician and he was with a patient in these two young African men barged in a third one was holding his secretary at gunpoint. And one of them put his the gun, his the gun to his head. And said at the counter five or whatever I'm going to kill you. And Shadwick said I was even surprised myself that I felt call. In what I found coming out of my mouth was. You can't kill me. You can destroy this body that I'm in, but I will be fine. He knew that he said I knew it. Because I'm not this body..

Sue family physician Shadwick Ryan South Africa secretary Bill
"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

Humans Rising Podcast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

"That, your intellect while it's tool is not the source of your wisdom. Exactly. You know in many people have pointed this direction is not like said was the first one point in that direction you know Einstein said the intuitive mind which another way of pointing to wisdom right the intuitive mind is a sacred gift. The Rational Analytical Mind It's faithful servant. However. He said we have created a society. An honors the servant. and has forgotten gift. Wow..

Einstein
"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

Humans Rising Podcast

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

"Had been taught whether they were really true since I knew that there were people all over the world that were as children were being given a starter kit and Everybody starter kit was different and everybody thought I was told that the starter kit they were receiving was the. True Starter Kit. Do you know what? I mean when I say that I do like it this is the truth. This is how it is. This is the truth you know and I talk with a man really really like him a lot. He's he's from the Middle East from Kuwait and he told me one day that he was MBA. And I thought MBA. You know I think masters in Business Administration he said, no, he said I'm Muslim by accident. And I thought well, that's really interesting because I've got good friends. I was Catholic by accident I have friends that are Baptist by accident, and I have friends from India, clients and friends than their Hindu by accident and Orthodox Jewish people that are Jewish by accident and every one of us it's fun when you get people. To, talk about what they were told when they were little about the other people. In you know. I've recently gotten really interested in Joseph Cambell to and in Joseph Cambell defined religious myth as other other people's religions. Are are myths. So. So there I was I was doing the best I knew how and I had failed in my marriage in partially good part to do to my own immaturity and my own lack of consciousness and lack of understanding and living in a constant state of. Stress to where I often had to run forty fifty miles a week just to deal with the stress that I was creating and and and did other things that were were it made our marriage. Very difficult and and she was a wonderful person and so there I was in California. Feeling like a failure I had two small children than I..

Joseph Cambell Middle East Kuwait Business Administration California India
"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

Humans Rising Podcast

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Humans Rising Podcast

"Okay So welcome to humans rising where we have conversations that as consciousness and expand your awareness of who you are. So he can have more good days and I'm so excited that today with me is Dr Bill Pettit a retired psychiatrist who has been doing some amazing work and I can tell you how I met Dr Petted he was referred to me actually about a year and a half ago, and we my daughters my two teenage daughters and I had a session with Dr Pettit. And the Truth and the understandings that he shared with us were really transformational. So I am so excited to bring him. and His wisdom to you. So welcome Dr Pettit. So happy to have you with me today. Well. It's I'm glad to be here caprice and I, I'm fine with bill whatever doctors is fine. But if I'm fine with bill, know that. Kid. Well. So I was first of all, really excited to have you work with me my daughter's because. They are naturally quite skeptical. And to me it was important that you had a you know a a very long profession. As you know as an empty is a psychiatrist and had really changed your approach to mental health and so when I see just the sky rocketing levels of anxiety and stress and depression and suicide I feel like maybe were Haina heading in the wrong direction. So we would you really share your story of how you came to while I, choose psychiatry and then, and how did your your work and your understanding of mental health evolve. I'm really glad to do that. it. It really did It it really changed you know in. Nineteen eighty three April fool's Day nineteen eighty-three but but I but I kinda jump ahead You know. I I was like I think most of us I was you I was looking to. To find peace of mind. And and to live. In a daily basis where I wasn't. In reaction to life's challenges as much as I was, it seemed like I was. Constantly, In reaction to things in often tell people I used to have sometimes up to six to ten hissy fits today. In, response to things. And it was clear to me for the first forty one years of my life. That those hissy fits were being caused by things.

Dr Bill Pettit Dr Petted Haina depression
Cardinals-Brewers game off after positive COVID tests

Dan Barreiro

01:25 min | 2 years ago

Cardinals-Brewers game off after positive COVID tests

"Everybody's being tested today. Psychologically emotionally, and for covid nineteen that's the Minnesota twins style today. Remember that the major league. Baseball. Protocol the twins at least they have three tiers of people to your one. The players coaches tier to kind of the direct support staff tier three media others. Tears one and two both tested today rapid tested today because of what's going on with the Saint Louis Cardinals a couple of cardinals tested positive for covid nineteen. There in Milwaukee are the cardinals not gonNA play tonight scheduled to play tomorrow provided. There are no more positive tasks did see that from a minute ago but the twins are going through their protocols now and that the cardinals were here and So they did some rapid testing Cleveland apparently today was their normal testing anyway. So they have all been tested as well. clubhouse disinfected. Daily Scrub down continuing elite reading from lavelle story deep clean before a new team uses it as well. So it was theoretically clean, very very well between the cardinals and Cleveland's visit but that's the deal game is scheduled to go on tonight twins looking to a rebound after last night's two zero loss it's clemenger versus Daba target field about two hours from. Now, we have no results of those tests just if they'd been administered is that correct? There's results I haven't seen anything about him, but that's that's what we know

Saint Louis Cardinals Cleveland Minnesota Baseball Lavelle Milwaukee
Certain blood type may limit risk from COVID-19, other may hurt, study suggests

Dan Barreiro

01:49 min | 2 years ago

Certain blood type may limit risk from COVID-19, other may hurt, study suggests

"My blood type is all plush, should I be extremely happy? Writes, the same emailer, a little, happy or not happy at all. He's referring to a recent report in the New England Journal of Medicine Suggesting Cove Nineteen patients with type A blood are more likely to have severe disease while those type. All were less likely. Well again it's kind of falls back into that category and it just actually wondering I'm finding. Dan is at my repeated radio. Appearances are getting more challenging pushing. It was easy in the early day, just a couple of tests, and not that much. No now there's more becoming out, but I'm staying on top of it as much as I can. This was actually what's called a genome wide association study so what they do. Do in in studies like this as they take a bunch of patients that have gotten sick in this case with cove Ed and some that have not and they or have gotten less severely ill, and they basically sequence there. They're all their DNA sequence all their genes, and then they just put it into a computer and say okay Is there anything that's associated? That falls out with patients. That got more sick. When they did this. They found that their parts of the genes that basically for your blood group had this association with pit. You know certain certain blood groups getting more ill than others We don't know yet exactly what that means. in terms of. Risk pro, you know it's a single. It's a single study so it's possible that that would help to predict, but again these are kind of relative risk. So you know that's what's challenging with. The might be their blood. Types are more susceptible to getting severely ill, but the flip side is. That doesn't mean that if you have a more more quote, Protective Blood Group that you're not, you don't have to worry about if there's nothing that has been found like that that if you have this, you're absolutely protected

Protective Blood Group New England Journal Of Medicin DAN
"dr bill" Discussed on Dan Barreiro

Dan Barreiro

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Dan Barreiro

"To Gregory? Sweden is not the garden of Eden that you want to believe that it is their stuff to discuss their their stuff to think about there but read the fine print and what you will learn that. There really are no absolutes as much as we want to believe. There absolutes across the political aisle. Whatever side of it your aunt that. It isn't exactly that simple. You gain something to give up something else as well and that includes the nation of Sweden we want to thank Dr Bill. Maurici joins us in the three o'clock hour. Today are male clinic big knocker. We gave him the week yesterday. Out of respect any animal seemed hurt by so that means she'll be back with us next week. I think that's the the moral of the story. Good stuff on some breaking news involving Mayo Clinic. And some rather unsettling data. They've come up with regarding how some of the Some of the tests have not been as reliable. Shall we say is? We'd like them to be details on that. That particular interview among other things that we discussed including plenty of vaccine conversation as well Frank Viola. We reviewed game seven nine hundred. Eighty seven world series. He pitched it he wanted. Mvp of the series. As I recall and he also reminds us of what happened after game. Four when he gave up a three run home. Run to Tom Lawless. All of fame Tom Lawlor correct and the choice. Say Post Game. Long after game conversation between Wallace's grandmother and Frankie sweet music while it is an F. absolutely fascinating anecdote. Frankie was great on everything as he generally is as. Well the Nick Sabin Mask. Psa is available on the show page. Best of PODCAST is indeed available to you as as well so many options so many choices in fact tonight following us. It'll be fan on demand. It's Thursday that means fan outdoors will follow the guest lineup. Tomorrow includes Lavelle e Neil the third. He is indeed a Friday regular will see if he thinks. There's any unseen seem to me. There's much sense of any movement regarding a financial agreement between the players and the owners the billionaires millionaires. That'll be the and I think again. Most people think it's GonNa get done just a matter of how quickly but it would be very very ironic. If what gets in the way ultimately is not necessarily the health issues that they are covered to everyone's relative satisfaction but that they can't come to terms on the on the money because the what's on the record seems to be the players will reject what is currently on the table. The question is how much wiggle room. The owners will will Will feel comfortable with or at what point will they just say? Well it's a shut the whole damn thing out in which case nobody will look particularly good. That'll be bad especially with the other sports. Getting a jump on it here. Well we think Disney disneyworld's happening hub. Cities are happy. Because you want it to happen doesn't mean it's that's what I say to my kids. We still know that I mean again. So everybody's going to be sequestered in their hotel. Are they going to be allowed to leave their hotel? I don't know that those details haven't been all the workers who are going to be doing the rooms and room service and etc. They have to stay in a hotel two or they be tested every every minute. I bet they get included in the testing. Okay you probably costs one hundred one hundred fifty dollars. A time is what we're learning. How much hundred to one hundred and fifty bucks okay? So now. We're trying to figure out how we're the colleges at WANNA play football going to pay for that this year. Who's.

Frank Viola Sweden Frankie Mayo Clinic Maurici Tom Lawlor Tom Lawless Gregory Nick Sabin Mask Mvp Dr Bill Lavelle Wallace
"dr bill" Discussed on Dan Barreiro

Dan Barreiro

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Dan Barreiro

"Today. After, good conversations early with Dr Bill Maurice. On! A number of subjects including some breaking Mayo Clinic News not particularly encouraging. About! How apparently several the antibody tests out there. Not are not very effective. At least we're trying to get to the bottom of that they are. should say Doctor I. WAS GONNA? Say Dr Frank via Louisa Use a PhD IN P starting pitching. We know that. He joined US earlier in the show. And now guards. He says he's got a great stack of Dr Dan inbox emails that we're going to get to right now. Is. You. Thank you as always to wedding day diamonds for bringing us and bringing you Dr Dan's Inbox. Thank you wedding day. DIAMONDS JJ KN DOT COM. If you'd like to get in on it, you can submit entries on Instagram you can submit enter on twitter facebook. However, you want dear Dr Damn any we got. I don't know a lot thirty. We try to get to thirty today. Is that too many I? Don't know that thirty. Might! Have Twenty I'm definitely have twenty. Wow, yeah, now. Some of them are probably. Right like we typically do okay. And what we have to from the same person, but for completely different reasons and completely unrelated, and it's so random, but I'll tell you those in a little bit. Dear Dr, Dan. Today my little cousin in Haya was informed that she is not considered essential in two thousand and twenty tomorrow I hear that my fellow Minnesotans will be having similar discussions about me Dr Dan. Will be determined that my nationally celebrated consecutive record breaking attendance will be my downfall. That what makes me the largest US gathering of my kind based on two thousand, seventeen, twenty, eighteen in two thousand nineteen attendance figures was all for nothing. Dr. Dan Minnesotan really be one of us. They do not have the opportunity to spill warm cookies in the dirt or debate the differences between a PRONTO PUP and a corn dock for the first time since nineteen forty six Dr Dan I might not be right around the corner. G Minnesota get together. S. Going to be as fair, but either works or one. State Fair s fair. Protocol.

Dr Dan Dr Frank Dr Dan I Dr Bill Maurice US Dr. Dan Minnesotan Mayo Clinic News twitter Haya Minnesota
"dr bill" Discussed on Dan Barreiro

Dan Barreiro

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Dan Barreiro

"Because. That's really what this was about last item because we've gotTA guess coming up at before four o'clock as well probably should gotten to it sooner. I'm looking at a story in the Star Tribune from I, think yesterday, Minnesota nursing homes already the site of eighty one percent of Covid, nineteen deaths continue taking infected patients. It's become a significant debate. An issue in which in fact in New York they ended up reversing their policy on this that required senior on. You know nursing home. Sorts of places to take in patients regardless of their covid nineteen status whether they've been tested on one hand. People are saying well. We don't want individuals who need a place still. To be taken care of to be refused on the other hand. There's great concern that given what a lot of studies indicate about already being overwhelmed on safety issues. At least some of these nursing homes that we are making. We've all been told that this is the most vulnerable population out there and that we're making a potentially volatile situation even worse with this. This policy which I think is continuing actually in the state of Minnesota. What what can you tell us about this? Well I it's a well. I can say is that it's it is. It's another one of these really difficult issues. That pandemic is facing us with because there's no doubt that having someone that's known covid positive. Go into a nursing home setting. Increases the risk for everyone in that care facility, and that is the age group that we know is going to be most likely to develop severe disease. The flip side is there? What other options are there? I mean there's the difficult to keep these people in the hospital for long periods of time you know there's really reflects to me a gap in the care system that and that's one of the things that Kobe is really highlighting. For us or things that we probably knew were there in terms of a healthcare, and where it needs to improve in this country but haven't been able to manage yet you know the the effect of the disease and you know the socio economically disadvantaged and people experiencing homelessness. We knew that was a group. That was you know going to be. Be Vulnerable, sure enough. It's been had much more serious effects their same for the nursing home. We've known for a long time. We need something transitional for for patients of that age at to get out of the hospital and into you know an assisted living or assisted care setting, and there's really no. There's no good place at this point for those individuals. Individuals to go when they have Cova, so we're left with some really difficult choices. Last question on this the would the numbers being as high as they are in this state and similarly high in many other states. I think is part of war. You're getting more pushback. from from people wondering whether we need as we're learning more, we need to be and we're also trying not to shut everything down to the degree. We've had that. There might be a more targeted approach in terms of who we say should stay home or who we stay say should try to stay far more segregated. Do these numbers as they've played out here? Tell you that we need to refine our thinking on that. Given that you know even guys like. Said we cannot stay sequestered to the degree. We have forever. Yeah I think it's IT IS A. I mean it's a question that's been in my own mind a lot and I think that no one would disagree that if we could have a targeted approach to that would be best, you know. A lot of people are being affected by Cova that will never get covert or whenever get seriously ill with Kobe and really impact away losing jobs other things. Mental Health included right DR Y-. Conclude mental health including which. Absolutely. Yes, so, but the problem is that I think those are much more difficult to actually do to achieve and -ality so I think we're GonNa see you know we're gonNA. Unfortunately, we'll see some movement this direction, and sometimes we'll get it right, and sometimes they won't, and that's what we're just going to have to manage your going forward. Thanks is always for the time we'll I'll tell you what we'll do now that you've. Mentioned that you were kind of felt left out last week. We'll go ahead and just say we'll call you again next week. How about that? Good I look forward to it, outstanding memorial. Day, there you go. Thanks, man I appreciate it all right take. Care Doctor Bill Maurice Mayo Clinic our Mayo Clinic Big Knocker, speaking of big knockers. Does it get any bigger than Frankie. Sweet Music Viola with everything on the line game. Seven nineteen eighty seven world series game is kind of in back in the news a little bit locally because Fox sports north replayed it a couple of nights ago Frankie watched it. What did he noticed this time that he didn't? As the guy who pitched brilliantly in game seven. was even was he ever off himself? As he watched him dominate through eight innings. We'll find out. Doctrines.

Minnesota Cova Frankie Kobe Star Tribune Mental Health New York Maurice Mayo Clinic Fox Mayo Clinic
"dr bill" Discussed on Beach Talk Radio

Beach Talk Radio

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Beach Talk Radio

"To a concert unless it's free because parking thirty dollars thirty dollars too far the beverages and the food like thirty dollars to park but thirty I mean twenty. That was pushing it by thirty. And you know what no cash you can only pay by credit card right well. They don't want to be messing with cash. They don't want to be getting no. That's because the parking lot of probably still in money but they might be getting roles for their money. Please nothing like that ever ever happen in Miami. I was really cracking John Up last night. Really yes talking about talking about 'cause you go to bed so early and and I was saying I wish our daughter was back because you go to bed at six o'clock at night so every night I'm eating dinner. I'm all alone so I said I need a nighttime daytime husband because I have daytime husband so I needed interested. It was quite funny. I didn't even like a friend. Not really like a platonic sure husband. Whatever whatever you said evenings that can do stuff around the house? 'cause not your strong suit Zari. Sorry sorry what's up here. Your sister called me the other day to ask. If we had a ratchet extension and I said well I'm not at home. Why don't you have your brother check? The graduates is like you know. This is as we've gone without you complaining that we've gone too long. So Oh wow look at that right. There was one other thing I wanted to bring bring up but I completely completely lost my mind. Oh after you said the The husband thing does that mean that your wife sitting two or does that. Good Luck yes you can. Let's see if you can find somebody. You need a daytime throwing out their daytime. Yes please please. Somebody take some of this. Awesome Ashley this is such a heavy burden. Hey no I did want to thank Dr Bill for coming on and really you know reaching out to people if you know somebody that would do the farm via friendly farmer or to please consider donating to his project. Because it's not going to get done if he's he's going to have to wait on government funding and you know it would move it along a lot quicker we would get the water quality back up. Ah You're so negative about water polity until until you have some d dreaded disease and then you're going to be all like along the plankton. I got a bottomless feet. So the last thing I wanted to say was last night at the dinner with John and Debbie. Something strange happened. He said did he. Thought I was a cross between Kevin Kevin. What's his name? Kevin James from what was that. I think it's King and Queen King of Queens and so that's like isn't less than dead now or he's like ninety years old friend in the UK are RPM Cincinnati. Turkey draw no and then Kevin James is like he's like three hundred pounds. He's a big fat dude. Hey I mean it's not trill. Oh come on. He's he's a little on the hefty side. If so I think we're going to keep doing Friday night conversation thing I haven't. I'm having some fun as long as you're had anybody that you'd like us to interview of just sending some suggestions to the Senate to the suggestion box at beach. Talk Radio DOT COM. I just made that up doesn't exist by about an hour. One has my phone number. So that's right. Yeah so thank you all so much for listening and good luck to all the candidates next week forest Kritzinger will be on. He's going to a a nine thirty he's our last candidate and the crew. They are going to have. Oh by the way Robert Brandt never got. He does do not vote for him zero volts. Because 'cause if you don't come on our show not worth anything and you know he's against TPI and he's part of that whole conduct ears clan so you want to vote no for him. And so far as Chris will be on and we will see you on the facebook and an hanging around in the community and you know with our. We don't do that holiday holiday. It's like a Halloween holiday. We passed so thank you everybody and we love you all and have a great holiday season and on Josh..

Kevin James John Robert Brandt Kevin Kevin Miami facebook Dr Bill Ashley Turkey Senate Josh Chris Queen King Queens TPI Cincinnati UK Debbie
"dr bill" Discussed on Beach Talk Radio

Beach Talk Radio

12:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr bill" Discussed on Beach Talk Radio

"It's time out table. twenty-three where we usually are but we're inside. A for a couple of reasons were inside. Because it's a little bit chilly. It's it's starting to warm up. We also so no. It's going to be crowded because it season and we WANNA make sure that Terry makes a lot of money today and the other thing is we don't care and you make some money and the other thing. Is this construction going on outside side which we'll talk about. It's not the town's construction now. It's Lee County construction so a big thank you. All our sponsors Pete's timeout. FM Designs and remodeling remodeling shuckers at the Gulf Gulf Gulf core and cottage bar or the Gulf shore and cottage bar and Fort Myers tiki tours and stay tuned all morning long long because we will be having more giveaways we are giving away two tickets to the J Kylie show at the Gulf shore cottage bar and we also have tickets to give away okay to the Fort Myers tiki tours so stay tuned for all our first guest. This morning is Dr Bill. Mitch Doc. Thanks for coming on. We appreciate your time. Always come here and you are a big advocate of the water and Dhaka's been very involved in water quality issues. He's a professor now. You correct me if I get this this wrong in any way a professor and eminent scholar. Which makes you a big frigging deal at the everglades wetland research park? FTC YOU NAPLES. Is that correct. That is correct. Thank you and this is the second time you've been on the show the first time you actually drove your car through Times Square because for some reason the blocking being poll wasn't up there and you just decide you're GonNa Park right here which was interesting but this time you're you're part fine and you're ready to rock and roll and when you have a big event coming up coming up talking about the water so that's about well we're GONNA have a workshop down in my lab. We have a big auditorium in Naples Naples Botanical Garden and it's going to be a a workshop on wetlands and how they can clean up water and they are the natural tro solution to all these problems that we have a water quality of people. Just put a bunch of wetlands back. And that's GONNA be coming up pretty soon February. Twenty first twenty twenty. I guess it's a to the all we didn't want to have people sitting for six hours so he wrote over two evenings and it's going to be six to nine down at the Naples area area and there's a is it a thirty dollar cost for both nights. A thirty dollars is is the only night yes all right and and so what are you guys going to be talking about down that well we've been studying different ways of Recreating Wetlands and agricultural landscape to take advantage each of their ability to clean up water. But at the same time. We don't WanNa penalize the farmers so what we're trying to develop as a business model. We're we're farmers get paid to clean up water. Just as if they were growing killer in fact we think we can make it very competitive with crops and and so is that. Can you explain to us. What is a wetland culture? Well that's that's a term that we coined the combination of wetlands plus agriculture. Sure so it would be a landscape that would have both systems and you would use the wetlands to take the pollution out of the water in the landscaped. And then you flip the land. I use flip not rotate flip the land to agriculture my plug and basically they agriculture coster then uses the nutrients that the wetland captured and we don't have to add more fertilizer. That's the whole point off this opium so the so the I'm the wetland would would capture in in the soil of the wetland captured the phosphorus. And then you would flip it. And then the agriculture cirque Lord drop the water levels also and then of course you can plant crops like corner sugar or whatever and then they can use the existing enriched soil rather than dump more. So what we're doing with recycling and therefore you don't have to add more fertilizer. Now we have experiments going both in Ohio and Florida on this. It seems to be working for the first phase. The wetland does capture the nutrients. So we're GONNA flip some of our experiments and next year or two and and see if we plant seeds or sugar or whatever and see if it grows. Doesn't we'll wait two more years and see if it works again back now. You mentioned Ohio so this this conference that you're doing in February it it's a similar one or it's the same one that was done recently. Deadly in Ohio is that we've received the I'm up in Ohio in the summer and we received National Science Foundation grant to run this conference so we ran it. Well everybody loved it and so on. But it's a great model for us us down here. So we're basically copying the same speakers speakers and so on and that model was for Lake Erie up there because they have okay but it was run by us after we had leadership and and and we talked about wetlands all over the world or I'm sorry harmful Algal blooms all over the world so really generic but but down here we went besides the problems in Florida Boorda right but the the there are some similarities between the Algal blooms there and oh here in lake show. It's the same tame problem all right so I was doing a little bit of research and can you explain a little bit when they talk about. What's legacy phosphorous risk? That term is often used to explain when you put fertilizer on the land year after year after year after year it just builds up in the soil. It's the legacy it's it's it's not used or it's there's so much fertilizer in our agriculture landscapes. We could run. They could probably plant for ten years without fertilizer wiser. But but no. That's the legacy it's they're stuck and we gotta get that down. That's the that's the bulk of the problem that we just have applauded looted landscape and so the wetlands are going to be one of the only solution to the water the solutions to act as a natural natural filtration right and get it out and so the idea is threefold to be able to grow crops be able to and they would be ecological ups. They could probably charge more money if they said they did it. By what to Have a lot better water quality downstream in the wetlands and then to reward the farmers for or taking the pollution out of water. We warned them for growing corn now at the they come at the workshop. Are they going to be talking about any of the other kinds of solutions. That not so much they they get a lot of coverage I mean they're called best management practices okay We're we're wetland people you know our motives are twofold number one. We weren't clean water but number two we've lost by some counts. Eighty seven seven percent of the world so it leads. Eighty seven percent are gone and and I'd like to put a few back so this is also to increase our wetlands in the landscape. All right deer run through the roster of some of the speakers at. You're going to have well. He's going to be there right. CIANCI GOSSIP GOSSIP GONNA come as in the welcoming session So I've got several people Involved in that and then I got You don't have memorize memorize sorry. Well there's some of the names of the big big Jiang my graduates. Two of the five speakers bakers are formerly eastern mind. That will be graduating this year at the like we should show them off. Yeah Loren Loren Griffith Birth Orthographic. She's one of my graduate students. And then we have a speaker from Notre Dame University of Notre Dame who has working with us on this business model. He's in the breath business school at Notre Dame and the interest coach very exciting ideas about how how we can reward reward. If that's the right term farmers take incentivize. Yeah now have have farmers. Have there been farmers who are industries that have shown an interest in this as of yet or is is it yeah. It's not a finished product on the biology and chemistry. Now that's getting. We're getting good numbers. Now we gotta develop the business model. But we've had the people say where I sign up and we're GONNA have a mental bond so people could invest and they're not going to get rich but they could get a couple of percent return on investment So that's the idea of Ramayana bond and some of the money will flow to the farm and the other money will flow to whoever's building the wetlands. Would you say that the water quality has improved since the new governor came on board. I don't think they've had been able to put any projects in in yet. I mean this is too early but I know that the governor is very interested in supporting some projects. In fact. I think we're going to get one or not not for this culture of more traditional I guess you'd say destruction of algae projects you know taking the symptoms but the symptoms are not what we do. We need to deal with 'cause ause the saturated nutrients nitrogen phosphorus MHM nitrogen. So the problem for red tide and phosphorus is more for the blue-green algae in freshwater. So why is it that the state so opposed to To eliminating roundup. That's yeah that's interesting that was on CNN yesterday a day. And that's how I one of my quotes in there. I don't watch CNN. So I didn't see your quote but the answer to that what is it. It's just the way they they do things for so long. They've used chemicals. Poisons gone to kill the plants and animals and stuff they don't like and Ed we're finding out that's a bigger. They use chemicals to kill animals. They don't like wow where the stuff that they're using the handley skirt round up at animals that not necessarily other there are chemicals. You get rid of fishy. Don't like and things like that that's been done Um but no we're talking about poison. Choose to kill plants herbicide. I don't people just get on their hands and knees and pull the weeds out. I don't know I mean wouldn't that be a safer for the environment but because it's so easy to score. Yeah you're in your driveway or in a Ah I just think it's better for the environment to get on your. I mean it's good exercise in you. There's the back sometimes. That's one other option. Are there any other her options. Vinegar things no not really. There's a reason those quote weeds and the some of them are not weeds. They're just opportunistic. Plants come into sites and the reason is we've all these nutrients and so it's a these. Two problems are very much connected if you want if you want a landscape beautiful rushes and grasses and so unlike everglades so you better get the nutrients out what is an algae bloom can you define. It's just the overgrowth of algae is always the water especially in the ocean on this. It's called plankton throats there. You don't see it. 'cause it's not very high concentration the plankton. The stuff that gets stuck on the boats to I guess slippery well sticks to the bottom of the boat that that maybe plankton but it's probably high concentrations what about stuck to the the bottom of a dock on a lake like. Is that plankton. Like if you call me because you know what happened once. I was in a triathlon and I started to panic and I thought it was in drown. I was in the middle of a lake and so I just quit. I just quit. I started swimming to the right toward the weeds and I saw dock and I tried to climb up the dock but my legs. My my feet were slipping on the bottom of. I think there was plankton or something. It's probably it's called benthic algae or attached out of you. Oh Wow so. That's probably why the bottom of my seat is so the way they are now. So how far away do you think this is to be putting in place how. How Art on the road? Well are we.

Ohio Gulf Gulf Gulf professor everglades wetland research pa CNN Fort Myers Lee County Gulf Naples Naples Botanical Garden Naples GonNa Park Notre Dame University of Notre Mitch Doc Dr Bill Terry Pete Notre Dame Dhaka Lake Erie opium
How Teladoc Health Approaches Clinical Quality, Meets Hospital Virtual Care Needs

The Voice of Healthcare

11:30 min | 2 years ago

How Teladoc Health Approaches Clinical Quality, Meets Hospital Virtual Care Needs

"So recently I came across an article On Talladega with the title. What's not to love about being in virtual healthcare? Maybe you can comment a little bit about the experience that you hope to create for patients as well as what safety and quality measurements. Do you as a clinician hoped to focus on through tele doc solution so I do believe that just like ten or twenty years ago when folks began exploring what it meant to be Devoting one's career to hospital medicine and we had that growing growing definition of the hospitalised. Actually the physician that coined that phrase Dr Bob Wachter WHO's the current chair? Uh of the Department of Medicine that. UCSF recently joined our medical advisory board. But I do believe that There will be in the years ahead. A growing field of medicine known as virtual care and that we will have virtual lists and virtual lists will have outstanding upstanding website manner if you will that ability to connect with patients and a highly personal way and then be able to offer that that individual a whole range of services. meaning that if that person for instance needs an expert medical opinion that virtuous can achieve that or if they need a type of referral to some type of specific expertise again the virtuous can care for that individual increasingly from our clients were getting Strong interest in virtual primary care. You're so this is an area that we believe is very ripe for development right now So no longer. Does it mean that your interaction with your virtual doctor is that episodic interaction but increasingly I do believe that there's a number of individuals who have a variety of chronic conditions diabetes hypercholesterolemia hypertension that really lend themselves into a longitudinal relationship with a clinical care team. And all of this can be done. Virtually what about quality and safety. What are you looking for? What are you tracking with these teams until talk solution so we believe that At the end of the day clinical quality is really what differentiates health In the market today and so we take clinical quality. Quite quite seriously actually Dr Bill Frist is On our board of directors electors and he tears up our quality and safety subcommittee and I would say that my job is a pretty easy job because when coming to that committee and having various ideas in terms of how we can move the quality needle I feel as though the quality and safety committee at CAL is a highly receptive audience for initiatives in these areas. So what are the some of these initiatives one. Our current General Medicine Program does see a tremendous amount of individuals who are suffering from upper respiratory illnesses. As you know there's a ramp's over prescribing of antibiotics And one initiative that. We've been very very focused on is antibiotic antibiotic stewardship. We're very happy to report that. We're currently working on a ARC grant With some researchers from the University of southern in California. Just around antibiotic stewardship. We do believe that we're currently tracking a bit better than brick and mortar in terms of Not Not over prescribing antibiotics. And yet we also feel so there's always room to grow We also feel as though there's ED overuse of steroids Being utilized for individuals who have a variety of upper respiratory complaints so using I using steroids indiscriminately is obviously not good for the patient. So this is another parameter that we're very carefully monitoring and then as you might imagine we look very carefully at our providers NPS scores that member satisfaction. We look at complaint rates. We look at visit time. We look at visit volume And ultimately what we have created for. Our clinicians is a dashboard. Because we do believe getting feedback on how you doing and how you're doing relative to your peers is a very important way that we can dr clinical quality On our expert medical services. We have a whole host of parameters that were routinely ainley tracking changes in diagnosis changes in treatment again. The member satisfaction being the hallmark of We're really trying to deliver care that is meaningful to the individual at the time that they're reaching out for care from Talbot Health. I Love Love The web side Care and As you as you mentioned when you were speaking about the virtual health care physician and I've never heard that before. I believe a lot of our listeners. When they hear virtual healthcare they are going to think that? There's this additional technologies in play other than what is at the normal Brick and mortar clinicians office. If you will could you discuss with us a little little bit about the technology you all are using that help. Sure so I I. I'd say that at its simplest. We really really feel as though we want technology to be deployed in a way that enhances coulda call quality so We do have the capabilities to integrate With Taito care for instance which is a way that one can Listen to someone's chest and look at their ear But we don't want these to be GATING obstacles So if the issue of the individual can be resolved with a simple phone call. Aw We will do that If the individual requires a video consultation. Of course we do that. With a high degree of frequency We also are always looking for digital therapeutics and other ways as in which we can deploy technology to enhance clinical quality. But it's not the other way around so we're not looking to just put if if you will sizzle into our program through integrating devices and technologies. That at the in the end result are not meaningful meaningful in terms of driving meaningful clinical outcomes. That's great so we're we're not adding tech just to have more technology and play. I I think I think we can all appreciate that. You mentioned that one of the largest growing areas is primary care and chronic diseases which is so important A lot of times a diabetic doesn't necessarily need to go in to see the clinician in person every week or every month month. So when I if I'm a diabetic do I have the same doctor each time or do I simply have tele doc health physician each time when I reach out to them. Right so Again we are just beginning to dip our toe if you will into the waters of virtual primary care but I think it is all centered around an individual's care team so it would be a physician. It would be some type of advanced practice. Clinicians being a nurse practitioner or physician assistant would be a medical assistant. And this would be the care team team that would be connected with the individual Seeking care. But it wouldn't be the general network work of general medicine providers. We really feel as though that personal care team will be key In terms of the success of the program. Yeah Lou I think That's a great point. I I like to highlight care team management and personalized. Care as much as I can. I think I think The clinicians that I've worked with over the years in the literature allstate that the healing process and maintaining wellness health. I come from a community so creating that upfront. And being part of the plan is huge no matter how high tech the solution might be a little bit of if you can you had. Yeah right I mean obviously I don't think either one of you on this call would disagree with that. I'm pretty sure our listeners would applaud that as well Not I tonight one point that I did want to make. Is that what we're trying to create in terms of our virtual primary care offering is much more than Instead of seeing me in the office on Brooklyn Avenue we can have a skype call and We can resolve your issue without you needing to come in and park and go through all that inconvenience. I do believe leave. That virtual primary care can achieve a higher level of clinical outcome through the successful deployment of Data analytics so that this program can be specifically targeted to individuals that we know we'll take full advantage digital therapeutics remote patient monitoring a I a lot of other resources that that frankly are not available to the general internist practicing in the office setting so that if one can if you will not only be prescribing medications but also be prescribing digital tools. That will help drive the the individual to a greater state of wellness. I think you can begin to see. How virtual care can in some instances exceed what is traditionally unle available through your routine? Hi Mary Care in a brick and mortar setting.

Mary Care Department Of Medicine Dr Bob Wachter Dr Bill Frist Ucsf Advisory Board Talbot Health Hypercholesterolemia Allstate Patient Monitoring California University Of Southern CAL Lou I
Preparing for Flu Season 2018/2019

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03:49 min | 4 years ago

Preparing for Flu Season 2018/2019

"The CDC the twenty seventeen and eighteen flu season was notable for the record breaking levels of flu illness and hospitalization rates throughout the country, tragically there were also one hundred eighty flu related pediatric deaths. Reminder of just how serious flu can be as the new flu season approaches time for a review on how best to protect ourselves. We're joined by Dr Bill Shatner, infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt medical center in Nashville working with the CDC doctor. What should we know? Gordon? There's going to be a flu season. That's the important thing. We should all know more severe less severe. But it will be here who is nasty, which means the bow is the time to get vaccinated. Let's all rolled up our sleeves the recommendations are so simple. We don't have to think about them. If you're older than six months of age. Yep. You're eligible for vaccination. We should get vaccinated to protect ourselves as well. As everybody around us. You don't want spread the virus? This nasty virus to anybody at work. In your family at home in your house of worship, don't be graded spreader. Get vaccinated. How difficult is it to create the correct vaccines? These days where we have lots of options, there's the standard flu vaccine. And then for people aged sixty five and older. This is important because they get the more serious complications actually to vaccines. That are licensed, especially for them. One is called simply dose, and the other has a fancy name called the agitators seen that just means there's an immune stimulant in it pharmacies. And doctors offices almost all have one or the other. And that's great for people aged sixty five and older and Medicare will pay for it. You don't have to worry about that. Do vaccines. Make it more difficult to battle the flu strains. Vaccines. Don't make it more difficult. In fact, they are the single best thing we have available to combat the flu. And we wanna particularly emphasize people age sixty five and older those younger than age sixty five we have an underlying illness such as diabetes lung disease, heart disease, or even a compromised and a special shout out to women who are pregnant back flu vaccine is safe. Protects the pregnant woman. You're pregnant when they get to have a very high rate of complications. And we don't want that. And then there's a bonus the protection they make actually passes across the percentage gets into the newborn baby provides protection to that new baby after it's born. Well, so that's a bonus. Yeah. We're speaking with Dr Bill Schefter, infectious diseases specialist at Vanderbilt medical center in Nashville the working with the CDC as we head into flu season with some tips on preventing flu any read on what these this season is going to be like a worse than last year. Not as bad. The read is that there will be a flu season. Crystal ball is cloudy. That's why we just say let's get vaccinated each and every year don't drink. Don't try to interstate is going to be a bad wasn't one. Just go ahead and get vaccinated. That's the best protection that vaccine will protect against any number of different influenza viral strains with a three or four the vaccine vary. Get the one that's in your doctor's office or that the pharmacist recommend.

Flu Vaccine FLU CDC Vanderbilt Medical Center Dr Bill Shatner Nashville Gordon Dr Bill Schefter Stimulant Medicare Six Months