29 Burst results for "Dr Anne"

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"And i in many ways changes incremental all changes incremental and. It is so small changes for me this small small things that i do a bit for the people that that They have a huge pet for these people. So i say that. That's probably and is probably the way i feel most comfortable about making change I think there are a lot of changes that still need to be. Made some not quite ready to give them up yet. i think The more diversity that we have now parliament the more that change is gonna come fellow wwl bencher andrew hastie having an impact from his background in the sis on national security issues and that sort of things. Do you see you having having a role like that. In parliamentary committees. The speaking up like that. I'd like to but there are challenges to that and those challenges That you know. Politics is not america crecy and you don't necessarily always get put into the area where you can make the most contribution so like anything ma focus of just gotta cape finding my place. So it's a hell of a thing get elected to federal pollen jerry. It's it's it's actually. Yeah i mean it's easy to laugh at politicians but is is really quite an honor to in an incredible on a an incredibly incredibly humbling experience. I think as well to think that there are so many people who.

wwl bencher andrew hastie america jerry
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:07 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"Was a sense of loss. A a real sense of loss at the center conscious of radicalizing preaches with you as well. Yeah about that process of radicalization. It's really interesting because i've spoken to a lot of people who've left that behind people walked away from terrorism. We've walked away from. Violent extremism walked away from white supremacist groups and former foreign fighters as well and mesa One of them described it to me. He said you know. And i've always been an activist. I've always been an activist. This is a former foreign fighter. He traveled to afghanistan and fought in in in that wall or in that battle end. Hey says i. I've always been an activist now. He works in a different kind of activism. he says now he works in d. radicalising young people says not just a different kind of activism. And you learn a lot about how young people. Oh even older people can be influenced but also the commonalities that That that are used whether it's a white supremacist group You know a a violent jihadist group the kinds of narrative structure and the things that they use to an influence to people in order to bring them into the fold and change their change. Their world views a very very similar to me. The things they have in common is is that with young young young jihadists particular. Some some guile sought up sawed up along side them and say that islam. You father practices decimal real islam. The church here the bedstead realism and what they offered him. As a grievance and a and a real rock solid structure that allows to that appeals to their sense of honor perversely. And that's that can be also is true for what supremacist absolutely. I think that the the underlying basis of with us and then that has to be the start of it you apart of us and they are them and then comes in the grievance. We are under attack by them. You know they're taking things away from us and then this kind of moral superiority. We're better than them. We're better than them and then you get the dehumanization of them You know the cockroach syndrome. They are cockroaches. They are vermin. We need to eradicate them. And that's where it tips over to violence or the propensity for violence. So now you become doctor. Dr ali invited all over. The world went to a conference obama white house where he died of the call just waiting to them because you never seen snow before people keep telling me all and you need to see snore like it's cold it's wet. What do i need to say it for. And how can we have. A doctorate and slow is called. Oh i know my doctor. I wasn't in ensnarled nonetheless. You you do all these amazing things and and you've also ran about the son kinda of this lovely man that you'll marry to now developed. How'd you meet him. So i met ages ago. Actually we're working in the same place but we both married to different people. And it wasn't until about i-it's lighter. I get this eight mile for all dadi. Dr and allio lodhi counter-terrorism moved on. And i'd moved on anyway We made up and you know how things for you all terrible. I'm getting a divorce. What about you all yeah. I'm getting a divorce today. So as sank ice It was just the right time right place and couple years later married hersey go with you inviting. What supremacist over for dinner. Well he's he works in intelligence and security so yeah he's a little bit likely of mason. I will find you have skills. Like invited are invited to why a form it was a former white supremacists. Come on give me bit of credit. An academic remember home. One day. she was taking. I could see that movie. So like i say you had this really interesting addressing the united nations in geneva going to the white house giving all this policy advice so when the labor party in wwl ring you and say we want you to run for parliament. You said yes. Why don't you give away that life to to a question. I asked myself every diary. Louis i think i did have this fantastic career and i was traveling around and doing all sorts of really great things. I was a professor. I'd been to the white house been into the club de madrid which sadly is not a disco The united nations. But i remember it was a cold november night in vienna and i walked out of the united nations building after three days of talks and three weeks earlier. I'd been in madrid at the club de madrid for two days of talks and i walked out of there and the sky was gray and somewhere in the background. The christmas market was sitting up their markets and die was waiting for me on the steps and you could say his breath in the cold air and he took my hands and started warming up and he said to me i you done and i said i'm i'm actually really done. And he said what do you mean. And i said well all these talk and all of these dialogues. That our to and. I'm going to go home to australia. And nothing's going to change. Nothing's going to change. Because there's no political will and you know you can call it serendipity or you can call it destiny you could call it fate but it was on the way home from there. We stopped off in bali to thaw out from the winter cold and as long by the pool and my phone rang. Didn't answer it. Because i didn't know the number and then i got this text message saying it's wwl lab. Give us a call. they want. We may. I was never political so rang. My son who was young labor and the conversation literally went like this richard. Oh hi adam. It's a high mom what's up. I said you know just got this takes from wwl labor. They wanna meet with me. What do you think that's about. Oh i don't know maybe they want you to run in. The next election. Doesn't election when i didn't even i didn't even know there was an election but often the same question i said. I've got these great career doing all of these great things. I've reached the pinnacle of my career. Why should i do this. And the response was because it would be a different way to make change. And that's all i needed. Is it true Only starting in parliament and you're a backbencher unknown just walked into the parliament and runs the joint. You're in opposition to do you. See yourself over time having influenced. I think there's i think there is a level of influence that comes with being a politician. I say that the greatest change that i'm making is the changes in small ways to people's everyday lives to the people who walk into my office. Oklahoma office her need help with centralink all with immigration or with those issues.

Dr ali allio lodhi united nations mesa de madrid afghanistan club de madrid white house hersey labor party mason obama Dr geneva parliament vienna madrid Louis
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:07 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"Was a sense of loss. A real sense of loss at the center conscious of radicalizing preaches with you as well. Yeah you learn about that process of radicalization. It's really interesting. Because i've spoken to a lot of people who've left that behind people walked away from terrorism. We've walked away from. Violent extremism walked away from white supremacist groups and former foreign fighters as well and mesa One of them described it to me. He said you know. And i've always been an activist. I've always been activist. This is a former foreign fighter. He traveled to afghanistan and fought in in in that wall or in that battle end. Hey says i. I've always been an activist now. He works in a different kind of activism uses in d. radicalising. Young people says not just a different kind of activism. And you learn a lot about how young people. Oh even older people can be influenced but also the commonalities that That that are used whether it's a white supremacist group You know a a violent jihadist group the kinds of narrative structure and the things that they use to an influence to people in order to bring them into the fold and change their change. Their world views a very very similar to me. The things they have in common is is that young young young jihadists particular some some guile sought up sawed up along side them and say that islam. You father practices decimal real islam. The church here the bedstead realism and what they offered him. As a grievance and a and a real rock solid structure that allows to that appeals to their sense of honor perversely. And that's that can be also is true for white supremacist. I think that the the underlying basis of with us and then that has to be the start of it you apart of us and they are them and then comes in the grievance. We are under attack by them. You know they're taking things away from us and then this kind of moral superiority. We're better than them. We're better than them and then you get the dehumanization of them You know the cockroach syndrome. They are cockroaches. They are vermin. We need to eradicate them. And that's where it tips over to violence or the propensity for violence. So now you become doctor. Dr ali invited all over the world. Who went to a conference obama white house where he died of the call just waiting to them because you never seen snow before people keep telling me all and you need to see snore like it's cold it's wet. What do i need to say it for. And how can we have a doctorate and called. Oh i know my doctor. I wasn't in ensnarled to all these amazing things. And and you've also ran about the sun kind of this lovely man that you'll marry to now developed. How'd you meet him. So i met ages ago. Actually we're working in the same place but we both married to different people. And it wasn't until about i-it's lighter. I get this eight mile from all dadi. Doctor and allio lodhi counter-terrorism moved on and i'd moved on anyway We made up and you know how things for you all terrible. I'm getting a divorce. What about you all yeah. I'm getting a divorce today. So as sank ice It was just the right time right place and couple years later married hersey go with you inviting. What supremacist over for dinner. Well he's he works in intelligence and security so yeah he's a little bit likely of mason. I will find you have skills. I like invited are invited to why a form it was. A former white supremacists come on. Give me bit of credit. Academic remember home. One day she was taking. I could see that movie. So like i say you had this really interesting addressing the united nations in geneva going to the white house giving all this policy advice so when the labor party in wwl ring you and say we want you to run for parliament. You said yes. Why don't you give away that life to to a question. I asked myself every diary. Louis i think i did have this fantastic career and i was traveling around and doing all sorts of really great things. I was a professor. I'd been to the white house been into the club de madrid which sadly is not a disc for the united nations. But i remember. It was a cold november night in vienna and i walked out of the united nations building after three days of talks and three weeks earlier. I'd been in madrid at the club de madrid for two days of talks and i walked out of there and the sky was gray and somewhere in the background. The christmas market was sitting up their markets and die was waiting for me on the steps and you could say his breath in the cold air and he took my hands and started warming up and he said to me i you done and i said i'm i'm actually really done. And he said what do you mean. And i said well all these talk and all of these dialogues. That our to and. I'm going to go home to australia. And nothing's going to change. Nothing's going to change. Because there's no political will and you know you can call it serendipity or you can call it destiny you could call it fate but it was on the way home from there. We stopped off in bali to thaw out from the winter cold and as long by the pool and my phone rang. Didn't answer it. Because i didn't know the number and then i got this text message saying it's wwl lab. Give us a call. they want. We may. I was never political so rang. My son who was young labor and the conversation literally went like this richard. Oh hi adam. It's a high mom what's up. I said you know just got this takes from wwl labor. They wanna meet with me. What do you think that's about. Oh i don't know maybe they want you to run in. The next election. Doesn't election when i didn't even i didn't even know there was an election but often the same question i said. I've got these great career all of these great things. I've reached the pinnacle of my career. Why should i do this. And the response was because it would be a different way to make change. And that's all. I needed true I mean i know you're only starting in parliament and you're a backbencher. Unknown just walked into the parliament and runs the joint. You're in opposition to do you. See yourself over time having influenced. I think there's i think there is a level of influence that comes with being a politician. I say that the greatest change that i'm making is the changes in small ways to people's everyday lives to the people who walk into my office. Oklahoma office her need help with centralink all with immigration or with those issues.

club de madrid Dr ali allio lodhi united nations mesa afghanistan white house hersey labor party mason obama geneva parliament vienna madrid Louis bali australia
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:09 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"You into an over ceva or we can just break you completely and a kind of turn into these kind of ever ceva. Who always wanted to prove that. I i could do it. I can do. I can do these embedded in this. I'm better than that. There was a brutal form of self confidence very much very much. So and i do. I do to these take still think that leaving him with the hottest thing i ever had to do because i had two children because of this constant kind of guilt the skilled that i couldn't make it work. I wasn't patient enough. I wasn't strong enough. I wasn't good enough to make my my marriage work. He wasn't paying bills or helping you and lift you with a mortgage in two two sons debris with a lodden and i ended up having to go on welfare ask Extremely extremely devastating extremely humiliating. And i remember walking into the dss. It was called back then. It was this horrible cry structure with these horrible gray warn carpet and just a collective of miserable souls. it's aimed and sitting there with my boys and the The the gentleman they saying you'll have to wait five five weeks for payment and sychev got nothing. I've got nothing had my children and he sits they somebody who can help you and i said no because the last thing my family was going to support me was the divorce and particularly divorce of my own making and i just walked out of there turned the corner and Leaned back on the wall and down broke down completely broken. That stand you in good state for politics. I think it does. I think it gives you a kind of empathy that You know you know how hard it is what it means to do it hard. You know what it means to be that person who has to put half their shopping back at the at the checkout because you just don't have enough money to to wonder what hey you're gonna feed you children and pay the bills and pay the mortgage I hope i hope that it does. It's certainly something that's left me. And you know you can go on and become all these great things and do great things and but there's always a little part of your. I describe it kind of like a little crack in a bone somewhere. A little part of that always broken and you carry that with you in your life but it's also an incredible sense it at an incredible source of strength as well. This little tape. That's broken so there. You would bring up two sons in perth hauling that a job studying frantically hit nine studying at not put the boys debate Study all not get a few hours slave by in morning and do it all over again. Because i thought you know. I've got to get these done. I've gotta i've gotta doing masters at that time And go to finish my masters of these done so i can stop providing bidder for my boys what were you thinking of the september eleven attacks in two thousand and one of the world trade center in washington some here. I think everyone's got a story where they were always at hyme watching television and then these images come on tv and also is this. The next bruce willis blockbuster. And i just remember sitting denigrating on my gosh i. Just oh my gosh. This is terrible. Oh my gosh this. Comp discount behalf happening copy real and then and then my thoughts turning to the perpetrators as i imagine. Everybody's thoughts would turn to the perpetrators and just thinking. I hope it's not muslims. What does it mean for muslim to be doing. The shopping after window was indeed found to kaieda and things changed really really quickly and it was like muslims were like statues in a room that suddenly came to life and the gaze turns onto these people and d- at one point. I was out doing the shopping and there was a muslim on muslim. Woman there with each app and This mother and her daughter. It was like a sane out of animal kingdom. You know there were. There were praying on her. There were following her through the aisles. And then i pounced on her and started yelling abuse at her And walked away with these big smiles on their faces in. The mother petting the doors back like they. They dumb ass service to australia. Christine was it done. But the sense of pride on this woman's faisal never forget the look on this woman's face as her daughter was yelling abuse it this woman. I just thought wow. This is what a stray has become. So that was that real. This is us in them that that environment. What did you feel like at that time. Did you feel someone who's grown up in a strategist manila all their life in australia within australia. Next sense Did you feel like a. Did you feel like you're on the side or not on a side where you saw them or them inside hustle. What did you would did you place yourself in there. It's religious because a lot of the other people. I've spoken to offer a pep side feel as acutely as women who wear the hijab for example or is young men Young young unfiltered but there was certainly the sense that you know. Wait a minute. i've always been one of you of always been us and now suddenly on vim And you know especially when because appeal muslim in in any kind of avert way. There's not anything conspicuous about it. But once people who i'd known found out that i was muslim their attitudes would completely change and it was quite telling to me how how How somebody could could change upon knowing one part of you. That was not significant to the relationship that you had with them. That was not impactful in the relationship that you had with them but once they found out you almost convicted completely turn around you decided to do a phd in counterterrorism orrin radicalization. I suppose yeah more about wanting to understand why people think about terrorism. The way they think about terrorism. I wanted to nari. Where do we get. These ideas of what. Terrorism is in has an impact on how every day. How does it. Impact on our behaviors It fit into australia's first metric. Afi where we look to behavioral responses to fear to the fear of terrorism. You know what. People taking on protective or avoidance behaviors in response to this Been called terrorism. That was now really pretty much pervasive in our meteor in a political dialogue and the way that we talked about muslims in the way that we talked about the middle eastern arab countries And in the way that we talked about ourselves as well so these are the kinds of things that are going to explore. What kind of people were you talking to. That process spoke to a lot of young muslims and and all muslims. As well and i spoke to a lot of brought broader community straightens And it was really. It was quite With the young muslims. That i spoke to you. The this whole thing of you know once we would them and now way now. We're not here once. I was a in and that was all i ever was. And that's all i ever was brought up to be in. That's all i ever considered myself. And now i'm concentrating constantly being told him. Notice trading notice trailing this complete. There.

sychev kaieda australia bruce willis perth washington Christine manila orrin
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"We were talking before about your friendship. You miss friend in school. In sydney was tracy has only later on in life. When you try to check with a brother sent you an email saying that it turns out. She'd been sexually abused by her father. Overtime time those ye is what i was looking at this family and thinking well. You know the dad tells. These affable character tells jokes. The mom gets perms. This is the quintessential this is the ideal ozzy family and it was many many years later that according amount from her brother you know asking me vote the same and elliott who grew up in chipping norton And her brother and my brother were best friends as well and then he. He told me he said. I'm not sure. If i should tell you this but i suppose it's out in the open now But dad's in jail. He was sexually abusing tracy from the age of six. And are just. I cried i cried. Ice fidanza dies just thought. How did i not know this girl. And i we went through puberty together. We we went to our first concert together kiss. We went to kiss concert together. We did everything together. Hal how could i not say how. Much pain my. Dt friend was in It was devastating to make. It was like being told that. Santa claus wasn't real and tracy came and stayed with us Come come to. W i inside with us server awakaned. We've reconnected. shannon changed at all. Actually and at the end of that weekend there was you could tell there was something on her mind the whole weekend and at the end of that weekend she asked me she said did my dad if a abuse you and it came to light that she'd been pretty much connecting with everyone from childhood trying to find out if father had abused any one of her friends. Maybe you were some kind of refuge in you. Maybe maybe mueller friendships whistle some kind of way of being a normal girl. I think when brother sent me that aim ow he said you know we have very fond memories of your house and you dating at your house and dinner at your house. It was the place that we felt safe and off. At first i was confused by that. And then when he told me What kind of abuse his father was that all kind of made sense so you they with an quote unquote normal house and i saw your house has just a normal house place. They could be who they wanted to be and he they needed to be uso blossoming into womanhood to use a terrible cliches lost into womanhood on. I'm putting that inverted commerce. Here tell me how your mom explained the birds. The beast plays an well if they brought something very afterward actually there. It should cochet had this way of explaining it to us. Arabic arabic is a very flowery language and it doesn't always translate very well into english and so my mother's translation of the kind of birds and the bees token something like this and he woman. She's like a flower. The man he liked to smell the flour so the men. He smelled the flower. Dwi say three times in the flower shenoy smell good anymore he throw it away another flower and that was it so so that was the so is the point into put a pig on the man's nose script out of flower arranging. Took me a while to figure out that it was actually the toll walk and once. I figured that out. Then we had great fun with my mother making fun about. She was very appreciative of essence of humid. So your academic overachiever like you got top marks. At school you earned a place. Sydney uni law school. But your mom wanted to come with. You can with her to cairo so to find your husband pretty much much. So it was on my final Out the day after my final exams my parents basically said You going to aged and you know they made it sound that it was going to be a holiday but i knew very well that it wasn't going to be a holiday. My sister had since married and her husband moved her back to egypt so she was living in egypt and i think my parents saw that. This kind of What was supposed to be. A temporary stay in australia was coming to towards its end. I've been they'd been in australia. Fourteen fifteen years. He's no contact with family in egypt. We never had anyone come and visit us except one auntie And so. I think they thought you know. Now it's time for us to move back and this actually happens with a lot of migrant families. They decide that they'll move back but the egypt that they were returning to wasn't the egypt that they had left. It was a completely different plays and that grown accustomed to astrid. Your estrada was home but it took that trip to egypt for them to realize that so basically got pepped up Waiting to egypt win inside with my auntie who had never met in my five cousins who never met and then after about a month my mom said will you staying going and and that was it so between you studied at the american university announced degree there and and for while the you almost got right into the life. Ancelotti became a kind of an addiction. Young woman in cairo for. I didn't really have much choice. Reach you know it was. I've always been kind of pragmatic thought. Arcane will this is the situation given kind of had to be that way. I guess him alive. This is the situation. You're given you work at. How do you work with the situation that you given so. I went to the american university in cairo and the american university. Cairo is such an elite institution. And it was so alien to me. Because i come from such working class roots working class background in egypt. Working class background in australia and here i was plunged into the elite world. Where my classmate was princess rania of jordan. She wasn't the princess then but she was And all your people whose parents were ambassadors and these old money in chipping norton. I was always the chiku. I went ice. Got uni in track pants and they will address to the nines. And i thought gosh obita feeding here. That's where you bet your first husband and you got married pretty quick to that five weeks. Five weeks wasn't a. It wasn't an arranged marriage but my parents from the age of will as soon as i moved to egypt Had a a constant flow. Shall we say of suitors. An attempt to marry me off car was instrumental has said that's pretty much how it works and managed to dodge every single one by By making up stories about them poor guys but this one was was with someone of my own cheating and between five weeks we will married when she moved back to a strategy in perth bitter that he was quite a violent man and abusive of disappeared disappear new for days on end. And all of that. That's when you were in that situation you've been this strong confident woman an overachiever. And you still thought you couldn't leave. That's the classic thing isn't it it is it is so classic that you know. Yeah i think as well richard for me. A lot of overcharging was always thought felt. Local wasn't good enough. And so when you feel like you're not good enough it can either make you a break. You can make.

egypt tracy cochet uni law school norton cairo american university elliott Santa claus Hal mueller sydney shannon australia Dwi astrid estrada Sydney Ancelotti rania
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

02:48 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"That kind of.

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:39 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"Problems and it. But it's actually given me a real insight into Into the the lives of indigenous young people and and and the kinds of racism and structural barriers. They they could have but yeah My best friend need to. Maria has of immigrants stock greek Just one day. Just stop talking to me and be my friend. I had no idea and remember spending the whole day following her saying. Why aren't you talking to me. Why are you talking to me. And it was at the end of the day when her cousin turned means. Listen blackie. she's not allowed to be a friend anymore so stop talking to her And are just remember thinking. But but i'm not black parents had samy and presumed that i was aboriginal and so band their order from being my friend. All that's mad. He's awful to do you know a lot of people i speak to say. Oh you know it's all about educating it's all about educating children amar response that. I've never had a six-year-old. Tell me don't let me because of color of my skin omar religion. But i've had their parents tell me that so slow pad. Educating the children sperry educating the adults absolutely hitler's hitler's germany was that domestic educated population in the world. At the time pretty much. I don't know about that education line. Either people always think that doing something to it's the kids the kids. It's the kids now. Are adults in this case. Your parents both working hard. Meant that you and your siblings were spending a lotta time after school alone. Typical latchkey kid kids. Now this carries over into your adult life. We have two sons single mom. How would you try and catch up on your teenage sons. When they were at how much what. I call creative parenting techniques and among my creative parenting take techniques was still This little kind of scenario. That i used to play with the boys will always i said to them right. If i'm not hype and somebody rings harm. Don't tell them mum's not hiring right stranger danger and all of that so what you need to do. Is you need to say to the mumps just in the shower and she'll call you back then you need to call me at work and then i will call that person. As if i'd just gotten out of the shower. I came so kissed them. So i'd bring them up and pretend to be mrs mcguire mcquay would sound like this okay. Helen is mom high ways. Your mom can you put your mom the fine for me and every time they would say to me mom we know it's you and jesus these kids are smart but then i figured at mrs mcguire only has one voice in one nine so they're probably figured out it was may put. Our accent is appointed exit polling hands. And i it seems one tovar rimba ringing and pretending to be mrs mcguire and the boys will like mom you please stop doing this and i said gee boys hung up the heart to my colleague. Sun's going to ring any minute now telling mating an opinion a meeting for last hour then eventually ring back my son and i said what's up on mother. I've done something terrible. Somebody rang for you. And i thought it was you so i so i told them to stop but actually it wasn't. You're saying see see this is. Why should always listen to your mother. That's light creative. Parenting so school was always problematic. It's sounds like times yet a pretty marvelous time but other times. Not so great. Chief tormentor in primary school was in sydney. By the time you move to sydney was christine. Tell me matt christine. And his sidekick silent iris christain you know everyone's gonna childhood nemesis that features like throughout. They live every time you picture like if you if you do boxing and you have to punch something. Biz christine doing as christine. She just as soon as i started at at bill north primary school. She took it upon herself. That to be my my tormentor Because she hated muslims and silent. Iris handle sought catered muslims. To so i thought. Wow you live in lecomba. You've got a lot of hating to do you. How do you find the time to hide so much so obviously had to take her hating into the school yard and she was just she would just walk past me and and kick me or will pass me whisper something horrible to me or send me notes in class telling me i'm going to go to hell. You know this was religiously is about my religion completely about my religion and then one time She came up to me in the playground. And she said do you believe. In jesus god he weaker she christine's at it again It didn't quite know how to answer because see. Religion wasn't something that we talked about very much. My family there was this kind of assumption that yeah well most slim and it was part of attribution coccia. But i didn't do religious lessons if anything. My parents sent me to sunday school. Because i thought that's where you learn maths and english and you get extra tuition. Jesus nonprofit nice la anyway. We just thinking that. I was going to get more maths and english. And then i came home with pitches of jesus and they realize what sunday school was but we never really talked about it and then she said no. You don't know you aren't you. Don't believe in. Jesus you were doting with someone. You're gonna go to hell. My mother's you are and she spent spent at me. What on your face right at my face. I thought right that see so. I took my little self down to. The teacher walked into the the teachers roommates. And she said what do you want. And i told her what happened and she looked at me and she wrote horizon she saw. Don't be so stupid. And when our protests didn't said you know you have to. You should do something about this. It's not right what she did. She threatened to set me to send me to the principal's office. And because i was such a two shoes who was really scared of going to the principal's office are kind of retreated But i do remember telling my mom about that incident later that evening and she she was all sorts of angry she marched into the school. The next day and biggest thing was putting the teacher in a corner saying how dare you call my daughter stupid. You know she's your top student. She's not stupid. She's because such are offended by that than anything else but the may it was a real eye opener because i thought it was it. Was that point in your life. And i think everyone goes has has this pointing the life where you realize that the world isn't perfectly ordered into the good guys and the bad guys and the good guys get you. The bad guys always out in the good guys always win. That you have an expectation of justice and then you don't get and you get it and the people who you expect to bring you justice who you rely on to bring you justice as adults of this world. Don't bring justice and and you know there has to be a reason why fifty years on we'll maybe not fifty. Let's not get too far ahead of ourselves. Forty on forty years on be still.

mrs mcguire christine mrs mcguire mcquay tovar rimba samy blackie matt christine iris christain bill north primary school Maria sydney germany Helen Iris boxing Sun la
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

06:59 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an abc podcast. Dr anne ali is the federal member for cowan which is based in the northern suburbs of perth and is not a political life. She hasn't spent decades fighting her way up through the party. Machine he'll life has given her enough. Struggles to contend with already and ali enjoyed a classic seventies working class strident sub childhood playing street cricket playing marco polo in the pool. All of that. She was an academic overachiever but when she finished school among took it to cairo in the expectation that would make a husband there and she did meet a husband. When i moved back to australia he turned out to be violent. An unreliable and at one point abbas bringing up who lovely sons alone holding down a job and studying at night gradually her hard work paid off and she became an academic after the september eleven attacks and was distressed to find that australian. Muslims like her were constantly being asked to affirm and then reaffirm that they had nothing to do with terrorism and this led her into becoming an international academic expert in counterterrorism and de radicalization and she was invited to the obama white house conference on violent extremism in two thousand sixteen. Her life changed again. When analee became the first muslim australian woman to be elected to federal parliament. She's written a classic australian memoir which is quite moving but at times it may be snot laughter which was embarrassing. Because i was drinking a cup of tea at the time called finding my place. Hello an highridge. What was the name you were born with. A pretty long and quite conflated. It's actually osama mood has seen rookie. I can't say that i just tries not to. I'm sure whatever when you went to school in. They had because you have to say as though with this kind of gus rolla zaza as look. It's actually yeah. It's actually quite difficult to say. Even the people who have the guttural. So i used to get cold as i ask what was i like was i was Is and you just it just got. Nobody can pronounce my name. But now everyone can say cappuccino kinda easier in the end. I i would call him in tease us because nobody could pronounce my name correctly and my sister had a relatively easy name to pronounce. She was rhonda. My brother was ho sam but people just called him sam. My mom had changed tone. I'm to sue or she was used people called her say and my dad people would call so i was the only one with the name that nobody ever could pronounce eventually. Just my parents gave in and said okay. Changing by date. Paul mccoy an you born in on sixty seven and buoyant egypt's and you got a really beautiful and vivid description of cairo. Nine hundred sixty seven in your book. I just read that china picture of what car i was like when you were born. Okay egypt's nineteen sixty seven. The blaring summa hate evening walks along. Clinician neil is called carrot juice from a straight vendor the songs invoking a greater arab homeland muhammad hasni in high calls weekly column. Frankly in the bottle your daily news. The cries from women in their house dresses greeting the familiar. Clang of the gas bottle man. The taxi phase starting at amigas six piasters the friday matinee at the cinema metro. The voice of the arabs radio abdel-halim half is the muslim brotherhood. Gamal up the nassir and arab nationalism. The freighting promise of a better egypt if the nineteen sixties symbolize the era of making love not war of blowing in the wind the beatles liberation and hope it was not the world that greeted my arrival here. This is not in sixty seven. This is the year the year of the six day. War says this means that your generation was known as the children of the naxos. What does that mean it was. It's quite an interesting price. Because it wasn't a phrase that i was familiar with having left egypt shortly after nineteen sixty seven when i was very very young but i came across this phrase forty years on the fortieth anniversary of the next hour and an actor is the colloquial name literally means the setback the colloquial name given to the seeks to war which was devastating to fate of the egyptian and united arab armies at the sinai and it really marked period. I mean even the name given to it. The the axa speaks to the way in which time is is marked by conflict in the middle east and and in egypt so that whole generation of people born nineteen sixty seven way this kind of marketing and i describe it as kind of like like a birth mark on our forwards that we're known as the children of the knox our generation of the setback the specs that means disappointment disappointment. Point changes. will i think more more disappointment than change. I think there was this before the six day. War armed as the as arab troops gathered in the cyanide. There was this swelling of anticipation that the arab armies. We're going to defeat the israeli army. Because i was so much bigger numbers but when the arab armies wearing infected faded was a huge humiliation huge disappointment caught on the hop went because israel acted preemptively and ahead of the stabilities. Gordon i they did and they They came in from From behind these saint shirley and even though the army was so outnumbered by the arab forces they managed to win win this war and agents and their armies retreated in in what was a very very humiliating defeat with your family fit into the class structure of cairo. Egypt back in those guys stream middle class of we a probably were the definition of the working middle class in egypt. Egypt is is very close by society. You have your really really reach and you really really poor and then you have this massive middle class that are very well educated but falling tencent purposes quite struggling not not much of a ryan mentioned in contemporary strata. So very middle class dead was an engineer. Mom was a nurse lived in in in pretty middle class suburb and and deal with these kinds of of always said if agents that that in terms of morality and the the morals and traditions. The rich diet don't need them and the poor can't afford them so they're very much a middleclass.

Dr anne ali Egypt federal parliament cairo gus rolla zaza ho sam Paul mccoy muhammad hasni cowan marco polo halim half abbas perth abc ali cricket osama united arab rhonda white house
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

06:59 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an abc podcast. Dr anne ali is the federal member for cowan which is based in the northern suburbs of perth and is not a political life. She hasn't spent decades fighting her way up through the party. Machine he'll life has given her enough. Struggles to contend with already and ali enjoyed a classic seventies working class strident sub childhood playing street cricket playing marco polo in the pool. All of that. She was an academic overachiever but when she finished school among took it to cairo in the expectation that would make a husband there and she did meet a husband. When i moved back to australia he turned out to be violent. An unreliable and at one point abbas bringing up who lovely sons alone holding down a job and studying at night gradually her hard work paid off and she became an academic after the september eleven attacks and was distressed to find that australian. Muslims like her were constantly being asked to affirm and then reaffirm that they had nothing to do with terrorism and this led her into becoming an international academic expert in counterterrorism and de radicalization and she was invited to the obama white house conference on violent extremism in two thousand sixteen. Her life changed again. When analee became the first muslim australian woman to be elected to federal parliament. She's written a classic australian memoir which is quite moving but at times it may be snot laughter which was embarrassing. Because i was drinking a cup of tea at the time called finding my place. Hello an highridge. What was the name you were born with. A pretty long and quite conflated. It's actually osama mood has seen rookie. I can't say that i just tries not to. I'm sure whatever when you went to school in. They had because you have to say as though with this kind of gus rolla as look. It's actually. yeah it's actually quite difficult to say even the people who have the guttural so i used to get cold as i ask what was i like was i was Is and you just it just got. Nobody can pronounce my name. But now everyone can say cappuccino kinda easier in the end. I i would call him in tease us because nobody could pronounce my name correctly and my sister had a relatively easy name to pronounce. She was rhonda. My brother was ho sam but people just called him sam. My mom had changed tone. I'm to sue or she was used people called her say and my dad people would call so i was the only one with the name that nobody ever could pronounce eventually. Just my parents gave in and said okay. Changing by date. Paul mccoy an you born in on sixty seven and buoyant egypt's and you got a really beautiful and vivid description of cairo. Nine hundred sixty seven in your book. I just read that china picture of what car i was like when you were born. Okay egypt's nineteen sixty seven. The blaring summa hate evening walks along. Clinician neil is called carrot juice from a straight vendor the songs invoking a greater arab homeland muhammad hasni in high calls weekly column. Frankly in the bottle your daily news. The cries from women in their house dresses greeting the familiar. Clang of the gas bottle man. The taxi phase starting at amigas six piasters the friday matinee at the cinema metro. The voice of the arabs radio abdel-halim half is the muslim brotherhood. Gamal up the nassir and arab nationalism. The freighting promise of a better egypt if the nineteen sixties symbolize the era of making love not war of blowing in the wind the beatles liberation and hope it was not the world that greeted my arrival here. This is not in sixty seven. This is the year the year of the six day. War says this means that your generation was known as the children of the naxos. What does that mean it was. It's quite an interesting price. Because it wasn't a phrase that i was familiar with having left egypt shortly after nineteen sixty seven when i was very very young but i came across this phrase forty years on the fortieth anniversary of the next hour and an actor is the colloquial name literally means the setback the colloquial name given to the seeks to war which was devastating to fate of the egyptian and united arab armies at the sinai and it really marked period. I mean even the name given to it. The the axa speaks to the way in which time is is marked by conflict in the middle east and and in egypt so that whole generation of people born nineteen sixty seven way this kind of marketing and i describe it as kind of like like a birth mark on our forwards that we're known as the children of the knox our generation of the setback the specs that means disappointment disappointment. Point changes. will i think more more disappointment than change. I think there was this before the six day. War armed as the as arab troops gathered in the cyanide. There was this swelling of anticipation that the arab armies. We're going to defeat the israeli army. Because i was so much bigger numbers but when the arab armies wearing infected faded was a huge humiliation huge disappointment record on the hop went because israel acted preemptively and ahead of the stabilities. Gordon i they did and they They came in from From behind these saint shirley and even though the army was so outnumbered by the arab forces they managed to win win this war and agents and their armies retreated in in what was a very very humiliating defeat with your family fit into the class structure of cairo. Egypt back in those guys stream middle class of we a probably were the definition of the working middle class in egypt. Egypt is is very close by society. You have your really really reach and you really really poor and then you have this massive middle class that are very well educated but falling tencent purposes quite struggling not not much of a ryan mentioned in contemporary strata. So very middle class dead was an engineer. Mom was a nurse lived in in in pretty middle class suburb and and deal with these kinds of of always said if agents that that in terms of morality and the the morals and traditions. The rich diet don't need them and the poor can't afford them so they're very much a middleclass.

Dr anne ali Egypt federal parliament cairo gus rolla ho sam Paul mccoy muhammad hasni cowan marco polo halim half abbas perth abc ali cricket osama united arab rhonda white house
"dr anne" Discussed on CharVision

CharVision

02:33 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on CharVision

"Read the wild parrots of telegraph hill Wait telling what. Read the wild parrots of telegraph hill. Okay so megan. Read the wild pear parrots of telegraph. No wow i think i'm gonna redac- okay so okay so dr anne. How can people call you or work on june with you or really up on on one absolutely. We need all that information. Tony do you ever information up. Your heart speaks dot com and tomorrow Teaching a level one. Actually if someone's interested They can find heart seek events dot. Es that any okay. Well wait a second. Tomorrow is in where you are is july or four but instead third. but it's the third for the rest of us in america and God only knows where else it is. Okay so how can they sign up for it and they look on the best way to reach you hard. Well look on our best page heart speak events dot. as that any You can always email us a adleman at heart speak. Dot com knows relative. Ad d. m. i. n. at heart speak h. e. a. r. t. s. p. e. a. Dot com okay. Okay well you are fascinating i am. I am so grateful that my friend robin introduced you to me. Please on my i. I wonder for haven't even watches the show. But talker sunder my love. And it's robin nemeth. Who actually is in melbourne in is a chiropractor so choose from new york originally so i wish you only amazing good things and i. I hope you will come back on again and realises a hi baby. Hi hi sweetheart. Oh my gosh so q. Acute is the anyway..

dr anne adleman megan Tony robin nemeth america robin melbourne new york
"dr anne" Discussed on CharVision

CharVision

02:09 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on CharVision

"Fear now with for fear. No stay Open and take an open posture on some fear. Just notice and then take that closed. Posture gannett contracted posture contract forward protects detective posture and in this posture. Look for feeling of love and sit up when you're any. When did you notice. I saw big heart. When i the last thing i saw was this huge art. Like there's like an emoji that you can do on your phone that you press the thing and it'll it'll make a huge heart and that's what it did mice so as far as the ease. How easy was it to feel. Love here contracted compared to when you're over. It was easier when i was open. Yeah i teach us all over the world and that's nine not nine hundred. Ten people will say that and on the other hand. What about fear. What about fear when you open this fear. When i'm open. I feel like the heart that came. Got rid of the sphere. Okay cool and most people would say that it's harder to feel fear when you're having broken posture. Yeah so maybe that's why. Yeah maybe that's yes. So that is that is in harshly. We do take postures. And i ask you to feel that was kind of a warm up exercise. Now let's take something that eater stresses you out in the presence of more in the past. Okay like everyone has bad memories now. I'm not gonna. I'm gonna ask you not to take your worst bad memory ever but maybe one that's a little bit upsetting okay and sit with either the stress and the president or the bad memory the painful memory.

gannett
"dr anne" Discussed on CharVision

CharVision

01:47 min | 2 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on CharVision

"Their maker and their divine energy so that they can move on in the spirit world and grow so anyway. I hope everybody's doing well I cope you had a good week. And i we have a guest today and her name is dr anne johnson and she is a floor thinking healer who earned her phd in evidence based healthcare from the oxford university. Through your background in chiropractic and psychology. Her empathic ability and sense of curiosity. She developed heart speak. She developed her own technique of healing unique and empowering stress reduction tool and Also she's an expert in applied kinesiology. And you know. I love applied kinesiology. And thank you so much for being here dr anne and you. Sharon's really great be year or a long. It's my pleasure. So i think everybody should know that even though it's july second for us it's like third for her because she's in australia in queensland yes and you went to oxford university. Wow you're a brainiac was excellent a love the but you're very you're very well-balanced 'cause you're you're right and left brain you're like amazingly well balanced and this Would tell us exactly what heart speak is well..

dr anne johnson oxford university dr anne Sharon queensland australia
"dr anne" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

Doug Miles Media

03:24 min | 9 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

"Thesis of the book Teaching kids how to make things we. We are species of makers need food means.

New COVID-19 variant in L.A. County: What do we know?

Here & Now

05:30 min | 9 months ago

New COVID-19 variant in L.A. County: What do we know?

"In los angeles. Health officials have begun testing patients for a new more contagious strain of the corona virus. I discovered in europe. They're trying to figure out why we're seeing a surgeon cases here one person dies from the virus every ten minutes in la county and hospitals are rationing care urging people to avoid going to the er unless they absolutely have to for the latest. We're joined by. Dr n remind professor of epidemiology at ucla. Welcome dr hi nice to be here yes so. La county as i mentioned testing whether the variant of the virus like the one in london south africa and korea could be spreading here. What do we know about these efforts in this new strain. Well this is very important Los angeles county. The laboratory is active or laboratories are actively sequencing strains and it's not only important to be looking for this Uk strain and the south african Strain variant should. I say but others as well. We're we're far behind here in the. Us and sequencing efforts and viral surveillance is a critical component of public health surveillance. And this is a very very important moment to be doing it. We're seeing a huge spread here in los angeles. There are a variety of reasons that this could be happening but it is critical to be doing this kind of viral surveillance. Well let's talk a little bit about the variety of reasons why this could be happening. If a new strain is spreading locally. How did it get here. And what what. Additional action should be taken to limit the spread. Well if the strain is if if this if these particular strains the uk the again the variance the uk variant or the south african variant are actually spreading here in los angeles which would make good sense Then they probably arrived through travel somebody. They're coming from europe or Somebody coming going and coming back from europe but but the thing is it isn't just about the uk it's not just about south africa. We are seeing many many european countries outside the uk of recorded cases denmark france germany italy the netherlands spain sweden. It's been detected even in toronto in a couple with no history of travel exposure or high risk contacts. So these this particular. Uk very int- is spreading. And because we here in the united states have been sequencing less than one percent of the of the cases that we that we have here as opposed to seven percents or more in the uk fifty percent in new zealand and australia. We're very very far behind. So the bottom line is it's very likely that either these particular variants or other variants. That are similar are spreading in our community and we just have not been looking for them and thank you for that distinction between strain and variant. We're talking about variants gear variants. Yes we we understand things like holiday gatherings and possibly this new variant of the virus could be accelerating the spread but what else could be the reason. The surge seem to happen so quickly here in los angeles here in los angeles. We have one of the most. We have the most populous county Here in the us and and so you have a lot of opportunity for spread. We know that people are fatigued and that they have been getting together. A lot of people got together for thanksgiving. And so we're seeing the effects of those thanksgiving get togethers now and i think that here in la county. We have a lot of multi generational households as well a lot of essential workers. So there's plenty of opportunity for spread and once this virus gains momentum. It's like a snowball rolling downhill. It's just gains momentum it gets bigger and faster and harder to stop so some of the force of infection perforce of infection. There's also this new data out in la county that shows that some grocery stores are hot spots for the virus. And that's alarming because going to the stores a trip that most people take because the risks seem low. What is your advice on how to stay safe. And what is now some of the darkest days of this pandemic. i think the key here is everything that you're doing today here in los angeles is more dangerous than it was a month ago. Every type of activity. I've seen estimates of anywhere between one and one hundred and one and fifty people in los angeles are infected. And so even if you're just going to the grocery store for example going to the bank or doing anything where you're going to be in contact with people outside your household. There's a higher chance today than there was a few weeks ago that you'll be exposed to covid nineteen so i think the key here is just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. There are a lot of things that are still permitted here but they may not be the right thing to do because they will carry risks for you and the people around you so my advice to people is stay home if you can. If you must go out make your plans ahead of time be very targeted. Go to the grocery store have a list and break it down by the sections of the grocery store. He know where you're going. Make it quick in and out. That's dr anne remind professor of epidemiology at ucla. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure.

La County UK Los Angeles Dr N Europe South Africa Los Angeles County Ucla United States Korea London Denmark Sweden Netherlands Spain Italy
"dr anne" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Mom Brain

"To us a little bit about the different pandemics that you've worked on. Were closely on that. You've studied so in terms of pandemic so the panned this is really the first pandemic in our lifetime so good. The last pandemic was the nineteen eighteen pandemic but in terms of epidemics. I've been working on. I've worked on bola for many many years. So basically after i finished my phd <hes>. I ended up working for an i h for several years. I started setting up. these research. Programmes in african countries. And i started working in the democratic republic of congo in two thousand and two and so i started this huge research program. That's what started as a team. Research program became a huge research program. And we've been working on things like ebola. Monkey pox work on maxene preventable diseases. So trying to get people vaccinated and understanding how many people are vaccinated against regular diseases like measles in leo and tetanus and these things that we worry about here in the united states to so. I've been doing that. But then i've also been doing things like following hunters and people who are at the animal human interface in trying to see will what viruses are. They getting exposed to who gets infected. What are they so <hes>. One of the themes of my of my work has been preventing pandemics before they start so in the whole idea that it's better to to avoid being in the situation that we are right now vent to spend the money to prevent it in. Its i always use the example. You know my my my late father in law always used to say it's better to stay out of trouble than it is to get out of trouble. How do you do that. What is that look like. What is preventing pandemic or epidemic. What is that look like. Well the the best way to do it is to is to invest in the research in the public health infrastructure to be able to detect these things beforehand because epidemics like wildfires. Or you want to stamp them out when they're just little sparks you don't wanna wait until they've started burning through lots of brush in becoming a huge wildfire the the. It's very hard to extinguish. And so you need trained public health professionals. You need to have good disease surveillance on the ground. You need to be able to have the lab infrastructure in place in the testing in place in all of the diagnostics in place. All the things that you're going to be able to detect what's going on. I you need your your. Your is near ears on the ground. And then the tools are detected and then the ability to go respond to it now is been spending the vast majority of my career doing this in places like the congo you know but here in the united states we're learning. It's the same problem. We didn't invest in our public health infrastructure. And so as a result we're really paying the price you know. It took us a long time to be able to to get <hes>. Testing in running. It took a really long time to be able to contact tracing in all these people who are trying to figure out okay. This person is exposed to this person. This person gave a guy gave it to this person. All of that has taken a very very longtime time to give get in place. And so we're it's like having a house with a really poor foundation that you know it's sinking while you're trying to build on top of it and that's kind of unfortunately where we are.

dr ramon ucla center for global in immi los angeles ucla peace corps twitter drc instagram middlebury united states west africa unicef la africa world health organization bola democratic republic of congo ebola tetanus
Battling Pandemics With Dr. Anne Rimoin

Mom Brain

03:22 min | 10 months ago

Battling Pandemics With Dr. Anne Rimoin

"To us a little bit about the different pandemics that you've worked on. Were closely on that. You've studied so in terms of pandemic so the panned this is really the first pandemic in our lifetime so good. The last pandemic was the nineteen eighteen pandemic but in terms of epidemics. I've been working on. I've worked on bola for many many years. So basically after i finished my phd I ended up working for an i h for several years. I started setting up. these research. Programmes in african countries. And i started working in the democratic republic of congo in two thousand and two and so i started this huge research program. That's what started as a team. Research program became a huge research program. And we've been working on things like ebola. Monkey pox work on maxene preventable diseases. So trying to get people vaccinated and understanding how many people are vaccinated against regular diseases like measles in leo and tetanus and these things that we worry about here in the united states to so. I've been doing that. But then i've also been doing things like following hunters and people who are at the animal human interface in trying to see will what viruses are. They getting exposed to who gets infected. What are they so One of the themes of my of my work has been preventing pandemics before they start so in the whole idea that it's better to to avoid being in the situation that we are right now vent to spend the money to prevent it in. Its i always use the example. You know my my my late father in law always used to say it's better to stay out of trouble than it is to get out of trouble. How do you do that. What is that look like. What is preventing pandemic or epidemic. What is that look like. Well the the best way to do it is to is to invest in the research in the public health infrastructure to be able to detect these things beforehand because epidemics like wildfires. Or you want to stamp them out when they're just little sparks you don't wanna wait until they've started burning through lots of brush in becoming a huge wildfire the the. It's very hard to extinguish. And so you need trained public health professionals. You need to have good disease surveillance on the ground. You need to be able to have the lab infrastructure in place in the testing in place in all of the diagnostics in place. All the things that you're going to be able to detect what's going on. I you need your your. Your is near ears on the ground. And then the tools are detected and then the ability to go respond to it now is been spending the vast majority of my career doing this in places like the congo you know but here in the united states we're learning. It's the same problem. We didn't invest in our public health infrastructure. And so as a result we're really paying the price you know. It took us a long time to be able to to get Testing in running. It took a really long time to be able to contact tracing in all these people who are trying to figure out okay. This person is exposed to this person. This person gave a guy gave it to this person. All of that has taken a very very longtime time to give get in place. And so we're it's like having a house with a really poor foundation that you know it's sinking while you're trying to build on top of it and that's kind of unfortunately where we are.

Bola Democratic Republic Of Congo Ebola Tetanus Measles United States Congo
Protect healthcare heroes And The Elderly 'from Influenza urges UN

UN News

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Protect healthcare heroes And The Elderly 'from Influenza urges UN

"Amid a potential global shortage influenza vaccines and the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic the U N. health agency has advised to protect the elderly and health workers I the updated recommendations from the World Health Organization who come as the Northern Hemisphere braces for these seasonal bug every year, it claims between two, hundred, nine, hundred, thousand, and six, hundred and fifty thousand lives from respond to related causes in the Southern Hemisphere. Influenza infections have been at historic lows most likely. Because of strict Covid, nineteen health precautions and travel restrictions, W chose Dr Anne Warren said, but there were no guarantees that this would be the case in the global north. This winter she told journalists in Geneva amid rising numbers of Corona Virus Infections. If this follow suit and influenza also is low circulation in the northern hemisphere, we may see we may see less infections and we also hope to see less infections due to the the very high uptake of. The vaccine but we are seeing some sporadic outbreaks in some areas of the world, and so we really fully believed that as societies opened back up, we'll probably start to see blue circulate again back to more normal proportions.

Dr Anne Warren Southern Hemisphere World Health Organization Influenza Geneva
Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

UN News

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

"This is Matt, Wells. At U. N. news well, with high level meetings own going to address the climate and Biodiversity Crisis Center stage you and headquarters one of the Secretary General's Youth Advisory Group members urging world leaders to make sure their decisions get back to the people that helped shape policy on the ground, and this Gibson is co Coordinator Three Fifty Fiji regional use lead climate change network in the Pacific driven by young climate leaders and he. Told Julia Dean, of our UN Country Team Australia was important to let groups like his know they've made a difference for me. There are three reasons why we should be continuing to engage young people and the first reason is around young people are the only demographic that has the opportunity, the agency and the capability to be able to respond really quickly and effectively situations that need a response in the Pacific. We Sierra really clear example when it. Comes to responding to natural natural disaster. You look at any cyclone that we've had over the last ten years any development sector agency that's worth. Their salt will tell you that young people have been at the forefront of driving the transformative change to ensure that the response to the crises was done effectively ethically and quickly, and so that's the first reason is the reason we engage young people because without founding biased, we get the job done but. The second reason I think is perhaps more important is because young people have the most vested interest in the way in which the future will pan out. We are in a unique sort of next this position where we have the ability to see the learnings from generations before us, but we also the generation that will be guiding in creating the next generation through the next thirty five to fifty years. So our interest is not just our own. But also the interest of ensuring that our children have a life that is something that is worthwhile and something that we would like for ourselves and fraud Johnson, and then of course, the third reason is because you've will be the population that drives future innovation. So the reason that we work with youth now is not because we want them to feel cool and fancy and like social influences. Now, the reason we work with youth now is to. Ensure that we're laying down the foundations so that humanity and society is going forward are fighting trump because at the end of the day, the leaders that we have. Now that you know pushing retirement age won't be there twenty five years from now to see their plans to fruition. So we need to be able to instill enough Dr Anne, capacity and young people to ensure that the future that we have is not just one that we. Wants, but it's a, it's a reality

Pacific Co Coordinator Three Fifty Fij Julia Dean Gibson Youth Advisory Group Biodiversity Crisis Center Un Country Team Australia Matt Dr Anne U. N. Wells Fraud Johnson
Parenting In A Pandemic

Therapy for Black Girls

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Parenting In A Pandemic

"Fellow parents in the community I am sure you feel me when I say this past couple of months have been rough. So today Dr Anne. Louise, Lockhart is back to chat about what it looks like two parent through a pandemic. Dr Lockhart is. Psychologist parent coach in the business owner of a new day, pediatric psychology in San Antonio Texas. Born and raised on the island of Saint Croix in the US Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. Doctor Lockhart has a doctorate in clinical psychology and is board certified in clinical child and adolescent psychology. She's worked in both military and civilian. Setting Dr. Lockhart, and I chatted about the benefits of routine and structure right now. Managing Your own and your child's anxiety about cities reopening. What kinds of things we should be considering about school in the fall and how to have conversations with our kids and our schools about racism and racial trauma. If. You hear something while listening. They're resonates with you. Please be sure to share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much joining us against today Dr Luckily. For inviting me. Yes, always a pleasure to chat with you and I was like we gotta get her back. Because the last time you shared such great information about co-regulation right and that was before all of our lives turned upside down right. Exactly like I have been trying to listen to the episode on repeat like okay. How can I regulates today? Because, it feels like all that good stuff you shared. I'm really struggling to try to figure out. I would imagine that lots of other parents are too so I'm curious to hear how the DEMOC and everything that has been happening his really just kind of did everything we were doing. It's parenting Oh. Yeah, definitely I mean before all this happened. I mean as you know, and as some people know or may not know. Is that when you are needing to prepare for a life altering event many times we have some kind of preparation. Right or we know that it's coming or at least have an idea. Have some kind of file system has experienced something similar right, and then this pandemic hit and we're like wait. Wait, I don't have a file for pandemics. I don't know what to do when a global I mean. I've seen movies on it. But. I don't know what I'm supposed to do and so. I think what has caused some such an upheaval, because for many people like here in Texas we were literally on Spring, break and ending it when we heard the news, and then we told our kids. Hey, guys. Spring break is extended and gay. If extended some more Mike. Okay they're like so are. When are we going back probably in April? Okay, maybe okay, maybe August. Right and so I think that we we really didn't know how to prepare like. How do you prepare for being home twenty four seven with your spouse and your kids? Nonstop. And then maybe not be able to go to work or work differently. Teach your kids, I mean it was. It was a crazy adjustment it was. It was very difficult and I. think that's what makes it so much harder that we didn't have anything to relate it to. And no kind of system to compare it to Yeah, that's what I have found. I think just so overwhelming I said our last conversation talked about like how important it is to make sure that you're taking care of yourself so that you can then extend your kids. And in this situation we were all just thrown into working from home. And then you're trying to school from home and you can't even. Even like move about the world in the same ways that you were in, so it just felt like lots and lots of demands on your time in resources without very many ways of really kind of releasing it exactly and I think what was happening for a lot of people including myself is the things that we would normally do. We could not do anymore so like I love me some retail therapy. I couldn't go anywhere, nor did I want to. You know getting together with friends. Social distancing going to the movies can't do that. Go to the zoo. That's closed, I mean everything. Everything we do with our kids or for ourselves you literally could not do. And I think that's what so much harder is that Nicole? Regulation and be able to regulate and manage and balanced. Your time is all fighting good when you have the option, but when you literally have no options. You have to get very very creative with how you do that. so now it feels like some parts of the country are opening back up right like I. Know We'll here. In Georgia there are several things that have been open even for a couple of weeks ago. We are staying put, but things are opening up again now and so I'm wondering if you have ideas about how we might be able to do that with our families in a way, that feels they've. Yes, that's a great great question. Because now, a lot of places are opening up including San Antonio, but we as you said are put as well. I think that's where you have to really do your research and look to see what kind of measures are put in place, and then again talk to your family about how they feel how you can do that gradually and safely, and how you can start to get into the world in a way, that feels right for you so for example couple of weeks ago every three weeks now. My family and I decided to go find a lake to go to. So we can get outside and be in nature. They were all closed, so that made it a little bit difficult, but we were still able to go to a park and hang out together a getting takeout from a restaurant and having a picnic somewhere outside being able. Hang out together. Being able to hang out with family, we actually hung out with our inlaws twice because we know that they've been quarantined, isolated and social distance just like us, and a initially felt uncomfortable, and my son told me he felt uncomfortable and I acknowledged that I also felt that way as well too, and that it was okay to feel that way. Because! It had been three months since he thought Persson in person

Doctor Lockhart San Antonio Texas Dr Anne Saint Croix United States Caribbean Business Owner Virgin Islands Dr Luckily Louise San Antonio Persson Texas Mike Nicole Georgia
Why COVID-19 Might Hit African Nations Hardest

Second Opinion

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Why COVID-19 Might Hit African Nations Hardest

"Kovic is occupying a great amount of our tension. We talk about restaurant closures. The economy allocating respirators. And all of these are important. But in some ways they are first world problems in a country like Malawi located in Southern Africa. There is a population of eighteen million people. A life expectancy of only sixty four years but there is little to no healthcare system to speak of health authorities know. There are cove infections. But it's not clear how many we can't even really respond based on where we are in the epidemic. When we have no idea how many cases we actually have. That's Dr Anne Holt. A wild animal veterinarian who lives and works in. Malawi. I caught up with her via skype. Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. Dr Anne Holt explained. Why social distancing is so difficult to do there? I mean we're talking. Three quarter of the people here are living on less than dollar twenty five a day about eighty percent of the rurally. Social isolation is totally impossible. In part that's because life in Malawi is not easy. People don't spend the day inside a house. Generally so house would be one or two rooms with toilet and shower outside no windows. No electricity and no running. Water and allowing women on average has a four to five children. If you're not going to work going to the market every day then you have no means of feeding yourself. People are doing their best. They try to limit their contact and clean their hands. But there is not even running water with like of running water. Basically what people have is a bucket that's full of water with a tap at the bottom and someone there with gloves who's turning it on and letting people wash their hands with soap so local and national leaders in Malawi have some difficult decisions to make. They could choose to impose strict social isolation which makes great public health sense or they could choose to cause the least disruption to the hard life. People Are Living. Some advocate and aggressive push to flatten the curve. Reduce the spread but others disagree. I'm not sure flattening. The curve is in the best interest of society. Because what you have is your prolonging the timeframe of the epidemic and you're prolonging potentially the economic consequences but if you do nothing the infection will certainly spread and there are few resources to care for those with serious illness in Malawi. Were only eleven hospital beds for every ten thousand people but I think the closure of businesses and the disruption of livelihood is likely not going to house a positive effect in terms of lives saved and it is going to have a negative effect economically mentally and in terms of lives lost to non corona deaths so during times of pandemics the choices facing world leaders are difficult and many will choose to follow a different direction based on what is best for their country their economy and their culture.

Malawi Dr Anne Holt Social Isolation Kovic Southern Africa
Hospitals Facing Coronavirus Are Running Out of Masks, Other Key Equipment

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

09:10 min | 1 year ago

Hospitals Facing Coronavirus Are Running Out of Masks, Other Key Equipment

"Are dealing with very critical shortage. Shortage is not just a protective equipment. They're also facing another huge obstacle. There are simply not enough supplies like cotton swabs to conduct the Coruna virus tests themselves. Cnn's Drew Griffin reports. How did the United States end up in this position with a desperate shortage of corona virus tests a shortage of supplies to administer these tests even a shortage of protective equipment for medical workers? The US government knew the virus was coming back in the beginning of January on January eighth when the CDC published an emergency health advisory on a reported cluster of pneumonia of unknown origin in Wuhan China. Medical experts tells CNN. The trump administration failed to act at this critical time. What we see is the lack of preparation over the last two months has now put us in a terrible position in late. January the first. Us case of Corona virus was identified in Washington state but while Chinese officials began locking down the city of Wuhan. President trump was in Davos Switzerland telling the world that China's problem would not be the world's pandemic we have a totally under control trump barred most non US citizens from flights coming in from China but behind the scenes. Mistakes were already being made as the numbers climbed a thirty five thousand cases worldwide the CDC was creating its own corona virus tests a slower process that included sending the test of public health. Labs to make sure the test would work those public labs found out the test was flawed so they immediately reported that and CDC began an investigation very quickly but more and more labs as they were verifying this through. The coming days also found the same problem but three crucial weeks testing was at a near standstill while the CDC tried to fix the problem and the US health system was flying blind the virus spreading across America and US. Health officials had no way to test for it that kept us from having visibility on domestic transmission of the virus for weeks and weeks and weeks when the CDC's new test was finally fixed ready. There weren't enough to fill demand. This letter shows public health laboratories begging the FDA relaxed restrictions and allow them to create their own tests. It happened within days but in a race to contain it the virus was well ahead by March. Six there are a hundred thousand cases worldwide and more confusion from the administration. Anybody that wants to test can attest. When the president said these words across the country shortages were everywhere today the shortages of tests include just about everything needed to administer the test there are shortages on many pieces of it. Public health officials. Say it just didn't need to be this bad two years earlier. The White House made another potentially dangerous mistake laying aside the pandemic response unit within the National Security Council though the White House says the same rose exist just under different titles. The team President Obama had bolstered to combat global pandemics after. Abol outbreak was gone. Critics say that trump administration decision hampered efforts with corona virus. I think he made a slower and it made us more prone to mistakes. Jeremy Conine Dyke who used to run foreign disaster assistance for. Us aid says all the shortages from testing to swabs to masks can in part be traced back to that one decision. Beth Cameron who under Barack Obama ran the pandemic response unit says. There is no doubt that well we have gotten more out of this at the office had still been intact. I think absolutely the president who alternately said he didn't know anything about disbanding the pandemic team and also defended it now denies his corona virus. Responsible has been anything but perfect. We were very prepared The only thing we weren't prepared for was the The Media Drew Griffin CNN. Atlanta healthcare workers deal with a shortage of testing supplies. The FDA announced today it has approved a new corn corona virus tests that can deliver results in forty five minutes the company that manufactured the test says it will begin shipping out the task next week. I'm joined now by Dr Meghan Ranting. She's an emergency physician at lifespan which is affiliated with Brown University. Dr Anne. Thank you so much for joining us. How significant development is this new test? This new test is honestly a potential game changer for us. My emergency department like hospitals across the country are increasingly filled with patients with symptoms. That seem like corona virus. But we can't test so the best we can say is we think you have covert nineteen and we're either going to admit you to the hospital or send you home and tell you to self quarantine it will be so transformative to be able to actually test patients the same way that we do for flu or other illnesses to able to tell people if they actually need to quarantine and then to make decisions that can help us see equipment for the patients that we do have to hospitalize generally very very significant to the largest cities impacted by corona virus. Dr Ready we're talking New York in Los Angeles now say doctors should prioritize testing for healthcare workers and the severely ill besides that they won't test unless it would significantly change the course of treatment. Does this new strategy makes sense to you. So it's tough. We simply don't have enough tests so it's just like we're doing with masks and gowns. We have to conserve tests to that. We make sure that we have them for the very sickest people. It's not just New York in Los Angeles that are doing this. It's actually the practice it almost every hospital in almost every state across the country right now. It is far from ideal. It is not the way we should practice medicine. But just like we're using masks right now. We have to ration are testing which really incredible so if large numbers of people still aren't being tested. How do we know how bad the situation is? Because presumably there could be thousands hundreds of thousands maybe even more of a lot of people walking around with Corona virus absolutely. I suspect that in my state as in most other states the numbers that are being reported are orders of magnitude lower than the actual number of people who are infected. We are sending most patients home from the hospital or doctor's offices without tests. Were getting the test on those really sick patients but if you are I came into the hospital. We most likely would not get tested again unless we needed to be hospitalized so we are absolutely under counting the magnitude of this epidemic. Zoo interesting story here. A New York surgeon and mother of two whose husband is also a doctor made a plea for more protective equipment on twitter writing. This don't make an orphan out of our two toddlers so bottom line Dr Rini. How dire are these shortages at hospitals all around the country right now? It is truly dire. That is a perfect word for what's going on. Listen we're all used to using isolation gowns? There's something that we use to take care of variety of patients who come into the hospital but never I've been physician for almost twenty years now. I'm never have we been told to reuse this equipment? It is puts us at a huge risk potentially puts patients at risk. It is exhausting and terrifying. I mean the number of steps that we have to go through every time we go in and out of a room with putting on a mask putting on a face shield putting on a gown putting on gloves seeing the patient stepping back out and then doing each of those steps again in every time you take something off. You're in danger of contaminating yourself and then instead of just throwing out the mask or throwing out the face shield. We're being told clean off the mask. Clean off the shield and it in a paper bag and then put it back on again before you go see the next patient there these series of steps where we could get infected? Which then puts us at risk. I have well over a dozen colleagues across the country who have already tested positive for cove nineteen fellow emergency physicians and nurses. And it's simply because we do not have adequate access to protective equipment and we're being told to reuse the equipment that we do have. So how worried are you about your own wellbeing Dr Rini so I am concerned? I'm hopeful that I'm relatively young and healthy and I'll be okay but I've had discussions with my family about if and when I should separate from them. I have friends who have sent their kids to limit our houses. And I'm personally told my parents that I'm not going to see them again until this outbreak is over because I don't want to risk infecting them. I think it's a matter of time in less. We increase the number of masks and gowns available. It is a matter of time until most frontline healthcare workers are infected. We

CDC United States President Trump CNN New York Dr Rini Barack Obama FDA Corona Drew Griffin Los Angeles China Wuhan China Wuhan Dr Meghan Ranting Jeremy Conine Dyke Brown University
Imposter Syndrome

Mentally Yours

07:10 min | 1 year ago

Imposter Syndrome

"Hi John and Welcomes Mentally Yours metro-dade. Uk's weekly mental health podcast. My Name Is Yvette. And this week my guest is Dr Anne White House. She's a scientist. And also the author of pullback your power we guys be chatting about imposter syndrome confidence and the weird and wonderful workings of the subconscious and White House. Welcome to mentally IOS. Thank you very much for coming on. So which hasn't today about your new book which is called Pullback Your power. Why did you decide that you wanted to write that? Well that's a long answer. Basically I went through a Takkula burnout in my my first career. Which was as the scientists that are not gimmick and instead of giving up I really spend the next two decades vide- digging into why I had had that reaction to walk out in what what is happening to me and other women like me because it's a pattern that many women experience and things it's not about just may about solving the problem for all women and that's really the motivation the book so it's literally twenty five years of my life journey. Twenty eight search making it accessible tool that benefits on and hopefully staff and what I've answered when you say you suffered ban would exactly happen okay. So when I read into my Shit I was there. I was dealing with students. I was dating colleagues dating The engineering companies. And what I found was despite my qualifications a Mike my competence and the fact that I could do the actual job no problem underneath the surface. I felt so undermined is I think probably read. I felt as if I were standing on. Nothing felt that I had no confidence on all of them able to speak up when I wanted to my stress just vamp I'm Sachi wrapped up in Somalia temple on these symptoms just Scott West West and there was no veal. Tangible leased to them I was actually I had was if you don't have the surface out of proportion with the facts the facts whether that should have been a problem underneath the surface. That definitely was a problem. So these Jess Simpson's literally got worse and worse than me so much that your body can cut breath and eventually my buddy says enough. That's enough I haven't you? Maybe some ills that I continue it affected you in quite a physical wears while eventually. Yes I had. All of the the mental and emotional symptoms described. The what I did as many women. Do we put full it? We are so determined to prove ourselves to fulfill architectural and not give up especially with me. Being in a male dominated environment is very rare with the fact that I was the role model what I wasn't going to give up slapped todd and harder and harder but then became counterproductive and eventually taught level of stress is going to go into health clubs in one way or another and it was chronic. Fatigue is that right and anxiety with is that the right description oh eventually chronic fatigue. Yes that's hot manifested for me. Huge level of stress and anxiety which led onto that that connick fatigue hallowed did take field doctor to realize that that was walks going on and also what was caused catch. Well that's an interesting question for a very long time. It was simply that I was told on your. You have a high stress Korea knuckles. I did have a high stress career but I was. I knew that that was going on but conventional medicine doesn't really look at those things so I I wasn't able to have much help funk medicine it because it was mayor what's going on inside me mentally and emotionally which. I believe was the cause of the problem. So how did you go about finding out? What was the cause of the problem because Jenny Don? Yeah so basically. We got the point where I had been forced to give up my academic career and I I thought point see medical profession said look on your Anything for you. Good luck and you have enough. Because it wasn't within their disaster and the expertise I because I is scientific mind. I just wasn't going to let it pass. I was on me. I thought I was Iraq. Thirty one thirty two at the time and I wasn't prepared to believe my life is over just at that's eight Jefferson so by member of every key moment when I literally said I'm not going to settle for this. I'm going to find a solution and I didn't know how long it would take an. I didn't know what it would be but I decided to look at all possibilities to think outside the box to go where I haven't gone before because I was determined to find the solution because I must be a cause that this couldn't have happened for no reason to be something going on which wasn't immediately obvious so I started looking at my reaction to life and that led me on the path of rebel. My subconscious believed. We're why was I reacting? To things may end the consult today often as if I was going to go to my own execution and then again to a meeting it was rare out proportion. Why had I felt that way? And so that led me into digging into the subconscious mind and finding what's really underneath the surface and by this time of course it's not just me. I've been helping other women as well. There was no way is going to go back to my engineering. Could be about who mission on a mission to work this out and to help other women. So that's what led me to identify the patents that I've described in the book about how literally women are being held back by. He owed subconscious Tagami which is still deeply rooted in the past. We've soared so much in the last two or three generations in terms of algae unity's and of our free agents but the operating system underneath in everybody's minds at our institution that solution the pause and that's giving women a subconscious message. You shouldn't be here while consciously pushing forward to Cossack creates enormous internal conflicts which is the visible these problems. That's why I've analyzed in a very helpful very logical way in the

Scientist Dr Anne White House UK White House John Somalia Jess Simpson Takkula Mike Connick Scott West West Jenny Don Todd Korea Iraq Jefferson
"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

12:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"To be doing the shopping after those attacks when it was indeed found to al-qaeda and things changed really really quickly and it was like muslims were like statues in a room that suddenly came to life and the gays turned onto these people and at at one point i was out doing the shopping and there was a muslim muslim woman there with collab and <hes> these mother and her daughter. It was like a sane out of animal kingdom. You know there were there. Were praying on her. There were following her through the aisles sales and then they poundstone her and started yelling abuse at her and walked away with these big smiles on faces in the mother petting the doors back like they they dump their service to australia. Cristina de les but the sense of pride on this woman's faisal never forget the look on this woman's face ah her daughter was yelling abuse at this woman. I just thought well this is what is trade has become so that was kind of real. This is us and them that environment. What what did you feel like at that time. Did you feel someone who's grown up in australia's minneola life in australia australia next sense. Did you feel like what did you feel like. You're on a side or not on a side where you saw them or them inside. I saw did you. Where did you place yourself in. It's really because a lot of the other people that i've spoken tuck into a pepsi aging fuel it as acutely as women who wear the hijab for example or is young men <hes> young young slim unfiltered but there was certainly the sense that <hes> you know wait a minute. I've always been one of you always been us and now suddenly i'm <hes> and especially when because appeal slum lem in in any kind of overt way there's not anything conspicuous about it but once people who i'd known found out that i was muslim their attitudes would completely change and it was quite telling to me how how <hes> how somebody could could change upon knowing one part of you that was not significant to the relationship that you had with them that was not impactful on the relationship that you had with them but that once they found out you almost could completely turn around you you decided to do a p._h._d. In counterterrorism or in radicalization i said yeah it was more about wanting to understand why people think about terrorism. The wiped think about terrorism. I wanted to nahra you know. Where do we get these ideas of. What terrorism is and how does it impact on every day. How does it impact on our behaviors. <hes> <hes> it fit into australia's first metric afi we looked behavioral responses to add to the fear of terrorism would people taking on protective or avoidance behaviors obvious in response to this <hes> this thing called terrorism that was now really pretty much pervasive in our meteor in political dialogue in the way that we talked about muslims in the way that we talked about the middle eastern arab countries and in the way that we talked about ourselves as well so these are the kinds of things that are going to to explore. We're gonna people were you. You're talking to in that process is back to a lot of young muslims and all muslims as well and i spoke to a lot of border communities triton's <hes> and it was really it was quite <hes> with the young muslims that i spoke to you the this whole thing of you know once we would them and now way now. We're not here once. I was a strident and that was all i have a watson. That's all i ever was brought up to be and that's all i ever considered myself and now i'm concentrating constantly being told him notice trading reading unnoticed trailing this complete there was a sense of loss a real sense of lost at the same time you were conscious of radicalizing preaches with as well yeah yeah you learn about that process of radicalization. It's really interesting because i've spoken to a lot of people who've left that behind people who've walked away from terrorism move walked away from violent extremism walked away from white supremacist groups and former foreign fighters as well and they said they <hes> one of them described it to me. He said you know and i've always been an activist. I've always been an activist. This is a foreign fighter he traveled to afghanistan and fort in in in that war or in that battle and hey says i've i always been an activist now. He works in a different kind of activism. He says now he works in d. Radicalising young people says it's just a different kind of activism <hes> <hes> you learn a lot about how young people even older people can be influenced but also the commonalities that that that a used whether it's what supremacist group of violent jihadist group the kinds of narrative structure and the things that they use to appeal an influence to pay in in order to bring them into the fold change their change. The world views a very very similar to me. The things they have in common is is that in with young young jihadists particularly that some some guile sought saudi up alongside them and say that islam your father practices decimal real islam- it's going to the church here you know that that the mosque that's that's not realism and what they offer them one grievance and a and a real rock solid moral structure but that allows to that appeals to their sense of on perversely so and that's that can be your true for what supremacist absolutely i think that the the underlying basis of it is the us and then that has to be the start of it you apart of us and they are them and then comes in the grievance. We are under attack by him will we you know they are taking things away from us and then this kind of a moral superiority. We're better than them. We're better than them and then you get the dehumanization of them and yet the cockroach syndrome cockroaches they are vermin we need to eradicate them and that's where it tips over to violence or the propensity for violence silence so now your doctor annually invited all over the world went to conference obama white house where he died of the call just went unusual because you never seen snow before people keep telling me all and you need to see snow and it's cold. It's wet. What do i need to say it for and we have a doctorate. Doctorate and snow is called. I know my doctor wasn't ensnarled. That's most called nonetheless ovallis you you do all these amazing things and and you've also ran about this. I'm kind of sort of this lovely man that you'll marry two now dave ellen. How did you meet him. So i mean i actually am. We're working in the same place but we were both married to different people and it wasn't until about i-it's lighter. I get this email friend. Dottie dr alley loudini counterterrorism moved on and i've moved on anyway. We made up and you know how things for you all terrible. I'm getting a evolve. What about you all yeah. I'm getting a divorce so as saying guys <hes> was just the right time right place and couple years later yeah who married house he go with you inviting white supremacist over for dinner well he's. He works in intelligence and security security yeah. He's a little bit likely of nason. I will find you so i like invited. Take a form. It was a former white supremacists. Come on give me a bit of credit an academic and one day she was taking. I i can see that movie so you had this really interesting life. You dressing the united nations in geneva going to the white house doing giving all this policy advice so when the labor party in w._m._u. and said we want you to run for parliament. You said yes. Why did you give away that life to to go to canberra question. I ask myself every i i look i think i was i did have this fantastic career and i was traveling around and doing all sorts of really great things i was a professor i'd into the white house i'd be into the club madrid which sadly is not a disc for <hes> the united nations but i remember it was a cold november night in vienna and i walked worked out of the united nations building after three days of talks and three weeks earlier i'd been in madrid at the club dimitra two days of talks and i walked out of there and with the sky was gray and somewhere in the background the christmas market was sitting up they markets and dive was waiting for me on the steps and you could say his breath in the cold the air and he took my hands and started warming them up and he said to me. I you done and i said i'm i'm actually really done. He said what do you mean and i said well. All these talk. Can all of these dialogues that are too and i'm going to go home to australia and nothing's going to change. Nothing's going to change because there's no political will and you know you can cola serendipity or you can call it destiny or you could call it fate but it was on the way home from there we stopped off in bali to thaw out from the winter cold and i was long by the pool and and my phone rang i didn't answer because i didn't know the number and then i got this text message saying it's w a lab the call i won't with me. I was never ever political so i rang my son who was young labor and the conversation literally went like this richard oh adam. It's mum a hi mom. What's up. I said you know i've just got this takes from. Wwl lie. They wanna make with me. What do you think that's about. Oh i don't know mom. Maybe they want you to run in the next. Election is an election i didn't even i didn't even know there was an election <hes> but i asked the same question. I said i've got this great career. Doing all of these great things. I've reached the pinnacle of my career. Why should i do these and the response was because it would be a different way to make change and that's all i needed. Is it true now. You're only just starting term in parliament and you're a backbencher unknown just walked into the parliament runs the joint and you're in opposition to are you still use of overtime having influenced. I think there's i think there is this a a level of influence that comes with being a politician. I say that the greatest change that i'm making is the changes in small ways to people's everyday lives to the people who walk in tomorrow i oklahoma office her need help with centre lane call with of immigration or <hes> with those issues <hes> and i you're in many ways changes incremental all changes incremental and he is so small changes for me this small small things that i do but for the people that that <hes> they have a huge impact impact for these people so i say that that's probably and is probably the way i feel most comfortable about making change <hes>. I think there are a lot of changes. That's only only to be made some not quite ready to give up yet. <hes> i think <hes> the more diversity that we have now parliament the more that change is gonna come a fellow wwl backbencher andrew hastie is having an impact from his background in the s._i._s. on national security issues and all that sort of things. Do you see your having yourself having having a role like that in parliamentary committees the speaking up like that i'd like to but there are there are challenges to that and those challenges <hes> that <hes> politics is not america chrissy and you don't necessarily always get put into the area where you can make the most contribution so like anything in my life. I guess i've just got to cape finding my place so it's a hell of a thing to get elected to federal pollen <hes> it's it's..

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"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an a._b._c. Podcast dr anne elise the federal member for cowan which is based in the northern suburbs of perth and it's not a political life. She hasn't spent decades fighting her way up the potty machine her life has given her enough struggles to contain with already and enjoyed a classic seventies a strident working class childhood playing street cricket. Marco polo in the pull will all of that. She was an academic overachiever but when she finished school her mom took it to cairo in the expectation she would find a husband there and she did meet a husband but when i moved back to a straight he turned out to be violent and unreliable one point and was bringing up her two sons alone holding down a job and studying not but gradually hard work paid off and she became an academic after the september eleven attacks. She was distressed to find that australian muslims like her. We're constantly being asked to affirm them and to reaffirm that they had nothing to do with terrorism and this led her into becoming an international expert in counter terrorism and the radicalization asian and an was even invited to the obama white house conference on violent extremism in twenty sixteen and ali became the first muslim australian woman to to be elected to federal parliament and she's written a classic australian memoir which is quite moving but at times. It made me sleep with laughter which was embarrassing because i was drinking a cup. Take the time. Her book is called finding my place. Hello an i._r._a. Check what was the name. You were born with okay. You're at a pretty long and quite quite convoluted. It's actually album mood yellow has seen his rookie or i can't say that i just not sure when you went to school and you had that guy it because you have to say as though with this kind of guttural asa it's actually yeah. It's actually quite difficult to say even the people who have the guts rolla so i used to get cold as i ask what was i lock. Waza was as bad it angers. Just it just got nobody could pronounce my name but now everyone can say cappuccino can they louisiana in the end was too. I i would call him in tease us because nobody could pronounce my name correctly and my sister had a relatively easy name mm to pronounce she was rhonda. Oh easy and my brother was who sam but people just called him san. My mom had changed her name to sue or she was used. People called who who say and <hes> my dad people would call so. I was the only one with the name that nobody ever could pronounce eventually. Just my parents gave in and said okay. I'd changing name by dade paul mccoy you born in nineteen sixty seven and buoyant egypt's. You've got a really beautiful and vivid description of cairo in nineteen sixty seven in your book. I just love to read that to china picture of what car was like when you were born. Okay egypt's nineteen sixty seven the blaring summa hate late evening walks along ordination. Neal is called carrot juice from his straight vendor..

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Middle age "a ticking time bomb" for heart trouble, CDC warns

Sean Hannity

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

Middle age "a ticking time bomb" for heart trouble, CDC warns

"Is w SP twenty four hour continuing news. What prompted a gunman to walk into a major Bank building in Cincinnati this morning and opened fire. Four people are dead. That includes the gunman at least another one or two injured. Authorities say the suspect walked into a loading dock at the fifth. Third Bank open fired. They made his way into the lobby where he then traded gunfire with police officers questioning supreme court nominee Brad Kavanagh now into the afternoon here it is day three officially top health officials. Warning. Now middle age can be a ticking time bomb, if you're

Falcons NFL WSB Brad Kavanagh Third Bank Cincinnati Dr Anne CDC Eagles Philadelphia Twenty Four Hour
Us, Acting Chair and Cpsc discussed on This Morning With Gordon Deal

This Morning With Gordon Deal

01:29 min | 3 years ago

Us, Acting Chair and Cpsc discussed on This Morning With Gordon Deal

"That's the message from the consumer product safety commission last year eight people died in the us from fireworks related incidents dr anne burkle as the acting chair of the cpsc and has a warning regarding illegal fireworks don't make them don't purchase them and don't go near them she's has wild sparklers are pretty look at the most often cause of any injuries that we see fireworks related they can burn up to two thousand degrees and she reminds parents to keep sparklers out of the hands of kids tanya j powers fox news tesla drives to its production goals ceo elon musk saying the electric automaker hit the target of building five thousand model s cars per week tesla has never posted a full year profit and plowed through one billion dollars in the first quarter a wild world cup sunday shootouts were needed to decide both games after each ended up at one goal apiece russia to four three lead on spain when dennis cherish net at the tiebreaking goal moments later goaltender eager convey blocked the final shot sending the home fans into a celebratory state croatia and denmark retired at two two and their shootout that's when yvonne racketeer scored into the left side of the net to end that contest russia will face croatia in saturday's quarterfinal bob mortality fox news and i'm steve rappoport fox news radio rochester newsradio whammy eighty weather brought to you by william muhtar hurt in a car call william muhtar warm.

United States Acting Chair Cpsc Elon Musk Tesla Spain Croatia Yvonne Racketeer Russia William Muhtar Dr Anne Burkle CEO Denmark Steve Rappoport Rochester Two Thousand Degrees One Billion Dollars
G7 leaders set to clash with combative Trump over tariffs, trade

All Things Considered

01:45 min | 3 years ago

G7 leaders set to clash with combative Trump over tariffs, trade

"Npr news washington president trump has do quebec today for the g seven leaders summit as dan carbon chuck reports it could be a combat a visit since trump has accused canada's prime minister justin trudeau of being indignant trump's personal attack will exacerbate was already expected to be testy meeting one which some are calling the g six plus one though six have lined up against trump over his latest trade measures twentyfive percent tariff on steel imports and ten percent on aluminum trump took to twitter to criticize trudeau on several ongoing trade issues canadian officials say the fact is there are strong differences of opinion and that means some tough discussions during the g seven trudeau and french president emmanuel macron offered some support to trump over his coming historic meeting with the north korean leader following the g seven but they also made it clear that trump's partners in the group would keep pushing him to end the tariffs describing them as illegal and bad for everyone's economy for npr news i'm dan carpenter in toronto hawaii kennedy's mayor harry kim now says lava from killer way of volcano has destroyed more than six hundred homes on the big island since may third lava has been pouring out of large fissures in the earth and down to the ocean you're listening to npr news a deputy director at the centers for disease control and prevention says it's time to expand suicide prevention in the united states dr anne shchukin says the focus should include factors other than mental health issues such as loss of job or loved one and other life stresses the cdc's most recent data on the topic shows a sharp rise in suicide rates nearly every state from nineteen ninety nine through two thousand sixteen there's heightened attention on the.

CDC Dr Anne Shchukin Hawaii Toronto Twitter Canada President Trump Washington NPR Donald Trump United States Deputy Director Harry Kim Kennedy Dan Carpenter Emmanuel Macron Justin Trudeau
Officials: Student accidentally shoots self at Lexington, Kentucky high school

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:06 min | 3 years ago

Officials: Student accidentally shoots self at Lexington, Kentucky high school

"Early evening temperatures get up to a high of thirty five to forty this afternoon but real feels 20s to near thirty for most of the day some clearing tonight we drop down to twenty five to thirty there could be some patches of black ice and then tomorrow partly sunny up to forty four mid40s sunday with some sunshine does a storm just state or south unease monday or does it try to curved back into southeast new england that's the question will try to answer is you stay with us through the weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist need to bore wbz newsradio 1030 thirty five degrees and overcast embossed him but it feels like 28 city for this event nails dr anne seal and doc shelly has by me to talk about eighteen both talk phyllis and more saturday night at eight o'clock on wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time 205 a student is wounded after he shoots himself at a high school in lexington kentucky police say there is no threat to the public and the school is not on lockdown the student was taken to a hospital with nonlife threatening injuries that student has not been identified but officials do say he will face gun charges no one else was hurt coming up in two minutes a check on bloomberg business here on wbz.

New England Doc Shelly Phyllis Accuweather Dr Anne Seal Kentucky 1030 Thirty Five Degrees Two Minutes
"dr anne" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"dr anne" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"I am because he checkin and check out and down the loss to let it the album was that sharon took floor and he wrote it they and it was when he was dumb statement sofas so renew the story was and his such a good wide smith nieto i think that was the best way to end it with an incredible songwriter who gets the store and top floor is that she will mom famous only albums also it's quite deep always wanted to do video for and put some old hollywood dr anne sner can round then see good morning ghana street loves snug my money and score a goal the same laws sweets is give by on the bill bulls off fast food on no foul smearing treat me sure the me like you we like the idea of the so the producerled album i think we'll means who jason is bull we talked about producerled albums and quincy jones and people like that who had album stop other eladha guests on them do you think albums like the shine a light on the songs a bit more than you traditional kind of artist album am i think got from this post deere bob nor i just think people wished especially produce eyes should take time making the albums no as in ten years but just take the time you need because some things of filet you when you are basing goal that russia and now show away and if froze live album which is pieced together after the sing was massive i don't like toilet that i've burnt wild miss next year as to fill riot in phnom penh schnitt even after this session so i dunno of british people will take more time vessel and that will show in the quality of the music israel and the polio the writing which you need in spray.

sharon dr anne sner fast food jason quincy jones russia israel phnom penh ten years