33 Burst results for "Dr Amy"

"dr amy" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

05:52 min | Last month

"dr amy" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

"Rarely world. I'm delighted to bring you dr. Amy silver today eighty. She's face she is an author and mentor on how to grow. Powerfully has get this doctorate in clinical psychology a master's in forensic psychiatry which sounds scary and a masters in performance and bse honors in psychology. Show sees a choose ahead sugar theory about that. She worked as a practicing clinical psychologists and an academic tutor and researcher at oxford university. So she's a poem every love for that after a short stint as a professional actress. Totally one ear. bud abbot. Amy has worked in corporate cultures for fifteen years using psychological knowledge ineffective conversations. She was bray organizations. I think that is a really important distinction being brave who want to have affected conversations that activate trust and sustainable growth so welcome eighty. Thank you thank you very much. Lovely be more others so much richness in your background in your expertise and it's a it's permanently time some from my point of view i just got off the phone. The client where the lack of feedback giving in the culture is significant and it's resulted in people carrying somebody who's really not up to special job. They take on all their work. Because there's not a culture of giving and receiving feedback and having those trusting conversations though is a huge trust in hoffman's in the organization so before we get into the detail of all your wisdom their personal one. So how did you end.

dr. Amy silver bud abbot oxford university researcher hoffman Amy
"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:31 min | Last month

"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Don't forget to check out the podcast in the classroom initiative we're doing we've developed discussion guides first, Pacific episodes using your class with your students also with a huge transition to online learning due to. Covid nineteen consider using podcasts where students ask your teachers use podcast. You can find the discussion guides on my website at America dabs, dot, Org. Okay. So if you're interested in highlighting Europe teaching work in a podcast via America DABS and yes, this is different than Simpatico. Think about using a podcast I've worked with a bunch of partners, World Wildlife, fund, it the trustees of Massachusetts, lots of different groups doing lots of cool work. So maybe you want to tell your story via podcast reach outlets partner. Also, I do presentations to classes and keynote presentations at conferences and I know we're all taking a break from those but feel free to contact me if you're interested in having me speak at your event. So must hurry talk about the work that I'm doing with some Pokka Studios I'm hosting live talk shows on the climate adaptation channel. So this is a streaming TV channel dedicated to climate adaptation. I have just passed one hundred and fifty interview mark on some paddock on interviewing climate adaptation experts, clean energy entrepreneurs, and academics from around the world. It's a little bit more broad in scope than I do. At the PODCAST. Now, if you're a professional in the space, maybe we can have a conversation about the important work that you're doing, and if Ross encouraging you to just come check things out, come, watch a live show and joined the community room browsers behind a firewall. So reach out to me or go to SIMPATICO DOT COM, and that's with the C. I. M. P. A. T. I C. O.. Put your information and we'll get directions on how you can sign up and yes, it's all free..

"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

06:24 min | Last month

"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Also, a part of that is introducing fiction writers to scientists to get them to talk about you know what are some of the things that we're seeing happening as a result of climate change that would make for good storytelling and I think it was just last. December, we saw a collaboration between the McSweeney Sweeney's press and the NRDC called twenty forty ad and it was an anthology of short stories by writers many of them who have never slur climate change in their fiction before writing about just that and the collaboration was between them and scientists. Each writer was partnered with a scientist about a specific aspect of climate change. You know whether it was sea level rise or wildfire, and what was so remarkable about the. was that because so many of those writers hadn't written about climate change before perhaps they hadn't even thought about it too much before they were suddenly creating stories that didn't rely on a lot of the same tropes that I've been seeing over and over again then climate fiction felt fresh felt new and it just really drove home. You know how enormous climate change is and how it touches on. So many different aspects of our lives. Very cool. You do focus more on the literary side of climate fiction and what's going on campuses university campus English slid is still very popular major. Are you getting asked? Are you hearing more about professors bringing climate fiction into those areas too I guess to talk with their students and use as a resource. Yeah a Lotta professors are teaching courses dedicated to climate fiction. So it's a really exciting time academia historically, and I can say this because I've been in academia for so long it tends to lag behind the real world a lot of ways at least English departments do. They don't always keep up on publishing trends. So the fact that this is happening now is really exciting to me and yes. So to answer your question about you know me going to college campuses I guess it was just last month I appeared virtually at this Hancock Symposium at Westminster College in Missouri. But with the author Omar. Ellicott who wrote the incredible climate novel American War to talk about his book in about climate fiction more generally. And about wipe the continues to be important in larger conversations by husband had the great pleasure of speaking to a class at my Alma Mater, the University of Kansas probably sometime next month there is a professor who very kindly is using my newsletter in her class to. Students Yeah about about art and literature and Climate Change. So there's a lot happening in that space while very cool related to that. We Actually Co hosted an episode together where we interviewed a professor who focuses on these things matthew. Snyder Meyerson very popular episode that was really funny. It was great having you on I asked the sort of dumb questions and you came in as the academic and you really rated made it a rich experience but he was doing some kind of. Survey work on how climate literature influences behavior. Now, have you stayed in touch with Matthew? I have I have in. Matthew's continuing to publish incredible studies of climate fiction. You know he recently teamed up with some other researchers to put out a whole slate of new studies. I'm still working my way through them the so far from what I read it's really fascinating. So in one of the recent studies, more recent studies that he did, you know he was looking at the kind of ideological impact of climate fiction on readers and you know in found that there are some stories that tend to. Express a more individualism even a conservatism which really interesting since in this country at least we tend to associate action on climate change with more liberal and progressive politics, and so you kind of explored this this question of. What is? Our how will climate fiction affect readers police? Handy. He very smartly says, there's No one conclusion we can draw from this. You know rather climbing fiction continues to be a very wide broad range of books can all lumped together under the same umbrella but that it is worth thinking about you know how else fees books are influencing readers is not just their thinking on climate change, but it's All the things that relate to taking action on climate change you know like, where do you fall on the spectrum politically where do you fall on the spectrum in terms of thinking that doing something about climate change is a personal issue or whether it should be a more social one you know. Can they influence you in terms of thinking about you know whether you can take personal action to do something about it or weather action can only be taken at the highest levels of government and you know at the very top of the corporate ladder he is doing incredible work. I can't wait to see what he does next I, like to think always one of his first readers. And Yeah I'm just I'm very grateful for the work that he and his colleagues are doing. All right. So I think this is a very encouraging sign that you know just be podcast in nonfiction writing articles in coverage of climate justice in climate equity it showing up a lot more. Do you feel like that's true within climate fiction? Absolutely ideal. Absolutely. Ideal. To my mind. The best writers working today Kim Stanley Robinson probably mentioned on that I. Guess. He has a new book that came out just this month called the ministry for the future and like all of his work, it said in the near future I. Think it opens in like twenty, twenty, four, twenty, five something like that. The very near future it in opens with this Java's stating seen about a deadly heat wave that makes its way through India I won't give too much away, but a lot of lives are lost in a radicalized..

professor scientist writer NRDC Kim Stanley Robinson University of Kansas Matthew Westminster College Sweeney Snyder Meyerson Ellicott Missouri India
"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

06:05 min | Last month

"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"I think you have a point that there could be an over saturation point I. Don't know that we've reached that yet I think in the wide range of publishing books about climate change still take up a relatively small amount of real estate and the fact that we are seeing so many more works of nonfiction and fiction about climate change come out I. Think at this point anyway can only be a good thing because it means that more people are going to take notice of it. You know we live right now I'm talking to you from New York City you know so you know here In the United States we are at a very crucial pivot point in our politics in in in our history, and so much is demanding our attention. You know the fact that climate change is getting mentioned at all during any of that the debates is astounding because it historically hasn't been, but since so much is trying to take our attention. I think that the more you know stories we have about climate change is good. It's going to remind people that, yes all of these other things matter but the fact that we have to worry about having a stable biosphere like that is kind of the. Worry. That the is fears the thing from which we derive all value of life as we know it. So let's not take our eyes off the goal here. All right. I'm total agreement and I hope my it wasn't dismissal of the content of the book. It's more like I guess what the orbits keep getting smaller and smaller and I just I. I'm hoping that you with climate fiction, it's an opportunity to blaze new ground, the type of readers that might be interested in the subject. So that's my hope. Again with trends. This. When when I read your newsletter and I see the authors and the books that you're talking about and quite honestly you know seems like literature these are people riding really smart intelligent books but do you get to follow maybe other areas of fiction with climate fiction and what I'm talking about is like even things like. Pulp Fiction. And Graphic novels in those areas. Do you follow those things and it is climate change showing up these more popular types of reading material? I, think that. Climate change or at least environmentalism though I think I think climate change is also a part of this you know has long been depicted in comic books. For example, it's also increasingly popular in movies and TV shows as themes. Yeah. I mean it is kind of everywhere I? Mean you're right I do focus more on the quote unquote literary aspect of climate fiction storytelling mostly just because that's my background. I have a PhD literature but but yeah, it's it's everywhere. I mean what? Something that I have had to think about as somebody who follows fictional stories about climate change is at what point can I even call climate fiction genre anymore and I say that not because it's going away but exactly the opposite when graphic no novelists when you know so called. Literary Writers Poets, screenwriters television show runners everybody is writing about climate change. The notion of Johner, kind of dissolves a little bit and at some point I think we just have to think well, these are created people simply responding to the moment in which we live kind of like in the early twentieth century when writers and artists were responding to the rise of. Modernism. MC, modernism modernity isn't a genre. It's a condition, the human condition, and so I think we are going to continue to see climate change addressed in all of these different mediums in different genres but I. Think time will tell whether we can actually consider to be its own its own genre right now it's still kind of feels like that but. Like I say it's stored it for future generations. Decide I think I wonder if like we know we've really sort of made progress getting out into the public mind is like climate change is showing regularly as like Harlequin novels and those kind of books you know it's like that would mean general public is. Understanding these things. So if you're out there writing our models, please consider climate change one that would that would make some progress. So sticking to that you focus on books but. Even your newsletter, it's you're talking about art in literature. So architect many forms and have you heard much you know what you deal with authors and such, but it said that next level of popularity is this is going to be made into a TV show or movie are you hearing? Is that happening more are like those kind of people looking at these climate fiction books in is that's an I guess an opportunity for them more. So now than even just a couple of years ago. Yeah I think. So I mean I don't want to be the person to break news but. I I have talked to a couple of fairly prominent writers who I will leave unnamed at the moment who I know have TV deals in the works and based on their novels which were about climate change. So I think the next couple of years we are going to see some incredible new series based on some really powerful works of climate fiction. There's that but you know to kind of get to your to your other question of your kind of or maybe just the idea of you know who is kind of driving this. So the NRDC I know has recently put together A. Task. Force. I, don't know what they call it internally you know people who are actually meeting with screen writers and show runners and producers in Hollywood, to talk about. How to get more climate stories on the big screen and a part of that is introducing them to the climate fiction writers. Apart of that is working with Spring writers to develop new stories..

New York City United States Hollywood
"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

07:51 min | Last month

"dr amy" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Hey adapters welcome back to the PODCAST I hope you're doing great and this episode returning for a third time as Dr Amy Brady. In case you missed those episodes Amy's the editor in chief of the Chicago Review of books and deputy publisher of quaker magazine, and she is my climate fiction or some call it clarify guru and mentor. It's been a while since we last chatted and amy comes onto update on some of the latest climate fiction work how? The genre is evolving and how it's becoming more relevant in popular culture even outside of books, it's always a treat chatting with amy in. Glad to have her back on. We started a biweekly newsletter here in America. Depths. We highlight the latest episode and also linked news and stories that are related to that episode's topic. We also highlight other climate podcast and share few other adaptation related goodies in the show notes there is a link to subscribe please do. Okay doctors. Let's join in with doctor, Amy Brady and catch up on the latest with climate fiction. It after today, I have a very exciting episode, my guest, who's a familiar name to you is Dr Amy Brady Amy's the editor in chief of the Chicago Review of books and deputy publisher of magazine. Also. Writes and publishes the monthly Climate Change Newsletter Burning World Climate Change in art and literature. Hey Amy welcome back to the PODCAST. Hey, thanks for having me back always a treat to have you on I. Think this is your third appearance there always very popular and thank you so much for coming on. So we're gonNA talk clarify climate fiction, but let's check in what's going on with you. Oh Man and The craziness of the world aside I in my little area, the world things are going well healthy. Happy. Close families of things are good browse. My most exciting news is that I have a book coming out in early twenty, twenty, two called House on fire. It's an edited anthology of personal essays about climate change that feature some of my favorite writers who were working right now it's Co edited by the brilliant editor Tajik said, and I can't wait to share it with the world. I will obviously have. You back when that comes out to do a nice plug for it when looking forward to that. Okay. So you do PA and I WanNa talk about the newsletter a bit more about the content later on. But let's just check in for people aren't familiar. So you do a climate change newsletter burning world's what's that about? Yes. In the newsletter is an extension of the original column that I still. Right. For the Chicago Review of books that columns also called burning worlds and every month I interview a fiction writer who has written a novel or a collection of short stories sometimes, even a poet who is addressing climate change in their work that became a very popular column and started asking me what about other types of writers excuse me of artists and creatives, and so I created the newsletter burning. Worlds to explore how artists of all kinds are addressing climate change in thinking about it. Well, I recommend to my listeners. If you have already to subscribe to a newsletter, it's fantastic and I want to ask about on the content that a little bit but let's I'm still doing this catch up with you and so you did our first up. So it's actually been a while I was looking back on. It you're actually I think in my first year we we go way back. Yeah. It's and I've been doing this for four years now. So it's it's been a little while but I guess what I want to ask is that as you've gotten more into this climate fiction space, it's probably been quite a for this podcast has been a journey for me, but you can't necessarily predict some of the. Things that you get involved in and get invited and so I guess for example, you know you recently moderated a panel with nrt see these are some probably some partnerships you didn't necessarily anticipate you'd be having yeah I had no idea. It turns out that people in the climate space are really kind collaborative people who are always seeking to do things together, and so I've had the great opportunity and. The. Great pleasure of partnering with people like the RDC as as well as other Bruno Writers, artists, and organizations, other universities and colleges in schools who are really interested in bringing conversations about climate change know to the public, and so I so enjoyed being part of the conversation because it's it's really it's just a really meaningful thing. All right. So what was the panel with NRDC yeah? Yeah yes at. The Energy DC Gernika magazine where I serve as deputy publisher and the Brooklyn Book Festival got together to put on a panel aboud narrative and storytelling surrounding climate change, and so that panel feature. Rob Moore who you just mentioned a policy expert at the NRDC who uses storytelling to get across to public officials in other folks in leadership about why climate change like doing something about climate change is so important. As he put it, people respond to storytelling much more than they respond to a cold graph or. Statistics but that panel was great because it also featured the novelist sipping Ben Artists as well as a journalist from the New, Yorker who writes nonfiction investigative journalism about climate change. So just all types of storytelling history is coming together to talk craft it was it was a Lotta Fun who'll all right this is a very open ended question, but let's just started and so clarify isn't going anywhere. In fact, it's only going to become more popular. What are some of the trends that you're seeing I know you and I had this conversation three years ago. But like what's happening in the space? What are you noticing? Well, climate change. Climate Fiction and some people call it. You it's just becoming more in more. Among Writers and also among rivers I'd like to thank or the books wouldn't be published in the first place that would so interesting that I'm noticing a lot more works of climate fiction being published by international voices in Translation, and that is so exciting to me because here in the relatively climate stable United States I think it's still really difficult for a lot of people to imagine what climate change is going to do to their communities and to the people in places that they. Love whereas in other places in the world were the people are already witnessing some of the worst effects of climate change firsthand and even in other places where maybe they're not witnessing the worst effects like say, know Germany or northern Europe they at least exist in a political landscape where they can have more robust conversations about climate change and all of that is informing these writers work and so when it comes to the United States, it just provides for or just makes for a much. Richer range of stories that I haven't really seen yet in the crash almost four years that I've been doing this or been covering us. You follow folks on twitter probably some similar folks that I follow and you see a lot of. Announcements for climate books at a lot of it lends itself to the nonfiction category and I wonder and I it seems like there might be some diminishing returns for a lot of those books. Probably, in my hand slapped for this and you know I, I find like probably some the more popular ones are more or less books about cheerleading keeping people spirits up that if you're in this fight and that's a good thing I appreciate that but it just seems that it's basically a lot of the same kind of material over and over again hoping to will this kind of make the difference or this kind of create some new buzz around doing something around climate change and I guess my point here is that hopefully, climate fiction maybe will step in there and and. I guess drive more interest in action I if that you could be completely disagree with that sort of assessment of like with all the folks coming out of the nonfiction space..

Dr Amy Brady Amy Dr Amy Brady Chicago Review of books deputy publisher editor in chief amy NRDC America twitter quaker magazine United States Gernika RDC nrt editor Germany Europe Bruno Writers
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | Last month

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
How to Biohack Your Sexual Pleasure

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:19 min | 3 months ago

How to Biohack Your Sexual Pleasure

"Did you know that being sexually active associated with closer relationships, better immune function, lower blood pressure improved sleep, reduce stress, and even lower mortality. In this mini episode I speak with Dr Amy Killin Elicit City, and Dr. Stephanie. Steam about the importance of sexual pleasure to our well being how sex drive in orgasmic response changes a woman cycle Y orgasms should be part of our Self Care Regimen Spicy topics. Let's listen in starting with interview with Doctor Amy Killin an anti ageing and regenerative fission specializing in sexual optimization aesthetics and longevity medicine. How important is sexual pleasure and sexual health for our overall health what we get from it So we get so many things It's basically important for all aspects of health when I talk about health I look at. Of Six main components of health. So you have physical health and I will talk about kind of some specific things with that and there's spiritual health there's emotional health mental health there's. Environmental Health and their social health. So those are kind of the six main types of health or parts of health that are important and sexual health and sexual function having a happy successful. Pleasurable sex life actually impacts all six areas of health It's also impacted by all six areas of health. So it's Kinda goes both ways So for instance, for comment of Health, we know that people who have active healthy sex lives and usually is defined as something in the realm of maybe once a week having sex or certainly a couple of times a month it depends on the studies, but it's not like every day. It's just you know it's something that's generally a part of their lives. Those people tend to have less cognitive decline as they get older. They said he's with with women and men, but basically looked at women who had were having sex versus women who had not been having. You know regular active sex in the wants you were sexually active. had better. Cognition had less cognitive decline as I got older, which is interesting. They've done look looked at the hippocampus and basically people who are more sexually active attend to have. Larger Healthier hupa campuses which tie memory and things like that. So it's tied very much cognitive health. Sex's definitely tied to mental sort of emotional health. In that, we know that people who again has been active healthy sex lives tend to have less anxiety tend to have the they feel better about themselves have better. Sort of self they their self. Self esteem. They'd have higher self esteem is. A sleep better a which, of course, we know sleep has its own whole other. The the benefits of sleeper could talk for half a day about that. So it helps sleep helps. It helps self image. And other lots of other things like look less depression people are who are having a lot of sex have less depression. So all of that's important from physical standpoint we know that people who are sexually active tend to have lower blood pressure. They tend to against sleep, which is really important. They tend to have less cardiovascular disease There was one study in man again who looked at men over a ten year period of time men who were having sex at least once a week I believe, and at the end of it, they showed that there was actually a fifty percent reduction in overall mortality in the men who were having regular sex. Versus the men who were not now there's things probably tied to that. I mean you can't just say it's just accent maybe they're just more active in general or they have a better relationship with their partner etcetera. So but but these are pretty big things to you know to talk about and think about and it's besides sex is fun but it also does all this really good stuff for US A. Woman's hormonal landscape changes dramatically throughout her life because of this unique biology understanding her menstrual cycle and it's rhythm can be incredibly useful for optimizing productivity weights, sexual drive, energy mood, and so much more Elissa vide- a pioneering female bio hacker and women's hormone and functional nutrition expert, and by the way bestselling author of Women Code and in the flow talks to us about how for women the best pat to. An orgasm changes depending on which phase of her cycle she happens to be in and what's happening with her hormones. She also shares great tips for couples who have children or who are new parents and the importance of communication and regularly scheduling time for physical intimacy. Let's listen in one of the ones that you had mentioned in is sex and intimacy. Yes. So let's talk about how that plays into the rhythm. So, as I mentioned before sixty percent of women are sexually unsatisfied, which is a ridiculous amount of women. This is not good. You know we're talking about when women are happy to other people are happy I mean I think this is a great place for women to just get some agency because it's a very simple fix. The reason why women are are I think unnecessarily unsatisfied is because they are not aware of the fact that they have real physical physiological changes across their libido and orgasmic response across the infrequent cycle. Right? So that means you'll. have times when you're naturally less look self lubricating, you'll have times where you need more clitoral stimulation to achieve not only the orgasmic flato but also climax, right you'll have times in the cycle where you'll need more emotional connection before the physical connection. This is not just like shots in the dark of Oh I wonder why last week was fireworks with my partner and this week was like a Ho hum right and this and women because we've been deprived of all this information right it's the same continuing the conversation when the Diet doesn't work we think. That inner critical steps in and it's like Oh it's my fault I failed something's wrong with me I lack discipline I lack willpower when the fitness plan doesn't work we don't question the plan we questioned ourselves we criticize ourselves when our sex life isn't going the way that we would like it to sixty percent of us to to be exact are not fulfiled sexually. We think there's something wrong with our libido, and

Environmental Health Partner Dr Amy Killin Amy Killin Dr. Stephanie United States
"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

07:59 min | 3 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"I don't do it very well, but It will I think it's it's for for us get help for months or Sometimes others but I I think it is so important to. Be Able to forgive myself for all the mistakes I make and you know but the. Interpersonal mistakes you know again. saying something hurtful or sarcastic win that wasn't necessary or whether laziness not getting something done I thought I should get done whatever it is. If you I you can I can easily feel crippled by my shortcomings. And then that's kind of a downward downward spiral I suppose so. I work at. Letting myself off the hook and that's a little bit with the fallow where the fallible human being mantra comes from. You know I've got to A. Absolutely okay that on the fallible human being like everybody else is a fallible human being. That's really touching to force and I wrote a book together. Called resilient and one of the you know elements in it. So it's about twelve psychological factors within individuals twelve. We could say in restraints that promote resilience actually in the meeting of our needs and the maintain maintenance of a kind of a core of wellbeing even as when cope with challenges and recovers from losses in Traumas and setbacks. What helps us be resilient and one of the things we explored in that was the internalisation of of sort of inter allies in resources who are forgiving encouraging. Kind Compassionate for ourselves, just through normal processes of internalisation of interactions with other people I, kind of loosely call it the Karen Committee, and because I'm quite fanciful in my imagination. Characters on the Karen Committee like Gandalf in the fairy godmother in sleeping beauty. Sort of odd characters rock climbing guides I've had things like that who are just really supportive and we draw on. And in a funny way to extend this if we think about the the fareless organization, the mind in a sense as an organization, and so we can ask what promotes internal safety inside our own experience right and including the capacity for embracing different parts of ourselves recognizing that we're functioning in a crazy chaotic world. Of course, we need new information and we need to regulate that which disrupts internal safety and in the psyche, and also do those things that you know foster the sense safety inside oneself like talking about self forgiveness. The word that comes to mind when you were talking is is Is Judgmental and you know anti judgmental because I think I think that might be. The Achilles. Heel that I sort of internalized in grew up with, and it makes me very judgmental and the judgment isn't was isn't necessarily on. Ability or accomplishment, but on on. Generosity and goodness and. Non Selfishness. But but if you if you have a little judge inside your head, that's always self judging and other judging. You know non flourishing state of for. Sure. So if if that carry the carrying committee is fantastic metaphor because. They're not judgmental. The could will be supportive. They can be discerning. Exactly right? Yeah. They can. They can say you must step. We love you. So casual important. So amy you've made reference a number of times during this conversation to your childhood and. You know growing up and what that might have been like for you and household environments and things like that and that reminds me of a question that we'd like to ask most everyone who comes on the podcast if you had the opportunity to go back in time and talk to yourself as a child or as a young adult what would you want to say to that person? You are love to I mean. No I I don't think. Well, your dad might be better I. Don't know if you have children but it's you know you don't really understand how much you parents love you for all their flaws or. Not saying mine had so many but They don't really understand the. Depth of that law until you have. Your own children and then you have to live with the reality or. That they, they won't ever understand it either. And they look at us and think okay, anyway. I thought that was really lovely amy and thank you for being open about that and for for sharing that and speaking personally as you sort of alluded to earlier, I don't have children and so I don't have that relationship with a child in the same way that my dad has with me and. You know I had the good fortune of growing up in an environment where my dad was a clinical tests. Days were conversations that we had around the dinner table of by even. So even if I might know it intellectually, it's really good to have a reminder every now and then and to really to really feel that love to really feel the source of that affection. From. Another person to know that I have that as a resource in my life. Oh, it's been really a pleasure to talk with you and. This topic of fearlessness I just think profound in his profound in our culture, these days Many kinds of ways that think of factors that undermine the sense of safety including through social media, forest his talked a lot about how we see the highlight reels of other people's lives against which we are are the full movie. Of our own life of our arts and all and I'm reminded as well by this parable from this proverb, rather from the Buddhist tradition. One is wise who has peaceable friendly and fearless. I really. Don't know that. That's great. So before we get you out of here, Amy, is there anything you would like people to know about anything you're currently working on? Well, I'm I'm I'm at least gearing up to write a little bit more about failure maybe. You know good failure with that with that really needs. So. That's Kinda Fun aren't amy. Truly thank you so much for taking the time to do this today. You're very welcome. Thank you. It was it was a genuine pleasure I mean I could talk to the the the two of you all day. So thank you. So today, we had a great time speaking with Dr Amy. Edmonson. Our conversation focused on psychological safety and how psychological safety applies to both our work lives and our personal lives. We really kind of went down the psychological rabbit hole a little bit there going into the conversation I thought that we would probably focus more on work but by the end of it, we were really exploring a wide variety of topics. For me one of the big takeaways from the conversation was the importance of demonstrating fallibility and creating a work environment or a play environment or a relationship environment whatever it is where it's really okay to be wrong where somebody feels like they aren't going to be punished. For expressing a view if that view turns out to be wrong in some way, our focus with amy was maybe more organizational. But I think about all the ways that that applies to our personal lives and there are so many ways that applies to our personal lives. I like to remind you about Amy's buck the fearless organization creating psychological safety in the workplace for learning innovation and Growth. If you're interested in learning more about it, I've included a link in the description of today's episode..

Dr Amy Karen Committee Edmonson
"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

08:03 min | 3 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"That creates a environment for example, is part of the training it was part of the. And Edit is was part of that. You know talk about Hollywood part of that mental model that you know. Grew up watching the movies where the leaders were the all-knowing all-seeing. Yeah. As a strong leader, you never admit that you made a mistake right except it doesn't work right I mean because we we all were all watching that leader and just saying. No right that so. candidate John F. Kennedy after the. Bay of Pigs, fiasco. Went on. National, TV. To to own it and to say you know basically I am sorry with my failure my fault. And at McNamara had said to him. Hey all know you're the president we've gotta protect your reputation all take it right all all fall on the sword. He said no you know fair. Success has many parents of failures in orphan. This one's mind right Ed and win leaders do that. They actually look strong right because they're able. They're big enough. To acknowledge and something that we all knew anyway yet that was pretty stupid. But. If you don't acknowledge it then then there's a kind of. Inference that you don't even. Understand your contributing to it. So I think that we've gone down a wonderfully deep a rabbit hole here in terms of the psychosocial aspects of all of this, and I don't know maybe a continuation of that may be a little bit of A. People are increasingly as we are right now due to the circumstances meeting of the through zoom and conducting meetings and doing business through various telecommunication devices, and as you know far better than I do there was already a big movement to this inside of the workplace. But I think there's no doubt that the pandemic has absolutely accelerated this process. How do any of the things that we've talked about during this conversation change or are impacted or modified by having to do all of this through screen? Well, the first thing to recognize is. Inherently harder to steal a sense or to create a synthesis ecological safety in a virtual team that in a face to face team because it is. Darn near impossible to kind of read the welcoming cues, those just those subtle things where people are. Nodding or or even just making sounds a small sounds of agreement. That's quite natural that you can't hear your people are on mute or even if they're not, it's just not. It's not that good and there's slight delays that make us less. You Know Mess A. We have less access to these cues right accused of belonging accused of of it's okay and so so yeah, there are real risks. Here of losing psychological safety even without. All stuff that's going on in the broader environment which THREATENS OUR GENERAL SENSE OF? Of of of confidence and and you know we're we're we're we're anxious in general about what's going to happen with. With disease with the with the economy so What that means is there is an even. Greater. Need and even responsibility to work harder to create. Psychological safety to create the invitation of for for people's input to kind of have that dialogue back and forth where people can. Can contribute and feel a part of something. I wanted to ask you about a couple other potential factors of that foster psychological safety in addition to what we've talked about so far since of frame embracing messengers of acknowledging fallibility asking for forgiveness and I thought about my own experience. With families and relationships where there's an emphasis on validation and you haven't spoken about that as a factor of psychological safety I'm kind of curious about that. She works mainly an organizational environments and then another kind of question I had is what do you do with people who disrupt psychological safety? It seems so two different questions first one. Yes. I. Think it's. Very important to validate the effort Fred because even even when you even when you're in a really truly great team, they're still a little bit of like maybe this this won't land right? Right. So I say something and if if if the if the response is At stupid right I'm, GONNA feel bad. No matter. You know who I am, but if the response is one that's interesting or or even. Get to your second question or even. Let's take that offline. That's what's. Important, not here not now, but but I, think it's very quick and very important to just be appreciative however whatever that means you know thank you. Expression of interest. Listening, maybe maybe kind of. Are you saying whatever just you matter that's the only thing that that's the only message that must get across I. Don't have to agree with you or take what you said as you know mission critical to this particular task, but I need to make sure. I indicate in some small way whether appear a manager that you matter. Now? that. Does not mean that we are. Did anyone in fact is exempt from the need for feedback. About the impact they're having, you know the the old Joe Hari Window where it's where there's essentially very high awareness of my intentions but by me right I know what my intentions are by the way they're good always. But I am almost necessarily blind or at least partially blind to the impact I have. So. If if you have someone who's blind, you help them across the street. So why would we you know if someone is being disrupted I'd say you know. Ninety nine times out of one hundred. They didn't mean to be disruptive like they didn't come in to sabotage the meeting. Right but they just they talked too much. They suck all the air out of the room or whatever it is. But you at least have to start with the assumption that they're blind. To the negative impact they're having, which means they need and deserve your feedback I'm not gonNA come out with a blanket prescription on where and when you do that can be right here right now like. Thanks Rick Let's. Let's hear from others right or can be interesting. They do. We'll take that off line or it can be whatever it is or if it's in a recurring when you say you've got people who are disruptive I think you've got to schedule a little bit of time to help them see that because your job is to make them better. You know and you, I. Think your job is to make them better whether you're their manager or their peer. Or even their subordinates If, you can find a way to on share. Insight that they don't have You've gotta find it. Amy There's a question that we asked most everyone who comes on the podcast. Curious what your answer to it is given all of your work on psychological safety and related factors. What's the most important thing that you do inside your own mind each day for your own wellbeing? Wow. That's a great question. In. It's probably.

Amy There John F. Kennedy Hollywood president McNamara Rick Let Ed Joe Hari Fred
"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

06:35 min | 3 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Big enough of every one of us is a fallible human being and that's if everybody was aware of that end was explicit about that. I think we'd have a whole lot of psychological safety. You actually going to build on ways to set right there and kind of say back to use this phrase embraced the Messenger and that's such wonderful phrase including the messenger a bad news. Or Messenger of critique about oneself as a leader and also you know model fallibility. Yeah. Embrace the Messenger is a deliberate play on words around the old phrase that we all know shut the messenger don't shoot the Messenger, which is meant to say that you're just the bearer of bad news or there's something in our brains that immediately caused us to kind of blame. The Messenger, rather than focus on the message, the message is important. Let's get to it. But the Messenger is not at fault and in fact, the Messenger. So. I I like to say you. Don't shoot. The Messenger. is very low bar you're sort of. The the. Singer gets to stay alive out whereas I think the Messenger. Deserves your facts, right. So embraces metaphorical. Of course, we don't advocate hugging a random people at work but. You know live in California obviously. Yeah. Well, I get it I came from New York but I you know I came from a world in a workplace where everybody everybody but nowadays we have to be a little careful about that but yeah so you have to be You have to kind of program yourself to. Genuinely Force yourself genuinely appreciate that data for what it is. You know it's a treasure. You know you'd rather have good news than bad everybody would and. You'd rather have bad quickly so that you can do something about it. Before we go any further, I wanted to take a moment to let you know that we have a new sponsor which I'm really excited about. As you know, if you've been listening to the podcast for any length of time where big believers in the positive impact that therapy can have on people's lives that's why think we found the perfect sponsor for the podcast in better help the world's largest online counseling platform. It is really really cool to have them as a sponsor and the do great work. On better help, you can join over a million people who are taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional counselor. Once you join, you can start communicating with that counselor and under forty eight hours and from then on, you can log into your account anytime you like and send them a message. You can also schedule weekly phone or video sessions all for less than traditional in person counseling without leaving the comfort and security of your home and with the benefit of total privacy. Finally as a special offer for our listeners, you can go to better help dot com slash being well and get ten percent off your first month. That's the word better than H E L P dot com slash being well also include a link in the description of today's podcast. So thanks for listening. We really appreciate your support of the podcast. Let's get back to the show. So how can a leader be both leader with authority a different environments? And also often people rise to the level of leaders because they know stuff they can do stuff right while at the same time modeling fallibility. To me that just goes back to. Your favorite whether whether you'd like the you know the VOCA world, the volatile uncertain complex ambiguous world. If we actually live in that, you are not even. A rational. If you don't realize you're you're you know you're fallible. So fallibility can be as impersonal innocence, which is Great. It's not a fall. It's just now it's not in fact. Yeah, it's anything but a fall it's just a fact. It's a fact because you don't have a crystal ball says great. No. So you know that's a fact. So you have to learn to embrace it. and. So it's it's it's kind of it's situational. It's factual. It's part of it's part of the reality thing again and and and then. Or fell, you know Buca World and or again knowledge explosion as as. As knowledge. Continues to grow exponentially what that means is that even with. Your for example, you're very real expertise. over time it. Necessarily narrows. It because the knowledge in your field just keeps growing and so you can't just be like psychologist you end up being a family systems psychologist. Who Specializes in you know alcoholic families or something like I'm making this up right but it's So that means. So that's okay like very deep expertise, a powerful and important tool but most of the problems that we have to solve don't come in a vacuum. Or? A silo. Where you only need one form of expertise to solve them I. mean most of the problems are multiple. That is so interesting year in effect pointing out that the cultivation of deep expertise in a particular slot in larger VOCA world world is changing and dynamic actually. inherently. Leads to a certain kind of fallibility. Exactly, because I know my stuff really well, but I don't know side, you're slot your. Yeah I. Don't know how my slot and then it turns out that they were being asked to solve. Diabetes Prevention social work. Medicine, and endocrinology pharmacies. You know all all of our policies together exercise nutrition. And we need to bring. We need to not only bring all those different hats together, but we need to. Truly value and understand each other and you know you got your personal trainer doesn't necessarily Come from the same tribe as your MD, and then you talk about how leaders and people in general data ask for forgiveness because we are fallible and again it's hard to think about the classic model of. Theory Acts Organizations where leaders are asking for forgiveness. My parents said lovely people never admitted fault then you.

Messenger Buca World Diabetes VOCA New York California
"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

06:44 min | 3 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Doesn't work right that the that that. A fund fundamentally selfishness feels emptier than feeling like part of. A group that matters whether that's a family or a team or A. an organization. I think we all have a deeper longing to be a part of something larger than ourselves. And Where that longing can bear most fruit is when we feel. Safe enough to bring ourselves resits paradox in a way because I want you to know and appreciate me. I WANNA be a part of us. So it's doing that authentically right I. It's not going to be I can imagine subsuming ego completely but not feeling if I can't feel safe to bring myself forward it's going it's going to be a little bit lonely. Yeah that makes total sense. I think that's a great framing of it. You a point earlier that. Teams that feel safe are the exception and not the rule and so. Something must be done to foster that and safety and I had a couple of reflections along the way here. On my way toward asking you. Okay. What are some other factors that foster safe? So you've named one so far clearly named only one kind of framing and a sense of mission relationship between. The quality of safety the goals of the organization and so forth. I. Point I've I've been thinking about. How fresh, what you're bringing up his in a Lotta ways applied in the realm of function more in which his. Informal groups. Medic relationships, we can think of any one of those really as teams and The qualities that you're talking about also can foster safety in those environments and second. I was thinking about my own family growing up to new my my parents who are no longer live very loving people very decent people came out of the depression and there were not a dull abusive and yet my family environment was not psychologically safe. Can My parents had a monopoly on expressed anger and a whole variety of other things and I i. think there's a category here where people might look around their organization, their relationship and say, well, it's not abusive as not like my bosses Darth Vader I'm not married to Dorothy. But was it not safe? So I wonder if we talk more about that including other qualities that people can do to to foster the sense of safety. This is so important and I think I grew up in the same family so West Covina Southern California for me. They say in my field social psychology especially that all researches Mesa. That you're this is what gets you interested in something is that lack of of safety. So again, you know you can you can be in an environment that looks. Very good and it really truly nothing abusive but feel very. Unsafe. In terms of expressing your true thoughts or your true self in some. Because your cells. Need Yeah, and they seem you might think there's something about your true self it's either not good enough or not. You know generous enough. You know the your selfishness is. Unacceptable of or something anyway. So yes. So I think it's Such an important point and and. Also the. Most of the environments I have studied most of the work environments I've studied are not with you know. Abusive bosses they do exist I've seen them. I've studied the, but you know most bosses are just. Following a playbook that Seems natural and might even seem to be described in the mid. Management Textbooks of old. And And but even the ones who think of themselves as. Very interested in what other thoughts may fail to recognize that your belief that that's who you are isn't necessarily going to be seen by others who report to you because they have their own mental models of what boss means which they bring from their family origin from their prior jobs. Right. So the very fact that you're might boss leads me to be a little bit afraid of you even though you've never done anything scary. and. So we we bring the baggage. And baggage is at odds with success in a knowledge environment knowledge economy. So So this is I. Think I'm so glad you brought this up because you know when? People listen or read my work or listen to this program. You know they could eat a well excerpt of interesting about other people but it doesn't apply to make It applies to all of us. I mean I think it applies I was I was. A tenured faculty member before I realized that. A doctoral student could be. Intimidated by me because I don't think of myself as intimidating at all. So I just but the position or the success or the whatever the role comes with its own. With its own baggage. So what does that mean that means that managers have to in order? You know if you're if you're sincere about creating an environment where? Ideas are heard critiques are revealed in time to do something useful. With them and so forth. You have to do more than just set the stage you literally have to go out of your way to issue. Invitations routinely for voice. By which I mean. In ordinary English. Ask. Questions. Ask Good questions at you as as a clinician you know what I mean by a good question because a good question isn't A yes. No question. It isn't a leading question. I'm right right. It's not a prosecutorial question. Do you realize what a mess you made here? Right, right exactly. Yeah. You know or you know when did you stop beating your wife right? It's it's a so good question is one that says I have to interrupt you I know right now for us having a moment where he's reviewing about ten interactions me in which I asked the wrong. Well. Hello No one's immune job one is admit acknowledged that you're a fallible who've been.

West Covina Darth Vader California faculty member Dorothy
"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"A getting energy from interacting. Versus what I interact about I suppose but but So in fact, in in one study and others have done similar work. But in one study I had the big five personality variables. I had twenty six teens in seven companies. So I was able to see of those three layers of influence on psychological safety. How do they play out and Whereas personality explains a little bit of the variants. An organizational differences? Let's say organizational culture explains a little bit of the variance team differences explains a lot more. At. This is that that you know statement you may made when we opened which was we've all been on great teams. We've all been on not so great teams and you know so it's not just us it something emergent about the team. And sometimes, it's the people leader or manager that that exerts a larger than usual force on on everybody reflate. One of the points you made also in one of your interviews that I saw. was that. In a knowledge economy. Knowledge his vastly important asset and knowledge is distributed among all the people in the organization. So that's another point to the larger rationale that why it's really important to support a culture of Alcala expressive nece. which requires a context of safety to facilitate expressive nece right. We need people's expressions in a knowledge economy. It's really well put I mean that's bore Laura. THEM WHAT I. I've been studying a US a chance. Yeah, the thing about knowledge that's so important is that it's By definition constantly growing. At a more is constantly being learned whether in your company or in the world at large and so. That means that we are all very much in need of continuous learning, and if we're native continuous learning were native continuous sharing what I might see something that you miss and vice versa. So pointing out that we're in knowledge economy is another great way of setting the stage in such a way that says there is a rationale for why you should be willing to take the interpersonal risks of speaking up. So I think that we all have a vision in our head, maybe coming from various Hollywood blockbusters or things like that of what a high performing team looks like at some big consulting agency or bank or something like that kind of these traditional, very high performance environments and I think maybe alongside that, we might have a view on a personal level of what a super productive has sold or super productive relationship looks like. And for me when I envisioned these things are I think about the cultural tropes more broadly they come across as very type A. Everyone's hyperfocused may be very good at their jobs. and honestly maybe it's just my personality but I'm not sure how enjoyable these things feel to me. They feel kind of stressful and intimidating. To maybe put another kind of way, I think that culturally we might have this view that there's a bit of an inverse relationship between achievement and safety or comfort is essentially the more comfortable. You are the less you will achieve. But what I'm hearing from you here is that your research suggests that this isn't the case or at least the relationship between them is a bit more complicated than that. Yes and for sure the relationship is not. At odds. So you know high performance and energizing driven teamwork is not. Either harming or in any way at odds with having psychological safety. In fact, I would argue that you need both right. You need psychological safety to be willing to take the very real interpersonal risks of. Jumping in and going for it right you know playing to win with your teammates. And if you aren't. Driven and energized in some way, it's also hard to achieve. high-performance and really be engaged in sort of making something happened. That's someone exciting. So you know I would make a very strong argument you need both the whole is more than the sum of the parts that they sort of have an interaction with each other. But let's back up because teens the classic team you know research and I think it's consistent with the Hollywood idea that you're suggesting and and and even I think we get much of our mental models about teams from sports. We we think of Great Sports Teams Whether Basketball Baseball. You name it and. There's a clarity about what the goal is of course in sports that comes with the territory, their rules, their score they're scoring there's championships. So there's a clarity about. What what we're trying to get done at least in a over arching sense I'm and then there's A. A very real a presence of the expertise or knowledge or skill set that you need to get that thing done together. It's so those are those are the things that you mentioned in both of those can be certainly very I don't know ambitious and hard. Driving hard charging factors. But more at almost as important as those two I would add. An Eye. Versus we. You know we versus I or you know we we versus me. spirit because if we all know the great, you know the teams of experts that the completely crashed and burned, right they have have the superstars on them, but they can't work together because everybody is such an individual that they're not capable of subsuming some part of their own ego identity for the for the you know the the good of the team and yet I think great teams have to have that like I. Just I'm so excited to be on this team that I'm willing. To not have it be about me. It's about us. It's about the goal it's about the customer whatever it is. That team is for it entered. That's really the must the you can have the clear goal. You can have all that expertise in all that driving ambition, but if you don't have a we Feeling. In Spirit, you won't get their. Emmy what you're really talking about here is quite deep added quite personal I mean to use the psychological language. You're talking about a almost a subsuming of the EGO and into way from individuality to maybe more of a collectivist perspective, and that's a very deep thing and it'd be a very personal thing as well. So yeah, I would love to get your thoughts on how you do that, how you make people more comfortable moving away from the self and toward a broader perspective well. The most important thing is it's actually more fun more rewarding I. Mean I think we make the mistake of thinking I i WanNa be up on that pedestal with the gold medal and that's where I'm GonNa be I'm suddenly going to be happier I want to be the top student in the class or Whatever prize get the Nobel Prize, whatever it is right and that's that's the source of happiness. It's a cliche that it isn't that.

Hollywood US gold medal Nobel Prize Laura Alcala Baseball
"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"So professor, thanks so much for taking the time to join us today doing. Very welcome and I'm doing as well as can be under the circumstances which is. Pretty well. I'm one of the lucky ones. Yeah. It's an increasingly loaded question. These days back when we were doing these conversations before the whole pandemic started I would ask that question and people give kind of a normal maybe sorta tried response. Oh I'm doing good these days. It's a little bit tougher I'd love to start by defining some concepts for people maybe starting with psychological safety, which has such a important part of your work, and as you know back in twenty fifteen google finished this massive four year internal study on what made for an effective team and they identified five key factors the first four pretty traditional dependability. Structure and clarity meaning and impact the fifth and most important one was psychological safety. So this is a big important topic for organizations. Great. Okay and and it is Google study is a truly amazing study that actually motivated me to write the fearless organization because I had been studying psychological safety for. Twenty years not as a fulltime activity, I my primary interest teams and organizational learning. But never occurred to me that there would be that much interest in this topic until Google study. So I'm eternally grateful of that happened. So I, I define psychological safety as a shower beliefs that the environment is safe for interpersonal risk taking. And what's an interpersonal risk while it's it's speaking up with a question or a concern or? A mistake or an admission of weakness. So anything anything for which others might judge you harshly and. Are you do you feel that that's easy. You feel that's possible or is that something that you're strong inclination will be to hold back if so that's a lack of psychological safety. That's interesting. So people experience within themselves whether they feel safe from not then related to that. There are beliefs about how safe they are, and then there's a group level where there's a commonality of this there's a shared by as aura and what are some of the factors that promote this really great result inside teams of factors of what people can do themselves, and particularly what leaders can do teams that. Create in foster this quality of psychological safety. It's a great question and I feel I have to back up a little bit and say. As listeners can probably imagine it's not the norm when I think psychological safety particularly in the workplace is not the norm it's not to be taken for granted in fact, I, would say most workplaces aren't particularly psychological safe. By most somewhere above. Half are probably not psychologically safe. So what is it wouldn't it? So that means when its present it's generally the case that. People have done something particularly, managers have done something to make it so and I think the most important things most important thing to do is to always just keep on talking about the nature of reality. Now that sounds funny because I mean that because I'm into it. I. Don't mean it in the cosmic sense I mean it in. Most Physicians the work. That people are doing is. Subjective complicated. Novel I mean th there's there's a fair amount of uncertainty and there's a fair amount of challenge and there's a lot of interdependence like we can really go into that one There's just A. A much higher level than ever before that, I can't just go in and do my job and everything will be fine. You know we must work together in a in a in a coordinated thoughtful way to do our jobs. So that's that's the nature of reality, and so the two, the two features of reality on most I think our most powerful to talk about our uncertainty and interdependence. which team leaders managers are just making it? And making it explicit that what we face in what we're trying to do here. Is. Is. Enormously unclear of an and some jobs are obviously more clear than others but you don't know exactly how the customers will react. You know in the in the case of the pandemic we don't know when this will end. We don't we don't know. What Organizations and customers and what it's all. GonNa look like when when we get through it. So acknowledging uncertainty and acknowledging interdependence SORTA gives people at least the semblance of a rationale for why their voice might be needed a maybe a simpler way to say what I'm saying is just a of routine comments like I might miss something I need to hear from you or were up against an immense challenge. Anybody's ideas might be mission critical. So because I think if you don't set the Stage by making clear that there's a really a rationale for why I welcome I will. I. Welcome Your Voice. Then the default is to think I probably should just shut up. So Amy, one of the things that I really started learning when I was delving into your work and your book, the Fearless Organization is that my first assumption about psychological safety was that it was essentially a personality factor or it had a big part of it that had to do with individual variation and personality. Much has some people are naturally more extroverted. Like felt more psychologically safe in other words. Some people probably just felt more comfortable speaking up and expressing their view and essentially being vulnerable publicly in that way. But in your research, you found that it really wasn't particularly tied to personality. Is that right? Yeah and it's not to say that there aren't personality differences which. Would the research does suggest is that they are the personality differences are swamped by the climate factor, right, and in fact, the on the big five personality dimensions. extroversion doesn't matter. It turns out but neurosis I've seen the negative direction does right. So if you're Boorda Roddick, you're less likely to feel psychological safe that seems. Pretty expected and openness is one of the big five and and that does that does have a small effect on psychological safety and if I'm just more open, I'm more open and I'm GonNa an. extroversion pertains more.

google Fearless Organization professor Boorda Roddick Amy
Courageous Cultures With Karin Hurt & David Dye

The LEADx Show

04:44 min | 4 months ago

Courageous Cultures With Karin Hurt & David Dye

"Employees have ideas, leaders want to hear them, and yet somehow there is a disconnect. So what if instead you can have a courageous colchester where people speak up, they share ideas, the default is to contribute. So today, we're going to start with grounding you in a little bit of the research under grounds, our work, and then from, there are going to give a series of very practical tools to help you tap into the very best ideas and micro innovations that are happening on your team right now. So. To answer these questions about why speaking up with problem solutions with micro innovations advocating for customers is difficult. We partnered with the University of Northern, Colorado and a research project both quantitative and qualitative to figure out what keeps people from being able to speak up and what are some of the best companies doing to overcome those barriers. The first reason we discovered through that research is that no one's asking, in fact, forty, nine percent of our research respondents said, they are not consistently asked for ideas by their leaders. And then many people feel like nothing's going to happen. A full fifty percent of respondents said that if they were to share an idea, it wouldn't be taken seriously by their leadership. So, why bother? And then you ever feel stock. Well quite a few respondents feel the same way just over two thirds. Sixty, seven percent said that their leadership operates under the principle because we've always done it this way if we've always done it this way, that's the way we're always going to do it, and then there's the reluctance that comes from fear or a lack of confidence forty percent. Our research respondents said that they lack the confidence to share an idea. So this concept of sue or fear of speaking up was very interesting as we conducted interview after interview across a variety of industries and countries all over the world. Why are people so afraid to speak up and I? We said if you did speak up what are the ideas that you're holding back and these things are not trivial sound like Khumbu, in a break room kind of ideas. They said my idea that I'm not sharing would be to improve the customer experience, the employee experience or improvement of process. People are scared primarily because they have had a bad experience in the past. So research shows that people tend to hold onto a negative experience longer than a positive experience, which means that even if you are a fantastic leader, encouraging people to speak. Supporting them. If they had a bad experience in the past, they may still be holding onto that and are not sharing their best ideas because of old fear. So, an addition to that psychological aspect of overweight in the past people also tend to discount the future in Dr Amy Edmonson Research. She talks a lot about how when it comes to psychological safety. People don't recognize just how valuable the contribution they could make will be. So as a leader, you want to be aware that these things are happening in your team. Another reason people lacked the competence to share is that they haven't been taught how to share their ideas well, and so we will also be giving you a tool today to help you give to your team to help them vet and think through their ideas. So we'll just take you through a little bit. Bit about the courageous cultures process, and then we were going to go a little bit deeper into a couple of these areas. Today. When you're building courageous culture, it really starts with navigating the narrative that is grounding yourself in your own fear or confidence. So are you letting a bad past experience? Hold you back and so one of the things that we do in our programs is really get people to think about their most courageous sacked at work and build on that confidence. The next is creating clarity, and when we talk about creating clarity, we're really talking about in clarity into areas, I being crystal clear that you really do want people's ideas and reinforcing that. Again and second clarity around what a good idea would accomplish, and we'll talk about how you can get more specific than just. Hey, does anybody have any good ideas? Next is cultivating curiosity, and this is where it will spend most of our time today. How do you go out and deliberately stay curious and draw out people's best

Dr Amy Edmonson Research Colchester Khumbu University Of Northern Colorado
"dr amy" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:18 min | 5 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"It depends on the studies, but it's not like every day. It's just you know it's something that's generally a part of their lives Those people tend to have less cognitive decline as they get older. They done studies with with women and men, but basically looked at women who had were having sex versus women who had not been having regular active sex in the ones you were sexually active had better. Cognition had less cognitive decline as I got older, which is interesting. They've done look. It looked at the hippocampus. Basically people who are more sexually active attend have. Larger healthier people campuses, which tied to memory and things like that, so it's tied very much to cognitive. Sex's definitely of mental sort of emotional health in that we know that people who again has active healthy sex lives tend to have less anxiety. They tend to have they feel better about themselves have better. Sort of self. theirself. Were self esteem barrier they can tell. They'd have higher self. Missiles have less anxiety to sleep better, which of course we know, sleep has own whole other the benefits of sleeper. Talk for half a day about that, so it helps with sleep. It helps things Zaidi. It helps with self image. Other lots of other things like depression. People are who are generally having sex less suppression, so all of that's very important from physical standpoint, we know that people who are sexually active tend to have lower blood pressure They tend to against sleep. Utter, which is really important, they tend to have less cardiovascular disease There was one study in man again who looked over a year period of time. Men who were having sex at least once a week I believe. At the end of it, they showed that there was actually a fifty percent reduction in overall mortality in the men who were having regular sex versus the men who were not now other things probably tied to that. You can't just say it's just maybe they're just more active in general, or they have a better relationship with their partner etcetera so but these are pretty big things to to talk about and think about and besides sex is fun, but it also does all this really good stuff for us. You know on that on that. No I think that one thing that people often wonder about with this topic. Is that water? Some of the I know you said in when I reach out, he said listen. I'm not a sex therapist so like there's a lot of things that I can't or don't go into. But? From an anatomy standpoint, our men and women different, and what is it important for like the listeners to know about of just how sex isn't just about the organs in our body, but also how pleasure is received is there are things that you talk about with your female patients to help them understand? Here's the differences or the distinctions that are important to know that we wouldn't just get in traditional high school..

Zaidi partner
Masks have become a partisan issue

All In with Chris Hayes

06:35 min | 6 months ago

Masks have become a partisan issue

"Earlier today. The vice president united. States Mike Pence stopped by diner in Pennsylvania typical campaign, fair and video that event was shown on TV and their other than a secret service guide appears in the back and later a waitress. Almost nobody is wearing masks as far as I can tell no one, certainly not these supposed head of the corona virus taskforce. You remember that. That and that might seem like a small thing especially to anyone who managed to convince themselves, and you'll want to really have to worry about the virus. The reality is that the virus is still here. It's still killing people every day and the more we learn, the more we know, that close sustained indoor proximity without masks like what they're doing in. The diner brings with it a high risk of transmission. Seems the more we learn, the more we learn, that masks matter a lot in many of the countries that are managed to control the virus like Taiwan pretty much. Everyone wears masks. In fact just this week. A British study found that widespread mask-wearing could prevent covid nineteen second waves, not that we're even to the point where we're trying to prevent a second wave here in America. Sadly, we are still squarely in the first wave. We basically plateaued. Twenty thousand cases a day, just under a thousand deaths a day. That is our new devastating normal. We've already lost more than a hundred and fifteen thousand Americans right now. Hospitalizations are surging number of states including Arizona, Tennessee Arkansas South Carolina and Alabama. Two States Oregon Utah have paused their reopening efforts amid spikes. In cases in fact, I'm going to talk the governor of Oregon Kate Brown in just a moment about that to other states with large populations Florida and Texas just reported records for daily highs in new cases, which is particularly striking given that Republicans announced yesterday that Jacksonville Florida is the new alternatively location for the Republican National Convention after officials in Charlotte North, Carolina declared. The event would not be safe there. The safety does not seem to be much of a concern for the President United States amidst the pandemic that is seen one hundred and fifteen thousand people die. Next Week Donald. Trump is as you may have heard holding his first campaign rally since lockdown in where Tulsa Oklahoma, where covid nineteen cases just record daily high. That's right. Officials said the increase has been identified as an outbreak linked to indoor gatherings, okay. The president will be holding his rally at. An indoor arena at the Bank of Oklahoma Center, which just over nineteen thousand people packed in there. As far as we can tell, he's telling his supporters that if they get the corona virus at his rally, it's not his problem in order to attend. They have to agree not to sue Donald Trump if they come to the rally and they catch the coronavirus. At least those people have choice, the president has forced graduating cadets at west point who have been sent home to return to campus, so he can deliver a commencement address tomorrow, which we think will be outdoors, so that's good and can have a photo op with them. At least fifteen of those cadets have already tested positive for the virus. The science here as tentative and unformed as sort of dynamic as it is, suggests our best hope to fight the virus right now. If we want to not have locked down, right, be some version of normal our best hope right now. He's wearing masks, washing hands social, but wearing masks, wearing masks wearing masks. And yet the president and the vice president who extensively want to get the economy back on track and get back to normal, not only refuse to wear them. They have effectively turned wearing masks into a culture where issue and they have stoked this political backlash against those who dare tell us how to stay safe. Here's an example in Orange County California the chief health officer Dr Nicole quick resigned amid backlash and a death threat death threat over in order to wear masks, residents, comparing her to a Nazi and holding protests at her home. This was a scene at Tuesday's Orange County Board of supervisors meeting. I have been discriminated five times in the last two days I have been actually turned away. I cannot go in these businesses without a mask. You're telling me that I have to breathe in c. o two when God gave this body, the ability to extract that from my body, and now you want me to put it back in my body. I have natural rights as a sovereign citizen of the United States by continuing to keep people in masks separated out of work with no legitimate cause. You are kneeling on the next of the people, and you are continuing to act in a thuggish manner. Guys over like really like. You know I mean. Are we talking about this? Kneeling on the next, she compared wearing a mask to killing. George Floyd and it's over. Are we still talking about this? Yeah, we're still talking about it. People are still dying from it, but that's the view of the White House that women's view. It's not just happening in Orange County Ohio Ohio state. There's been a relative success story and containing the virus Republican. Governor Mike DeWine. Has Been a leader on the issue. He credited Dr Acton, who's health rector, the state as a hero for her role, and that included advising government wind lockdown early very early left the state in much better position to reopen. Dr Acton has now resigned amid lawsuits the push by Republicans. And protests at her home where some people conspicuously carried God's. The Guardian reports some demonstrations at the State House featured signs bearing antisemitic messages. That's comparing her Nazi again. Acting as Jewish and one lawmaker referenced her with an anti-semitic Slur. Dr? Amy Acton died her estate through a pandemic and for that she target for Reactionary Idiots. Look it's a complicated world we live in. Complicated time it's not like the experts are all in unison about everything they're not. It's not like this isn't complicated. There have been mixed messages about the virus and transmission about mask-wearing. When they told us not to wear mass February, they were wrong about that and we're still processing data, and they're still all sorts of countervailing balances between different kinds of risks. What we're doing. But we have seen what happens. If there's one thing we know, we've seen what happens across the world. And in this country when leaders just shove their fingers and say I can't hear you corona virus. There's a real danger of politics and political forces overwhelm public health entirely. And we sure as heck should not be punishing health, experts and leaders were crying to help us help ourselves to stay safe and healthy.

President Trump Donald Trump Amy Acton Vice President Mike Pence President United States Oregon Governor Mike Dewine United States Orange County Board Of Supervi Bank Of Oklahoma Center Florida Pennsylvania Orange County Ohio Ohio America George Floyd Taiwan Oklahoma Kate Brown
Ohio state health director resigns

Mark Blazor

00:26 sec | 6 months ago

Ohio state health director resigns

"Wyatt governor Mike DeWine announced today that Dr Amy Acton will be stepping down as director of the Ohio department of health five as lance Himes who served as past out of interim director to assume that role again as interim director and he has agreed to do that the governor says she will now become his chief health advisor as we enter another phase of the corona virus

Wyatt Governor Mike Dewine Dr Amy Acton Director Lance Himes Interim Director Advisor Ohio Department Of Health Chief Health
Psoriasis on The Rise Due to Quarantine Stress

Fat Mascara

01:32 min | 6 months ago

Psoriasis on The Rise Due to Quarantine Stress

"I. Just read this really interesting study. This was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology so there was a survey of people with psoriasis in China during the covid nineteen pandemic there and the quarantine, and they found that that resulted in people, psoriasis, having negative effects on both their skin, their skin condition the. The psoriasis and their mental health, so part of the problem was that people weren't working, so they didn't have money to to pay for a lot of their psoriasis treatments, but a corrected for that, and they still found that there was a impact from the pandemic and the thinking. Is that It was partially because people weren't having outdoor access, and they were more stressed, and that's what you know played up the psoriasis. I feel like this is something we'll be talking about with our guest in the interview. So if that's intriguing to you definitely keep listening through the interview. another news item earlier, this spring, America's first native American beauty brand opened in window rock Arizona with a storefront I should say all of its employees are from the Navajo nation and the company beauty makes skincare and makeup I actually read about this company to feature in beauty. Independence linked to that on the blog but I love how the owner. Her name is a sake bottle of France SASSARI and she describes the products this way, which is just I just like smiling when I read this, the quotas quote our skincare line is ninety eight percent botanically based gentle yet effective life is already complicated, and my goal is to make sure our products are uncomplicated easy to use. Preach preach preach, preach, preach US ocoee Bois. I'm excited to see this brand. I'm going to order some so I can try it out, but for now just an interesting news.

Psoriasis Journal Of The American Academ France Sassari United States Arizona China America
"dr amy" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

02:33 min | 6 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Everyone is jess I'm Jen. I'm still JEN ALWAYS JEN? We Are Fatma's Skara and we are back for another week of beauty. News were fat Mascara I like it. It's like our band name now. Famous Garra rocking the house We are excited to back with you I. feel like we're gathering around. We know every every Wednesday or whenever you listen to us we've got a lot to talk about. We know it's been. It's been a tough week. A rough. We all over the world. Yeah, we thank you hope everyone is hanging and staying safe, and if you are joining us this week, we thank you for coming back and hope that we can provide a little bit of a break for everyone on that note. WHAT ARE WE GONNA? Talk about this week. Let's see so I up. To issue a correction, an episode or two ago, we talked about deep stuff bikini line bumpy, if you. Are like me in are taking bikini line grooming into your own hands during the quarantine, you may be experiencing some bikini line bumpy as an I, asked my good pal Dr, Rinella. How to handle this. I came out with a lot of great tips and one of those was to treat with Hydro Court of over the counter hydrocortisone I was so caught up in her tips so excited just like going crazy and I said ten percent hydrocortisone and a couple of you, you guys. I like you guys because you're so informed. And you wrote me some friendly friendly criticism, a correction and you said correction, a correction they sacked, checked us, and one of the emails was from a registered nurse, and said you cannot get ice at ten percent hydrocortisone can't you cannot get ten percent hydrocortisone at like a CVS? It's one percent and I look back at my notes from Manila and. And of course Ronel, said one percent guys sometimes I get really excited and carried away, but if you have inflamed skin bumps, look for one percent topical Hydrocortisone, really sorry, so editor's note I was wrong and I hope you'll stick with me. I. Do not tend to make these kind of mistakes and I'm really excited that you guys are so informed and kind to correct me. Kindly, so we are going to also hit you with the headlines of the week Jen right correct, and we also have sunscreen news to share with everyone, and then our guest is I think it's really timely right now. We have Dr Amy. Wechsler, she's a board certified psychiatrist and dermatologists, so we're going to talk about the link between mental health and your skin so should be really interesting. You're ready to do it..

JEN Jen Wechsler Dr Amy skin bumps Hydro Court Manila Ronel Rinella editor
COVID-19 Question Answer Session with Dr. Amy Baxter

Outcomes Rocket

08:15 min | 7 months ago

COVID-19 Question Answer Session with Dr. Amy Baxter

"So let's chat cove in nineteen. You know what what? What are some of the myths out there that you want to help us bus than you know? Guide us through that. Sure well I think the scariest myth was one. That was introduced to me by my bank teller. I put on a mask. She had on a mass. And we've known each other for years and she said confidentially. Is this really a thing? Because I've got a friend in Brooklyn says he drives by the hospitals in no one's there. Is this really happening? So the biggest myth is that coveted is not a serious disease that it's the same as flu. A study. This week showed that there actually are twenty one times more fatalities from Kobe in New York were from flu so the biggest Smith is is this going way and is is really a thing and the answer is no and yet Yeah no I. I definitely appreciate that. And it's real you know and a lot of us in the healthcare space Definitely feel it but there might be that out and so as we as we think about it. You know What what are some of the questions year getting and seeing that that you feel? The listeners could benefit from knowing around the around this virus. Sure I think that the interesting things are how this virus is different from other viruses and some of those attributes we could leverage for treatments and for care and some of them may get really scary because we don't have One of the papers I read yesterday said this virus is unlike any other and I think it's true. This pathogen is doing things that other viruses haven't so first of all the biggest difference is in infectivity by age. Usually we have what we call A. You're a where the very young ages we have a lot of infections in morbidity which means bad things happening and at the old ages we have a lot of corporate entity mortality. And we don't see that this one is very much a a along J. It's very very low. At young ages goes way at the top other than it. Strange about. This is how long it takes to become infected and how precipitous drop is when people have a problem so. I think that you probably know that. From the time of infection until you show symptoms can be five to seven days so that incubation is very long the scary part is that forty four percent of infections come during that a symptomatic face. So it's very easy to spread without knowing you have it. Which makes it harder to track. Hard to trace and hard to know who detest. Yeah it's It's different and and so how about the ideas of like where it came from and and you know why any thoughts around that sure well. It turns out that bats are natural reservoirs of grunted irises. So for example a Bola was initially in a bat in a cave. That a young boy outside the incident town was playing with. And that's where the virus team from as habitats change as the climate changes. Bats go out of their normal territories and they happen to have grown viruses as a very common infection. It doesn't kill them so it can be transmitted directly to humans now. The certainly the time that this virus started wasn't Wuhan an was from a back but it looking at the strains and the genetic typing of it it seems to be mutating fairly slowly and it makes it very easy to see when it started where it came from so the wet market in China is still the most likely it came from but no matter what. This is. The kind of virus that comes from that directly to humans. I'd heard that and I wasn't sure if it was true or not. I'm like is it. Is it really from Batson mean and then I also hear people saying it came from a lab somewhere? It's a chicken egg thing or a Atlantic yet. There was a there is a lab in Wuhan because of the risk of corona viruses. It had been studying. Bats heavily said SARS and Moore's so both stars and moons are Corona viruses and there had been increased studying bats in that lab. But it's because they're dangerous and because there are risks not because they're trying to create run irises or create infections. It's the fact that somebody was looking at it in researching yet because it was dangerous not that it became dangerous because someone was researching fascinating fascinating. I didn't know that connection. Thank you for that. So as we as we explore this J shaped curve. You know. I'm curious right. I mean I've got a three year old and I've got you know aging parents will tell me more about that and and particular things that you'd recommend for safety and and You know just things that we need to keep on our mind share it. Will I have a couple of theories about why the J shaped curve is typically the U shape curve has to do with mutagenicity so how well your immune system protects you and young? People don't have very weldon alter union systems so they tend to be more vulnerable to respiratory diseases and older people also have decreased immune systems so the the very heavy incidents on people who are over sixty five which seems to be where the cutoff is to have a dramatic increase in risk. That probably isn't due to decreased. Immunity one of the theories is that due to increased immunity. That there were the two grown viruses virus alpha and Beta cuddling named that were circulating in the late fifties and identified sixties. And so it may be that those people were alive in the fifties and sixties before it. Kinda petered out has some immunity that was developed that point which causes an excessive immune response in older patients. Now the other possibilities are this. Virus doesn't seem to enter the body and then get into the bloodstream and spread everywhere. It seems more like this virus comes into the body and marches a bit at a time. Almost as if the the troops come in and they set vacations and it's like World War Two and so the battalion's multiply and spread on a time. So with that being the case the interesting thing is that paper nature last week determined that tissues that this viruses attaching to before the lipid fatty layer of the virus. Fuses with the cell. Can the news in the nose? There's something called an ace two receptor. That is where the little spiky protein hops onto and holds on and their ace two receptors. All over the body but the ones that were interested in the nose and children don't have big noses they also don't have sinuses. You don't get a false at sinuses teenager interesting so because of that. Maybe that's why they they're less less at risk to to get this. Yeah absolutely if what we're talking about is something called viral load which is literally hell many virus particles. You have That is going to be difficult to accumulate in a small child. One of the interesting things I found out was that the nasal cavity size is dramatically. Increased over the age of seventy and it's Moammar nails. Oh is that right. Yeah certainly we've seen that males can be more at risk of catalyses more at risk of catching the virus than females. The ratio is about five to three some studies on about sixty percent of males. Were the ones who are affected by an only forty percent cements

Wuhan FLU Sars Kobe Brooklyn Batson China Smith New York Moore
Concerns rise over accuracy of coronavirus antibody testing

The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

Concerns rise over accuracy of coronavirus antibody testing

"There of course is a lot of talk about testing for covert nineteen and some of the problems with the accuracy of some of those tasks university of Minnesota medical school professor Dr Amy Carter explains why saying that when the virus hit the FTA open the door to all companies to come up with tests on their own there are a lot of questions all tests on the market and that's a consequence of the FTA relaxing their regulations when I'm covered nineteen pandemic started in the US they basically said that any company could sell antibody test without showing any sort of data that the test work she says over the last month or so more reputable organizations have created much better tasks like if the U. S. and mail and the CDC is going to start reviewing older task to try to get some of them out of

Professor Dr Amy Carter United States CDC Minnesota
"dr amy" Discussed on Columbus Concerns

Columbus Concerns

10:21 min | 9 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on Columbus Concerns

"This is Columbus concerns a public affairs presentation of North American Broadcasting. Here's your host Mark News at. Thanks so much for joining us this morning. Of course everyone is talking about Kovic. Nineteen or the corona virus. We still haven't had any cases reported here in Ohio no confirmed cases as of today however we have had confirmed cases as close as Kentucky and Indiana as the virus continues to spread across the US. Well this week Dr Amy Acton. The head of the Ohio Department of Health was a guest on our low power and Randy morning show on ninety nine seven the blitz here in Columbus and she gave some good advice on Kovic. Nineteen Dr Acton. Thanks so much for spending some time here on the show with us and taking a second how you done this morning good. It's good to be here this morning. Thank you as someone who's really into fitness and health and wellness. I was a little bit you know. Obviously it was a gut blow yesterday as we saw you and Mike. Dewine talking about The spectator aspect of the Arnold being canceled. What exactly went into that in the thought behind it. Well I can tell you know that. That was a very big decision. One that took a lot of thought and I have to really commend first of all the governor. The mayor and the organizers Anybody saw Arnold Schwarzenegger himself spoke This is a hard decision. But as you know they're taking preventative measure It is an unusual and unique situation that many athletes from over eighty countries. There are over twenty thousand athletes. Twenty five two hundred fifty thousand spectators. So you know it is. It is something that the. Cdc came out with new guidance and it has to do with. You know the local capacity to put preventive measures in place. And I can tell you. Columbus public health is one of the best health department in this country and they feel they can do a very very good job protecting the athlete but This is a preventative measure to stop the spread of disease talking about the spread of the disease. Are there any other events that are coming up in the near future that will be cancelled? That are large gatherings Games Blue Jackets Games breasts. The Crew Yeah. I think at this point you know. I think we're GONNA see evolving cancellations around the world you're seeing just to you. Know just athletes without spectator. Large conferences businesses. Not Sending in workers and again. This is something that can help. Slow US passing very catchy infectious disease to each other and I suspect we'll see more of it at this point. You know something like a two hour your kids back while game or something like that is still something where you can take precautions. Wash your hands. Avoid being very close to someone. Who's crossing our sneezing. But when you're talking something. So big as a arnold where people are there for days and very close quarter. That's different but I think you'll see this evolving thoughtfulness as as we see community spread Here soon I'm sure we'll see it in. Ohio is seeing it around the country so in New York City they are already disinfecting the public transit. Are we going to be doing things like that with the code buses and stuff like that? Yes absolutely you know. There's so much that goes on behind the scenes in has been going on for weeks and we work with businesses and hospitals and schools. Getting them tips on how to get ready. How to do cleaning and I WANNA say to people at home regular cleaners work so they can be doing that as well. Okay and so. Let's just go through it step by step so if people are listening to this for the first time how is the best way that people here in Columbus Ohio can protect ourselves against the Cova? Nineteen buyers want folks to take it seriously but not be afraid. This violence is a lot like the flu in. I don't think people take the fluid seriously. They started. We actually have a vaccine for that and people should get that vaccine if they haven't yet but it is like a bad flu experience factious people who are outerly immuno-compromised healthcare workers are little more susceptible to it than the average person. It looks a lot like server. Coughing potentially difficulty breathing but for most people. Most people will get it stay home. Stay home if you're sick and and they'll get through it Some folks that will need to be hospitalized. What you can do. We recommend recommendations. I would make right now. Are you know stock up in case you have to stay home from work On some food for about two weeks. Have your medicine supply of your regular medicine for thirty days. Think things like cold medicines and things. So if you're staying home you don't have to go out to the drugstore and potentially exposed more people think about your elderly parents think about neighbors who alone and don't have how as much as people are afraid. This is a time we can also help each other and that is a message. I really want to get out there. We have more checks On our website Corona Virus Dot Ohio Dot. Gov Washing your hands as boring as that sounds can stop the spread back fifty percent laughing all things. It's boring the coughing and your sleeve. The things were saying actually worked the proven to work so And then just kicking some distance if somebody is coughing sneezing around with lots of tips on how you can prepare the mostly. How can we help each other? Because a lot of people will be more you'll be told to stay at home and rasp potentially if you have the disease for up to fourteen days At this point I'm dreaming of a Quarantine. Wasn't that flex but you know so you know retired. Try to see the positive side of things and and but that's what it will look like for. Most people be like a foolish deadly thirty. Five thousand people died in this country last year from flu and we've had a third A child die in Ohio from the flu. So it is polluted colts in all of these things. Work On all of these diseases so I'm kind of nervous because all the reports I'm reading it attacks the lungs that's what it wants wants to attack the lungs and so it wasn't necessarily do that right. It does the flu actually a lot of times when hostile. I will be for things like pneumonia so it does go to the lungs and difficulty breathing. Assign to look for when you know. That will be a sign that your your disease is worth name should definitely be talking to your healthcare provider. I have asthma so it gives me anxiety. I'm like I can't even I don't want to catch it all because I already have terrible. Longs until you know definitely talked your healthcare provider on that do all these preventive measures. That really will help and again. The flu could do this to you too. If you haven't had a vaccine go get that because again the hardest thing about this new diseases. It'll be a while before we have a vaccine and we're not immune to it so so again you know. I want people to take the right precautions. Corona Virus Dot Ohio Dot Gov and then but but those things will help and and you know your doctor and provider will be there with you to walk through it as our local health departments. The great resources of information on the. I'm so sorry I had to let people know that. Amy Acting is on the phone with us right now. The director of the Ohio Department of Health. So I wake up this morning. And we have one strain of corona virus and now reading reports that there are two strains of corona virus in her spreading around the world. Seventy percent of infected patients have caught the more aggressive contagious. And so maybe that's why people were getting it again. Rumor Kelly. We were reading reports that once a had the coronavirus it was all said and done. They caught it again. Like both the strains here in the United States so there's a whole family of corona viruses. Some of them caused the common cold. And I think that's where that misunderstanding could be coming from. There's a technical corona virus that is a common cold this new type. The Beta class is zoonotic disease. Meaning that from animal to human. And that's what happened in China that happens occasionally with fires as we probably give them to our pets too and talks about that but this virus is a particular strain that again is particularly infectious and and does have you know that Fatality rate of up to three percent again. Our knowledge of it is evolving daily. So you know that's why I know. It's confusing the people that adds to fear because we learn a little bit more every day. That's quite so important to go to good trusted. Sources of information I think that that that people probably aren't being reinfected with it. Actually I think the testing or Swat not being done right or it's not. There's more to that CA. I I think we'll learn more about that. I'm thinking people had it all along. Not Being reinfected in your opinion. How far out is some sort of vaccine? Well you know I don't feel slow but it's actually with each one of these like the viruses that we go through like this eve outbreaks things get faster and faster. It's practically a miracle that they are going to be testing and less than three months. I talked. Science has evolving on this. That we can even test for it will be passing here in Ohio. That is a miracle but the actual vaccine is about a year to year and a half away. There is some hope there are some anti viral sort of like Tamiflu is if you already have the flu. There are some that are already on the market that are being tested against this virus will know in about forty forty five days if it's effective and that would be a great boon to us in this fight against this virus and there's the latest on. Cova nineteen from the head of the Department of Health. Dr Amy Acton who appeared this morning on our ninety nine seven the blitz radio station here in Columbus.

flu Ohio Columbus Dr Amy Acton US Ohio Department of Health Kovic Arnold Schwarzenegger Columbus Ohio Mark News Mike Cdc Department of Health North American Broadcasting Kentucky arnold pneumonia Randy Indiana Dewine
Male Survivors of Sexual Assault and Abuse

The Psych Central Show

09:44 min | 9 months ago

Male Survivors of Sexual Assault and Abuse

"We have Dr Amy and Dr Joan Cooke. Amy is a licensed clinical psychologist and the assistant director of the trauma. Resolution and integration program at Nova Southeastern University and Joan is a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Yale School of Medicine. Department of Psychiatry. Amy Joan welcome to the show. Thank you happy to be here. Thank you well. I am very glad to have both of you because we have a really big topic today. We're going to be discussing male survivors of sexual abuse and assault. And I'm a little bit embarrassed to admit when we first started putting together this episode. I thought to myself is this a subject that we need to cover. Is it big enough? Aren't we already discussing it and the research that I did in the stuff that I learned from both of us? Thank you very much is that it's actually sort of under disgust and under reported absolutely and thank you. Gabe for admitting to that I think a lot of healthcare providers a lot of the public and many male survivors themselves adhere to a number of male rape myths. We need to talk in this country. About how rape and sexual assault of boys and men not only possible but actually occurs at high rates. If I could share with you just a snippet of how frequent it occurs. Please please got my next question. What are the prevalence rates? Okay so I think a lot of people don't know this but at least one in six boys are sexually abused before their eighteenth birthday one in six and this number rises to one in four men who were sexually abused across their lifespan. That's too many obviously. Any number is too many absolutely but that stat blew me away at the start of my research for this episode. I believe that the number was half a percent like it was just ridiculously low and I think that's because let's face it people don't report sexual assault. Both men and women don't tend to report it to law enforcement agencies to the FBI. We just don't have good crime. Statistics on these. Why SHAME EMBARRASSMENT? Minimization and people not believing survivors. You know a lot of the research and the clinical scholarship that we have on sexual abuse including the development and testing of psychosocial interventions really focuses on women. And that's important for sure absolutely but men and boys who experienced sexual abuse. They're out there. And they're largely overlooked they're stigmatized or shamed by the public and sometimes by healthcare professionals. It's just not acceptable. I also notice that pop culture covers everything. But this is not atropine pulp culture. We see the sexual assault of women in law and order. Svu In primetime television week after week and marathons all weekend. But I can't really think of any pop culture representation of sexual assault rape or trauma in pop culture at all outside of that one movie from the seventies with the Banjo and that's regarded as like a horror movie. And do you think that this plays into the public dismissing sexual assault on men and boys absolutely? So what you're picking up on is that this really just isn't represented. We have amazing celebrities that come out like Tyler. Perry who disclose sexual abuse. But it's not often enough and it's often with a lot of snarky comments. That are written a lot of trolling a lot of other things. And I think this really speaks to the toxic masculinity that's present in our society. The idea that men should be able to ward off sexual abuse or they're quote unquote not real men and that's something that kind of pervades even around more kind of socially correct politically cracked people. It's still that idea of like grow side or just step up. Or How could you let this happen? It's still a lot of victim blaming that. I know women face as well but I think even more so around men which just signals to us that there's an issue in terms of how we view masculinity in general as a society. I feel that we should point out that. Of course we're not contrasting and comparing male to female assault and sexual abuse in any sort of competitive nature. It's just that we WANNA make sure that everybody gets the help that we need and your research has determined that there's a lot of men that aren't getting the support that they need. I mean anybody who was sexually abused or sexually assaulted raped deserves good care. And the fact that your research is determined that a lot of men being left out of this conversation is obviously very problematic. I appreciate that very much gay because sometimes and this is what we've heard from survivors to sometimes when they go to survivor meetings. You know they are seeing a perpetrators instead of survivors of violence themselves. And so they're not as welcome at the survivor table or some survivor tables. And then even when they go to some providers providers or said like you know. It's not possible that you were assaulted or you must be gay. You must've wanted it. And so all of those myths and stereotypes keep people from getting the help that they need and deserve and working on their path to healing. And also like you said it is not a competition. Everyone deserves this kind of validation and attention and help improving their lives. I could not agree. More amy and John. Let's get into the meat of your research one of the first questions that I have is. What are the differences in prevalence rates and clinical presentations of men and women with sexual assault abuse? Histories aren't vastly different as I mentioned earlier. It's one in six men before their eighteenth birthday and then that number increases to one in four women do have higher rates the CDC estimates that one in three women experience sexual assault or violence in their lifetime the presentation the PTSD. The substance abuse the depression anxiety. The suicidal aviation seem somewhat similar. Both sets of sexual abuse survivors experience. It it seems to US clinically. That there are some very prominent psychological. Symptoms that men have that don't fit neatly into our diagnostic classification system. So oftentimes with men who've experienced sexual abuse we see intense anger and it's always there and it's always seething but it particularly comes out when they're feeling threatened or portrayed. We see a lot of shame a lot of feeling damaged and worried about their masculinity we see quite a bit of sexual dysfunction including low sex drive erectile problems. There's a lot of chronic pain difficulties with sleeping and believe it or not. You know we don't talk a lot about men who have eating disorders or difficulties but see that as well including some negative body image one thing also that we don't talk about and probably too because this carries some shame is that we see higher rates of sexually transmitted infections increased sexual risk for HIV and higher sexual compulsivity. And so I think when they present to US clinically and if they're not acknowledging a sexual abuse history and not because of their own shame though that could be it could also be. They haven't been able to acknowledge it. Or label it accurately themselves and then connect that experience to the symptoms that they're having that I think we're treating them for other difficulties instead of what's really driving their symptoms so they're getting inadequate treatment. What are some of the barriers that men face in disclosing sexual abuse and their sexual assault histories? Well I think it goes back to that concept of toxic masculinity and so. There's a lot of cultural influences. So you know men are supposed to be powerful and invulnerable and there's this idea that men should always welcome sexual activities. So you've kind of got this just societal barrier around people wanting to come forward and I think also it boils down to the consequences of disclosure. So are people going to regard your sexual orientation makes some sort of assumption that because you were sexually assaulted or you must have wanted it or it says something about you. It could even just be about the risk factors involved coming forward and wondering if you're gonNA actually more violence or more discrimination as a result so there's a lot of negativity there a lot to be afraid of in terms of coming forward and that disclosure. John had alluded to it earlier as well. If you're going to your doctor and your doctor also believes in these things you might be repeatedly getting shot down. And so- disclosure just isn't a safe option. I mean honestly. It also boils down to a lack of resources or lack of awareness of certain resources. There's a few nonprofits out there that are dedicated to working with masculine identified individuals. And you have to know that. There's a trauma and in order to seek out these resources a lot of men wouldn't use the label of. I've been traumatized I've been sexually abused. They just don't use that language so really trying to capture men and their experiences and then having them be aware of of what might be out there for them.

Assault Dr Amy Amy Joan Rape Department Of Psychiatry Nova Southeastern University Yale School Of Medicine John Assistant Director Dr Joan Cooke Atropine Associate Professor United States FBI Victim Blaming Gabe Tyler Perry
Gov. Mike DeWine outlines Ohio's coronavirus preparation

Joel Riley

01:03 min | 9 months ago

Gov. Mike DeWine outlines Ohio's coronavirus preparation

"Still still no no confirmed confirmed cases cases of of the the coronavirus coronavirus in in Ohio Ohio but but that that hasn't hasn't stopped stopped Ohio Ohio governor governor Mike Mike DeWine DeWine from from ordering ordering state state agencies agencies to to take take preventative preventative steps steps to to contain contain it it I'm I'm asking asking or department of rehabilitation and corrections and the department you services to increase the frequency of frequency of and be very aggressive in the use of disinfectant measures all their state facilities to protect the inmates the families and the staff the Y. maintains a bigger threat to Ohio and still the flu in the risk of coronavirus in Ohio still very low Dr Amy acting director of the Ohio department of health is a corona virus is different what's different about corona viruses we don't have a vaccine yet and it will take at least a year to a year and a half for us to have a vaccine on and it's it's an amazing pace they're doing in doing that but everything we do in public health is to slow down the spread of this disease while we get to that place where we have a disease a vaccine she adds the spread is a symptomatic meaning patients don't have to show symptoms before they can spread it to others

Ohio Ohio Acting Director Ohio Governor Mike Mike Dewine Dewi FLU Dr Amy Ohio Department Of Health
Suspect in Drew Carey's ex-fiancé's murder behind bars

AutoNsider with Daryl Killian

00:22 sec | 10 months ago

Suspect in Drew Carey's ex-fiancé's murder behind bars

"And the ex fiance of the price is right host may have been strangled before being tossed off a third floor balcony the Los Angeles county coroner's office said Thursday drew Carey's ex fiance Dr Amy Hardwick also suffered blunt force trauma and her death has been ruled a homicide our weeks recent ex boyfriend is now behind bars for the alleged murder John Kline NBC

Carey Dr Amy Hardwick John Kline Nbc Los Angeles Murder
"dr amy" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

06:07 min | 10 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"I'm amy minds or your guest host and I'm here with my co host Chuck. Nice shall we talk about some space probes. Yes we shall all every time you save space probes. I feel so immature. Sorry I can't help myself okay. It sounds like alien it really does but space probe is different from alien probes. Let's not comp- US all right. Let's move on with our questioning from our audience and this is Brenton fedor off. Who wants to know? Why haven't we sent a probe that can take a core sample uh of the Martian lunar surface? Now this is what I want to know. We do have over there right. Oh yeah there's a couple couple of rovers ars. It was a good deal. Yeah so are we not giving anything back from there. We are not at present returning samples from ours where we're getting back. There are a lot of pictures. We're getting incredible amount photos and data. But it's really hard to get something off the surface of Mars and is because his Mars as a lot of course a lot of gravity you have to launch it the same way. You launched from Earth exactly so you would need some type of propulsion system that would be able to clear the gravitational pull of the planet Yup and then get back to Earth. That's exactly the problem. And so the thing is that is really difficult to do. Because propulsion means you need fuel and fuel means takes mass. You GotTa have something to burn off the planet and up until now that's proven very very difficult so people have plans for what's called a Mars sample return mission but it's not easy and it's going to take a lot of talent to do that so now I may be silly but could we not attach a very long string to some type of canister and just give it a hell of a Yank. Yeah I I was thinking catapults myself Tribu. Shame like medieval winger a do this. Just as just as quick though wouldn't that be feasible to think of instead of a propulsion system perhaps a tender like not even a tether but something that would shoot it off the planet. Oh yeah yeah so. People have talked about these things like rail guns gun like that. Ride Superman ride at Magic Mountain. Yeah yeah it's like cool straight off. Yeah people have talked about that. And it's it's just I Up until now it's proven pretty difficult to get something like that to work in practice. Mostly what we rely on is chemical propulsion most of our rockets us. So basically that would have a A. If you're going to do that you might as well have a manned mission to Mars. Yeah it's pretty tough. I mean the Mars sample return with robots is probably a lot easier than sending people because people have this annoying habit of wanting air and food and babies. Oh Yeah and the problem is it's it's like It's kind of hard. We call it the can meet flinging right I mean it's it's just harder than robots were in some ways robots. They're much tougher and so they can tolerate things that human embodied can't well one day they'll all be our overlords so I for one welcome robot overlords. Thank all right here we go. Let's move going to Hernando Morales Fron Cini. Who wants to know? Are there any define candidates for new horizons to to explore after Pluto so pluto was right well. New Horizons is GonNa Really Whip by Pluto super fast because in order to get to Pluto in any kind of reasonable amount of time they had to basically do a bunch of slingshot maneuvers to pick up the speed. And so the thing is they're going to blast by Pluto and collect. It's a lot of great data but the question is could they go somewhere else and so astronomers have been looking very hard to see if there are any other Kuyper belt objects these these are very icy bodies far away from from our son to see if they could find any and as far as I know there are no viable candidate present. That doesn't mean there aren't any. It just means you gotTA. Yeah that's right and part of the problem is poodle right now is in the plane of our galaxy. It's it's that's where it happens to be in its orbit. We're seeing the Milky Way behind it and that is is. There's a lot of stars in there right. So peaking out a distant faint moving object is challenging. And they're working on it. So you mentioned slingshot in is that it means of propulsion. That is common when you're talking about sending something somewhere. Yeah it turns out this has been one of the key techniques for getting around the solar system. It's funny you would have never thought this fifty years ago that this was possible but it turns out to get to some of the most distant parts of the solar system. You've you've actually got a steal a little bit of energy of orbital energy from planets like Jupiter and even from the earth itself right so cool so yeah so basically basically you're gonNA say playing pinball. Yeah exactly it's just like laying pinball you got to pick up a little speed by Hitting a resonance nice all right. Let's go to Andrew Angelil mic band. Druze I wonder if that's a real name. Hello I'm Andrew mcbain. Andrew Higher your priority target with limited NASA funds Europa or Titan. ooh boy talking personally to know. Which one do you think is more important? Well I have to say I really loved getting those images from the Hogan's probe is as it made its way through Through Titan's atmosphere. But you know you wrote. It looks like an interesting place to you and we know less about it so I think that might be an interesting place to go in other words. We haven't really been there in person with a with a probe going directly there so I I'd probably vote for a Europe this point. Yeah so you've got to go to the place that's the road less traveled rice. Something New I know exactly so all right. Well we're going to take a short break here.

Brenton fedor Hernando Morales Fron Cini Andrew mcbain Europe Andrew Magic Mountain Tribu Andrew Angelil NASA Hogan Kuyper TA
"dr amy" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

07:42 min | 10 months ago

"dr amy" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Where science and pop culture collide startle begin right now. They welcomed Star Talk Radio. My name is an astronomer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena sitting in California and I'm here guest hosting I'm here with my wonderful co host. Chuck Nice Amy. How are you doing? Great Yeah Yeah good to see you good to be here with you today. We're going to talk about spacecraft. Yes that's right space probes and something you would know about because as as as we have talked off the air. I found out that you were an engineer for quite some time with Lockheed Martin and building spacecraft. Yes that was my my my other life my alter ego and it's so weird because I when I think about Lockheed Martin I what comes to mind I envision like the underground layer ah a bond villain. You know there's no walls there's just rock and titanium everywhere and guys walking around in white jumpsuits with clipboards in hardhats. That's what's it like. You'd have a security clearance number one and no security clearance but I would say a lot more guys wearing socks with sandals lots of socks with sandals on there was one really cool tunnel that went a long ways and the walls were made out of rock. Oh actually there were okay. I'll take that I was kind of cool. I'll take that but socks with sandals all right well listen you know we have a cosmic queries. What we do is we take questions from all over the Internet and all of the outlets where we are found and people just Right and things they want to know about. And this is right up your alley so you will answer them so you ready to get into it. Sure let's go all right here. We go let's start off with David Spitzer. WHO has a two part question? Where would you most be interested in sending a probe and of the upcoming missions which interest or excites you? Most little personal there from Davis sure well there are so many great places to explore in our solar system and beyond it and the robots that we send out our basically our eyes and our ears they can go places and see things that are fragile. Human bodies body's pretty much just can't do so they can go places like for example into the surface of Europa or maybe even into the ice of Europa. I personally think that would be a pretty cool place to go because you robot is a moon of Jupiter and they think that it has a liquid water ocean underneath very icy surface. So who knows. Maybe there's spe- spe- squids under their right. That'd be nice. So there you have. It probes to Europa. That floats. Your boat personally is what you're saying. Speak Right because on AROPA. It'd be more like that skis your ice. I don't know I think who knows. Okay all right so now. When we're talking about how probes these are spaceships? Basically right that we're sending out to look for things. And here's something that Logan keeps tweets tweets at tweets by L K now are asteroid fields and she thinks star wars really dangerous or is there enough room between the rocks to navigate. So that makes sense if we're going past our solar system. How do you get past the asteroid? Bill you know. When astronomers I thought about sending spacecraft out into the outer reaches of the solar system like the pioneers in the voyager missions at first they were very worried about this exact thing? The Asteroid Belt is full of asteroid between Mars and Jupiter. And we know the at least six hundred thousand of these asteroids there today the thing is is is it like the empire strikes back you know that Seymour Hansel who is trying to give you the slip absolutely got a dodge among all the speech rocks. Well no no no. It's one of the great disappointments it's of an asteroid scientists. When you when you first starting out in the field you realize that actually the astros are big but space is bigger right and there's a tremendous amount of room room between all of these space rocks so it's a very comfortable commute? Yes it's not so bad so it really is that you don't need the Millennium Selenium Falcon to get through an asteroid. Fortunately not I wish I had a Millennium Falcon though. Don't we all yes. Everyone need. Yeah I'd take it to work every day. You kidding me. That'd be awesome so speaking of that scene okay completely right completely unfathomable that a giant Space Lisera could live on an asteroid right. Yeah seriously nicely. Fortunately space legit cool but we don't know of any real probably a good thing all right. Let's move on from facebook. This is Keri corral corral. Who says what is the single most important thing we've learned through data sent by a space probe? Have we learned anything that prior to launching improves. We had never even contemplated previously. Oh Wow okay. So th there have been so many discoveries that have just really changed. Our understanding of astronomy automated come from space missions for example of the cosmic background. Then this is something that was was first discovered on the ground by radio. Astronomers astronomers this is an echo leftover from the big bang itself right way back in time the thirteen point seven. Well here we go billion years in a long time ago but this radiation is still around. Astronomers had found evidence of it on the ground but when they launched the cosmic background explorer explorer mission Back in the eighties they were actually able to really precisely tell exactly how old those echoes of light were and from that. Tell the age of the universe itself. So would you say that's the most important discovery that we have made Once by launching a pro. I would say that's one of the big ones. That's a pretty important discovery over the age of the universe and of course the Hubble Space Telescope was instrumental in finding other ways to help pin down that number by measuring the distances of exploding stars called Supernova. So that's another one. I mean there's just so many examples of where these robots have helped us out. I just learned that there is a plural for Supernova which riches Supernova. Yes all right have that special in fact Nail Polish wearing right now is actually called Supernova and what color is your nail Polish. Let me see their silver. And quite fetching I must say thank you very sparkling very sparkler a Supernova that's what you want a Supernova cool the Supernova ever in my life was a chevy and it wasn't so all right let's move on Scott McGregor wants to know this. What's the most important probe? In use today the Rockstar of probes. The one to watch also can we look forward to it in terms of new technologies right. Okay so I have a personal couple favorites everybody. Everybody knows and loves the Hubble Space Telescope. That's our one of our biggest workhorse telescopes that we uses astronomers to look at everything from the distant universe to very nearby things. I also have a fan. I'm a big fan of smaller. Things like the Whitefield infrared survey explorer a little infrared telescope. That's a heat sink heat-seeking telescope and it seen an awful lot of asteroids last rites Nice. Yeah so we've got a hopefully we've got a few new things coming on the horizon that'll really expand our knowledge of the universe. That's classified buddy.

Hubble Space Telescope Europa Lockheed Martin Chuck Nice Amy Jet Propulsion Laboratory California engineer Pasadena astros hardhats facebook David Spitzer Seymour Hansel Whitefield Davis Bill Logan Scott McGregor
Outbreak-Tested By Measles, Washington State Officials Feel Ready For Coronavirus

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:18 min | 11 months ago

Outbreak-Tested By Measles, Washington State Officials Feel Ready For Coronavirus

"There are now three confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the United States the first confirmed US case was found in the Pacific Northwest Snohomish county north of Seattle the man who had it had returned recently from a trip to Wu Han China but is will stone reports the local health care system isn't panicking in fact they feel ready because of a recent wave of measles this medical clinic in admins is not far from the hospital where that first infected person ended up after traveling from Wuhan China so it's natural that some patients have been asking questions we do have patients that are calling in and we do have patients that are talking about it with their provider staff Tobi's Compton is the head nurse here at the community health center of Snohomish county Compton is unfazed in fact she already had all the right protocols and infection control gear at the ready like this air filter stashed in health clinic supply room that fits over your whole head good that connects to the to and so the providers head is completely contained and all of the years filter staff at our clinics have practice getting ready for an infectious outbreak pretty recently last year there was an alarming measles outbreak in parts of Washington state mostly among unvaccinated children no one died it's often says he was a wake up call for the health system the measles really kind of in my industry body about while there's a lot of things out there that can be really contagious and can get really sick really fast measles is one of the most contagious diseases honor in contrast experts think this new coronavirus requires close contact to spread between humans but they're still investigating scoffed and says she's glad last year's measles outbreak forced them to improve we've recently grown our infection control program so it's kind of at the forefront of a lot of what we do and it wasn't just measles that push health providers to get ready for an outbreak it was also the a bowl a scare back in twenty fourteen that prompted a Snohomish hospital to prepare for high level infectious pathogens the set of isolation rooms with robotic devices Dr Amy Compton Phillips a hospital executive says they also have special isolation gurneys so that you can delete a person through a hallway you can keep the germs contains that hospital Providence regional Medical Center in average is where the man with Wuhan corona virus was transported after returning to Seattle infrastructure had been put in place to ensure that when something came around weekly ready but what about the people who came in close contact with the infected man before he went into that hospital health officials have tracked down more than fifty of them and are monitoring them in case they develop symptoms but overall the public health messages the risk of corona virus spreading here remains low Dr oz while gay Tana is the chief medical officer for a handful of clinics in the Seattle area that serve lots of patients from Asia and the Pacific islands she says some of our patients have already traveled to China for the holiday celebrations and come back and some told her they gots sick while there and were hospitalized in China that they'd come back and they are a symptomatic it's possible that it was gonna virus but she says it's also possible it was another type of

United States
"dr amy" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr amy" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"Do that I really. We love my workouts. What is the optimal balance that I mean? That's medical doctors. What would you suggest? Well if you really love working out than you find activities Timothy's that are not so focused on sort of one movement or one muscle group you want a mix of the muscle groups and you want to sort of stay moving one of the areas where I see see people with the worst pain. Syndromes are people who are weekend warriors. Say Dentists or truck drivers so dentists. They Monday through Friday. They're sitting in this position for hours on an a lot of programmers. People work on computers sitting in his physician for hours on end and on the weekend. Go completely wild. They're hockey league or the Rudder Prospect Austin these are the people who are at the highest risk of getting hurt because all week there in one position sedentary on on the weekend. They're going crazy. So what does that me. Mix Mix up your activity so if you have sedentary work make sure that you get up and move around at least every two hours. So what you're saying his Nixon match it up so for for example of you're doing a heavy workout say chest press on a Sunday you may not work out the muscle group again for Saturday's the in the tweet to be doing yoga. You could be doing running. You could be doing at the type of exercise so don't over exert on one particular style of workout now. What about something like Yoga? I know a lot of people who do yoga. Every increasing the day. Is there a benefit to that. Is there a certain plateau that you reach of. You're doing it every day. I love you and if I could've every day however we see injuries stories from over all the time I mean shoulder. Injury are actually pretty common. Because you're taxing saying muscle over and over again so I think it's all about mixing things up and straight for the mind fight and.

Rudder Prospect Austin Timothy Nixon hockey
Study finds increased cases of high blood pressure during pregnancy

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Study finds increased cases of high blood pressure during pregnancy

"A new study finds an alarming rise in high blood pressure among women during pregnancy CBS news medical contributor Dr terror on the rule explains why women getting pregnant later in life contributes to the upward trend thirty one year old Chanel Bradley is pregnant with her second child and is hoping medication will control her high blood pressure we're just going to induce early before I even get to that super high scary point Bradley developed hypertension during her first pregnancy which caused her to deliver six weeks early. today's study finds a huge spike in high blood pressure cases during pregnancy increasing thirteen fold over the past forty years researchers defined high blood pressure as one forty over ninety or higher African American women were twice as likely to have high blood pressure as whites high blood pressure raises the risk of complications such as stroke kidney failure and stillborn or infant death Dr Amy Stoddard of UCLA health says age is a factor in the rising rate of hypertension during

Dr Terror Chanel Bradley Dr Amy Stoddard CBS Ucla Thirty One Year Forty Years Six Weeks
Water restrictions lifted on some floors of Mount Carmel Grove City amid Legionnaires' outbreak

Auto Smarts Show

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Water restrictions lifted on some floors of Mount Carmel Grove City amid Legionnaires' outbreak

"Water restrictions have been lifted at Mount Carmel grove city hospital after a recent outbreak of legionnaires disease, Ohio department of health director. Dr Amy Acton issued a statement on Thursday saying efforts made by hospital administrators, for fact, of and preventing the water borne bacteria from becoming a larger problem a total of fourteen patients contracted the disease storing the outbreak resulting in

Mount Carmel Grove City Hospit Dr Amy Acton Ohio Department Of Health Director
UPDATE 2-Roche's Tecentriq notches win in breast cancer with U.S. approval

Home Sweet Home Chicago

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

UPDATE 2-Roche's Tecentriq notches win in breast cancer with U.S. approval

"Has approved the. I drug that boosts of women's immune system to fight breast cancer. Correspondent Jan Johnson. Reports breast cancer specialist at New York's Mount Sinai, Dr Amy Pearson calls it tremendously exciting news T Centric has been okay to treat advanced triple negative, breast cancer. Roughly fifteen percent of breast cancer cases. The new medication from Roche is designed to be combined with standard chemotherapy treatments. A study of hundreds of women found

Dr Amy Pearson Jan Johnson Mount Sinai Roche New York T Centric Fifteen Percent
The potential long term effects of a concussion

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

The potential long term effects of a concussion

"Effects one of the potential long-term effects of concussion is chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE Dr Amy Mckee is with the Boston University school of medicine. We know that he is not Alzheimer's disease. It's not aging. It's not any other disease C to ease unique degeneration triggered die exposure to. And Trump those at risk for CTE include former amateur and professional athletes as well as some members of the military, but others also are at risk. Dr Angela Colin Tonio is with the Toronto rehabilitation center study. We published we reported that fifty eight percent of homeless down and forty percent of women reported lifetime. Prevalence is terrific brain injury. Mostly occurring prior to the incident. Tonio adds that domestic violence victims may be at risk and their head injuries often. Go unreported doctors agree that more research needs to be done on concussion and

Dr Angela Colin Tonio Dr Amy Mckee Alzheimer's Disease Boston University School Of Me Toronto Rehabilitation Center Fifty Eight Percent Forty Percent