6 Burst results for "Dr Barber Sampson"

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some of the most rewarding tons of my career could sit with families and to tell them fax. Finally we have found something of their loved one. And I've had numerous families say to me that you know, I really thought I was going to die. Without knowing for sure that mine son, for example, was was killed that day without knowing for sure without a scientific identification. And the relief in their voices and on their faces of having A little bit of their loved one to either, you know, bury or happen, remain in the repository down at ground zero. I can't say it gives them closure, but it makes them feel a little bit little bit better. That was Dr Barbara Sampson, the chief medical examiner of New York City. Lebanon may have just announced a new government more than a year after the previous administration quit following the Beirut port explosion, But it remains in an economic crisis. Some people are experiencing power cuts of 20 hours a day while motorists queued for hours to fill their petrol tanks. The British Embassy in Beirut has repatriated diplomats because of the fuel shortage and hospitals have cut back on essential services from Lebanon. Our Middle East correspondent Quentin Sommerville, sent this report. Okay, okay. Good. In Lebanon's southern city of Sidon. It's as dark as a tool. There's barely been electricity for a week and the city's all passageways, locals use phone lights to cut through the gloom. With no fuel. Even generators have stopped working. They are surrounded by candlelight is Hassan, who shoe Nadine nine million and then news I take medication for a chronic disease. I was told we can get it in Beirut, but for double the price and still couldn't get it. We can't even find cough, medicine and Panadol. Everything is running short. The currency is now worthless and most people savings have disappeared in the financial crisis last week, Bread was in short supply. This week. It's bottled water. Ali Chama is another side and resident lived. We don't have a state at all. This man in the Presidential palace should be burned and alcohol. Is this alive? I had to go back for two packs of print one for me and one for my daughter, and it's not cheap to me. The other Holding has become commonplace at a petrol station inside and confrontation between the army and locals. Things are so desperate troops have been deployed at petrol stations.

Quentin Sommerville Barbara Sampson Ali Chama last week This week nine million Hassan Beirut Sidon two packs Middle East 20 hours a day New York City British Embassy Lebanon Nadine ground zero double palace one
"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:54 min | 3 months ago

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"To do whatever it takes for as long as it takes and as the science improves, and we are able to use improved techniques to extract and analyze the DNA that is available to us from these remnants that we go back to them, and we continue to try to make a new identification. Of course. In the beginning, the process was much more rapid because The specimens were easier to work with, at this point where working with fragments of bone, some of them very, very small the size of a tick tack. But the power of DNA is that the only need a little bit to make an identification. The DNA, though, does need to be intact and the conditions down at ground zero that day on 9 11, and in the months and years after that, Were absolutely the worst that could be imagined for maintaining the integrity of DNA. There were, of course, the explosion the fire the fuel from the Jets, the water from firemen trying to put out the fires. All that degrades DNA, as does the passage of time. So we were faced with specimens that you know are in. You know, previous times, it would be unheard of to get any kind of DNA from them. But you know, we continue our efforts. And now technology is so much better that we can get identifications from even smaller, more degraded fragments of DNA, and that's what we're working with now. Better extraction techniques. And then better techniques that analyzed. Yes, I mean, for Lay people listening. Can you explain a bit about what those advances have been? Sure at the beginning we were trying to extract DNA from all the specimens and bone in particular is very difficult to extract DNA from and over the years we've developed improved techniques in order to get more DNA out of even smaller pieces of bone and get out more efficiently. So that's what we have been working with over, especially over the last few years in the fall. Now we are going to be starting to use a new technique called Next Generation Sequencing, which will it's an even more sensitive techniques so that we will be able to generate DNA profiles from even smaller fragments of DNA. And this kind of technique has been used by others, Uh, in remains, for example, from various wars and those kinds of situations where the DNA is also very degraded. So we are hopeful. That this more sensitive technique will in the future. Allow for more identification. What does it mean for the families who know that their loved ones? Have been lost and have known it for many years to actually get the phone call to hear that there has been a and identification made. So let me start by saying that we know the wishes of every family. Some families do still want to know if we make an identification, and some families have chosen not to hear from us. And families cannot course change their mind about that. You know, as years go by, as new generations of family members are making these decisions, and a family can always reach out to us on their time schedule. And ask if there have been any update, given that the families who do want to know which is the majority are extremely grateful for our continuing efforts, and the times that we have been able to make these identification even so many years later. Are some of the most rewarding tons of my career to sit with families and to tell them fat. Finally, we have found something of their loved one. And I've had numerous families say to me that you know, I really thought I was going to die. Without knowing for sure that mine son, for example, was was killed that day without knowing for sure without a scientific identification. And the relief in the voices and on their faces of having a little bit of their loved one to either, you know, bury or happen, remain in the repository down at ground zero. I can't say it gives them closure, but it makes them feel a little bit little bit better. I was Dr Barbara Sampson, the chief medical examiner of New York City. Lebanon may have just announced a new government more than a year after the previous administration quit following the Beirut port explosion, But it remains in an economic crisis. Some people are experiencing power cuts of 20 hours a day while motorists queued for hours to fill that petrol tanks. The British Embassy in Beirut has repatriated diplomats because of the fuel shortage and hospitals have cut back on essential services from Lebanon. Our Middle East correspondent Quentin Sommerville, sent this report. Okay, okay. But in Lebanon's southern city of Sidon, it's as dark as a tool. There's barely been electricity for a week and the city's all passageways, locals use phone lights that cut through the gloom. With no fuel. Even generators have stopped working. They are surrounded by candlelight is Hassan Horseshoe. 98, then news I think medication for chronic disease. I was told we can get it in Beirut, but for double the price and still couldn't get it. We can't even find cough, medicine and Panadol. Everything is running short. The currency is now worthless and most people savings have disappeared in the financial crisis last week, Bread was in short supply. This week. It's bottled water. Ali. Chama is another side and resident lived that we don't have a statement all this man in the presidential palace Should be burned and alcohol. Is this alive? I had to go back for two packs of bread, one for me and one for my daughter, and it's not cheap to assist the other. Holding has become commonplace at a petrol station inside and confrontation between the army and locals. Things are so desperate troops have been deployed at petrol stations across the country become.

Quentin Sommerville Barbara Sampson Beirut This week last week one Sidon Middle East Hassan Horseshoe Ali New York City British Embassy two packs of bread 20 hours a day Chama Generation Lebanon 9 11 ground zero double
"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on WBUR

"I've been hearing more about that work and the reason for it from Barbara Sampson, the chief medical examiner of New York City, we made a commitment back in 2000 and one to the families. To do whatever it takes for as long as it takes and as the science improved, and we are able to use improved techniques to extract and analyze the DNA that is available to us from these remnants that we go back to them, and we continue to try to make a new identification. Of course. In the beginning, the process was much more rapid because The specimens were easier to work with, at this point where working with fragments of bone, some of them very, very small the size of a tick tack. But the power of DNA is that the only need a little bit to make an identification. The DNA, though, does need to be intact and the conditions down at ground zero that day on 9 11, and in the months and years after that, Were absolutely the worst that could be imagined for maintaining the integrity of DNA. There were, of course, the explosion the fire the fuel from the Jets, the water from firemen trying to put out the fires all that grades DNA, as does the passage of time. So we were faced with specimens that you know are in. You know, previous times, it would be unheard of to get any kind of DNA from them. But you know, we continue our efforts and now technology is so much better that we can get identification from even smaller, more degraded fragments of DNA, and that's what we're working with now. Better extraction techniques. And then better techniques that analyzed. Yes, I mean, for Lay people listening. Can you explain a bit about what those advances have been? Sure at the beginning we were trying to extract DNA from all the specimens and bone in particular is very difficult to extract DNA from and over the years we've developed improved techniques in order to get more DNA out of even smaller pieces of bone and get out more efficiently. So that's what we have been working with over, especially over the last few years in the fall. Now we are going to be starting to use a new technique called Next Generation Sequencing, which will isn't even more sensitive techniques so that we will be able to generate DNA profiles from even smaller fragments of DNA. And this kind of technique has been used by others, Uh, in remains, for example, from various wars and those kinds of situations where the DNA is also very degraded. So we are hopeful that this more sensitive technique will in the future allow for more identification. What does it mean for the families who know that their loved ones have been lost and have known it for many years to actually get the phone call to hear that there has been a An identification made So let me start by saying that we know the wishes of every family. Some families do still want to know if we make an identification, and some families have chosen not to hear from us. And families cannot course change their mind about that. You know, as years go by, as new generations of family members are making these decisions and a family can always reach out to us on their time schedule. And ask if there have been any update, given that the families who do want to know which is the majority are extremely grateful for our continuing efforts, and the times that we have been able to make these identification even so many years later. Are some of the most rewarding tons of my career to sit with families and to tell them that finally we have found something of their loved one. And I've had numerous families say to me that you know, I really thought I was going to die. Without knowing for sure that mine son, for example, was was killed that day without knowing for sure without a scientific identification. And the relief in the voices and on their faces of having a little bit of their loved one to either, you know, bury, or it happened, remain in the repository down at ground zero. I can't say it gives them closure, but it makes them feel a little bit little bit better. That was Dr Barbara Sampson, the chief medical examiner of New York City. Lebanon may have just announced a new government more than a year after the previous administration quit following the Beirut port explosion, But it remains in an economic crisis. Some people are experiencing power cuts of 20 hours a day while motorists queued for hours to fill that petrol tanks. The British Embassy in Beirut has repatriated diplomats because of the fuel shortage and hospitals have cut back on essential services from Lebanon. Our Middle East correspondent Quentin Sommerville, sent this report..

Barbara Sampson Quentin Sommerville Beirut 2000 New York City British Embassy Middle East 20 hours a day Lebanon more than a year ground zero Generation last few years one years later 9 11
"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

04:52 min | 3 months ago

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"On here It is the Friday Morning news Fried day. Tomorrow is the 20th anniversary of 9 11. And as we mentioned, the Bidens will be in They'll be in New York. They'll be in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. They'll be in Pentagon to mark that at the Pentagon. I should say to mark the 20th anniversary Still, the emails about people asking the Bidens to stay away. Yeah. Yeah, not for that. No, I'm not either. I just, You know, there's just point that well, there's a lot of hate out there. Another is, It's just a lot of hate. Um, I thought it was interesting that as we mark this 20th anniversary Did you happen to notice what just occurred the other day, and that was The discovery and of the remains of two more victims identified through DNA testing 20 years later. I was quite amazed by this and and my first thought was Hal. And what happened? Why? Why? 20 years now, remember, now they're sifting through rubble still sifting. Through rubble. This is person number 16 46 and 16 47 to be identified. Dorothy Morgan of Hempstead, New York. And then a man whose name is being withheld at his family's request. They were identified through DNA analysis of previously unidentified remains recovered from the World Trade Center site. Wait, wait, wait, wait right there. You said 1600 have been identified. Yes. Are you telling me that another 1000 or more have not been identified. 1100 victims are yet to be identified. I had no idea. 1100. But you know what? I'm going to give New York and the chief medical examiner, Dr Barbara Sampson, said this this week when making this announcement, she said 20 years ago. We made a promise to the families of the World Trade Center victims to do whatever it takes for as long as it takes to identify their loved ones, and we continue to fulfill that sacred. Obligation. And 1000 ago. Yeah, and so they've got new technology. This next generation sequencing technology. They call it which is more sensitive and it's aided identification zones and they and they say it's going to result in more And it may speed up that house so we mark we may start to see more and more of them. So, but the latest Dorothy Morgan was an insurance broker who worked in the North tower. And her daughter said. This has been an emotional roller coaster as you might imagine. Oh, my gosh. Yeah. You imagine having to sift through all that rubble that had to be taken from ground zero to another location getting all mixed together. The tonnage. Oh, yeah. And having to go through that to try to find Yeah. Find former lives One little piece of DNA. Yeah, my goodness. Yeah, I had no idea what a daughter, her daughter said, and I can see this house because she had no closure. You know you had no clothes, she said. So for years, I would tell myself maybe she had amnesia was released from the hospital. And she said, I had this whole story made up in my head that she was out there living life and happy. Um, but this brings closure to that. Wow. Well, that's that's truly amazing. Fact. They still have 1000 ago. Yeah, 1100. My goodness, And that's why tomorrow. That's why tomorrow. Uh, 20 years later. We remember still. Yo, Yes. Traffic right now. Here's Monica. Monica. Hi Hispanic. Sylvan Looks like that one's still there in the two right lanes still heavy beyond Westmoreland. Now I 20 East fence for four away. Just got one off to the shoulder there but sluggish back beyond Mountain Creek Parkway. Do have one North County super 20 Trinity Boulevard. That one is only the left lane getting through in the backups on that one are solid all the way back to high 30. W B. A P first traffic on the ones I'm Monte Cook. This report is brought to you by the North Texas dealer Association. Do you have insurance? And do you know your rights in Texas? You have a consumer bill of rights, giving you the right to choose the company that repairs your car and the parts used to get you safely back on the road. Learn more about your rights to prepare dot com. From the W B A P Weather center. We're going to be sunny and hot through the weekend. Certainly warmer than normal. 94 today 70 tonight 95 Tomorrow and 94 on Sunday. Monday, a little more humid,.

Dorothy Morgan New York Texas Monday 20 years Monica Sunday Pentagon Mountain Creek Parkway Barbara Sampson tomorrow tonight Friday Morning today Sylvan 1100 victims Tomorrow Westmoreland North County 20 years ago
"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Laura Ingle and Fan of Classic Rock Yes. Former rock DJ Oh, is that America? Yes. Okay, well, that explains care. Xq 93 rock. Sacramento spent some time up there doing the evening show hosting metal shop. Local Lick stuff. True story Fantastic. Listen. This is fantastic, too. 9 11. The event was 20 years ago minus three days. Every day. Pretty much. People have gone to work. And their job is to identify the victims. There were so the destruction was so devastating in the towers fell and you know I don't want to get too graphic or gross, but bodies were not. In a state where it would be easy to identify who it is, and they're sitting on a massive collection. Of body parts. And they've been testing and testing with D. N a. And they have new techniques now that are allowing them to continue 20 years later, to make progress in this question, I believe they will never stop. Unless they managed to eventually identify every single victim, and that's that's when they will stop right and the work. The work as you mentioned has been painstaking, and you're right. I think it will go on. And I think that they do know that there are some people who unfortunately Were incinerated and that you know we're not going to get the total. However, just two more victims. We're learning this today of the terror attacks at the World Trade Center, where identified And and one story that sticks out as a woman named Dorothy Morgan and she lives out on Long Island. Instead, she is the 1646th victim to be identified through this ongoing DNA analysis of these unidentified remains, Um and you know when you take a look at what they've been doing, this is all being done at the New York City Medical examiner's office. And through as you mentioned advanced DNA testing. So, of course, 20 years ago, they had a certain way. They were doing it now as each year passes, and the pandemic slowed down some of this process to a degree, But this new technology that is being used, um, this this woman, this family member of Dorothy Morgan doesn't even really remember providing the reference sample nearly two decades ago for Mother's DNA, and she just got knocked at the door. They said. We have identified your mother. Finally and so 20 years later, this woman and those family members that are getting that similar not have to decide. All right. So now they are going to give us possession of whatever is left of my loved one. And do I want to Have a funeral. Do I want to have some kind of? You know, what do I do now? So some people are being forced. Um, you know, I mean, they wanted the answers, but now they're faced with something that they didn't expect was even going to happen. And But what's really interesting about the the DNA technology that they're using? And the city's chief medical examiner, Dr Barbara Sampson, said it well, that they Consider this a sacred obligation of using these refined techniques. Um, but they go with these lab workers you know until recently were using a mortar and pestle to manually crushed the bone fragments when the project first began, But now they have been going into what they call a bone mill using fragments that are put in these glass tubes. Frozen with the help of liquid nitrogen. They put them in a bone mill machine that shakes it. Until they can get the extraction that they need and working with the new technology to pull that DNA to make those matches and and Jennifer and I, or in New York City for the first time together, covering 9 11 Had never been here before, And I think everybody who watches the reels of 20 years ago and anybody that was here knows and remembers the people walking around with the pictures. Have you seen my loved one? That was the first thing that I encountered walking around with my K f I tape deck downtown. Just encountering all these people. Can you help? And here we are 20 years later, and some of those people are getting exactly that they're finding out. Where their loved ones were and how they are being identified now. All right, it's it's good to hear that they're never going to give up gives hope to the people who still are dealing with a missing person's situation, basically until until until your loved one is identified. It's a missing persons case and this brings closure to that case, and I'm sure closure for a lot of these families of the victims. Let's get a news update from Jennifer Jones Lee and then handle on the news. Late Edition. Right here on K F. I am 6 40 live everywhere on the I Heart radio app. Animal shelters in L. A county of a program to try and keep pets in loving homes. It's called managed intake, and it's being used to seven county run shelters. The goal of the program is to only accept sick, malnourished or neglected animals. Pet owners can make an appointment at any of the shelters so officials can figure out whether they can help by providing assistance with vet bills, food supplies, boarding or training for behavioral issues. Fewer than 25,000 dogs, Cats and other animals were taken in at the shelters in L. A county in the 2020 fiscal year, compared to 46,000 in 2019, Deborah Mark Ko Phi News. A man has been arrested over the stabbing death of another man in Temple City. The L. A county sheriff's Department says deputies and crews from the L. A Fire department were called out late last night, They found a man who had been stabbed several times. He was taken to the hospital where he died. They say The other guy also had been stabbed. Police say the two were brothers. The U. S. Navy is released more information about the helicopter crash off the coast of San Diego that killed five sailors. The Department of Defense says the helicopter was trying to land on a flight deck last week when the main rotor hit the deck. It caused the helicopter to flip and crash into the ocean. Five sailors were declared dead. One was rescued. And five others were hurt. A Motown recording artist who later became a minister and AIDS activist, has died. Carl Beane founded the Unity, the Unity Fellowship Church for Gay and Lesbian African Americans in 1982. At the height of his recording career, he worked with Dionne Warwick, Burt Back Correct and Sammy Davis Jr in 2010 being wrote his own autobiography. I was born this way it was about being gay. And a preacher who loved gospel music. Carl Beane was 77 cannabis apparently causes some cardiac conditions. Research says Pot users between 18 and 44 have a bit higher chance of having a heart attack than the pot less people. The study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal says people in that age group who used cannabis at least four times a month at a 1.3% chance of having a heart attack versus 0.8% for non pot, part takers. Researchers say the problem could be a mismatch of oxygen supply and demand since marijuana can limit Very of oxygen. How marijuana was consumed. Being edibles, ointment or smoking was not considered. But smoking was the primary method noted in the study. Michel Crozier Kft news and officials with the Museum of Pinball in Banning, say the pandemic and financial hardships have forced them to close the doors for goods for good. This weekend, 1100 classic pinball machines and arcade games will be auctioned off inside the museum on South Hathaway Street. The total value of the collection is $8 million, and the museum boasted the largest collection of pinball machines in the world. Let's take a look at your driving. Jeff.

Carl Beane Laura Ingle 2010 San Diego Jeff Dorothy Morgan Jennifer Dionne Warwick Long Island 1982 South Hathaway Street 2019 New York City $8 million Deborah Mark Ko Phi 0.8% Barbara Sampson 46,000 Temple City 1.3%
"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"dr barbara sampson" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Be asked to segregate the claims from the unclaimed bodies bodies claim by families will eventually go to overwhelm funeral homes unclaimed bodies were taken by the city medical examiner I think they're preparing for the fact that they may need to the pair for mass burials of unclaimed bodies burials in common graves are under way on Hart island in Long Island Sound it's new York's potter's field where more than a million have been entered since the nineteenth century in the pandemic about one hundred people were buried here a week several times more than usual these are the simple pine caskets of people who were unclaimed or released by families that couldn't afford a funeral it is very difficult and very challenging but in the same way we did nine eleven everyone it's all hands on deck Dr Barbara Sampson leads an eight hundred person staff as the city's chief medical examiner we're having to deal with things on a scale that we have never before anticipated although we have planned in the past for pandemics you planned for pandemics and trained for pandemics but not one this large the scale and the repeated E. R. is something that no one could have imagined not only is there an overwhelming of the health care system there is an overwhelming of the funeral directors and every essential service in in this city and all across the country have you called in reinforcements absolutely that when there is no way we could do this on our own even with such a large agency so our main and main source of reinforcements has been in the military how many bodies are you recovering in a typical day so on a standard day I collect between thirty and forty on average that's what my team of twenty five people lieutenant Sean Levin leads of the Talladega search and recovery team for the New York Air National Guard they carried the dead for the medical examiner they do the paperwork we do the lifting are there other teams similar to yours deployed from different units we started with thirteen members three weeks ago I think to be close to four hundred people doing what we're doing by the end of this week one reason for the increase is the number dying at home or outside hospitals about four times the usual our initial information from my commanding officer was we'd be collecting just from hospitals but after arriving here we moved quickly from hospitals into residences have long term care facilities it was a long term care facility we visited with Levin Steen and the medical examiner's van we treat every collection as the possible culprit tell me what the process is like so on a call all of my members are donning proper PP before they go on so some kind of tie back suit gloves mask hi pro but we go into a residence often as a grieving family there we offer our condolences we make the necessary adjustments with other furniture or anything in the room and then we assistant kind of collecting that person who died some who had died or fallen ill are among those the city was counting on most how is your staff doing hold a fairly well hi we've we've lost about thirty percent of our employee population to the disease you've lost almost a third of your employees to illness yes we have every buddy from doctors down to housekeepers how many of your staff members have lost their lives as of right now five would you describe them to me I think the one that had the biggest impact on us was one of our patient transporters who referred to her as the mayor ed okay his first name add as a patient transport was one who was responsible for bringing bodies from floors to the morgue when we had patients expire and when we had to bring it down to the blog the employee's lines throughout and prayed for him it was heartbreaking to say the least your employees are returning after being ill now have antibiotics correct they must be incredibly valuable to yell it's we're hopeful we're hopeful that this might be one of the the tools that may help us to defeat this virus Brooklyn hospital center is one of many hospitals testing what's called convalescent plasma this move is the liquid that carries blood cells and antibodies made by the immune system to attack viruses a recovered virus patients plasma can be transfused into a patient is still suffering in theory if you give a large enough dose and early enough in the disease process the antibodies in the convalescent plasma will neutralize the viral particles in the bloodstream of that individual and that could lead to a more mild course of disease and it could lead to fewer complications and now Dr David rich is president of new York's Mount Sinai hospital part of the national convalescent plasma program being led by the renowned Mayo Clinic in Minnesota what is the history of this kind of plasma therapy it has been shown to be effective in certain epidemics and less effective in others for example there was some evidence that it was a benefit for the sars epidemic in the early part of the two thousands and so there may have been some benefit also for the swine flu also known as H. one M. one but it did not seem to seem to be effective in treatment of a ball the disease recovered patient Meredith Berkman donated plasma after managing her co bid nineteen symptoms at home at its worst I would say was the tightness in the chest but manageable terrible terrible headache and just complete exhaustion nation David bird dogs also recover and donate my symptoms were at gastrointestinal I was vomiting quite a bit did you have respiratory symptoms so I had a cough I had a little bit of shortness of breath full guard winter show a patient eliminating the virus and has a high level of antibodies they can volunteer to donate I figure okay I had this disease that everybody in the world is at risk for I seem to have kicked it might one might be useful for whatever science experiments that they might be doing whatever treatments they might be experimenting with the donation is similar to giving blood but only plasma is taken so as you're sitting there you watch the bag filling with what I can only describe as liquid gold I mean literally and figuratively the plasma is liquid gold the donors do not know who receives their plants I felt that if you believe you can help someone else you would especially in a situation like this how are you selecting the patients in your hospital who received the placebo what we're looking for people within the first four days of hospitalization so it's early enough that we would expect it would be effective and for people who are showing that they're taking a turn for the worse it will take weeks to know whether plasma shows promise so far nationwide about five hundred sick patients have received plasma a tiny start with unknown benefits most of America was blindsided by the pandemic but Sean Levins Air National Guard team has been preparing twice a year working with mannequins in exercises ironically the unit had long planned to be in New York in late March for a disaster drill with the medical examiner we've been training for a decade since two thousand nine about how we collect fatalities in this kind of incident but there's really no way to prepare for what we're currently going through you can have all the actors you want or all the dummies laid out in the field but we are actually doing it real world with grieving families it's a much different atmosphere how should team holding up it's stressful but I think they're rising to the challenge and some of the bench like strongest people I would ever want to work with to kind of stop you dated a civilian life put on the uniform I know full well what you're walking into and then not complaining when you miss Easter or Passover just getting the job done the can help the city New York nearly two hundred trailers are now receiving the dead in the city of New York we noticed some are beginning to draw the sympathy of their neighbors the city has another ninety trailers on standby enough in the estimation of chief medical examiner Dr Barbara Sampson I'm a New York native so to see this happen and again to New York City after what we went through in on nine eleven just breaks my heart but we have a role to play and we're very proud to play it how do you bring dignity to so many dead one by one you treat every person as an individual everybody who works here at CME realizes it could be their mom or dad that is next person who comes in and you learned that working here but we are going to do our best to serve every single family at to the best that we are able until we are not able to do that but we will go.