19 Burst results for "Dr Bars"

"dr bars" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

06:23 min | 2 months ago

"dr bars" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Back, everybody, Joe, conscious in four guy Benson and you know it's happy hour somewhere. It's happy hour. You gonna bring on happy people? I think she was happy. Actually, I've heard that comedians are the most miserable people on the planet. But he makes people happy. I know that sounds crazy, but you can follow Choe at Joe DeVito Comedy on the Twitter. Joe. How are you? Are you happy? Are you depressed? Like every other comedian? You know, I used to think I was depressed. But now I see the rest of the world kind of caught up to me. So I'm feeling pretty good. That's right. Good for you. Congratulations on that. Hey, I watched one of your stand ups and the way you do stand up now in Covina. We We we talk not too long ago is obviously comedy Clubs are a tough get right. You can't just walk into the comedy cellar and then have you know the usual 100 people sitting in front of you nice, intimate setting and and do your thing. It's like everything else like we see in business. It's largely gone online and you compare and I could relate to this being in my forties myself, not single, but always wondering. What if I was single, particularly during a pandemic, but being in your forties? Is really like shopping. The thrift store, isn't it? Can you explain that a little bit more? Yeah, well, you know, that's one of things I talk about being special now than a single. Now that I'm over 50 is that Yeah, it's it's hard to believe. You know, I've I've learned I've learned when someone says you look good for your age. They're not telling you. You look good. They're telling you, You do not look as bad as they were expecting. And that is what you have to accept The compliment. Oh, God, have you? I mean, you are single. Correct. Yes, I am. Okay. All right. So this is your speaking from experience. So how does one date during a pandemic? Then when In other words, if you get to the more intimate times, I mean, do you asked to test the other person do you just say screw it literally? I mean, what? How do you handle that sort of situation when you have to actually become close physical contact with someone not knowing if they could kill you. Yeah, well, you know, I always like to think on every day there's a possibility of homicide. That's what keeps things exciting. You just getting staff of the fork in the forehead, right? Well, the CDC did come out with the guidelines and they said, if you're single, and you're become intimate with a stranger, they said, wear a mask and I heard that and thought I've been there, but it was actually not the kind of massive favor, referring to But, yeah, I think Look, it's It's 2021 u know we're two weeks a little over two weeks in almost three weeks now and my advice to people. Look, if if you've got some coupons Go out and use them because things were going to get even crazier this year goes on. I think you're right about that. We're talking to Joe DeVito. We talked about how you do stand up these days and you have one of your specialties. Call your drive our special just to get people on idea of how starved we are toe laughin starve. We are for fresh content right? Because there's not real movies out right that they came out. There's wonder Woman 1984 that eyes very forgetful for a lot of people who I think it got an Academy Award nomination, which is quite remarkable, and then Interviewed Russell Crowe. Actually, I'm totally gonna name drop here for for no apparent reason for a movie called Unhinged, which, you know, I guess I could say now not not the best piece of cinema that you'll ever see. But But the point is that your particular my bar special by Dr our special over one million views on YouTube 1.8 million on Facebook. How do you monetize that? Exactly? Okay, That's the question. I always ask it, Z interesting to see that. What did it take to get me the appreciation of the people? It was a worldwide pandemic. Nothing less than that. Would have been enough to put showed a veto over the top. It's been one of the few good good things this year. You know his for me. I got kind of lucky that you know, we're not working as much as we would like to, like everybody else where you know people need entertainment business their feelings to hit. You know, I learned that when you talk about your essential workers, I am not on that. Listen. I'm actually what you call the last responder. Okay, even when things were going well, they asked me to stay home to stay out of the way. But it's nice that people could go watch the special it Z for free. If you just type in Joe DeVito, dry Bar on Facebook and YouTube and It's really been nice to see people were enjoying it and hearing from them still being able to interact with them. So I'm hoping that when things start to open up over the course of the next year that I'm able to go out and meet some of these people in an entertainment person. There you go. We're talking to Joe DeVito Comedian at Joe DeVito Comedy on the Twitter. You know, I wonder if you get obviously on YouTube. There is a comments section or on Facebook. Obviously a comments section and you get complaints or thank you so the feeling it's the latter. As far you stay away from the political stuff, for the most part because I think people are so inundated now, obviously in the late night shows, for instance, with Colbert and Seth Meyers And Jimmy Kimmel, where you turn it on. You're like, Wait. Why is my remote on CNN? Still What? Because they basically sound the same at this point. So are people almost appreciative that I think it takes more of a talent by the way to not do trump stuff or political stuff because it's just too easy. Half the time. Do you get thank you for that, For, like, Hey, thanks for doing comedy like the way you know Eddie Murphy used to do comedy where I didn't have to hear about Republicans, Democrats and everybody else in between. Yeah, That's that's for sure. And one of the things with Dr are the reason why it's called Dr Bars because the company that produced the specials they operate operate out of Provo, Utah. So it Z produced in conjunction with the Mormon company. So they asked. Hey, we are already inflates things to be clean and free of a lot of political content and pretty that that was so much fun too. Have the challenge of nothing in a dirty comic, but to work clean to do stuff That's going to last for a while and to just provide people with entertainment. Because I look at what I see on the late night shows, and to me, it's not even a question of whether you agree with it. It's just not well done. And you know, there are people who think if you if you call the president a Cheeto that is the height of wit and I just was hearing the same lame jokes over and over again, and you know if there's if there's one thing I'm hoping is that you know as we the nation tries to move forward, you know the jokes about Joe Biden. It's look the man's could be the president for possibly as much as four months..

Joe DeVito Joe Facebook YouTube Twitter Dr Joe Biden president Benson Choe Academy Award Covina CDC Eddie Murphy Russell Crowe Utah CNN Provo Dr Bars Jimmy Kimmel
"dr bars" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"dr bars" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Would you and they'll then I? Think HBO would say well. You Might WanNa. Think about changing your TV system so this. They're trying to use users as leverage between each other and poor dewey gets caught in the middle. About everything sorry. No! I. Anything HBO these days. What, what are you subscribe? I just you know I like your time. Jerks. Shadow to patrons that our master and grandmaster levels including Dan Kovac Irwin Stir, and just an Zeller's also a big thanks to Veronica Belmont for being with us after all this time. We really missed you. Let folks know can keep up with your work. Yeah, Gosh. Veronica Belmont is really just a little portal page for all the stuff that I'm doing right now. certainly are of course still going strong after what twelve years. so we're. We're still cranking out. Certainly there every other week, superfund and spark. Yeah, the product that I work on adobe is called adobe spark, and you can check out at spark dot. ADOBE DOT COM. Also folks you can so support for daily Tech. News show at any level by going to daily Tech. News show dot com slash patriots of perks for thanking you. If you find value in the show, we just ask that you give value back there and we also support the show through some merch. Hats sweatshirts we know not all of you want a mask, but if you do we've got him in the store right now. Who wouldn't want to walk around with ADIDAS LOGO ON THEIR FACE? Come on, go check it out daily. Tech new show DOT COM slash store. And you got feedback for us. We'd love to hear it. Email addresses feedback, daily Tech News show at DOT com. If you'd like to join us live, we'll guess what we are live Monday through Friday. Four Thirty PM Eastern Twenty thirty TC. You can find out more at daily tech new show dot com slash live Dr Bar with Lamar Wilson has guest tucked then. This show is part of the broadband network. GET MORE AT FROG PANTS DOT com. Club! Enjoyed this broiler..

"dr bars" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

Dead Celebrity

12:44 min | 11 months ago

"dr bars" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

"With complex issues of gift estate entrusted taxation. Jackie also has a strong background in international state planning factor compliance and pre immigration tax. Planning thanks for joining us. Jackie Dave Bahir subjective. Today's episode is Albert C. Barnes Barnes was an American businessman best known for his massively valuable collection that he devoted most of his life to curate the nine hundred piece collection which was worth some twenty five billion dollars featured one hundred eighty-one in-laws sixty nine says on sixty matisses. Forty four Picassos and fourteen Medaglia Ottis to just give a few highlights. Barnes intensely disliked the elite Air quotes of the art world and negated his life to providing education to less fortunate. You defied convention by grouping is our peace based on aesthetics philosophical reasons instead of artists are period Andrea. Matisse said the foundation is the only place to see Harken America Dr Barnes never had children but he took great care to plan for his legacy in one thousand nine hundred eighty two created a title. Trust agreement call the trust indenture. This trust established the Barnes Foundation a charitable organization to manage his art gallery as an educational institution in Lower Merion Pennsylvania. And if that name sounds familiar. That's because it's where Kobe Bryant is cool his lengthen. These documents that was not be sold moved placed on tour or even rearranged within the gallery itself. He wanted used primarily for education but open for the public on a very limited basis. He restricted how it could be viewed when only one day a week usually and how much could be charged to see the restrictions also made it very difficult for the board of to keep the foundation profitable or at least that's what they climbed so little by little a filed corpse-eating asking for permission to change the trust. Provisions Trustees engaged in expensive litigation in court arguing that the terms of Dr Barnes's trust impossible because of the great costs needed to maintain the collection and the final blow. Came in two thousand four when a judge ruled that the Barnes Foundation which now supported by three wealthy and elite Charles Foundations and the Pennsylvania attorney general can move the entire collection to the museum district or Downtime Philadelphia right next door to the Philadelphia Museum of art for context of House offices. Barnes had once said the Philadelphia Museum of art is a house of artistic and intellectual prostitution so safe to say probably not what he wanted. So how could he wishes have been so blatantly disregarded or because of a doctrine of deviation which is a legal principle that allows court effectively rewrite a charitable trust if the purpose becomes impossible to maintain without changes. The trustees argued that there was no financially viable way to keep the art of the building. Dr Bars created for the collection could only be maintained. You'd by permitting the move and I'm sure. The allure of creating a huge tourist attraction by relocating at twenty five billion dollar Philadelphia certainly offered no motivation at all. Now there's more twisters to this story which inspired the excellent documentary the auto steel. And we're not gonNA cover them here. Our focus was just how surprisingly easy. It is to have estate planning documents and wills in particular modified overturned. So Jackie how worried should clients be about how close to the letter? Their estate putting documents will be enforced after they're gone if someone just leaves a will and everything's going outright to their beneficiaries. I think that clients can essentially rest assured as long as they've picked a a trustworthy executor that their wishes are going to be carried out. Same thing with a shorter term trust for beneficiaries. For example. You might leave your child or a younger person Entrust to a certain age. I think that you can probably guarantee who the trustee is going to be or who the trustee and potential successor will be so that you can have pretty good control over these dispositions link where clients do have to worry is especially in this area with long-term charitable dispositions. You have certain people that you're going to put in charge right after your death. Almost a hundred years later you might have an entirely different board running the organization. Different Trustees of a trust and then your vision can start to go awry if you haven't done some really careful planning. What's the difference in this situation between the will and trust and what those different instruments are supposed to do and of what they can do? They can be quite similar documents depending on the type of woman type of trust here we. In the case of Barnes we would have a a well with which essentially disposes of your estate at your death and then we have this trust which established his foundation ultimately to hold this art and carry on this educational mission. This charitable mission rather than necessarily run art museum so that's very different and also obviously Your estate isn't going to last forever. The idea is to administer an estate and have it wrapped up within a year or a few years. This other plan in which the arch foundation was held was mental last. Ideally in perpetuity are as long as possible. And I think that we should talk a little bit more about the doctrine of deviation to and how that's brought us to where we are today in terms of how have you made your wishes known to your fiduciaries how major wishes known your executor if you have a will and how have you made your wishes known to trustees if you have a trust or how we made wishes known to Charitable Corporation. That's going to continue beyond your debt. Obviously some methods making your wishes known or not going to be ultimately legally enforceable when they applied the doctrine of deviation to barnes they essentially were trying to anticipate how could most closely meet. Barnes is desired end. When circumstances changed so I think that something. That's it's important to talk to clients about is what's your ultimate goal and get that in writing. Even if it's not legally enforceable I think if Barnes have been consulted on this and someone had said well it's down to this re they're gonNA move your entire collection right next door to the Philadelphia. Museum are moving out of the suburban setting that you chose change. The way to the artwork is presented from what you designed to something that's perhaps and more accommodating to the General Public. Would you rather have moved? And your vision changed in that way or would you rather sell. Certain pieces certainly arguable. That might have said sell certain pieces or we might have come up with a different way to raise funds to keep the off foundation operating as it was one of the difficulties. When you're dealing with these plans that are intended to last in perpetuity. Right is that that's impossible along the way and you have to anticipate not just through the various scenarios that could occur over the ensuing rest of time but also the legal changes that are and all that stuff is just impossible for an estate plan to like completely for. See it in any way how good you are all. That's kind of why it's best to sort of building at certain points. Some safe spots here where where things can transfer or where where things can change a little bit in some flexibility. Because you know the only fact that you know is that things will change. You have no idea what the changes are going to be necessarily. Yeah in hindsight is twenty twenty but I think that if I were assisting with creating this plan I might ask those questions. If you're endowment runs low in years what changes would you be most okay with if changes had to be made because we never know even if someone gets a hundred million dollar endowment today the market crash could be invested in something that seems really safe at suddenly becomes unsafe or sometimes organizations are even victim of produce aries? Obviously we don't see that very often but it does happen. So how are we going to necessarily plan for all contingencies? That can happen there including running out of money to keep the operation going until depicted the night honestly in this situation despite what I just said. It's kind of the most obvious question right pure album. Barnes's stay planner and he's putting all these rules saying people can come in once a week and it can only be X. People at once and you can only charge this or it's just simple math. Look at and be like well. Rent costs this much to say like a house. It's going to work out. And would Albert Barnes of preferred to allow more people in at a time or preferred to have partnered perhaps with the city of Philadelphia or even with Philadelphia Museum of art to transport people easily from Philadelphia to Marion in that suburb where he was located rather than have the artwork moved. I think people describe Albert Barnes being someone who got what he wanted and who might not have been particularly open to hearing different perspectives. But I think that this is the kind of thing where if someone brought in this concept for an estate plan. You'd have to push back if the individual wasn't willing to sort of look at the different contingencies and plan for them and I think that you know now we have the example of Albert Barnes if someone doesn't WanNa plan for different contingencies. We can say okay but if these unforeseen things happen we want to know. We most like your opinion on what should happen because that can be instructive for how changes should be made. And if you don't provide it you're leaving it up to the court and you're leaving it up to whoever might be in charge of these assets or your plan to one hundred years after death. And that's probably someone who has no personal connection with you concede the Barnes case the smallest possible genuine to the most closely adhering to your wishes can be nowhere near what his wishes clearly would have been right out in. My last possible thing you to do was hurt. His Art to go to this autumn quote elites in the Philadelphia Museum. It's also possible. That was the best way to do it now. You know it's sort of a a weird situation. Where even sometimes the closest possible best solution can be the last thing that person would want if they haven't specified right exactly. I mean he might have wanted everything to be sold and wound down if it got to this point. But we'll never know because obviously it wasn't anticipated the endowment would deplete to the point that they were in grave financial trouble but these are the kind of questions that we need to think of as a state planners. And that's why we why we study things that's why we read case law. People might not have been as aware of these problems back in nineteen twenty two or back. No one this estate plan was initially created but we have the benefit of an extra hundred or so years of history to guide us in making a state clowns. Obviously don't think that most of our listeners have clients with twenty five billion dollars collections. That they're gonNA have to worry about this about unless you do. In which case awesome. Why the Hell you listening to me? You know. I think this concept of what porn was doing this idea of dead hand control and sort of the risks inherent in that and the natural idea that sort of the natural tendency toward of powerful people to want to do that is something that can be instructive for all advisors regardless whether working on estate planning on vacuum. I'm just talking about the dead hand a little bit with that. Mean a good way to phrase it. It's essentially trying to control beyond your death. What happens to your assets as we discussed at the beginning of this podcast? It works best for a shorter amount of time in the longer. It's been since your death the harder it can be. For example sometimes clients will want a particular financial firm or financial advisor to be working on their assets. That usually works fine. If it's just going to be your estate but if you have perhaps a lengthy trust and you might not even think you have a lengthy trust. You mentioned that most listeners probably don't have huge art collections to dispose of. But if you have younger people in your life either. Children Nieces and nephews. Whoever even the children of family friends? Who might be inheriting from you? You have to anticipate that if these kids are three years old today you might be putting something in your estate plan that has assets in them for trust until they're thirty five forty so that's going to be a fairly lengthy amount of time and if you're restricting to certain financial advisers. We don't know what could happen with that. For example people retire financial firms emerge and go under and it might not be clear what to do in those situations so I do try to draft with a certain amount of flexibility to.

Albert C. Barnes Barnes Philadelphia Barnes Foundation Philadelphia Museum Albert Barnes Barnes trustee Jackie Dave Bahir Medaglia Ottis Kobe Bryant Andrea run art museum Picassos Matisse Lower Merion Pennsylvania arch foundation General Public Pennsylvania Dr Bars
Fertility doctor accused of impregnating at least 11 women with his own sperm

Radio From Hell

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Fertility doctor accused of impregnating at least 11 women with his own sperm

"Fertility doctor who inseminated up to one hundred women with his own sperm has been fined ten thousand dollars a hundred dollars a woman doctor norman barwick who ran broadview for tilleke clinic and ottawa canada a gay patients his own sperm instead of that of a donor or their partner or mixed up samples the misconduct which dates back to the seventies was uncovered after one of the children became curious about her heritage and got a genetic test while a second developed ceac disease a genetic condition that neither parent was a carrier for rebecca dixon found out that dr bar one was her biological father when she was aged twenty five describing the impact she said for a while i felt this associated for my with my own face it's as if the person looking back at me in the mirror wasn't fully me anymore cat palmer realized with rebecca that their dna matched describing his actions as an appalling and reprehensible at the college of physicians and surgeons at ontario said he betrayed patients trusts your actions deeply affected individuals and their families and caused irreparable damage and will span generations rebecca dixon said she felt repulsed him contaminated when at the age of twenty five she learned that dr borrowing was her biological father not her father her mother her father had been unable to produce sperm and so they win with fertility clinic and you know wow her father dance at his world was turned upside down to rebecca is our child but then she's not our child she is but she's not i it's just bazaar and they find the guy ten thousand dollars and said he's really all he's eighty now he's he's a fight him and said you can't practice medicine anymore all right okay former candidate number

Norman Barwick Tilleke Clinic Rebecca Dixon Ontario Partner Palmer Ten Thousand Dollars Hundred Dollars
"dr bars" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on Science Friday

"Welcome back to bar. Hello nice to be here. You're you're welcome. Thanks for joining us. Dr cannon as I just said, the this patients cure, or require that you have a bone marrow transplant from a donor who happened to have this rare genetic mutation that makes people resistant HIV infection. He is as I say now the second person to ever achieve remission for more than a year. There may be another patient and Dusseldorf right on the on the way to the same thing. But is this a practical cure for the other thirty seven million people? No, not until but that doesn't mean this is not incredibly exciting and of great value on what researchers are, you know, focused on doing. Now is saying can we understand why this, you know, very specialized and boutique treatment worked for these patients on come. We recapitulate the elements of that. And find a way to do it. That's you know, safer and applicable to, you know, people who don't have an underlying council that would make them undergo my transplant Dr bar with about other things like vaccines or other work that isn't getting as much attention. There was a case of a potential cure. That got a lot of press coverage earlier this week one publication actually leaked the news earlier than there was supposed to what are what are you excited about? Yeah. That's a great question. I mean, it is hard not to be excited about the second example of a possible cure. But but you're right. Dr cannon is right. This is not directly translatable to a large number of people. So when we think about the thirty seven million people as you mentioned who are infected with HIV right now in the world, we want to think about things that are a little more simple and a little bit more broadly applicable, and and honestly the HIV cure research field for those approaches is a little bit earlier on. So we're looking at strategies to reduce the size of the virus population. That is infected and remains in the body despite long periods of HIV medicine, and then we're looking at novel immunotherapy mechanisms so way to train the immune system or enhance the immune system to identify those cells, and then clear those cells. So you're right. There are things like vaccines. There are things like antibodies. There's many stra-. Deji that have been used in other types of cancer approaches that we're looking to apply to the situation of HIV. But I will say that many of these stages are in the very beginning of development, and though there are positive and really exciting developments. We're not at the stage of being able to even do large stage clinical trials or or implement them. Broadly to all the people who could benefit ultimately deduct cannon. What about gene therapy? We hear so much about that with is that useful and applicable line of work here. Let's lutely..

HIV infection Dr cannon
HIV injections to replace daily pills pass medical trial

Science Friday

11:28 min | 2 years ago

HIV injections to replace daily pills pass medical trial

"Hopeful news this week for people living with HIV a couple of drug trials have shown that a monthly long acting injection is as effective as daily dosing of pills and keeping HIV in check. This news comes just days. After researchers reported that a second man has been cured of infection from HIV man known only as the London patient. This comes twelve years after the cure of the world's first person. Now, why why a cure for these two? Well, both men in addition to HIV had cancer, requiring bone marrow transplants and both receive transplants have cells with one very particular. Genetic twist HIV resistance, if the London patient remains off drugs HIV free as he has for eighteen months. Months then that would make to people in the whole world who have been cured of the virus and only after risky procedures meant to save them from advanced cancer. So what does research hold for the other thirty seven million people hoping to live the best lines? They can with the virus. That was once a death sentence here to talk about the future of HIV research are to HIV researchers working on different kinds of treatments to pull a canon is professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the school of medicine university of southern California in Los Angeles. Welcome back to Canada. Hi, nice to have you start to Catherine bar assistant, professor of medicine and the factious disease division university of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Welcome back to bar. Hello nice to be here. You're you're welcome. Thanks for joining us. Dr cannon as I just said, this patients cure require that you have a bone marrow transplant from a donor who happened to have this rare genetic mutation that makes people resistant HIV infection. He is as I say now the second person to ever achieve remission for more than a year. There may be another patient in Dusseldorf right on the way to the same thing. Yeah. But is this a practical cure for the other thirty seven million people know, but that doesn't mean this is not incredibly exciting and of great value on what research is odd, you know, focused on doing now is saying can we understand why this very specialized and boutique treatment worked for these patients, and can we recapitulate the elements about and find a way to do it. That's you know, safer and applicable to people who don't have an underlying council that would make them undergo by my transplant Dr bar with about other things like vaccines or other work that isn't getting as much attention. There was a case of a potential cure. They got a lot of press coverage earlier this week one publication actually leaked the news earlier than they were supposed to what are what are you excited about? Yeah. That's a great question. I mean, it is hard not to be excited about the second example of a possible cure. But but you're right. Dr cannon is right. This is not directly translatable to a large number of people. So when we think about the thirty seven million people as you mentioned who are infected with HIV right now in the world, we wanna think about things that are a little more simple and a little bit more broadly applicable, and and honestly the HIV cure research field for those approaches is a little bit earlier on. So we're looking at strategies to reduce the size of the virus population. That is infected and remains in the body despite long periods of HIV medicine, and then we're looking at novel immunotherapy mechanisms so way to train the immune system or enhance immune system to identify those cells, and then clear those cells. So you're right. There are things like vaccines there things like antibodies. There's money. Strategies that have been used in other types of cancer approaches that we're looking to apply to the situation of HIV. But I will say that many of these stages are in the very beginning of development and end though, there are positive and really exciting developments. We're not at the stage of being able to even do large stage clinical trials or or implement them. Broadly to all the peoples who could benefit. The Decca cannon. What about gene therapy? We hear so much about that. With is that a useful and applicable line of work here? Absolutely. Yes. Unin deed as we are trying to figure out how to sort of recreate what happened with these transplant patients. Gene therapy is is really playing a starring role. We have two challenges, you know, first of all we have to figure out a way to sort of devote the reservoirs HIV that exists in patients. That's kind of one of the things that happens when somebody gets chemotherapy for that council. We we don't want to have to do that. We don't have to give people chemotherapy. So instead, we're trying to sort of figure out kinda jump Lhamo targeted ways that could specifically remove HIV infected cells. But then that's not going to be enough because we'll never be able to get rid of all the HIV. And so what we want to do then it's used gene therapy to take some of the patient's own cells and make them resistant to HIV to sort of mimic. What happened with these? Stone as off the bone marrow transplants on twenty nine teen. And it sounds crazy to me that I can even say this. But doing gene therapy to recreate the genetic quack that these HIV resistant down this hot is is almost becoming routine. We have amazing tools like like, Chris bustle example, that allow us to go in and target the specific gene that can make people cells resistant to HIV JEAN CLAUDE c- c- all five. And so so that part of the treatment pot that gene therapy can do I kind of feel like, you know, we can do that already. But what we don't know is if that's going to be enough. And instead, what do we combine that with to kind of if you like deep oak people's HIV reservoir, if you can you think do gene therapy that kind of work already are there trials with gene therapy? Yes, indeed does actually trial. What's going on already what people's own bone marrow stem cells are being taken out and with reagents that are a bit like Krista cool zinc finger nuclear crisis. They act like genetic scissors, and they are mutating this, gene, the five G in the patient's own stem cells, which are then kind of return to them. So there are ongoing trials in Los Angeles looking at whether or not that can help patients if not completely kill them. At least get them some benefit in some way of controlling the virus. Katherine let me ask you. What makes HIV such a hard disease research is it just that the virus is a is a complicated problem. Yeah. The virus is a very tricky adversary. You know, it's a small virus. But it's very flexible, and it changes quickly to sort of fight off, whatever strategy we use. So it can quickly develop resistance to HIV medicines. And that's why we have to use multiple medicines at the same time in order to even suppress it, effectively, not not a radical the, you know, the reservoir for care, but just to maintain suppression. But the other thing that makes it really tricky is that it's it's a type of virus called a retrovirus, which means it takes a copy of its DNA or its genetic material and puts it into the host cell and so shortly after infection and just a very short period of time the virus embeds itself permanently and an HIV positive person's body. And so that that window to prevent the seating of HIV is very very narrow. And so basically every person who becomes. Infected with HIV has these permanent copies within their own selves? And that's this major barrier for HIV care that all the research is sort of trying to reduce and hopefully completely clear more and more. We're seeing the overlap between cancer research and HIV as you point out both of these men involved in this cure had cancer and treating the cancer. Also got rid of the virus. Doesn't mean there are still other things from cancer treatments that we could apply HIV. Yeah. I think that's actually a very exciting area of research. We are borrowing a lot of immunotherapy strategies as well. As a lot of the knowledge that cancer. Researchers have gained from exciting new and really groundbreaking treatments and cancer. But one of the problems is, you know, when you think about someone who has a a life threatening cancer that that maybe caused their deaths in three to six months, you're really willing to take a lot of risks in order to try to extend that person's life so side effects are Texas cities for for very exciting therapies are are tolerated in that situation. But when we talk about HIV positive individuals is doing well on HIV medicine, and and really leaving living a very functional life. We're not willing to entertain serious toxicities. And so that that margin or that window of what we're able to tolerate in order to see the effects of these exciting, immunotherapy strategies is much smaller. And so that's one of the limitations of applying many of these exciting immunotherapy strategies that are. Are currently being so successfully employed in cancer limited by the number of candidates who have both cancer and HIV finding them. If you wanted to. Paula. What do you think? Oh, yeah. No, absolutely. I mean, you know, really, if if you if you have a blood cancer, and you failed initial treatment. So that you then become a candidate for transplant. It's almost like, you know, the planets have to be aligned, and you know, you have to have HIV have a blood cancer need a bone marrow transplantation. And then find a donor who is not just what we call it tissue much somebody who can you know, service, your bone marrow donor, but he also has this Rudge mutation the see all five mutation that only about one percent of the population. Do so, you know, it's it's always going to be a very very unusual circumstance. But one of the things that I think quite exciting is, you know, increasingly Counci doctors know about this. There's a large consortium in Europe called icy stem, which is actually it's. Funded by the American Foundation for aids research, which is the charity that Elizabeth Taylor setup, and they are putting together a database of potential bone marrow donors who are carrying the mutation. They got more than twenty thousand people on the books, if you like ready to go, so although it's always going to be a very unusual and only be possible in the smoker to patients, I think what's exciting is that you know, that's going to be made available to people who you know, who qualify for that. And who wants to undergo that

Hiv Infection HIV Los Angeles Dr Cannon London Canada Dusseldorf Canon School Of Medicine University Professor Of Medicine Professor Philadelphia University Of Pennsylvania Texas Europe Jean Claude Paula
"dr bars" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"But he's not in studio with us this week because he's traveling. He's on a junket and Paul is on the phone with us. Hi, it's great to be with you on this Friday. Thank you for making time to join us. So tell us where you are. I'm in New York City right now New York City at a right rapid city so much so I just feel right at home being here. Okay. So tell us why you're actually there. Yeah. From number two junket. Search you coming up one is for the new Mark Wahlberg movie, Houston family and wrote burn play this couple that decide to grow their families through adoption, so doctors snitch girl her chew siblings. One movie. And then the other movies knew how the current comedy. Tiffany haddish. And we'll be interesting. I have not heard anything about that movie. Tell us what to going on a junket. I think people probably have an image in their head. But like what is a day? Actually, look like when you're on a junket go. What did they look like is that on the night before the interview? So it's nice. All of us journalists and to go see Nobody's Fool, which is movies. So Baucus together. There's a reception for us for the movie, and I'm not going to love. We'll see they're living. And then in the morning, we go to where the universities are being held. And then tomorrow. Easterbrook interviewed. Loser movies will happen tomorrow morning. So in the morning. It would be me. We'll get to ask member. It'll be like me with Mark Wahlberg and rose Byrne together, for instance, movie and usually three or four minutes with each outline, which is so cool. Now, can I have this one other question because I mean, it seems like many times when you've gone on a junket you have been able to double up and do a couple junkets like you are doing this time. Like the studio will line them up in such a way. So that you can do more than one at a time. I think so, you know, these these movies, I'm paramount, and we have a really good relationship with prince these by with paramount. So they all signed you to your Emily out to do them. So I think when they can turn a pair movies together up their release do that to kind of maximize art time and how Dr bars parties movies now, this is an opportunity for you to get in front of actors and ask them questions. But you also are asking them questions that probably a lot of other people are going to ask them. How do you go about trying to come up with questions that not every other reporter's going to ask right because you're on twin cities live accuracy p? That audience. I think about what does the audience wanting here asked about that? You know, our motto is food hash funds. So they may be questions about bats. Why don't they really relate to what the movie's about specifically in how the highlight of their life? So like with Margaret rose about family, and adoption, and I'm going through that right now. Talk fat or parenting advice. Like, what's the parenting advice you've ever received something a little bit? They're not used to or like, we'll be Kohlberg is a bucket list person for me like I was going to be a big wine. But I'm going to kind of talk about my Bob up some movies distract you. And what that movie to me as a kid, and how that is inspired by hope know, part of my career. So it's stuff like that. I can try to make a personal connection with them. Ben, Hutton and out. Do you ever get a little bit? Are you at all nervous? Paul Maguire Grimes to me these people. Yes, I I remember about one of the last ones. I did this. Clod getting interview Diane Keaton has I loved the godfather so much, and we'll have the same way to where she is an eye. She isn't he got winner. So I'm a little combinations about that. Because I dot com for so long, and I don't wanna make a bumbling fool myself. Maybe a little bit of I don't know. So. Keep it cool. And and trust myself. I think that Hopkins myself, and I know that will be it'll go well, okay. Paul Maguire grinds from Paul's trip to the movies, you're on junkets in New York. What is the best part about being on a junket come on? They're gonna they gotta be throwing some free stuff your way. I mean, it's usually the combination. So when I'm in LA, they put us up at like the four seasons Beverly Hills. So it is swanky Royal they treat you really wild there. I think that talking to celebrities having face to face time. And then getting to know other journalists reporters from countries been been great personal networking relationship as well. Okay. Now, we just have like a couple of minutes left here. Paul. Can you tell us about the QNA that you are moderating around beautiful boy? Yeah. So last week, I talked about beautiful boy system. We'll be Timothy Charlemagne. I'd see crowds playing and this Sunday Amazon pretty seen. This movie is flying. The account feeder as Wallace shop and Timothy plays next shot in the movie. So I'll be moderating both Saddam about their movie beautiful boy. And if you remember she was nominated for an Oscar last year for call me by name. He's also in lady guard like this I really feel passionate about and really excited about and I note that the tickets went on sale yesterday, and we're sold out fairly can simply so that I'm really excited box. People not only to see this movie and LAN more out math, addiction, mental illness. But then to talk to me Charlemagne asking questions and as well. Yeah. Absolutely. This'll this'll be a really cool event. Also, you know like we talked about this. I know last week a little bit. But Timothy shallow may has is like having his year. He has been definitely buzzed about. And certainly this movie is a really important movie. And he's he's attached to it. And and very cool Paul for you to be able to be involved with with this project as well. Thank you so much for.

Paul Mark Wahlberg Timothy Charlemagne New York City Paul Maguire Grimes Tiffany haddish Margaret rose Timothy shallow Diane Keaton Baucus Houston Paul Maguire Easterbrook reporter Kohlberg rose Byrne Emily LA Beverly Hills Bob
"dr bars" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Station. And we got seventy eight degrees at three o'clock. Good morning. I'm sue Guzman. President Trump is hinting that a New York Times op Ed authored by an anonymous White House official is treasonous. The op-ed says there are people in the White House who are trying to protect the country from Trump suite here from correspondent Jonathan Karl. Unnamed official offers a devastating portrayal of Trump at the president the president's leadership style is impetuous adversarial petty and ineffective senior officials will privately admit their daily disbelief at the commander-in-chief comments and actions meetings with him veer off topic and off the rails. He engages in repetitive, rants and his impulsiveness results in. In half baked ill informed and occasionally reckless decisions that have to be walked back. There is much speculation as to who wrote the op-ed some including bookies are betting its vice President Mike Pence based on one unusual word in the peace. Lodestar a word that has been used by pants in speeches in the past an outbreak a flu in the middle. East might be the culprit enforcing an Emirates airlines flight to briefly be quarantined at JFK airport yesterday cities acting health Commissioner Dr bar Bose says it looks like those who got sick aboard the plane had the flu given the symptoms that we're seeing in the patients and giving given the histories that they present it looks like this is probably influenza Dr Bose said seven crew members and three passengers were taken to Jamaica hospital and are in stable condition. She said all the five hundred twenty one passengers aboard were assessed and the vast majority were cleared of any illness while one hundred six. Did report cold like symptoms. I'm Lisa G for seven ten W O supreme court nominee. Brad Kavanagh will be back on Capitol Hill today following a marathon confirmation hearing yesterday cavenaugh spent more than twelve hours being questioned by the Senate Judiciary committee, the federal appeals court judge was grilled on abortion rights. Presidential powers and pardons cavenaugh suggested that the Roe versus Wade abortion decision is here to stay describing it as a settled law. A violent first day of school for a student in Brooklyn who was stabbed in the head with a metal hair pick happened in the courtyard. If automotive school yesterday morning when police say a seventeen year old male student stabbed another during an argument police say the suspect told them he was tired of being bullied group of students are sick. From the heat at Bergen arts and science charter high school and Garfield according to one student some eleventh graders collapsed in the heat while running a mile during gym class.

President Trump Dr bar Bose flu president vice President official Bergen arts and science charte Trump sue Guzman Mike Pence cavenaugh White House Jonathan Karl Emirates airlines Brad Kavanagh New York Times Brooklyn Lisa G Senate Judiciary committee
"dr bars" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on KTRH

"At shale mag dot com welcome in this hour we got the authority things ants welcome back in i'm gonna i'm gonna make a kind of promise to this is not the last time we need to get you in one more time before the end of january twenty eighteen okay because he's going to retire after that i can't believe that you're younger than me you're not allowed to retire dr paul mister he is our aunt texas harris county extension whatever you wanted to department of into malla gee all these ties back to him he's been our goto and'specialised specialist for so long and i thought it was worth bringing them in here before the christmas break just so we can get an update on a couple of things and again thank you for giving up some of your time on a saturday guide to be really appreciate that i told everybody on the air in the first hour of the program this morning when you came in i was gonna ask this question whether i'm right or wrong oh by the way let me give the phone number if you've got an aunt specific maybe an insect specific question but definitely in the world you got a question for dr nassar now's the time to get it in seven one three two one two ktar h actually if you want to call and thank him for all his years of service to 'em and extension and all the things they've done to help we've been able to kind of put out there his information on how to control the answer you know i i have great and control because of people like dr nestor dr bar driesen am and they're all the information they put out over the years you want to call and thank him because we now know he's going to retire at the end of january argue that opportunity to since it is the christmas season seven one three two one two ktar h that's seven one three two one two five eight seven four i swear.

dr paul mister malla gee dr nassar dr nestor dr bar driesen harris county
"dr bars" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Part of what went on is that national democrats looked at california saw that hillary won all these congressional sees and went darn california has changed you look at the results and actually you were talking earlier about turn out in primaries you had democrats and republicans going crazy trying to get people to vote and we just did but we always do which is not vote just like jillian so i am registered now barbara i just didn't want to drive to norwalk voted in twenty something years and it's never come up and they'll finally i registered to vote and everyone's pointing out that i don't vote it's very coming up at four thirty zarni because you said it on the air but the bottom line in all of this is i and this is something you to somebody's going to have to work through for november donald trump was not popular in california when the california primary came donald trump had already ready won the nomination and all kinds of republicans either didn't vote or didn't vote for him which skewed those congressional results because you had a lot of people just staying home so they all decided that these seats had changed and frankly no these seats haven't changed the whole state is a lot bluer than it was but to think that trump well that the hillary victories meant that you could well they fit made them some mel blood in the water and so then the dc got all excited and went out and recruited all these rich people who would sell funds so they didn't have to spend any money on them except other rich people smelled the blood in the water and came in and around two so they ended up having to spend a fortune attacking republicans pick just trying to get a democrat in the runoff to get back to where you would have been with no effort under the old system perspective hey it's fun and while i lectured a little that was a fun election guys thanks so much dr bar can i call her dr barton dr bomb.

california hillary jillian norwalk donald trump
"dr bars" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"The great pyramid right he's the and it's the largest pyramid built in some ways it's the most intricate pyramid ever built everybody thinks that he's the guy who really showed egypt to pyramids but it's not true it's his father snafu who really taught egypt how to build tournaments never was an amazing guy because not just because he told me pyramids but he didn't give up you know everybody tends to think that the options were these infallible people on the nile everybody's happy and they never make mistakes and everybody's doing great things it's not true for one thing they were sick all the time they had malaria that all kinds of diseases also they had failures and sometimes when they built pyramids they collapsed and we have them you know these failures in the desert hulking mathis that didn't didn't do very well it's never started by building what he tried to build was the first true pyramid ever you know originally they were stepped pyramids done by the car and things like that yeah he's got the idea let's fill in the steps and have a true pyramid smooth edges all four sides smooth so at my doom city quote my many id not why deal at my doom he built this pyramid and it seems to have collapsed while it was spilt now you got a problem here you know sort of one of those moments no you tell the pharaoh no you tell the feral you know he'd been building this pyramid for five or six years maybe more and the thing collapsed and he can't be buried in it what are you gonna do so he went and built another pyramid at about a mile away to push a little more than a mile a place called you're so he's building another pyramid and that one starts to collapse they had another building problem it wasn't built on up from foundation so that one had to be abandoned now he's built snafu has built the two largest buildings on earth and neither one of them can be used for his burial i dr bar that you describe as being one of the most dangerous places you've ever been in in order research you went into was trying to get to the burial chamber of sniffer what was going to be his burial chamber not even used in the bent pyramid was at.

malaria egypt six years
"dr bars" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on WJR 760

"I'm dana clark wjr traffic first on the fives from the wjr weather center terrible forecast temperatures finally rebounding over the next couple of days augusta south west breeze today a shower rainer wet snow this morning otherwise cloudy cloudy this afternoon fifty eight tonight forty four rain late tomorrow windy with rain in the morning partly cloudy in the afternoon seventy one from the weather channel i'm meteorologist ray stagich on newstalk seven sixty wjr jr world markets sponsored by mother waddles donate your car to mother waddles get the blue book value call three one three waddles asian markets closed mixed london and the german market or down dow futures down about one hundred a doctor who ran for tilleke clinic in ottawa canada used his own sperm to father at least eleven children dr norman bar one is charged with using his sperm without the knowledge or consent of the families who approached him for insemination at his clinic that's according to a class action lawsuit filed in ottawa the suit alleges that in some cases dr bar one was supposed to use the sperm from the male of the couple for insemination in other cases he was expected us an anonymous donor instead it turns out that dr bar one himself is the biological father according to the families who sued i'm dick haefner wjr news more news at seven or whenever news breaks you're hearing the paul w smith show news talk seven sixty wjr you know take some of your stories leave me speechless and make this up i don't know what to say after a story like that and and yet i guess when there's money involved and other costs involved in collecting from other men and keeping track and files and all of that he just turned to the the internal source he had available the cheapest source that cheapest source available and i don't that's going to be a bizarre legal case no man if he didn't use the designated fathers e he is going to get in big trouble but if he did this only at times when he was supposed to use an anonymous donors i don't know how he's gonna get in trouble unless it specifically said you can't be one of the anonymous donors i dunno it's too bizarre.

ray stagich newstalk tilleke clinic dana clark wjr ottawa dr norman dick haefner paul w
"dr bars" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The law firm that is representing the class action suit now says that they have identified one hundred and fifty individuals who they say have been adversely affected by dr bar wins for tillage practice and they include sixteen people who thought they had been conceived using their father's sperm who found to be not a biological match their father another thirty five who were conceived they thought using anonymous sperm and don't have a match with the intended donor how much wider do you think this is going to go i think it's going to continue to expand we now know that byron was doing this drug his whole career from the nineteen seventies to the two thousand ten so that's forty years span of which anyone who has ever patient of his for for tilleke reasons probably has good reason to ask them questions and and has the opportunity now to come forward investigate and trying to find out find out the information that they can i think for for all of these people who now they're paternity is unknown there's a specially difficult because it's very hard to begin to know how to trace back who their biological fathers and other biological family might be they might have luck if they test on a site and connect with someone but that doesn't always happen easily and certainly it takes a lot of work and it's it's very distressing to not know who it is we there's the the allegations have not been proven in court and we did reach out to mister barone's lawyer who says they have no comment at this time and all this unraveled from that moment when there was one shadow of a doubt in your parents because of their own enquiries and now we have this would have you heard from dr bar one what does he hinted why he did this if if it's found to be true.

dr bar byron mister barone forty years
"dr bars" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"In the beginning there were two but now the case against a former fertility doctor has gotten much bigger and much more complicated an on wall law firm says there are nine additional individuals who are biologically related to dr norman borrowing doctor baron is alleged to have used his own sperm to inseminate patients without their knowledge the layers handling the case announced the updates to the proposed class action lawsuit yesterday none of the allegations have been proven in court when we contact dr barwa nhs lawyer we were told no comment rebecca dixon says dr baron is her biological father she has been part of this case since it was launched in two thousand sixteen we reached ms dixon in ottawa rebecca how many siblings do you now have i now have counseling and you were an only child as far as you knew until recently yeah i was raised on the child and as far as you know what you believe is that this man dr bar when is the biological father of all your siblings end of you yes he and my sister cat had taken a dna test and he confirmed the results to her saying that he was her biological father and then i've subsequently had a half sibling test with her that proves that we have a paternal connection and then the others the others have all done a similar kind of half sibling tests testing against my dna and you just how you've determined at your all related.

nhs rebecca dixon dr baron dr norman dr barwa ottawa
"dr bars" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"Where's the media on the story absolutely nowhere to be found all right i got a lot to get through today so bear with me for a minute why don't we go next to you all right i know what to do here i target i talked to one of my best sponsors thank you i target for your for hanging in there with us you guys are great we love you i target is one of the best systems around for improving your firearms proficiency folks anybody can fire a firearm the question is can you do it accurately this is one of the best systems i get tremendous feedback on this out there thank you the customer support it's amazing the target system is waiting to take your dry fire practice to the next level dry fire practice is when you when you pull the trigger on a safely unloaded safely unloaded weapon you check it you check it twice check it three times you look you look away you look again you make sure it's loaded you take that pinky finger probe a safe and empty chamber and what you do is we used to do some secret service is you take you you slowly practice your trigger control your sight alignment but the problem with dr barring is obviously there's no round in the weapon it's empty so you know you could go to the range and shoot live rounds and that's always good for practice but sometimes you want to practice in safety and security for on home i target pro will take you to the next level the website is the letter i target pro dot com that's i target pro dot com and if you buy the system it's really really easy they will send you a laser around you put in a firearm you've now no manipulations necessary you have a nine millimeter weapon this nine millimeter around thirty eight special son thirty eight route simple as that and when you dry fire the hammer will fall on this laze around and it'll little laser will basically come out of it onto a target they send you and you could see where the round would have gone just as simple as that if i've seen groupings they're really wide and nasty looking at end at the end of the.

"dr bars" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

"And a couple of other conservative outlets but the vast majority of the reporting was that president trump called this woman and said well you know your son signed up for whether them report is use some signed up ford and despite that he went in to the face of danger and he lost his life and that's bravery that's incredible bravery and a lot of people wanna talk about this we're gonna go right back to the phones and assisted in a few minutes from and also trying to get too i want to play a sound bite from general kelly's news conference statement yesterday where he talks about dover and i want to put this in context because it here in delaware we see gold star families come through all the time amina most people don't see them but often dover is the center for the return of fallen soldiers soldiers who fallen battle mostly in western europe up and anywhere that's not the pacific rim usually they come back through dover and general kelly talked about that and i want to play that for you but there are a couple of people who have been holding patiently and bob in wilmington you have been holding patiently thanks are waiting at a year on the regents and show you bought a bad at all five at but what it what it it where in your bat out of the ordinary o f f i that call well that out of the ordinary i think it where it remember grow why it it or the also because it built a out of the ordinary that of agriculture would you take all the other out of it an attack at get all the pope it under the glare which awakened by opinion water really the white brick your listeners what about eric of the parade white we we know that by any volker ruehe back up on governor or war yep i happen to be in a meeting with dr bar outlived the superintendent at backed up at at 1145 when you with old added debating at you euwide if he oversaw locked up an error hearing of all the old mcgregor what older threat by daughters volleyball gave look at old faithful yet on what i it all i just wanted to give a shout out there of all the.

ford kelly dover delaware wilmington dr bar superintendent volleyball president amina bob volker ruehe
"dr bars" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"News radio one hundred two point nine karn newsradio one or two point nine karn first news with kevin miller whether you're a kid or a kid in heart i think you're gonna like this national geographic kids has a new book it's called trump fears facts about the bite force crushing jaws and mighty teeth the earth's champion chewers and the guy that put it together dr brady bar good morning dr bar you do it i am well good to be here interesting at your bio it says you've been bitten by a lot of creatures over the years how many greeks have you had that type of contact with it oh i mean i i try not to remember most of the by from a something a try to forget but i will say this a lot of bite uh went into writing this book is this up at you seek out a video tried to get there you edgar trying to make poke a stick in these animals trying to make clear what oh absolutely not i mean i do the last thing i wanted to dave abide directly from some of the animal highlighted in the book i mean add something i void at all cost but being a scientist at work for national geographic in and around the world and remote places on big dangerous animal by the nature of the basement you're gonna take a few bite along the way so you know what i said what to put it all together and give kids what they want kids are always asking me about the bite book give them a book all about trump birth quieter fewer um that's why we came up with trump a you've traveled all over the world to find this information to oh i've of into over eighty countries over the last twenty years the most remote and exotic places places that most people can only dream about or in some that might be a nightmare every care of them that are naim absolutely right doctor brady bar the national geographic kids book it's called job okay what is the well i don't even have of how to put it is it the worst or the biggest bite or that's out there oh god question oh.

kevin miller scientist trump dave naim twenty years
"dr bars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Fifty thousand in american job were taken up with people that weren't supposed to be here hold on now that's true but a lot of these some of the thirty one some of them are 21 than some of them are you know eight years old pdb or eight years old means working in four years they'd be i don't wanna be will on your four years boy but they might be working in ten years you never know or any job picking off the market drop and nobody else if dummy barrier illegal there are enough and i've made this point too but i do think there's a bigger point right what is and is not legal what is in is not constitutional in this whole thing is crony democrat powerhungry grab that's what it is where it got evercorrect old party who put daca in place can we least admit that was obama i have no argument buried app on your right both parties are now descending act including the president president said after six congress get six months to deal with this and then he would and then he said look if congress doesn't deal with maybe maybe we'll work something else that okay well what what the hell is i mean but what happened in the next stock mark i don't know does unless they may act faster than they've ever acted their entire lives to two confers some kind of official status right i wouldn't be surprised well here are some who say with appropriate to dump it back and congress now it's not why do you cheer lead even when you're wrong 90s told use three times that he backed off his position threetimes he's backed off his position what does he mean let me ask you this question jim what does the president me when he says after six months you know we'll take another look at it maybe we can work something does that sound like a firm deadline to you manager danger manager there you go ladies and gentleman there's gm so jim you're not serious about doc either dr bar dr no no no no you're not now now comes to manage it sounds like manager now it doesn't sense like somebody who's playing both sides anyway thanks for your call i appreciate it sorry exactly what it is mike sydney montana sirius satellite go hey mark yeah i'm calling me doc in.

obama president congress jim official gm mike sydney montana eight years four years six months ten years
"dr bars" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dr bars" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Myself boy you're the first game ito sophomores know everything oh yeah have you been around the block vote about hours dr bar we were upwards we were up in south bid okay and we were rank pretty high i read ranked pretty high throw me coming off of the no sophomore year yes sophomore year we finish no we won't even ranked i don't think we've rate get we were wish he resisted sixyear smith freshman year woke till sophomore year they didn't really think highly of us in that was gets notre dame at home yeah and so we had something to prove and it was abby ejei mole came out there improved it will now did you see i wasn't just me it was army yet jim harbaugh yet your defense the 85 deep with incredible so you had guys gaby i know how hard day hit me so i i felt bad plenty of that debate so it kind of has that feel why i talk about that kind of has that feel because everybody does it if that they don't know what's going on you know what i'm saying they don't know what's happening people people like well how good really are you gonna see you get a chance to see you know so it'll be patient happy two days away excited about abby be from from a perfect defensive standpoint i i'm looking forward to seeing rishaad garish start oh see what he can do it with dr with a four fullseason because again he played played in every game little encourage every day yet play on every biologist but be in the serbian the guy's a whole different geico yet but it again obey oh yes a whole deal now and you're getting doubleteamed every time you're writing things along those lines it's nice eddie's they'll get a little bit of a sporting cast their in the along the rest of the line going maurice hurst there's though her own monet right so you've got some people that stood that guys that can help him oh yeah he's got a ban by himself oh yeah saturday night might mcrae at linebacker have young linebackers roche oh yeah but there i mean he gets leaders the only thing.

jim harbaugh geico eddie sixyear smith abby ejei rishaad maurice hurst mcrae roche two days sixyear