18 Burst results for "Dr Benjamin Rush"

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"Was not born to wealth. He was a farmer's son. He was superbly well educated. You went to Princeton and then to the University of Edinburgh Medical School, which was the best medical school in the world. At the time, he finished his studies in London, where Benjamin Franklin introduced him to England's most distinguished thinkers and scientists. Although he treated Philadelphia's rich and famous, he spent most of his time treating the poor even African Americans. First Caucasian doctor in America to do so. And you're listening to Harlow Giles Hunger tell the story of Dr Benjamin Rush, and I thought I knew quite a bit about rush, but that medical unit field Unit and his invention of the idea of a medical corps. I had no idea that this was his way of volunteering in our fight against the British was to be on the battlefield, caring her wounded soldiers, and then he invented it essentially invented. Medics and medics in the army. What an idea what a revolutionary on so many fronts from the abolition movement, the women's suffrage and more this remarkable story one. They're not teaching through certain in schools across this country. The story of Dr Benjamin Rush continues here on our American stories. Mhm. Hi. Hello. Hi..

Benjamin Franklin London America Harlow Giles Hunger University of Edinburgh Medica Philadelphia First Caucasian England Benjamin Rush African Americans Princeton Dr British American
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"His signature on the Declaration of Independence comes immediately before that other famous Benjamin and that, of course, would be Benjamin Franklin. Russia was one of the men who encouraged Thomas Paine to write common sense, and his impact on the founding is much more broad. The fruits of Russia's underlying faith is the story, though, that we're about to hear from a prolific founding fathers biographer Harlow Giles Hunger. Harlow is a New York Times best selling author of 28 books, including Dr Benjamin Rush, The founding father were healed Wounded Nation. Is also a former distinguished visiting fellow in American history at George Washington's Mount Vernon. Let's take a listen Dr Benjamin Rush was one of the most important of our founding fathers. In many ways, the most important George Washington was unquestionably the father of our political and military structure, and Alexander Hamilton father to our economic structure. But it was Dr Benjamin Rush, who fathered our social structure. He was the only doctor with the medical school degree who signed the declaration of Independence and with his signature. He began a lifelong struggle for abolition of slavery for women's rights. For a ban on child labour. He fought for establishment of universal free public education. He was first to.

Thomas Paine Alexander Hamilton Benjamin Franklin 28 books Harlow Giles Hunger Benjamin New York Times Harlow Benjamin Rush one Mount Vernon George Washington first the men American Russia most Declaration of Independence
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:01 min | 7 months ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of the United States If we can find him out there, Mr Jefferson, are you there? Calling TJ Yes, I'm here. Mother. Cello. How are you, sir? I'm good. Happy birthday. No, wait. When were you born Thomas Jefferson. Was born on April 13th according to the new calendar, April 2nd according to the old one, So this was 17 43, so a couple of months from now Don't know if you'll be able to answer this question. But one of our mega pros trivia questions for presidential trivia today is two presidents died on the fourth of July. And no one actually, three did. But you only have to name two Can you name Two of the three presidents who died on the fourth of July. I'm one of them. Of course with the other two are James Monroe and John Adams. Nicely done, sir. Nicely done. Uh, is that old story? True that Adams wanted to beat you to the finish or no, he wanted to live longer than you. Is that how the story goes. Well, it's not even clear what he said. But my last words on the fourth of July. Where is it the fourth I had been moving in and out of a coma for several days. Then, about five hours later up in Massachusetts, John Adams died at the age of 91. His last words were Thomas Jefferson still survives. What tone he was using. I don't know. Oh, In other words, was he asking or was he damming the fact that you outlasted him? You know, it's it's tempting to think that it was envy because he was envious of all of the other founding fathers, especially George Washington, but it may have just have been. Our friendship had been restored by Long syriza of wonderful letters that we exchanged. Perhaps he just was musing that after all, this, his younger companion from the Declaration of Independence was still alive somewhere. Didn't he not want the fourth of July to be the date of our independence anyway? Yes, he thought it should be the second of July because that's the date that the second Continental Congress actually declared independence. That was when the resolution was finally passed. And then two days later. My declaration of independence was unanimously adopted, and that became the date. But Adams had written a letter to his wife, Abigail, saying From now on through all of human history, the second of joy, I will be a day of fireworks and orations of parades and speeches and festivals. So he was right about the celebration. Just wrong about the date you and I have Ah, date scheduled. I don't know if you know this, but we're going to invite you back to Chicago to appear on stage with me and hopefully we can do this. But we're hoping that the Saturday of Halloween weekend so not until October, but hopefully you and I can share a stage and talk to people in October of this year. The yellow fever epidemic will be over by them. I think it's ah, not not a bad idea to remind people that while this pandemic seems extraordinary In fact, you told us once upon a time that the founding fathers went through something very much like this, right? Much, much worse Search. Although more localized in 17 93, the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, where the government of the United States was then stationed carried off one in 10 people, You know, I think your mortality rate is under one. Percent mortality rate of the yellow fever epidemic was one in 10. So 5000 people in Philadelphia died in spite of all the work that Dr Benjamin Rush did to try to save them. Or was he the Fauci of your day? It's that the after that would cause he he Woz. Although he didn't have your phone cheese expertise. We were still in the dark. We didn't understand virus. We didn't understand germs. We didn't really even understand how infectious Diseases work. Hey, was a brilliant man and certainly gave his best energies to try to make people better or at least too, Palley eight. Their conditions, but he was sort of knocking at the door. Maybe it had something to do with the mosquito, but he never quite reached that conclusion. Did they tell you guys to her face mask then? Yes, we did All the right things. You know. All societies dating back to the great plague of ancient Athens of the fifth century BC have effectively used the same techniques social distancing, although he didn't use that term masks. The ending of shaking of hands quarantining in one form or another in Philadelphia. The houses that were especially infected would have a read. Cross actually painted on their front door as a sign for others to stay away. It's President's Day. So I thought maybe you could give our listener a hand. We have one of our callers on the line, and we're going to ask a serious of presidential trivia questions. And maybe you could give them an assist. Is that okay with you, Mr Jefferson? Well, I was hoping to win. And then maybe you would pay off the depths that I haven't Monticello. But yes, I will assist. How much when you died. Were you in debt to how much? How much did you Whoa? By our currency $104,000, which would be about eight million in yours. Should have written a book, man. You come out with a book boom. Barack Obama, Donald Trump any of them Bill Clinton. They get $8 million just for signing the deal. Gentleman would not do such a thing. I printed a book My my own book notes on the state of Virginia. But I would not have published it because, ah gentlemen, is certainly no former president would would debase himself by publishing for profit. I think of the stories you could have told. I mean, think of the question marks that hangover Thomas Jefferson, if you would have dished Wow, that that thing would have. You would have sold a lot of copies, sir. I don't know what this means. For me. That means putting a plate of peas in front of a non erred. Guests. Not what it means. Now, let's talk to Tracy. You're on W g and Tracy. Good morning. How are you? I'm fine, John. How are you? Good. Thanks for listening to this. Thomas Jefferson's on a phone line. Say hello to the third president of the United States. Tracy Hello, President Jefferson. Tracy. I would not have called you by your first name during my lifetime. So I'm gonna call you, Mrs Tracy. That's fine. Really, that was a matter of decorum. We would never under any circumstance. Talk about a woman by her first name, not not even Mrs Jefferson. Wow, Wait till you see our ankles. Okay, Let's go with question number one, which president was the first born in the United States? Was it the first president Washington? Was it the fifth president? I don't expect you to know who that is. Or was it the eighth president, which was the first president to be born in the United States? Our first our fifth or our eighth? Tracy? What do you think? I believe it was George Washington. Mr Jefferson. Do you have any advice for her on that? Well, this may be a trick question, because it depends on what you mean by the United States. We didn't become a nation until July for 7 76. I was alive. George Washington was alive. James Madison was alive. James Monroe was alive. I'm guessing this kind of move of the eight because that would be a boring after our birth certificate. That is correct. All of those who were born in colonies you got to get to Martin Van Buren, the eighth president before you had one born in the United States. Not in the colonies. Who was a trick question, Tracy. Sorry about that. Yeah, that's okay. You're still get your strength. We're not done yet. Hold on name name. The four named the four presidents on Mount Rushmore. Tracy. Everything's been going. Roosevelt. Yes, Leikin? Yes..

James Monroe Barack Obama George Washington Thomas Jefferson John Adams Donald Trump John Bill Clinton Abigail Tracy James Madison $8 million Philadelphia Massachusetts April 13th April 2nd 5000 people Adams 17 93 fourth of July
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:41 min | 7 months ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Back with you on this Friday night on 7 20, WGN. We're talking to Roger. Banish. We pulled him out of bed. Time. Hush, of course, on the other side of the glass over here. We're talking about the streets of Chicago. How they got their names. Roger. You've got some really deep insight on how lakeshore drive kind of stand Good. Well, lakeshore drives goes across its along the lake. Okay, Great. That's it. That's all we need. All right, Uh, have you ever been driving on Lakeshore drive when that song came on the radio? Blizzard. Have you ever had that weird odd thing happened? You know when I might have turned it on, But I don't think it came on while I was driving, But it's a very interesting Yeah, it happened. Only once. Did it really Was that the blizzard when you were there for five hours while the car died after 2.5 gonna listen to music through seeing out the window, But it happened once I was heading, believe it or not. In the north side from out where it starts in Hollywood and heading down into downtown, and I was listening to music out of nowhere. It came out. That's cool. That's cool is great. Have you ever driven the entire length of lakeshore drive? I have not have you Yes. No. OK, back when I worked down at Chicago Vocational career Academy is a teacher. I before I ever got to the school to teach. I drove all the way as far south as I could get. On the drive and just to see the area to see where watch. Yeah, that's cool. Very cool. Yeah, sure. I like that. I like that. Tom's got one on Clinton Street once you sure That was so So the point Dexter's over at the textbook factories. They'll tell you that Clinton Street honors DeWitt Clinton, the 19th, century mayor of New York, who was responsible for the Erie Canal. Project that hugely aided the commercial growth of Chicago. That's that's a textbook people. Here's Here's the real scoop. Here's the down and dirty from the streets of Chicago. It's actually named after George Clinton, leader of Parliament Funkadelic. Oh, for his contributions to music, and that's That's the God's honest truth. That's the real story. That's the real story. Just pretty funky. Exactly. Clayborn was taking his name from early Chicago settler. Archibald Clive, born hey, was also the Archie Cli born was also the Chicago's first constable Damon and I like this one, Damon was honoring Catholic priest father Arnold Damone was born in Holland and 18 15. After studying in ST Louis, moved to Chicago in 18 57 founded Holy Family Church and ST Ignatius. High school, and he died in 18 90. But it took like 30 years to rename the street after him, which was then called called Robie Street, and I know there's a Roby Hotel on Damon and North, so there's There's gotta be something behind grow be, too, and there's there's a big statue, Father Damon over at loyal university. That's cool. Yeah, it's really, really, that's very cool. I love Grand Avenue. Because it's grant Howard Pontiac is our man. Is it still, that's what I love it. That's another Is, I don't think so again. That's another show that I don't think they make Pontiacs anymore. That would be that would be the bigger issue here is he's talking about cars that have been discontinued. Um, maybe the insults be made there. Roger. Well, A lot of people got upset that Howard Pontiac isn't there anymore, And they went with the old name of the street Whiskey Point Road. Very upset they took to drink. But the road was named Grand Avenue formally was key Point Road allegedly takes its name from quote by Chicago's first Town president, not mayor, but town President, Colonel Thomas Jefferson Vance Owen, who was said to have called the city of Grand Place, Huh? Nice. Very nice. Very nice. Dearborn, Fort Dearborn, Of course, Diversity took his name from Michael Diversity. A German born Chicago businessman in the 19th century had a brewery here was the largest outside of New York that burned After the Great Chicago Fire Division and Division Street likely has its name. I don't think there's any full facts on this, but it by sex Goose Island, which lies you know, within the convergence is of the north branch of the Chicago River and a manmade channels so It's just that the street that divides that the time what about Elston? Told Elston named after Daniel Elston, a businessman who lived in Chicago in the early 18. Hundreds made made and sold soap, candles, bricks. He also served as an alderman when the city was only made of six wards, which we should get back to. Yeah, let's just scrap. Got 41 50 something. Get rid of it too much too much. Fuller 10. Fuller team was a lawyer. They came from Vermont a lot of transplants, so it's a lot of people that helped build our city, obviously, hey, was one of the first three lawyers in the city. Which was the engine that saying, I'm one of Chicago's top three lawyers. That's right. That's right. That's right. Hello. Came in third out of three. Um, uh, love to switch to one of my favorite street. Yes, sir. Right, man. Yeah. Just the Willet Kedzie Avenue. Okay. Love heads yet First I let the name It's named for John Hume Keggi, a prominent Chicago real estate developer. And if you all know, back as Chicago was starting to come the center of the Nation, the railroad hub of America and then rebuilding as it did after the great Chicago fire, he served in the state Legislature and helped found the Illinois Republican Party. No. Look at that. 19. Yeah. Died in 1903. He's in Rosedale Cemetery, which sits about nine blocks east of the street that would eventually be named for him. Now That's pretty cool. Very cool. What about Randolph Randolph was Um, named by James Thompson, one of Chicago's first city planners, and 18 30, resident of Randolph County, Illinois. So it was just a tip of the hat to him Rush during Rush Street, which is you know the you know, kind of war by the Viagra triangle over there. Takes his name for document of the years of my life. I think we all did at some point, Um Dr Benjamin Rush, a physician from Philadelphia, who was the signer of the Declaration of Independence is often considered. The father of American sex Psychiatry, which Makes sense, I guess. Yeah, why are just hanging out there? Probably for you, Sheridan Road. Now we're talking about Green Bay Road shared and rode, it say is a huge road also goes way up north in the state of Illinois along the lakefront or close to it. It's named after Philip Henry Sheridan, who gained prestige as a union general in the Civil War. He lived about 10 years in Chicago, and he worked during and after the Chicago fire, he was considered a hero. Have Chicago started rebuild. He used dynamite to demolish those busted up buildings that had been destroyed in the fire and helped cleared out the land. Um On. It also starve the fire of fuel, helping to eventually slow down the fight. That's mark the disaster. He organized Army troops keep boarding the city and protected from looters. And of course, we all know in the northern suburbs, I think just north of Highland Park. Woz.

George Clinton Daniel Elston Archibald Clive Roger Arnold Damone John Hume Keggi James Thompson Philip Henry Sheridan 1903 Clinton Street Chicago Archie Cli Philadelphia DeWitt Clinton Green Bay Road Holland Illinois Republican Party three Vermont Chicago River
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:43 min | 11 months ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Taking your working on review in the notes of what she said. Whenever it comes to counting the ballots. I think that's gonna be up in the air and And when I look at what you're saying, but I thought she was a constant chief election officials saying by eight PM if they don't receive it, that's it. Now we've seen this happen time and time again. Brothers being Legal situations back and forth over that, that if they postmark, it should've been counted or wouldn't be counted or whatever, but I believe so much saying if it's not post For today. And they don't receive it. They're not not going. I don't think we're going to take it. You sound but it Ah, I would let you finish that thought we're short of time here, but I'm going to double check on that myself. I'm mad at myself for not knowing the answer to that question. But I would understand that if it's not postmarked by today that it doesn't get counted today, that is the polls close. If you didn't vote in time, he didn't vote in time. But if they received it after today, would that vote be counted and I'm going to clarify that here in just a moment. But either way I have And I have a quote for you just took a little bit, she says, and stayed like that confident you're going to the polls on Election day. You want to make sure you have one tactical variety. If you don't you're going to Catholic Provisional ballot. She goes on to say if you already have an absentee ballot, that was thank you, Leo. You haven't returned it yet. You can return that valley. Even a drop or two. You're pulling your pole or county location on Election Day. Right. We don't know how to close to election thin about by mail. USPS has said that for you now that it could take up to a week for your ballot to be returned, And so it's still do not want that. Consider one of those in person actions to return. Now, if you're brilliant holding elections, you already have the requirement that in this state From what I understand it's going if they don't receive it on election day. I do not believe they're going to count it and I'm going to make sure but I was interviewing her. She thinks really emphasize that like if it's not received on Election Day, we're not going to count it. So if it comes in a week afterward, we're not going to take it and go out out double check with her on that, But that's gonna be the hot button issues because a lot of people think that not there. Andi. When I talk to you about political science expert, he said. That's not bury a In theory. The person should still be able to do that. But if the count is done by that day in that time They're not going to take about that comes in a week later off four days later, it's not gonna happen even if it's postmarked for Election Day. By the way, you are also reminding us that we probably won't have the last numbers from Wisconsin until maybe this time tomorrow. Who knows? OK, flat. Bolton News Nation correspondent in Milwaukee today police. It's nice to talk to you. Thank you for your time. Thank you Appreciate it. You betcha. It's 11 50. For how long does that last sound bite from Thomas Jefferson go from the other day, the one about voting during the pandemic Producer. LF we've got about two minutes here, and I think we have enough time for most of it, we are reminded that Things were a little more complicated voting this time because of the pandemic. When I talked to Thomas Jefferson, the other day, third president of the United States, I asked him if they ever had to deal with the pandemic. And this is what he said. Oh, yes, this was in 17 93. There was the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia and the government was there then this is before the government moved to to the District of Columbia and One in 10. People in Philadelphia died of yellow fever. So think of that death rate compared to the minuscule one that you are facing in your own time, and we didn't understand germ theory or viruses or Even the origins of yellow fever and malaria at the time. So the greatest physician who handled this Dr Benjamin Rush, by the way, a signer of the Declaration of Independence had to Medical methods. One was bleeding and one was purging. And neither one of them, of course, could could possibly help somebody who had yellow fever. So this was a very severe epidemic. And it was deadly in a way that I don't think any person in your time can understand to our masks. Yes. And we did We practice so I did you really? You knew all the things that humans could do. If you look back into the iconography of the ancient world in Florence during the black plague masks have been the only thing that humans have ever figured out. That can be done short of vaccines aside, remind you, John. The first vaccine came in the 17 nineties by Dr Edward Jenner of Britain, and that was a smallpox vaccine. But before that, there were no vaccines. And so pre previous to pharmacology, the the only method of resisting AH, plague of any sort was social distancing, although that term would not have been used And masks and you confined widespread use of masks in my era. Thomas Jefferson, the president of the United States, part of the Mincing Rascals podcast this week. WG on radio news than New Nation nude and not news nation than the Wintrust business. Lunch comes up next. Hey, dog. I'm sorry I'm late. There was a construction snafu on wall bash. Don't hang on. Yeah, Yeah, I'm here. No, don't Don't put me on hold again. What's going on? I've been holding for my bank since 10 o'clock this morning last night. My call is very important to them. Oh, I can tell. I filled out my bank's online application for a payroll protection program PPP right now, and I haven't heard.

Thomas Jefferson fever Philadelphia United States president USPS Wisconsin Dr Benjamin Rush Dr Edward Jenner Bolton News Nation New Nation Leo Florence Milwaukee District of Columbia Declaration of Independence John malaria
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

The Ladies of Strange

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

"When eastern state penitentiary or Cherry Hill as it was known at the time was erected in eighteen, , twenty nine and Francis Ville it was the largest and most expensive public structure in the country which country. . I've never heard of the eastern state penitentiary. . It's Bainian okay was. . nope Cherry Point. . Just Kidding Cherry Point with Carolina's where my brother was born Cherry Hill. . It's still the same country. . Back to it. . So about that map. . Okay, , starting off the strong today. . Did you mean which state? ? Even when I, , you align. . Oh, , happy. Belated . birthday by the way tiffany was going to mention it but I didn't want us to be all of them. . You let that slide since it's your birthday week. . All right. . So from eighteen, , twenty and From eighteen twenty, , nine to nineteen seventy-one, , the eastern state penitentiary in Pennsylvania United States of America north. . America. . Earth Opera Milky Way Galaxy. . Belief operated as one of the most famous and most expensive prisons in history at its completion. . The building was the largest emo-. . I can keep saying that the largest and most expensive public structure ever record in the United States and quickly became a model for more than three hundred prisons. . Worldwide Eastern state emerged from concerns of prison reformers in Philadelphia in the late eighteenth century when prisons held accused criminals only until their trials if convicted prisoners face public in corporal punishment in seventeen, , Eighty, , seven, , a group of well known and powerful Philadelphians known as the Philadelphia Society for alleviating the miseries of public prisons. . Oh. . What is the please? ? Give me a what's it called acronym Yup Thank you the Fist Sim. Map. . . The FISA Abba Papa they met in the home of Benjamin Franklin. . The members expressed growing concern with the conditions in American European prisons conditions at the Walnut Street jail, , which is located directly behind independence hall were appalling open in Seventeen, , seventy, seven, , , the Walnut Street Jail House accused men, , women, , adults, , children's thieves. . Murderers were all jailed together disease ridden dirty pins were rape and robbery were common occurrences. . Okay. I . know that this is an other movies and TV shows and everything. . 'cause you know this is something that was prevalent in history but this reminds me of outlander haven't seen IT A. . Girl Uni Watch it but there's a scene where Jason are like a season where he's in prison in its continue. . Okay I think lots lots of prisons are bad. . The jailers made little effort to protect the prisoners from each other. . Instead, they , sold prisoners alcohol up to nearly twenty gallons a day Jeez. . Food Heat including clothing came at a price and it wasn't unusual prisoners to die from the cold or starvation and keep in mind. . They were only cap until their trials because if they are found innocent, , they were like, , Oh, , if they were found guilty day, , we're usually guilt Dr Benjamin rush spoke on the society's goal to see the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania set the international standard in prison design. . He was convinced that crime was a quote moral disease and suggested a house of repentance were prisoners could meditate on their crimes experienced spiritual Ra- Morrison undergo rehabilitation good for him. . What's his name again? ? Dr Benjamin Rush Okay you rush rush come down on the Cocoa Award Good Just hear me out for pages. . The concept grew from enlightenment thinking but no government had successfully carried out such a program. . It took the society more than thirty years to convince the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to build this kind of prison. . But in eighteen twenty, one, , , Pennsylvania legislature appropriated two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for eastern state and thus began a revolutionary new building on the farmland outside of Philadelphia at twenty twenty, , seven Fairmont Avenue all

Cherry Hill United States America Philadelphia Society Jk Rebecca tiffany Benjamin Franklin FISA Philadelphia Francis Ville Carolina Pennsylvania
Isolation and Freudian Paranormal Slips

The Ladies of Strange

04:11 min | 1 year ago

Isolation and Freudian Paranormal Slips

"When eastern state penitentiary or Cherry Hill as it was known at the time was erected in eighteen, twenty nine and Francis Ville it was the largest and most expensive public structure in the country which country. I've never heard of the eastern state penitentiary. It's Bainian okay was. nope Cherry Point. Just Kidding Cherry Point with Carolina's where my brother was born Cherry Hill. It's still the same country. Back to it. So about that map. Okay, starting off the strong today. Did you mean which state? Even when I, you align. Oh, happy. Belated birthday by the way tiffany was going to mention it but I didn't want us to be all of them. You let that slide since it's your birthday week. All right. So from eighteen, twenty and From eighteen twenty, nine to nineteen seventy-one, the eastern state penitentiary in Pennsylvania United States of America north. America. Earth Opera Milky Way Galaxy. Belief operated as one of the most famous and most expensive prisons in history at its completion. The building was the largest emo-. I can keep saying that the largest and most expensive public structure ever record in the United States and quickly became a model for more than three hundred prisons. Worldwide Eastern state emerged from concerns of prison reformers in Philadelphia in the late eighteenth century when prisons held accused criminals only until their trials if convicted prisoners face public in corporal punishment in seventeen, Eighty, seven, a group of well known and powerful Philadelphians known as the Philadelphia Society for alleviating the miseries of public prisons. Oh. What is the please? Give me a what's it called acronym Yup Thank you the Fist Sim. Map. The FISA Abba Papa they met in the home of Benjamin Franklin. The members expressed growing concern with the conditions in American European prisons conditions at the Walnut Street jail, which is located directly behind independence hall were appalling open in Seventeen, seventy, seven, the Walnut Street Jail House accused men, women, adults, children's thieves. Murderers were all jailed together disease ridden dirty pins were rape and robbery were common occurrences. Okay. I know that this is an other movies and TV shows and everything. 'cause you know this is something that was prevalent in history but this reminds me of outlander haven't seen IT A. Girl Uni Watch it but there's a scene where Jason are like a season where he's in prison in its continue. Okay I think lots lots of prisons are bad. The jailers made little effort to protect the prisoners from each other. Instead, they sold prisoners alcohol up to nearly twenty gallons a day Jeez. Food Heat including clothing came at a price and it wasn't unusual prisoners to die from the cold or starvation and keep in mind. They were only cap until their trials because if they are found innocent, they were like, Oh, if they were found guilty day, we're usually guilt Dr Benjamin rush spoke on the society's goal to see the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania set the international standard in prison design. He was convinced that crime was a quote moral disease and suggested a house of repentance were prisoners could meditate on their crimes experienced spiritual Ra- Morrison undergo rehabilitation good for him. What's his name again? Dr Benjamin Rush Okay you rush rush come down on the Cocoa Award Good Just hear me out for pages. The concept grew from enlightenment thinking but no government had successfully carried out such a program. It took the society more than thirty years to convince the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to build this kind of prison. But in eighteen twenty, one, Pennsylvania legislature appropriated two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for eastern state and thus began a revolutionary new building on the farmland outside of Philadelphia at twenty twenty, seven Fairmont Avenue all

Dr Benjamin Rush Pennsylvania Cherry Hill Benjamin Franklin Twenty Twenty Philadelphia United States Philadelphia Society Walnut Street Jail House America Carolina Francis Ville Tiffany Jason Fisa Rape Robbery
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Back again to the sons liberty folks, let's get back to this got my dander up just a little bit. You know, the bible talks about. When the Lord say something to his children. He would say Moses, Moses, Abraham Abraham Isaac Isaac. Jacob jacob. Today, we have to say it over and over and over and over and over and over again. Truth is stranger than fiction to so many people in this country here, I'm gonna show you your reality. I'm gonna show you what America you're putting up with outside corrupt politicians, and I'm talking about the corrupt politicians that you have been led to believe are the good politicians. What you have been fed as the good politicians in America friends. Here. Let me say it this way. Today's Republicans for those that are caught up into that little game. Our yesterday's. What? Democrats. No comes to my aid right now. And he's exactly right is Benjamin rush. Dr Benjamin rush signer of the declaration of independence. He was asked. If he was aristocrat he said, I'm not an aristocrat. He said, I'm not a democrat. I'm adding I'm not a Republican. He said, I'm a Christ. Oh crat. That's exactly right. Where are the principal people in America that get this? We're the principal people in America that love their country enough to actually study their history. Because that's what we need. Hey, folks, let me say it this way another way. Okay. That's what radio is given. The same message at different way every day of your life. It's time to quit playing the blame game concerning the left and the right because no one wins this way, except the enemies within and without we need to take responsibility. Where you see a wrong, then take responsibility and write it. Dodo LEA's are who took the sword of the Lord. He went after the Philistines. Well, everybody don't namely, the children of Israel turned ran and got out of dodge. You know, it's interesting to note about that story. And I is when Elliot as our went and dealt with the Philistines all by himself along with the Lord, which was in the majority. It's interesting to note that the children of Israel turn, and they ran from the battle. But when he won the battle the bible says that they returned for the spoil. Oh, there's plenty of people that will take credit for what's done right in how many people that will take credit for what's been done. We're actually a partake of writing the wrong. So very few. Very few. I want to get back to these church signs..

America Abraham Abraham Isaac Isaac Benjamin rush Jacob jacob Moses Israel principal Dodo LEA Elliot
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on WTVN

"The only live legal show of its kind in Columbus the coffee offer one of Ohio's meeting criminal defense for your host of foreign and defense. Columbus attorney Brad. It's let's see Sunday before two thousand nineteen it's eleven thirty five AM and the segment of the show is sponsored by the bench dot site. The bench thought SAT it is a local blog podcast in the every morning. Get a newsletter on last night. Sports results this day in sports history and quick take on tonight sports. So it's a nice little feed. For those of us who want to be in the know he wanted to be in the know and the sports, but there quick it's not a it's not a link, you know, like, the I like the athletic is a very good if let it has longer reads, but the bench dot sites got a little bit quicker reads. So we were talking about investigating the investigators and this bogus. Quote evidence that was used to build a case against Trump. It was used to recruit Bob Muller. Give up two years of his life. To get in here rundown. Dead ends. And again, let me read to you the statute that. I'm sure Peter Struck. Jim komi? Andrew mccabe. We're thinking this is the net. That's gonna get Trump. This is the net. It's eighteen US code three seventy one. And this is the statute I'm sure they were expecting to catch President Trump. It's the conspiracy statute it's very broad and it deals with two or more individuals who conspire quote to defraud the United States or any agency there of in any manner for any purpose. I mean, you could talk about defrauding the the postal service somehow. Through envelopes and not using the correct post. I mean, there's a being the bad example. But to postal service employees decide to steal a chair. Yeah. I mean, these are the federal codes that are almost impossible to walk away from and you have several dozen highly skilled very experienced white collar prosecutors being led by a widely regarded as one of the top prosecutors FBI agents out there with Bob Mueller and a very broad statute. They couldn't find you. There's no I mean, regardless of what you want to say about well how much of the report was was sanitized by Bill by bar and wasn't correctly stated in his summary. Here's what we pretty sure about. We have leaked memos from Jim Komi, we have Hillary Clinton the DNC buying bad information bad Intel to steal dossier partially being used to get agents who have already professed that they will stop Trump from becoming president these same agents. Go into a Pfizer court in front of a federal judge and don't share their biases or any the sculpt, Tori evidence or information it's all rumor and innuendo lying to a federal judge the crime line to the Pfizer court is a crime not being totally transparent as a crime. And that's how the Trump investigation took cold. And one of the very first victims was Michael Flynn. And I had a hard hard time believing that Michael Flynn with his credentials would actually act as a Russian foreign agent. It was ridiculous totally. So let's look at let's talk about Michael Flynn. The guy needs to be pardoned. He hasn't been sentenced yet. But. Go back. And and these are published reports Andrew McCabe, the former FBI director deputy director who was one of the agents who interviewed Michael Flynn. Is reported saying I didn't think he was lying. Jim Komi testified to congress. He didn't feel like Flynn lied to the agents. The Mola report, then confirms no collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. No obstruction. Meanwhile, you have to remember that former FBI agent Peter Struck interviewed Flynn had already texted Lisa page that we will stop him. And so, you know, you've got Komi leaking classified memos to start the Muller probe. Christopher Steele dossier was purchased by the Clinton campaign. The DNC. So it all seems like a setup to me general speaking of hiring foreign nationals. So Flynn was the very first victim in this unprecedented attempt at framing Donald Trump of collusion with Russia and should be the very first pardon. And I'm on record. I'm not I'm not I'm not a Republican. I'm not a democrat an independent libertarian. I their parts of Donald Trump that drives me crazy. Like everything going on in America right now. I have no specific complaints other than some of his boneheaded tweets. But this is. This is bad. For a democracy. And I hope that the investigators get investigated. What's your forecast on this general? Well, I will have to credit Mr. Muller on one thing. He's spent two years found nothing but admitted it and all these Democrats saying, oh, there's parts of it being withheld if there were parts of Mr. Mueller's work being withheld. He would be out there saying you have not gotten all of what I did. But he has not every aspect of the Muller probe is tied to either Hillary Clinton or FBI agents like Peter Struck and Andrew McCabe who absolutely unequivocally favored Hillary Clinton over Trump in two thousand sixteen and looked at them as we're the ones in the deep state, the people that are back here that are going to keep this from happening and Flint Flint was framed by unethical officials who were trying to do this to set up to to set up Trump. So the president should pardon Flynn who never lied about. Russia. Collusion since the mullahs report confirmed there was no Russian collusion. And I hope Mr Flynn gets a book deal and movie deal anyway to make all the money. He's lost. But defending these frivolous actions, one of these days, this the imagine this day in history down the road every day in this day in history. There's going to be something with Muller and the Trump investigation. So very leaking of which the in history. What do you have in seventeen seventy five the first abolitionist society in the United States is organized in Philadelphia by Dr Benjamin rush worth noting that those slavery has existed for tens of thousands of years and continues to exist in.

President Trump Michael Flynn Jim komi Bob Muller FBI Hillary Clinton Peter Struck Andrew mccabe Trump United States Bob Mueller Russia president DNC Columbus Ohio Pfizer court Brad attorney mullahs
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

17:02 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I'm happy to welcome back to my show for the third time. Harlow ongo Harlow has just written. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation. Dr Benjamin rush is unfortunately, a lesser known member of the founding generation this show at Harlem's book hopes to cure that Harlow to doctor give us some idea of the causes. If you will that Dr Benjamin rush devoted his attention to and also you explain in your book his skill as of all things a lobbyist. No. He wasn't clad in Gucci. Shoes. He didn't have an office on K street. There was no K street, of course. But he was a skilled lobbyists, and you have hinted that Harlow when you talked about how he persuaded general Washington who perhaps initially wasn't all that sympathetic to build the first field army hospital, and he did so just by becoming a pain in the pain in the neck to Washington. So, but he got the job done. And I think that is a a subtext in Dr Russia's life. How skillfully was at persuading his friends and using his relationships with the rich and famous if you will to accomplish significant social goals. So tell us some of you can't cover all that. We simply don't have enough time. But tell us the issues that Dr rush sometimes singly. All by himself adopted and how his skill as a lobbyist and using his friendships accomplished meaningful changes in the life of colonial America. He basically he appealed to the selfish interests of the rich and famous after all with Washington to start at the beginning with Washington, the more troops that rush saved who could fight. Again. The fewer troops Washington had to recruit, and it was a big problem recruiting enough troops. Rush managed to heal enough soldiers if they could go back and fight again similarly in Philadelphia. The the the more more he cured diseases and illness in the poor sections the more workers the rich merchants had to work for them. This is one of the things. You ask how? He developed as a doctor because medicine was so primitive. He intuited a lot of the so-called cures that he developed people didn't bathe in that time. Most people thought bathing was dangerous that you could get you could get sick by taking a bath washing yourself. He intuited the opposite. The first thing he did was to clean the wounds and that poor people. He ran in it that he treated contracted. And those ones would would heal by washing them with whatever soap, they were very strong soaps in those days mostly lie, but they would get better. So he intuited a lot of the medical. Miracle said he performed in those days naturally for serious diseases. He relied on bleeding, which did not work. But the interesting thing about bleeding is that those that did get better from the disease. It was a huge yellow fever epidemic. Those that did get better for those who contracted it and got better from bleeding. We've gotten better anyway. And a little bleeding can make a person feel a little woozy and euphoric. And and in the presence of the great rush. They would always feel a little bit better after bleeding if they died while they were anyway goes didn't die would have lived anyway. So no, one realized that bleeding was not effective. But other things that he did were he in in hospitals that he worked at he got the directors to clean up the hospitals. He got town town fathers to clean the streets had been no they didn't clean the streets in those days, and then the poor sections the sewers ran out into the streets. So when you walk down a street in Philadelphia and any other major town you'd be walking Schumer JR. He got convinced the town that it would be healthier and wealthier if they cleaned up the streets, and they did and he got rid of the mass odors that fills the streets. It got rid of it diminished, the incidence of disease diseases, and he did the same thing in the hospitals where he got them a clean up the hospitals to limit patients to one in each bed. So that they wouldn't get each other's diseases with the army, he talked Washington and getting the soldiers to have their hair very very closely along the sides to get rid of body life and get rid of the diseases that life carried. The soldiers were taught to to bathe or wash themselves three times a week minimum and cut their hair. So that they were cleaner and we're less subject to illnesses in the field in the hospital. He he worked out he found a group of patients naked in the basement naked chained to the walls and these were the insane. The Mandalay yell. They were starving to death. Witch versus sleep by sadistic guards for demanding food or anything else. Rush went tearing up to the board room and board of directors of the hospital together. He had seen better treatment in France. And so he demanded that he the each of these mentally ill patients be transferred to a special wing in the hospital where they each had cleaned beds and were treated as patients not as the the victims of of Satan ization, they thought that mental illness was worth of the devil. So he got got religion out of the hospital and got the mentally ill too treated as patients, and he found that many of them responded to all sorts of different treatments. One was what we now. Call physical therapy or exercise made them healthier. And so they felt better about themselves and their mental illness declined bit. He found that other. Others were had talents. And he he had those talents trained. It's what we now. Call occupational therapy. And the biggest discovery a century before Freud. The biggest discovery was what he called talk therapy. He would take each patient aside. And just listen and talk with him or her and lo and behold, many of them got much much better. Some better enough to go to go home and leave lead productive lives. The century later. The American psychiatric association recognized him as the father of American psychiatry and his image is on the official seal of the American psychiatric association. He was a pioneer in modern medicine and really is the father of modern medicine in many, many ways basic hygiene that is now practicing medicine is a result of Russia's efforts. The rush designed the first code of ethics that made fee. Splitting illegal or unethical not illegal. But unethical among decent men and women in in the medical profession until until rush. And and really long after rush doctors, referring a patient to another doctor would split the fees. So obviously. They were often sent to doctors who were not very good simply a partnership that had nothing to do with healing the patients. So he developed the first code of ethics for modern medicine. They were in so many areas he was revered. He was a great teacher. He wrote the first tech medical great medical textbook. He he was first faster to teach chemistry in America. And then he wrote a foreign volume work on medicine and medical care at became a bible for medical care for at least a couple of decades after he went and his work on mental health on basically, the was basic tech in in psychiatry for more than a century until the end of the nineteen hundred medical his work, medical inquiries, and observations upon the diseases of the mind was basic psychiatric text in America until the end of the nineteenth century. So his influence on American medicine has just is is infinitesimal. And indeed in Chicago. Of course, there's a huge rush your. University. Complex with a medical school nursing school, and it's enormous and very very central to medical life in Chicago. Harlow up. I I you mentioned Benjamin Franklin with whom Benjamin rush had a very close personal relationship. And also you point out we may have time to discuss it his relationship perhaps with Thomas Paine. And if we take those three founding era men, Benjamin, rush Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Paine, this one thread that may be coincidental. And maybe not Dr Benjamin rush was not in it for the money was never rich. Although he married a wealthy woman. And that was the source of some financial security, but he was not in any of this for the money. He for he served the poor for free. He wasn't into for the money Benjamin Franklin because he felt he had lots of inventions. But. His inventions like the stove and other inventions. He refused to patent many. He gave them to the public domain because he felt he didn't want the money, but he wanted to encourage the development of mechanical science and of other science Thomas Paine similarly wrote the best seller in the founding era in common sense, but he would not take any royalties. He he wanted the book to get out. So those three men all of whom are in the same arc as Benjamin rush. All although frankly, became very wealthy all of them would subordinate their desire for money in favor of the public. Good. I found that to be an interesting connection between three the two other men in Benjamin Russia's life and Benjamin rush. Bet BB coincidental. It may be there are others. But I thought I would mention that now Benjamin rush. Also, he's interest was we we use the phrase humanitarian, his interest was beyond pure medical science science is in quotation marks. He was passionate about women's rights child labor. And of course, slavery. We're running out of time a bit, but tell us if you will how important these issues and others were to Benjamin rush and how much of a visionary. He was in seeing issues that we are still talking about today this morning in the news. Well, I'm glad you mentioned these other social issues because he was passionate about women's rights. And again, he talked the legislature. Into allowing girls should go to school by telling them that do do you want your boys to grow up as ignorant masses? Who's the first teachers of your of your voice? They are your lives and your wife should have as good an education as you. They are going to take the responsibility of raising your boys. So that's how he coaxed the Pennsylvania. Let he was a lobbyist he was a skillful lobbyists. And he showed everyone how it was in a better interest to improve the launch of everyone. He was a great humanitarian and wanted. Everyone to have a decent life as for slavery. He went into the black neighborhoods help. Talk them into and help them raise the funds to build the first African American church in America in Philadelphia. He actually went to the slave market bought a slave himself. So that he could Ray he was a teenager. So he could raise the boy educate him, and and then free him soon as he was educated enough to get a job, and boy, I got a job on a ship. And as a Freeman and whenever the ship came to town. He went to stay with with rush swipe feet that was now his own. So he made the rush house his home Russia's I said was deeply involved in the fight for the patient. I'm glad you mentioned that his his running with Thomas Paine whom he met in in a bookstore. Thomas painted come over and was eager to wasn't was an enemy of royalty and was eager to help Americans gain independence. And he was writing an essay he got a job as an editor of a magazine. Was a great writer his words just leapt off the page and gripped readers, and he was working on a on a document that he wanted to a pamphlet. He was writing on liberty and independence of American liberty. And the the horrors of the. The whole concept of divine right of kings. He said, why should some baby is born some woman have the right to rule the world. And so he wrote this pamphlet. He showed it to rush. Rush edited it and rush came up with the title commonsense, which spurred which pain then delivered to Washington on the banks of the Delaware opposite, Trenton, Washington, ordered commonsense. Which you may remember began these are the times try men's souls..

Dr Benjamin rush Thomas Paine Harlow ongo Harlow Washington Benjamin Franklin America Philadelphia Dr Russia Harlem field army hospital Benjamin Russia Russia American psychiatric associati Chicago army fever Miracle
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

19:56 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"We are today. And always this show of ideas, never ever, the show of attitude. My first exposure to Dr Benjamin rush a name that probably most of my listeners are not familiar with. But will be before the hour is up. My first exposure was when I read what I became interested in American history somewhere around the end of the nineteen eighties. A book was published by Joseph Ellis, call passionate sage discussing the retirement years of John Adams, John Adams has become my favorite founder. I learned in that book as I became fascinated with life, John Adams. Is that a doctor Dr Benjamin rush was instrumental in reuniting? Former president John Adams with former president Thomas Jefferson who had stopped communicating with each other after Jefferson one beat Adams in the presidency campaign in eighteen hundred Dr Benjamin rush, the brought them together started them corresponding to each other which produced a rich history of our country in the hundred and fifty odd lettuce. I believe that they wrote to each other. Then Dr Benjamin Russia's name was filed away as being an important figure in the founding generation. I never knew much about him. Now, I know a lot thanks to this morning's guest Harlow Harlow is a historian. He has written about twenty six bucks. Harlow if I have shorted you buy a book or to my apologies. He is a student of the revolutionary era. He is a distinguished visiting fellow in American history at George Washington's mount Vernon. He's a journalist veteran journalist broadcast, educator and historian Harlow is visiting us again this morning for the third time on my show, and we'll continue to visit each and every time he writes, a book that captures my imagination. Harlow has written just published. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation, Dr Benjamin Russia's you will learn is a fascinating and quite important figure in the founding generation. He was always on the scene and so much of what makes life better today can be traced directly back to Dr Benjamin rush. Harlow? Welcome to the show this morning. Thank you, very much pleasure and an honor to be back on your show. And how will thank you so much, of course for being on my show. But most importantly for all of the scholarship, you have given us you are on you, you you. I I spoke in two thousand thirteen when you wrote thugs and gangsters real story, if the Boston tea party, and of course, you then caused Samuel Adams to fall from grace, at least in my mind, he was not the flowery figure I thought he was then we visited again in nineteen in two thousand fourteen when you wrote a wonderful book, which I commend to our audience how Washington invented the presidency. So Harlow, Dr Benjamin rush a medical doctor. What the only doctor I believe who signed the declaration of independence. Tell us. What brought Dr rush. To your attention. And why did you determine at have you shown? He was worthy of an entire book explaining his life. Benjamin rush was as you said, the only MD there were five others you call themselves doctor, but they hit never studied medicine. They were quacks as most people call themselves. Dr. Were in that era. Dr Benjamin rush was the only MD who signed the declaration of independence, and he was America's first and only at the time only great humanitarian all of the other signers are almost all of the other signers were wealthy merchants bankers and plantation owners. Most of them with slaves to do their bidding and do do the work and earn the money for them. Dr to rush was a man of modest means who. That was the first great humanitarian who who signed the declaration of independence, actually believing. In the words, or the preamble that all men were created equal on entitled to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. He was a champion. He became a champion of the Americans that all the other founding fathers for dot women slaves. Indentured workers laborers prisoners, the poor the indigent sick the mentally ill ninety percent of the population of the United States lived in that other America without money without education barred from voting barred from the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness by the constitution, which declared independence from Britain concentration did. I'm sorry by by the declaration of independence, and then the constitution the neither document ever. Did. It gave women the right to vote. It didn't give didn't free the slaves. It didn't give rights to indentured laborers in most states only property owners could vote. So the cons both the declaration of independence and the constitution were documents written by the wealthy for the wealthy. Only Benjamin rush signed the declaration of independence because he heard the cries and pleas from the rest of the Americans that other founders forgot, and he actually did sacrifice his life his fortune, and is sacred honor to try to heal and bring Justice to these other people. The phrase, you just mentioned, of course, is the last phrase in the declaration and to these ends, we we pledge our lives our fortunes and our sacred honor. You can't pledge very much more than that, can you hollow? And remember what Jefferson who wrote those words after he wrote them. He fled back to his home in Virginia and Monticello up on the mountain outside Charlottesville and never fired a shot against the British. He didn't risk his life at all. It's certainly didn't risk his fortune didn't risk anything. I know the revolutionary war. I'm smiling. Harlow because I know you are not a great fan of Thomas Jefferson. And I was wondering how many minutes into our discussion of Dr Benjamin rush. Would you find that opportunity to mention Jefferson, not in the most laudatory of phrases because I know you're not a fan of Jefferson and Jefferson was of course, a complex figure. Quite complex, and of course, somewhat somewhat but quite hypocritical between what he wrote and how he lived. He didn't really walk the walk. He just talks the talk that of course, is for another show. Now, Dr Benjamin rush was perhaps I don't know if I can say this statistically, but he was not a political animal many of the founders were steeped in political study and political knowledge, of course, Madison, especially the consummate politician, but that's not to exclude. Adams or Jefferson or the other founders? But Dr rush was as you have said and what what makes him special. He was a from the heart and from the mind, a true humanitarian, not a politician, so his interest in the revolutionary era and didn't independence was only because of the humanitarian that only but was primarily because of the humanitarian benefits he saw in a country, which was true to the principles of the declaration. He was not a student of politics. He was a doctor first and foremost in the greatest sense of the word, isn't that? So that's correct. And and there was no way for him to be a politician. He didn't own any property only property owners could. Involve themselves in politics after all the nations of the south covered most of the land. So the the the the man who owned these plantations ruled the land and with with a man who made all the political decisions for that territory in the north of the major brick merchants and bankers people like John Hancock were those who had their communities. They alone had the power to do. So the rest of the population really in the south. They were mostly slaves and in the north they were mostly working people who. Many of them indentured which meant they were under contract to work for their employers for specific periods of time usually six to eight years at a would each contract. So they had no rights they could not involve them. So they couldn't vote. They couldn't involve themselves in in politics and under British rule. They had absolutely no rights. The governors of each province says the states will call that governors were appointed by the British government. So there was no self rule after the constitution after the declaration of independence. And then the constitution the those who were named governor. We're usually one of the big bankers or merchants in the north like John. Hancock or big plantation owners in the south like Benjamin Harrison, Patrick Henry, and and eventually Thomas Jefferson, although he resigned after a year because she was terrible governor and failed to defend Bill defenses to protect Virginia against British troops. Now, Dr Benjamin. When would reach your book. One of the real pleasures of your book and one of the real takeaways besides that of being quite impressed with Dr Benjamin rush is his wisdom has foresight. And his humanness is the book gives us a wonderful social history of the times, most biographies of the founders focus on the founders, and you don't know very much. Don't learn very much about the environment in which they lived what life was like you have a vague picture. But you describe it with great understanding and passion, tell us about the the world the revolutionary era the country that Benjamin rush saw. And what what he dedicated his life to curing. Tell us a tiny bit about what life was like. And what bench? Rush thought ought to be different rush. Of course was a grew up on a farm. He was so farmers son. So he was not born to wealth when he returned. A he did studied medicine at the university of Edinburgh in Scotland which was the finest medical school in the world at the time. He was very fortunate to come under the patronage of Benjamin Franklin who was kind of quit. Of an ambassador for the provinces of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts. And a couple of other provinces in London. And he Franklin was very very warm in welcoming Americans who were lucky enough to come to study in England, and he patronized Benjamin rush. Benjamin rush stayed with him. When he finished his studies. You went to London and had the good fortune of being able to study more medicine under a great scientists and doctors in London and then travelling to France where the government still Royal governments nonetheless worth had taken measures to provide for the poor and especially for the orphaned children bake unwanted babies were left on the doorstep of the hotel. God's hotel hospital was called and put up for. Option. Rush was really overwhelmed by by what he shot and he came back to America. Without a penny in his pocket, and he stayed with an older brother and in Philadelphia and didn't know how to get started in medicine. So he just. Trucking's instruments in his bag and went into the poor sections of Philadelphia knocking on doors saying anyone need a doctor. Well, they sure did. They came flocking down. The stairs stairs of these tumbledown some shocks and bringing their children who were sick or hungry. And and rush took care of them. All and soon gained a reputation as a fine. Dr. Yeah. When the the I the second congress came to Philadelphia to to write the declaration of independence in reaction to what had happened in Lexington. A lot of people raced out of town to greet these people coming from all these other states and rush was among them, and he jumped into one of the carriages and sitting in the carriage in that particular guards was John Adams and his cousin Samuel Adams. And they got to talking and then finally rush invited them to stay at the rush home in Philadelphia. The atom says, we're terribly please. They did not look forward to sleeping in taverns which that were not hotels in those days. Visitors slept in taverns on the second floor where they were pallets on the floor and everybody stuck together. With with the lice and the and the body odors and everything else that went with travelers. So that's how rush became friends of the both Adams is at the time. And in turn was introduced to other members of the second congress, and because of his good service to local Philadelphians has doctor. He was named to that congress that second congress which signed the declaration of independence, and instead of just continuing with his daily life as most signers dead, including as I mentioned Jefferson went home to his plantation. Didn't wanna do with fire fighting a war. Rush went up to Trenton to to the West Bank of the Delaware river where Washington's troops had retreated after disastrous battle at Brooklyn. And they they they then lost Manhattan. They fled across New Jersey. And finally settled on the opposite Bank of the Delaware river opposite, Trenton, it was there that they started planning the attack on Trenton Christmas day Russia arrived at the same time went with them in the aftermath of the battle and started treating wounded troops on the penalty of actually was never done before never done never been done before hoops were fodder. That's all and they were left to die because they couldn't if they couldn't walk or crawl off the battlefield. They were left to die because they were they were considered useless. And they weren't they they had no rights anyway, citizens they they didn't own any land these were ordinary workers. So. Rush. Started tweeting them any realized they needed shelter. And he went to Washington and demands and some help on a big argument with Washington in Washington just wanted to rush off his back and told one of his officers to commandeer a house on the edge of the battlefield and rush turned it into a field hospital the very first field hospital in American military history from that from there he continued his efforts to treat the wounded. He went through several battles, including brandy wine where he also treated wounded British troops and won the praise and safe passage of. Through British lines while it's American lines. I I talked to do that safe. Passage for health workers now is is is part of international law in in wartime. So that was that he that he planted the seeds of what later became the the the medical corps the army medical corps, and one lesson one lesson that came about that comes about from your book is when you said he studied medicine in Edinburgh. And he he practiced medicine help our audience understand how difference that phrase.

Dr Benjamin rush Thomas Jefferson Dr Benjamin Harlow Harlow Dr Benjamin Russia John Adams Benjamin Franklin Samuel Adams Washington Philadelphia Benjamin Harrison America Virginia Trenton Delaware river Joseph Ellis president George Washington Manhattan Adams
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

16:58 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I'm happy to welcome back to my show for the third time. Harlow Unger Harlow has just written. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation. Dr Benjamin rush is unfortunately, a lesser known member of the founding generation this show and Harlow book hopes to cure that Harlow to doctor gives us some idea of the causes. If you will that Dr Benjamin rush devoted his attention to and also you explain in your book his skill as of all things a lobbyist. No. He wasn't clad in Gucci. Shoes. He didn't have an office on K street. There was no K street, of course. But he was a skilled lobbyists, and you have hinted that Harlow when you talked about how he persuaded general Washington who perhaps initially wasn't all that sympathetic to build the first field army hospital, and he did so just by becoming painted the pain in the neck to Washington. So, but he got the job done. And I think that is a a subtext in Dr Russia's life. How skillfully was at persuading his friends and using his relationships with the rich and famous if you will to accomplish significant social goals. So tell us some of you can't cover all of that. We simply don't have enough time. But tell us the issues that Dr rush sometimes singly. All by himself adopted and how his skill as a lobbyist and using his friendships accomplished meaningful changes in the life of colonial America. He basically he appealed to the selfish interests of the rich and famous after all with Washington to start at the beginning with Washington, the more troops that rush saved who could fight again. If you're troops Washington had to recruit, and it was a big problem recruiting enough troops. Rush managed to heal enough soldiers. If think they could go back and fight again similarly in Philadelphia. The the the more more he toured diseases and illness in the poor actions. The more workers the rich merchants had to work for them. This is one of the things. You asked how? He developed as a doctor because medicine was so primitive. He intuited a lot of the so-called cures that he developed people didn't bathe in that time. Most people thought bathing was dangerous that you could get you could get sick by taking a bath. Or at washing yourself. He intuited the opposite. The first thing he did was to clean the wounds and that poor people he ran in that he treated contracted. And the those ones would would heal by washing them with whatever soap, they were very strong soaps in those days mostly lie that they would get better. So he intuited a lot of the medical. Miracle said he performed in those days naturally for serious diseases. He relied on leading which did not work. But the interesting thing about bleeding is that those that did get better from the disease. It was a huge yellow fever epidemic. Those that did get better for those who contracted it and got better from blading we've gotten better anyway. And a live bleeding can make a person feel a little woozy and euphoric. And and in the presence of the great, Dr rush, they would always feel a little bit better after bleeding if they died while they would have died anyway, those that didn't die would have lived anyway. So no, one realized that bleeding was not effective. But other things that he did were he in in hospitals that he worked at he got the directors to clean up the hospitals. He got town town fathers to clean the streets had been no they didn't clean the streets in those days, and then the poor sections the sewers ran out into the streets. So when you walk down a street in Philadelphia and any other major town, it'd be walking from Schumer JR. He got convinced the town that it would be healthier and wealthier if they cleaned up the. The streets, and they did and he's got rid of the mass odors at fill the streets. It got rid of it diminish the incidence of disease diseases, and he did the same thing in the hospitals where he got them a clean up the hospitals to limit patients to one in each bed. So that they wouldn't get each other's diseases with the army, he talked Washington and getting the soldiers to their hair, very very closely along the sides to get rid of body life and get rid of the diseases that life carried the soldiers were taught to two days wash themselves three times a week minimum and cut their hair. So that they were cleaner and we're less subject to illnesses in the field in the hospital. He he worked at. He found a group of patients naked in the basement naked chained to the walls and these were the insane. The mentally ill. They were starving to death. Witch versus by sadistic guards for demanding food or anything else. Rush went tearing up to the board room and board of directors hostile together. He had seen better treatment in France. And so he demanded that the each of these mentally ill patients be transferred to a special wing in the hospital where they each had cleaned beds and retreated as patients not as the victims of of Satan as Asian they thought that mental mental illness was the work of the devil show. He got got religion out of the hospital and got the mentally ill too treated as patients, and he found that many of them responded to all sorts of different treatments. One was what we now. Call physical therapy or exercise made them healthier. And so they felt better about themselves and their mental illness declined a bit he found that other. Others were had talents. And he he had those talents trained. It's what we now. Call occupational therapy. And the biggest discovery a century before Freud. Biggest discovery was what he called talk therapy. He would take each patient aside. And just listen and talk with him or her and lo and behold, many of them got much much better. Some better enough to go to go home and leave lead productive lives. The century later. The American psychiatric association recognized him as the father of American psychiatry and his image is on the official seal of the American psychiatric association. He was a pioneer in modern medicine that really is the father of modern medicine in many, many ways basic hygiene that is now practicing medicine it was all Russia's efforts. The rush do designed the first code of ethics that made fee. Splitting illegal or unethical. Not illegal unethical among decent men and women in in the medical profession until until Russia, and and really long to rush doctors, referring a patient to another doctor would split the fees. So obviously. They were often sent to doctors who were not very good simply a partnership that had nothing to do with healing the patients. So he developed the first code of ethics for modern medicine. They were in so many areas he was revered. He was a great teacher. He wrote the first tech medical great medical textbook. He he was I faster to teach chemistry in America. And then he wrote a foreign volume work on medicine and medical care at became a bible for medical care for at least a couple of decades after he went and his work on mental health on. Basically, the basic tech in in psychiatry for more than a century until the end of the nineteen hundreds medical his work, medical inquiries and observations upon the diseases of the mind was basic psychiatric text in America until the end of the nineteenth century. So his influence on American medicine has just is is infinitesimal. And indeed in Chicago, of course, is a huge rush university complex with the medical school nursing school and. It's enormous and very very central to medical life in Chicago. Harlow up. You mentioned Benjamin Franklin with whom Benjamin rush had a very close personal relationship. And also you point out we may have time to discuss it his relationship perhaps with Thomas Paine. And if we take those three founding era men, Benjamin, rush Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Paine, this one thread that may be coincidental. And maybe not Dr Benjamin rush was not in it for the money was never rich. Although he married a wealthy woman. And that was the source of some financial security, but he was not in any of this for the money. He for he served the poor for free. He wasn't there for the money Benjamin Franklin because he fell he had lots of inventions. But. His inventions like the stove and other inventions. He refused to patent them many. He gave them to the public domain because he felt he didn't want the money, but he wanted to encourage the development of mechanical science and of other science Thomas Paine similarly wrote the best seller in the founding era in common sense, but he would not take any royalties. He he wanted the book to get out. So those three men all of whom are in the same arc as Benjamin rush. All although frankly, became very wealthy all of them would subordinate their desire for money in favor of the public. Good. I found that to be an interesting connection between three the two other men in Benjamin Russia's life and Benjamin rush. I bet BBC cO which. That'll it may be there are others. But I thought I would mention that. Now Benjamin rush also his interest was we we use the phrase humanitarian, his interest was beyond pure medical science. Although science is in quotation marks he was passionate about women's rights child labor. And of course, slavery. We're we're running out of time a bit, but tell us if you will how important these issues and others were to Benjamin rush and how much of a visionary. He was in seeing issues that we are still talking about today this morning in the news. Well, I'm glad you mentioned these other social issues because he was passionate about women's rights. And again, he talked the legislature into allowing girls should go to school. But. Telling them that you do you want your boys to grow up as ignorant masses? Who is the first teachers of your of your voice? They are your lives and your wife should have as good in education as you if they are going to take the responsibility of raising your boys. So that's how he coaxed that Pennsylvania. He was a lobbyist he was a skillful lobbyists. And he showed everyone how it was in a better interest to improve the lodge of everyone. He was a great humanitarian and wanted. Everyone to have a decent life as her savory. He went into the black neighborhoods. Help. Talk them into and help them raise the funds to build the first African American church in America in Philadelphia. He actually went to the slave market bought a save himself. So then he could Ray he was a teenager. So he could raise the boy educate him and then free him as soon as he was educated enough to get a job and the boy got a job on a ship. And as a Freeman and whenever the ship came to town. He went to stay with with rush feet that was now his own. So he made the rush house his home. Russia's I said was deeply involved in sight from anticipation. I'm glad you mentioned that his his running with Thomas Paine whom he met an in a bookstore. Thomas painted come over and was eager to wasn't wasn't enemy of royalty and was eager to help Americans gained independence, and he was writing an essay he got a job as an editor of a magazine. He was a great writer his words just leapt off the page and gripped readers, and he was working on a on a document that he wanted to a pamphlet. He was writing on liberty and independence of American liberty and the the the Harz of the whole concept of divine right of kings. He said, why should some baby is born some woman have the right to rule the world. And so he wrote this pamphlet. He showed it to rush. Rush edited it and rush came up with the title commonsense, which spurred which pain then delivered to Washington on the banks of the. Delaware opposite, Trenton Washington ordered the common sense, which you may remember began..

Dr Benjamin rush Harlow Unger Harlow Thomas Paine America Washington Philadelphia Benjamin Franklin Russia Dr Russia Trenton Washington Benjamin Russia field army hospital American psychiatric associati Chicago army fever BBC
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And he he practiced medicine help our audience understand how different that phrase was then as opposed to now he really didn't study medicine as we understand the term because there was no medicine to study, really. There was no science. So just tell us a bit about what it was like to study medicine just by way of comparison to the visual image of what people will put in their heads. When you use the phrase. Yeah. In medicine was in the most primitive era, not much had changed from ancient Greece. When gaylon? Decided that all all the all diseases are due to something in the blood. So the best way to clean out the the diseases and illnesses is to bleed patients and bleeding was still the the common form of treatment for disease when rush studied medicine. They by then they were now studying and Adamy, but it was against all odds against the law and all countries to to use cadavers for that purpose. None nonetheless did that. And so they knew all Abbadi parts, but they really had no conception of disease as we know it today, they they had no instruments the stethoscope had been invented. But they didn't know they really didn't know how to use it properly. I'm sorry. The Stanford had not been invented the microscope had been invented. But not the stethoscope stethoscope wouldn't be invented until around eighteen fifty. So they had no tools. They had no scalpels. They had a think all Lancet, which is a knife. And they would cut into the arm pull out the vein and bleed the patient until usually they take a pint of. Blood. A day during the illness. Fortunately for them and for the patients the human body replaces most of the blood within twenty four hours. So a pint of blood did not kill him. But in many cases, they bled so much that the patients would die of shocked after a certain amount of time. There's no more blood flows out in the body goes into shock, and that's how George Washington died. He did not die of his illness. He had basically laryngitis, and and he died of it because he he ended up just kept insisting as each day passed that he went any better. Let's take more blood and finally they took so much that he died of of shock. So that was a state of medicine there. There really was no Madison. There were quacks all around the colonies who would come into town on wagons and sell patent medicines and call themselves, Dr this Dr that but patent medicines were nothing more than a fruit. Syrups loaded with with rum or some sort of alcohol white lightning some sort of alcoholic beverage so people who face medicines, go into a drunken stupor, and then think they were better, but they never the patent. Medicines never healed anybody. Doctors were no more competent to treat illness and. Wounds, then a lay person they may have had some sense of cleanliness, and we'll get into that after the break. But in terms of day and die difference incompetence, doctor was not necessarily any war competent. He just they thought they were and they will practicing what medicine was at the time. But by objective standards. They really weren't any more competent than a non doctor isn't that sad to say they were a little bit more competent because they cared more lay people, especially on farms, get up and go to work farmer would tell kid. There's nothing like work to get rid of wellness. The job came first. So they they don't exhibit the compassion the doctors did and remember they were very very few doctors. There were none in rural communities, the only doctors has such with MD's equivalent of what? Rush had received the only doctors were in major cities and cities by major cities. Remember, these are very very small towns in today's terms Philadelphia, which was the largest most populated and richest in terms of gross product in America at that time Philadelphia only measured about two two miles by three miles. So you can easily walk across the whole city anytime you felt like this is how rush lose able to treat so many patients he'd go into the slum areas which were relatively small compared to today's city. And and treat the poor. So he could be back in in his neighborhood in the better neighborhoods within a within a half hour at most. And. Despite despite the limitations of formal medical education because of the state of science, Dr Benjamin rush as we will learn made enormous meaningful significant contributions that sprint stretcher, perhaps a hundred years beyond his death. As the first great American humanitarian. We will learn the impact of of a relatively unknown founder Dr Benjamin rush when we come back from our very short break this morning. I speaking with Harlow Unger for the third time. I'm proud to say Harlow has written Dr Benjamin rush the founding father who healed a wounded nation. How did he heal our nation? Be back in thirty seconds of explain all of that and.

Dr Benjamin rush George Washington Greece Harlow Unger Dr Benjamin Stanford laryngitis Adamy founder Philadelphia Madison MD America twenty four hours thirty seconds hundred years
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"He he practiced medicine helped our audience understand how difference that phrase was then as opposed to now he really didn't study medicine as we understand the term because there was no medicine to study, really. There was no science. So just tell us a bit about what it was like to study medicine just by way of comparison to the visual image of what people will put their heads. When you use the phrase. Yeah. Medicine was in the most primitive era not much had changed from ancient Greece when gallon. Decided that all all the all diseases are due to something in the blood. So the best way to clean out the the diseases and illnesses is to bleed patients and bleeding was still the the common form of treatment for disease. When rush studied medicine they by then. They were now studying anatomy, but it was against all odds against the law and all countries to to use cadavers for that purpose of nonetheless did that and so they knew all body parts, but they really had no conception of disease as we know today, they they had no instruments the stethoscope had been invented. But they didn't know, and they really didn't know how to use it properly. I'm sorry. The stethoscope had not been invented the microscope had been invented. But not the stethoscope stethoscope wouldn't be invented until around eighteen fifty. So they had no tools. They had no scalpels. They had a thing called a Lancet, which is a knife. And they would cut into the arm pull out the vein and bleed the patient until usually they take a pint of blood. A day during the onus. Fortunately for them. And for the patients the human body replaces most of the blood within twenty four hours. So a pint of blood did not kill him. But in many cases, they bled so much that the patients would die of shocked after a certain amount of time. There's no more blood flows out the body goes into shock, and that's how George Washington died. He did not die of his illness. He had basically laryngitis, and and he died of it because he he and the doctors kept insisting each day pass that he went any better. Let's take more blood and finally they took so much that he died of shock. So that was a state of medicine there. There really was no medicine that were quacks all around the colonies, you would come into town on wagons and sell patent medicines and call themselves doctor this Dr that but patent medicines were nothing more than fruit. Syrups loaded with with rum or some sort of alcohol white lightning some sort of alcoholic beverage so people who face medicines going to a drunken stupor, and and think they were better, but they never the patent. Medicines never healed anybody so medicine was doctors. They were knocked as we no more competent. Doctors were no more competent to treat illness and wounds, then a layperson they may have had some sense of cleanliness, and we'll get into that after the break. But in terms of day difference incompetence, a doctor was not necessarily any more competent. He just they thought they were and they will practicing what medicine was at the time. But by objective standards, they really weren't any more competent than a non doctors and that fantasy. They were a little bit more competent because they cared more. Lay people especially on farms, get up and go to work. Television kid. There's nothing like work to get rid of your Ellis the job came first. So they they Don exhibit the compassion the doctors did and remember they were very very few doctors that were not in rural communities, the only doctors had such with MD's equivalent of. What of what rush had received the only doctors were in major cities and cities by major cities after remember Egypt. Very very small towns in today's terms Philadelphia, which was the largest most populated and richest in terms of gross product in America at that time Philadelphia only measured about two two miles by three miles. So you can easily walk across the whole city. Anytime you you felt like it. This is how rush was able to. Treat so many patients go into the slum areas which were relatively small compared to today's shitty. And and treat the poor. So he could be back in his neighborhood in the better neighborhoods within a within a half hour at the most. And. Despite despite the limitations of formal medical education because of the state of science Dr Benjamin rush as we will learn made enormous meaningful significant contributions that sprit stretch for perhaps a hundred years beyond his death. As the first great American humanitarian. We will learn the impact of of a relatively unknown found Dr Benjamin rush when we come back from our very short break this morning. I speaking with Harlow longer for the third time. I'm proud to say Harlow has written Dr Benjamin rush the founding father who healed a wounded nation. How did he heal our nation be back in thirty seconds? And explain all of that and more,.

George Washington rush Dr Benjamin Greece Harlow laryngitis Philadelphia Ellis Egypt Don MD America twenty four hours thirty seconds hundred years
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The year after the Republic was founded George Washington authorized medical services in Washington DC for veterans and for the poor. We had government funded healthcare literally the first year or two of the public but spurred by that comment. I looked up our founding father physician Dr Benjamin rush. Jefferson surgeon general the continental army medical director of the corps of discovery of Lewis and Clark in eighteen o three and his favorite treatment. If you showed up in his emergency room complaining of belly pain and vomiting, and all that he would probably have led you because that was his preferred method people for yellow fever victims or he would have looted you up with heavy metals like mercury great. In fact, he supplied these pills for the Lewis and Clark expedition, which were more than fifty percent mercury. And archaeologist today have been able to trace the precise round of Lewis and Clark by tracing the mercury from these anti. Laxity pills that he prescribed for the it's amazing. There's there's a story behind that. Mercury. Was called quicksilver and the doctors of the age used it because it stimulates the immune system. The body knows that it's being poisoned, and it just freaks out and kicks into high fever response, which is actually antibacterial, you know, it's like it helps the body fight off bacteria infections. The problem is a poisons you with mercury, but they didn't know that at the time. And that's why they were called quick doctors or quicksilver doctors and that phrase over the years evolved into quack doctors. That's where the phrase quack doctor came from as as modern drugs are being developed in the late nineteenth early twentieth century penicillin or whatnot. And coming into the market a big way in the medical profession was starting to license itself and things like that they refer to the old mercury doctors Ben Rauch has as quack doctors or quick something else. They didn't have in. Dr Russia's age was the half a million dollar. And I've seen cases.

Clark Mercury Lewis fever Dr Benjamin rush George Washington Washington continental army Jefferson surgeon medical director vomiting Dr Russia Ben Rauch penicillin million dollar fifty percent
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"He came this close Brett they were so close to routing the British and in the last minute is fog rolled in the American militia started shooting at each other. It was just a mess. A giant mess of friendly fire which gave the British enough time gave general Cornwallis in time to get out of Philadelphia with reinforcements for half. And they turned what looked for sure. Like it was going to be a continental victory into this rousing route of retreat. So now Washington's over three in the west, of course, when the British took Philadelphia, the continental congress, such as they were abandoned the city and most of them went back to their their own districts, but a small core at if anyone point between eighteen and twenty three delegates took over the courthouse in the inland. Philadelphia town of York and now the whispers that I spoke about about Washington, they're they're full blown roar. John Adams wants him out, Dr Benjamin rush and Slovenia surgeon, very respective and signer of the declaration of independence. He writes, an anonymous screed calling Washington a full blown dictator with no military skills. Now, there's a courses turned into a pamphlet it circulated up and down the east coast. Roll the colonies Patrick Henry. As a matter of fact, he saw the original. And he writes, the Washington he said this is Benjamin Russia's hand. Right. I just want you to know the kind of statesmen kinda heavy hitters you're up against once you out and Washington oddly enough, he was a great militia commander and if tree commander, but he knew nothing about cavalry tactics for about a about military, engineering or bad artillery. So when he was named commander in chief. He ran out, but all these books about how does this work? So now, he was not only learning how to be a military commander. He was learning. How to be a savvy politician if the knives are out for me, I'm gonna turn I'm gonna turn the situation around to make knives out for them. So when he did was he didn't respond to rush right away. Instead, he asked congress in York, the delegates were there, can you said the commission out here unin inspection tour. I want you to see what's happening out here. And when the five delegates who eventually arrived Valley Forge saw the condition of the army, right? When I'm saying, naked or half bacon. I'm not talking metaphorically foreign officers who came to Valley Forge. Either. Volunteer to fight for the Americans or observe were shocked to see continental centuries naked under a ratty blanket. Barefoot standing on their hats in the snow or the freezing muck. I mean this army was on the on the verge as Washington wrote to congress of starving dissolving dispersing when these five delegates Valley Forge they were. So embarrassed started taking off their own shoes and Eum two soldiers. So now Washington starts manipulating what came to me known as the camp committee these five delegates and without them really knowing they're putting into action everything that Washington wants every day. He sends over one of his young aids props to John Lawrence Alexander Hamilton, and controlling and kind of putting into mind. Oh, God, we need food. Washington's not an autocrat is the only thing keeping his army together, which effect was true. So it was almost like the tail sorted wagging. The dog the five delegates to the camp committee began wagging the dog of..

Washington Benjamin Russia Philadelphia Valley Forge commander Patrick Henry army Cornwallis Brett John Lawrence Alexander Hamilt Dr Benjamin rush York John Adams Slovenia congress
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"The weird thing about these pills is that it was a large enough dose of mercury to actually kill a human being. But it went through their bodies. And the other because it was fast acting too. That was another part. That's why they were called lightning pills. I imagined right. Yeah. Exactly. And they had to be named after the sound, you know, which just still bothers me a little bit. No. But here's here's some saying sounded like lightning when they evacuated their bowels. Yes. Out of the sounded like the clap of thunder. You know, got it like is a storm coming in or is Louis sick. Again, you know, but here's something that hopefully made the pain of the journey worth it for these for these intrepid explorers for a long time. Archaeologist were attempting to trace the exact path that Lewis and Clark took and these guys stated over six hundred different sites. So you might know the general trend, and you can see some stuff that they have documented themselves. But if you want to find the specific actual facts campsites, you're looking at a needle in the haystack situation, or so one would assume or you could call it a pile of human excrement in a hole in the ground situation. That's true. That's probably more accurate. More accurate, which honestly seems to me would be pretty difficult to find as well. But find it. These intrepid. Archaeologist did did they not they didn't know they did. And they did it with the incidental help of Dr Benjamin rushes billions pills because remember how just a moment ago. We said that the these things are sixty percent mercury. Sixty percent, matures chloride or calomel. There was so much mercury. Running through these poor guys bodies that the mercury stayed in the ground where they're latrines were like, unusual heart. Tune ish I'll say it disgusting amount of mercury. And that is how given the opportunity archaeologists could differentiate between the Lewis and Clark poop and the poop of of others who may have passed through a similar location. But then they had to have had a vague idea that couldn't have been like, you know, going willy nilly to every random campsite like this seems like a insane process. How did this go down? It's a good question, my friend. There's a writer for the Chicago trip. View name Marie supposedly who walks us through a little bit of this in his journals. Mary weather Lewis refers to a campsite near a place called Lolo creek, which is just a few miles south of Missoula in causes police travelers rest, and they all everybody thought for longtime that this camp was at the confluence of the bitter river and Lolo creek about a mile and a half away. But this old change when a vapor analysis verified, this unusual amount of mercury there, a high was that much of Apor analysis, and it was like in the air and crazy they were able to they were able to analyze the soil pretty easily once they once they find that one site, and like, oh, this proves it. Let's see if we can test other specific sites entries as Merck, and maybe maybe. To the source. Buy seeing how the concentrations change, right? Yeah. Exactly. You could in theory. I guess find that that hole in the ground by tracking the concentration of mercury. Yes. And there's an interesting thing here that you and I talked about off air. We we've been mentioning mercury as a treatment for constipation, but it was also used to treat an entirely different medical condition. That's the thing. They were getting this mercury from from two different sources, the the billions pills, which was kind of considered a cure all, but then they also had a cache of another type of medication that was specifically designed to treat syphilis because they were they basically kind of prepared for the fact they're going to have a lot of one of their kind of sex. Was there the time unprotected sex? Some native women..

Lewis Clark Lolo creek syphilis Dr Benjamin Louis Merck writer Chicago Marie Missoula Sixty percent sixty percent
"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"dr benjamin rush" Discussed on FoodStuff

"To say that but yeah you know like the sugared ham or sugared bacon right thing yeah the quakers who were abolitionist made and promoted maple sugar as a replacement for sugar cane obtained through slave labor in the west indies in seventeen eighty eight they were led by dr benjamin rush and he caught the air someone who comes up lutton our episodes no not columbus napoleon no less come up in a while no right napoleon you've been slacken come on it's jefferson thomas jefferson jefferson became member of russia's society for promoting the manufacturer sugar from the sugar maple tree just the talk i tell you jefferson that of american farmers could produce enough maple sugar to satisfy the countries need and still have some left to export then they could put a stop to the british cane sugar operation at the time even though maple sugar wasn't exactly the easiest thing to produce this was not unfeasible an average farm family reasonably could've churned out two hundred pounds a season rush and jefferson made pamphlets why got so excited oh home of the antislavery sentiments it did come with less than scientific claims the pamphlets did like this one the play has never been known in any country where sugar composes a material part of the diet of the inhabitants i mean no right that's no i can't i haven't fact checked we haven't fact checked it we did not check jefferson's claim they're still playing.

west indies dr benjamin rush russia jefferson thomas jefferson jef two hundred pounds