20 Burst results for "Dr Alice"

"dr alice" Discussed on Podcaster Stories

Podcaster Stories

05:58 min | 3 d ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Podcaster Stories

"That was a wonderful piece of advice. Actually a friend gave me. He was like just try this for six months. You can always go back to drinking and that really made it very possible for me. And i liked that perspective and i share that frequently because it takes this scary nature of. Oh my god. I have to change this forever. You can do six months. Most of us can look at that time period and say okay. This is doable. Why don't i try this. Why don't i do some research with being sober and see what that feels like this week. Sure i've got dr. Alice curry from san diego in california. Who's the host of the beyond the pink-clothed podcast. So dr kirby dr sodium. No fewer which. I'll get you always welcome to the show. How about you tell us about yourself on your podcast. Sure thank you so much for having me. It's a it's a pleasure to be with you this morning. And so dr ellis kirby. I'm a doctor of physical therapy as well as the health consultants and a somatic experiencing practitioner in training and a lot of people haven't heard of somatic experiencing. It's essentially a trauma practitioner. So i work with trauma work with chronic stress and anxiety primarily within my consulting work. And i'm based here in san diego..

Alice curry dr kirby dr ellis kirby san diego california
What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:35 min | 2 months ago

What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

"Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk.

Dr Alice Flinders University Tesla Gorman South Australia Lois Football United States
"dr alice" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"That actually a lot of the other policy conversations. We've had where we kind of no big healthcare players within the biden harris administration. We know that. Hhs the health and human services secretary is going to be happy. But sarah we know the head of domestic quality. Counsel's gonna be susan rice. We have an excellent surgeon. General coming back for round two vivek murthy but so we kind of know the big players. So what is your take on the players that we have in place and what you hope to expect to see them. In terms of healthcare policies. I mean some far. I think it's it's It's excitement obviously. I'm like supervised lamb mary-julianne coming surgeon general. I think he's gonna allieu there but seriously like someone who like understands people who has compassion who can explain things that people in ways. That doesn't condescend that you know that that understands where people are But brings along. The signs brings along the public. Health brings along like the humanity of what we're all experience i think is so crucially important in this time Having that good communication out to the public is is is is so important somebody who can collaborate and bring everybody in I think hobby airport. Sarah has been there has been so steeped in health policy and the politics around it and also in the ways that people are harmed by our healthcare system. Right now That i think he's a really great choice to help us. Navigate all these political waters and get to where we need to go I'm excited about. Russia will end ski leading the cdc. I'm excited that tony voucher is going to be like actually talking to president goldman and not sitting sitting sitting out somewhere trying to get his message in. I'm i think that you know so far. The team feels like i mean so many so many of my doctors. Dr friends have said i am so relieved. That's the word they is if not excited. It's not like they're just so relieved to have people who are coming in. Who understand what needs to be done and we'll make that happen. Can you give us any insight. I mean you really are seeing it like at the front on the front lines. That can you give us any insight like what the tenor of those conversations are like about how to how to address not just coburn relief but like healthcare abroad in how the team is thinking about it. I mean i think. I think the team recognizes especially because kelvin has liked his throne our entire universe asunder. I think you know people have recognized before that health is important. Like all pulses impact health and health impacts all policies. But i think even more so now we know how much health impacts education and vice versa. That like you know if if the if if the schools aren't open then people can't work then they don't have health insurance and then they can't get him get an and get care and then have gone and they have to run out and like try to get a job that it's so difficult when we don't have our health of ducks in a row. And so i think the team is very much planning to be very sort of cross government like it's not just whole of government response in terms of the pandemic but also government response in terms of our health because at the end of the day. Like if we don't have our health than we can't do all the other things that you know we wanna do like we can pursue our dreams..

Sarah sarah kelvin vivek murthy mary-julianne susan rice president goldman Russia biden harris administration round two tony voucher
"dr alice" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"It's unpredictable what we need as the same. That's the point of healthcare coverage that it is unpredictable. Exactly it's often felt like that doesn't match up with reality of like when people need healthcare coverage totally totally you were one of the founders of doctors america the executive director for many years there's an organization that was organizing doctors really be pushing the administration and the obama administration on what better healthcare coverage look like what better healthcare options looked like. What do you think that doctors are looking for an organizing out of this administration. I mean the the first thing is is covid. Because that is the thing that is just on everybody's head and is it everybody on everybody's mind all the time is having having that that coordinated federal response Cova having a consistent message that it is a big deal that is it important that we all have to wear masks and be socially distance and that all of these sacrifices that we make are making it possible for life to continue That you know the the that is like the key piece is making sure that we're we're responding appropriately to cove it because grander thousand. People are dead and that didn't have to be But i think you know. I think they're the cova has also made even more apparent. How many disparities there are in this country starting with coverage and making sure that everyone has coverage But also making sure that everyone has you know that people have hospitals that are that are within reach That people have access to things that they need to be healthy Healthy food and access to you know fresh air where they can go out and exercise mental health That people have their bases covered so to help with mental help announcing that we're focusing on mental health as they really really crucial way. I mean i think all of us have had times during this pandemic when we've been dislike we've had it And for a lot of people it's much worse than that It's not just like totally had it with my day. But like i don't wanna be here anymore and so much of so much of what people need is help in terms of agile healthcare is not just say like pull yourself up and like put on a smile and like hooray gratitude. And yeah. i'm fine. It's it's it's i mean it's it's a it's a really. It's a real real thing to have health issues and so making sure that we're we're appropriately resourcing that moving forward so some of that can be done. Some of what you mentioned can be done just by the administration. I mean something as simple as having a consistent message that can obviously be done by just the administration themselves. Do you think the broader pieces of health the affordable health the aca the affordable coverage. That had to be passed by. Congress do you. What do you think this administration can do. Are you looking to congress mostly to be taking action or you looking to the administration to be acting on the things. They had promised part of their their policy platform. I mean it's very much. i mean. We have to be realistic. But i think that you know. I think you know for sure. The administration is going to do the pieces that they can do. In terms of policies in terms of improving quality of care and focusing on having everyone have the.

Congress congress one first thing covid many obama america Cova
"dr alice" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

04:54 min | 8 months ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"Welcome back to your political playlist. i'm your host. Emily tisch sussman with a new presidential administration and new congress. There's a significant amount of work to do cleaning up the mess trump left behind an enacting new policies. Some ideas are new and some were the policies debated throughout the twenty twenty presidential race that we discuss in season one no matter where these policies originated. We are going to continue to be your trusted source as the ideas move forward. Every week i'll be offering bite-size policy conversations from women who were leading the charge either as elected officials. Advocates or policymakers as always all of our guests will be women. Today i'll be talking about. How cove nineteen impacts healthcare policy with dr alice. Chen co founder and former executive director of doctors for america where among many other things she was instrumental in the passage of the affordable. Care act expanding medicaid and protecting access to contraception and abortion. Welcome dr alice.

Emily tisch trump congress Today alice Care act Chen season one twenty twenty presidential rac america dr nineteen cove
"dr alice" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:49 min | 10 months ago

"dr alice" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"83. He was fine yesterday. Became hypoxic an hour ago. The fourth patient I've lost today and they're all dying alone. Welcome back Richard. Much of the plot centers on the isolation isolation felt by doctors by patients by their families. The isolation that keeps Cove it out of sight in abstract to some of us were trying to hold in our minds, the risk and toll of a disease that took the lives of a record 2800 people yesterday alone. No, I know what you're thinking. Television is supposed to be an escape. That's what showrunner Krista Vernoff thought as well. We asked her and Dr Nasser Al Azari, a senior surgical advisor to talk about that balance. So when the pandemic hit at what point did someone have to pick up the phone and say I think we need to put this on the show. Well, we were still in production on season 16 when the pandemic hit, and the first phone call was, I think we have to shut down the show and when we reconvene is a writer's room. The conversation started as Do we put this on the show? Are we putting this on the show? Why? Why would that be a debate? Well, the debate for me was do people come to Gray's Anatomy for escapism? At this point, I spent the whole quarantine watching Shits Creek and the good place like totally escapist comedy because the news was so dire and so I said, I'm sort of 51 49. I'm voting, no pandemic, and I said, Who wants to convince me that I'm wrong and one by one. Most of the room raise their hands. Nasser particularly was persuasive because he had been on the frontlines of it, and he said This is the biggest medical story of our time. It's permanently changing medicine, and we have a responsibility to do it. Where the biggest medical show in the world we have to tell these stories. Dr. Alice Sorry you get to the writer's room and you hear the boss, eh? I don't really know. This is a bit much Do you freak out? I mean, kind of what goes through your head. When you raise your hand to say, Actually, this is something you need to approach. We were kind of like returning into this fog. It was thick fog. We did not know what's happening. I felt like definitely we have to say that, like, you know, tell stories about this because this disease is our zeitgeist. You know, you get small details muffled speech behind the mask. I don't know how you miked everyone, but people are wearing masks for a good deal of the time. But then there are scenes Maybe where someone's mask is hanging to the side. Or like how did you decide? To draw the line right, because at a certain point, what's real enough and what actually gets in the way of storytelling? That is an ongoing conversation, and it's always threading a needle. I think that Nasser would tell you he wishes that all the doctors were wearing masks and everything all the time because of best practices modeling. One of the things that I have had to do is find places where the doctors can go outside. And get some air and maintain social distance and take off the mask and get a breath. I'm not something that go home. Tom will stop by the store. Just go home. Stay home, trying not to Affect anyone else. Maybe you should put your mask back up that is designed to let the audience see the actors faces and we've tried to do that in ways that feels as responsible as we can be, and still make a TV show Chris, so that's like the realism of what's happening in their real lives of doctors. Wearing a mask and for 10 hours or 12 hours can be really encumbering. So you have to find like a way where you can, you know, take a little break from it in a safe environment for yourself and to protect other people. Christopher in off you've given your main character cove. It How did you guys decide with those symptoms would be what again walking that line between narrative and what people have actually learned about the disease at this point? We talked about a bunch of stuff early on, and then script started to come in. And the writers had, you know, MEREDITH being intubated like an episode to at the end of and I was like, No, you guys, you gotta slow your roll like we've got somewhere to go. We've got to go somewhere. So the bigger challenge is finding ways Have humor and romance exist in the show while MEREDITH Gray is in the bed Fighting Cove it, But I mean, did you was there a White board with like a list of symptoms? You know, kind of like, Where do you start? Yeah, there's a white board with a list of symptoms. There's also two or three doctors in the writer's room at any given time, so a lot of times there, the doctors will pitch something and and probably more often. One of the writers goes. Well, could we start with a physical collapse? Could she just collapsed in the parking lot before she shows any symptoms? Can you see how that could be viable? When are you gonna let me out of here? I'm gonna let you out of here when I'm convinced you won't collapse again. Well, that was four days ago. I feel fine. I think you should just release me the supplemental oxygen so I can go quarantine in a hotel. Let's give the room to someone who really needs it. And then they go. Yeah. If we say this, that in this medically, that's absolutely viable. We go great because we want the drama. We want the storytelling and we won't do it The dramatic way. We want to do it if it can't be authentic to the disease. So rather than build the illness the way you have seen it, we're building the story. The way we want to tell it and filling in the medical blanks. You also have to depict treatments. How Dr Alice. Sorry. Did you think about that, like, kind of what is on offer, so to speak for any given patient who goes into a hospital, right?.

Dr Nasser Al Azari writer MEREDITH Gray Cove Krista Vernoff Richard Dr Alice Shits Creek Dr. Alice Fighting Cove advisor Tom Chris Christopher
"dr alice" Discussed on Think: Business Futures

Think: Business Futures

03:03 min | 11 months ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Think: Business Futures

"This week Al Focus Tons to where women Australia fun themselves in the federal government's roadmap to recovery. Criticism. Has already been leveled at the government's two, hundred, forty million dollars women's economic security funding package that aims to support a return to the workforce for many greater opportunities in stem industries and channels, famous entrepreneurs and startups. It's a mere fraction of the spending over the last few months. But how little is too little to help women who've been disproportionately affected by the pandemic to discuss this I'm joined today by Catherine Reagan Executive Director of the Sydney Business Chamber and Dr Alice Clinton Senior lecturer at the University of Technology Sydney's business school. Thank you very much for joining us. Some of these statistics about women in the workforce over the last few months quite startling in Australia, women made up the majority of those who were affected by job loss during covid nineteen..

Australia Sydney Business Chamber University of Technology Sydne Dr Alice Clinton Catherine Reagan Senior lecturer Executive Director
"dr alice" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr alice" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Stanford Medical Center Dr Alice thanks so much for joining the show again sure thanks so as we look at these increased model numbers suggesting anywhere from a hundred and thirty four thousand deaths to two hundred thousand deaths by the end of August yeah I'm I'm frankly a little bit surprised at the amount of press is getting given the fact that eventually these lockdowns were going to and everybody understands that as the lockdowns and more people will go out in it the risks from cover nineteen have not been mitigated I'm wondering exactly which sectors do you think are lacking when it comes to releasing people from walk down a gradual fashion yeah I'd like if I can clarify something about the models first those figures that were just I received from the I. age I mean model have nothing to do with blocked on being released those figures are just simply updates based upon data coming in that we are already seeing so the the fact here is that these hypothetical projections shouldn't be obsessed over all they do when they change every three or four days is point out the inaccuracies of their own projection this is not based on changing policy that's point number one now the quicker your question was what you what should be done on re entry is that is that what your question is yes sorry about that so I mean the basic points here are using what we know it which is the the real realistic approximation of fidelity rate and who's vulnerable we need to focus point number one very strange and access to the most vulnerable people the tender box of people that are living in a nursing home and senior is nursing homes and senior care centers and what I mean by stringent requirements in there already regulated environment because you can't just walk into a nursing home anyway that should be done things like actually requiring testing okay you can have somebody who's coming in there and cleaning the floors who might be infected or who's touching these patients are working with them this is sort of obvious point number one targeted strict control point number two is people who have mild disease who are sick and have some kind of flu symptoms respiratory they have to assume they have the disease and self isolate you don't need a test for them well you urgently need is to protect the vulnerable in the way you do that is to let people know that if they're sick they have to self isolate assume they have the disease the other things to be done really hard to make sure that you have not incited fear in the public and instill rational trust in in their experience in self isolating and what I mean by that is they know who's vulnerable they know their elderly family members for instance people with underlying conditions particularly diabetes and obesity are vulnerable use the standards of hygiene we now know no one knew about social isolation before we know what social distancing it but that doesn't mean confining people into their homes it makes no sense there's no real evidence it's better to be strictly confined inside your home or is it we should keep K. through twelve schools open and I I I can talk about that in detail but young children the people in the case through twelve eight your we know overwhelming amount of evidence that these people have very little if any risk of serious illness from this virus and essentially zero risk of dying you don't have to keep them confined in their homes or even have six foot spacing between them if you keep them confined in their homes not only are you missing education but you're locking up the ability of their parents to go to work there's a massive really harmful nature to some of these restrictive policies similarly there's no evidence to keep people inside and walked down parks and beaches and outdoor facilities that was done to prevent this kind of very close proximity mingling but even when we we know even if you wanted to have that for some reason the clothes a park I mean that's just really there's no evidence for that and what these policies have done them is they have done something very harmful not just walking down medical care and people are dying because of that and the massive harm from the economic isolation but they have instilled fear and panic in people and you're seeing probably where you live certainly where I live in California I see people who are driving around inside their own cars with no one else in them wearing masks and believe me I'm not I'm not implying something wrong with these people all orders are underestimating their fear I'm saying it it is an indication of the fear from very poor leadership and very blue really lack of consideration of science and using logic to use appropriate policy so Dr Alice that I've I've been in the last couple days considering a question and it was actually raised by a column that you wrote for the hill in in sort of contradiction to an article that was written by a dining terrace over the New York times and this is with regard to social distancing itself what are the goals that we are attempting to achieve here the reason I'm asking this question is because it seems like basically we are now trying to figure out what to do based on future projections on the one hand you have folks who say okay well vaccine will come it will be imminent it will happen quickly or there will be a therapeutic don't happen quickly which would suggest Billington lockdowns you create lots of social distancing so as to flatten the curve until we get to some sort of day sex Machenaud that radically changes the math on the other hand there's a possibility that nothing changes that were two years out we still don't have a vaccine there's been no serious therapeutic that's been developed a radically lowers the death rate and then the question is why wouldn't we have preserved herd immunity among the non violent vulnerable populations in other words you make sure that the people who are most vulnerable are protected you make sure that the nursing homes are really well protected to make sure the people who are obese or who have pre diabetes are staying home as much as possible isolated from other people and you actually encourage the sixty to seventy percent of the population that does not have any of these conditions to go out and you actually want the the call they to move through the population and create herd immunity that's sort of the Swedish strategy it seems like we sort of split the baby here where we are on the one hand suggesting that we are not pursuing herd immunity and on the other end and that there will be some radical change that will happen in the in the very near future at the same time we want people to sort of go back to work and sort of isolate and sort of not isolate what is our goal here should our goal here should be assuming that there's some sort of radical change to the system in the form of therapeutic or vaccine and thus we should really mitigate the amount of social contact we have with one another or should we be assuming that none of that may be forthcoming and so we should actually pursue her pursue her community because every month we don't pursue herd immunity is another month of of that length in time where the economy is dead and where his percentage of the population have to stay home okay so you're pointing out really one of the major flaws of logic and common sense honestly that's being used by people including very smart people the point here is that there is no reason to do some of these sort of illogical isolation policies regardless of if there is a vaccine and I want to put come back to the vaccine point but the goal of the of the policy this is your first question the goal of policy was stated and it has been two fold stop the people from dying who are the most vulnerable which that called hi Leslie there's a problem with how they are was it sort of ignored in a sense but took flatten the Kurds what does that mean curve is nothing to do with number of cases the curse to be flattened there have been slapping our curse on hospitalizations per day and that's per day to prevent overwhelming of the hospitals and to understand that you sort of have controlled the progress of death there's a nuance to this this sort of a bore your audience but the reality is flattening the curve has nothing to do with changing the area under the curve this is very early on the point was to pro long and slow down and somehow reduce the overwhelming of the medical system and sort of in and out of control way so that we could administer care in control that kind of you know how to control sort of overwhelming issues but it was not really honestly to reduce the desk the reduction of deaths should be it should be this targeted policy of protecting the vulnerable we know who they are now the idea I want to mention something about the idea of vaccines there's just sort of naive interpretation of what a vaccine does and when it will come out okay and and this is not really I'm not trying to criticize people but you get that the general populace and even at people in this debate I've been very naive about this vaccines are not magic wands typically speaking you know it's very common that vaccine vertically for respiratory virus that has some evolution in changing that occurs like let's talk about influenza forty to sixty percent effective and we've been working on vaccines for influenza for many many years and have a lot of experience that's point number one there's no magic wands here that all of a sudden it's a hundred percent effective we don't know we have no idea about that but we know from other infections that it it it it may not be the second point is that despite the vaccines in influenza four hundred thousand to six hundred fifty thousand people die in the world every year from seasonal flu with the vaccine okay so you know the vaccine is not a magic wand B. about the vaccine is that vaccines are not ready tomorrow Texans are not going to be ready in a month the vaccine technology has dramatically improved and things are done with a massive amount of intention and rapidity in an incredible effort by the private sector and in the US in the academic sector as well as in the UK and and elsewhere lots of vaccines are being looked at probably a hundred roughly in a couple who have a significant amount of promise when will they be ready when will they be ready for production when will they be ready for implementation we're talking many many months so we don't know exactly when it's it's highly unlikely in my view and and it's impossible to predict because I predict I'll be I'll be way off but it's not going to be happening before twenty twenty one I mean almost certainly and you know even with the best case scenarios I really have to realize vaccines are not magic wands meantime there said Matt we can't ignore this massive harms from the current policy extending total isolation is killing people on the basis of the medical care and a catastrophic economic problem which converts into health care in poverty and death all over the world to the likes of which really people have not really calculated so final question for you Dr Alice so there's been people have been pushing it some Israeli scientists something called controlled avalanche which is basically make sure that everybody who is vulnerable is protected and then actually encourage people who are younger too not social distancing you sort of mentioned something like this in your article for the hill so in so is that something that we should be seriously considering just saying if you are under the age of forty and you're healthy you should go out you should go to ball games and if you get corona virus and then you get over it then you've actually added to the health of the country man this is really hitting the nail on the head sort of with the basic premise of immunology and decades of knowledge about about viruses it's actually a negative to interfere by total isolation with herd immunity herd immunity is necessary and it is the most immediately available way to break the connections towards the vulnerable in this contagious sort of disease so it's it's actually detrimental to lock everybody up and it prevents the low risk groups like you're saying to get the disease fifty percent of people are zero symptoms over ninety five percent of people probably ninety nine percent of people have very mild disease there's nothing wrong with that in the low risk groups the focus should be preventing the people who are the vulnerable we know who they are it's harmful to prevent mingling by other people well doctor Scott atlas Hoover Institution really appreciate your time Sir and I look for to speak with you again soon.

Stanford Medical Center Dr Alice
"dr alice" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"dr alice" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Now it's doubling every twelve days Dr Alice in our body leads the city's public health department she says it doesn't mean the city isn't clear yet the reason that this flattening the curve has happened is because you in Chicago have been staying home yeah have been limiting it new infections have been having fewer opportunities to interact with people outside your household have been social distancing have been washing your hands all of this is what has decreased the rate with which cases arising residents in Chicago's little village neighborhood who live near a coal plant have filed a federal class action lawsuit over this weekend's demolition of a smokestack EBITDA Crawford coal plants Saturday suit claims the developers involved botched the demolition and subjected residents to a toxic cloud of dust it demands immediate clean up of the homes and businesses public areas as well it also demands that residents are immediately provided with face masks as well as the new air filters for their homes demands the layer of dust to be tested by independent scientific monitors demands an air quality test calls for alternate housing arrangements for people while all that's being done but that's all in addition to the suits demands that a third party assessors that come in and evaluate property damage in turn should call the police superintendent Charlie Beck has passed these CPD start to now acting superintendent David Brown former Dallas police chief this is your superintendents badge where this with pride always always wear it recognizing that did you work for thirteen thousand six hundred Bucks a retired police officer says he'll return to list sensual is where he rose to the rank of chief of LAPD brown takes over the Chicago police department will officially remain acting superintendent until the city council vote which will likely come sometime next week Chicago police officers will be setting up one check point per day in each of the city's twenty two patrol districts officers will be there to make sure residents are adhering to the stay at home order that they're only driving for reasons that have been deemed essential by the state it's raising some concerns for the union that represents rank and file officers as well as for the ACLU the paternal order of police lodge seven says check point's conflict with its own guidance to officer during the pandemic which is to keep their distance with the public unless required the American civil liberties union says it's also concerned the checkpoints may needlessly expose officers and the public to the corona virus the ACLU says it's also concern the checkpoints could be used as a cover for what it calls race based enforcement schemes or other quote heavy handed police tactics former president Barack Obama held a video call with roughly a hundred community leaders activists in south side residents in Chicago he talked about response efforts to the pandemic also about what's next the aftermath of this is going to be cemex and if there was ever a time in which munity.

Dr Alice
"dr alice" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"dr alice" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Seven five three nine six perfect opportunity if you have a question for Dr Alex Moreno what Dr Alice arena think about people who waste our time like that or just sit in and call talk radio shows and then waste our time that's got to be some kind of psycho circus doctor I have an issue I call people names on the air when that when when they say stupid things how do I deal with my anger issues did we lose Dr Alex Moreno also I don't I don't know what just happened I think we just lost the doctor I think I I think I just I'm trying to question maybe maybe that's it I can tell you there yeah I'm sorry doctor Brian Robinson phone issues go ahead yeah and the branch are are great and I've taken up boxing some of my I like that all right well actually I believe we do have a call that's on the line I want to ask you a question let's go to James James you're next on the big stick what's going on subjects well thank you for taking my call my questions a little bit different I'm still working I work outdoors my elderly mom lives with my wife and me and I'm feeling a lot of anxiety because I'm I'm working and I'm concerned even though I don't really come in contact with people very often I may come in contact at times and my fear is that I'm gonna get I'm gonna contract this and bring it home and my mom is eighty six years old bad somebody in my house needs to continue to work and make the mortgage payments and all other financial obligations yeah so what can I do to keep my anxiety in check really good question go ahead Dr yeah really good question thank you again for being upset because unfortunately you're not alone in this experience there's a lot of people on who are still providing a services are there taking a left one could Boren I'm doing what they can't have a safe and maintain social justice while working and coming right back home and and in many cases like you James it's back home to people who are either elderly or medically compromised thank you so much for bringing that then you know it makes a lot of sense that you would feel fearful right now with the with everything that's going on and the important thing to remember are the things that are within your control I'm happy to hear that you're being careful while you're out there that you're taking care of yourself and repeating that the vehicle distance from others as you come home make sure to wash your hands with soap and water I know everything about that obviously it's very important anyone start disinfecting the items that are using while you're outside of the home and what we've done in our home because we have a similar situation it kind of left our entryway by our our front door adds the kind of little quarantine bubble of faith words like okay before you walk any further in her home on your take up issues whatever jacket you were wearing that was exposed outside whatever you touched while you're outside like the keys your wallet your phone place it down on the table and then it will disinfect the things that we have a family history for our shoes are outside we disinfect all of our items and remove the clothes that were exposed outside and then come on in and and to the press that for the household by the way space quickly doctor is in regards to the soap and.

Dr Alex Moreno Dr Alice arena
"dr alice" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"dr alice" Discussed on KTRH

"Scheduled programming for a channel three special report the world of medicine has seen its share of miracle cures from the polio vaccine to heart transplants but all past achievements may pale in comparison to the work of Dr Alice Crippen vaccine trials continue I'm still unable to transfer my immunity to infected hosts viruses doctor Griffin give it to me in a nutshell take something designed by nature and reprogram it to make it work full the body rather than against it this guy out of like a bomb went off inside campus liver kidney spleen five the least of my worries it will tip over we just need to make sure that nobody knows everybody knows how many people have you treated so far we have ten thousand and nine clinical trials in humans but now the virus comes here and two kids died and we can stop it right then and there but we don't because we have to protect the perfect biological weapons and how many are cancer free ten thousand and so you have actually cured cancer yes yes what is certain is that this seemingly unexplainable masses it used to spread throughout the injuries reported to be it's coming in now to take the violence is neither racially motivated restricted to the greater we're.

polio vaccine Griffin Dr Alice Crippen
"dr alice" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr alice" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Three special reports medicine has seen its share of miracle cures from the polio vaccine to heart transplants but all past achievements may pale in comparison to the work of Dr Alice Crippen vaccine trials continue I'm still unable to transfer my immunity to infected hosts viruses doctor Griffin give it to me in a nutshell take something designed by nature and reprogram it to make it work full the body rather than against it hi Sam how can this guy up like a bomb went off inside the pancreas liver kidney spleen the virus will be the least of our worries it will tip over now we just need to make sure that nobody knows everybody knows how many people have you treated so far we had ten thousand and nine chemical trials in humans but now the virus comes here and two kids died and we couldn't stop it right then and there but we don't because we have to protect the perfect biological weapons and how many are cancer free ten thousand and nine so you have actually cured cancer yes yes what is certain is that the seemingly unexplainable masses used to spread throughout the reports coming in that indicate the violence is racially motivated restricted to the greater we're.

polio vaccine Griffin Sam Dr Alice Crippen
"dr alice" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"dr alice" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"Dr Villalobos is a giant ascribe years of veterinary oncologist good. I've never I've been wanting to have a veterinary veterinary oncologist on. There's one locally who I've never I've never called because I don't have good contact with any case it's been my fault but I'm happy pitcher here and I'm GonNa for at least a little bit about a square cell tumor that one of my dogs has on the upper part of its mouth. Alf that we're afraid we're going to have to have her put down in the next week or two so I will bend your ear about that a little bit but first introduce yourself the little bit and your practice. You're down at the Los Angeles area as well as your website and I'm going to go buy a copy of your book. Just because cancer keeps coming up on this this program over and over and over again yes In fact dogs over the age of ten half of them are going to get cancer Sir and About a third of our cats will get cancer. And that's the biggest disease we deal with an older age but younger gods One in four of them will get cancer. So we're really talking about a very big disease and I think you'll enjoy reading my book because I wrote it for intelligent pet owners who want to know more. Are we seeing an increase in the incidence of companion animal cancer. Not really but we're just seeing an increase in Our ability to diagnose it earlier and to to You know help the animal so it looks like it feels feels like there's more but it's just because we're getting smarter and and more interested in getting a biopsy and the diagnosis in dogs. And Yeah you you want me to introduce myself gave it and I thought I would let people know I'm I graduated from. Uc Davis the number one veterinary school in the world. And I studied under the mentorship of a pioneer in the field. Dr Gordon Deal. And he wrote the first books on cancer medicine and I trained for three years years during my veterinary school in his proposed residency program. So I was basically as I resident and since I graduated in one thousand nine hundred seventy you too. I've been focusing on pets with cancer and end of life care and quality of life and how to emotionally support the family during End of life and I introduced My concept approach called pastas which rhymes with hospice. But the idea is that many pets are diagnosed with cancer late in the course of the disease because they just don't tell us and they don't give us warning signs much and so we often through cancer in advanced stages and we just WanNa make sure people know that this is a life limiting condition for many patients Johnson and so we call it pastas but we treat the cancer with kinder and gentler ways and not hurting the patient especially if they're older and if they have other issues I work in rescue particularly in rescue transport and we of course used the term phosphorus for these wonderful the people who are willing to foster an older and will frequently near the end of life. Oh how wonderful you do use the term great because I never did put a A patent on it because I wanted to be out there as part of our philosophy of helping animals at the end of life. That's wonderful yeah. It's foster hospice. This effort S. p. e.. So it's I knew what yours was a mmediately and it took me a few times to understand fos but now it is inventor. Of course I have two dogs at home that are hospice care. One being the younger dog who has cancer the other other one is a Brittany Spaniel who in January turned seventeen years old. Mike goodness congratulate and whose rear legs don't work like they used. Well don't work nearly like they used to but we've used CBD with considerable effect with her and had just had really hey good luck and while she falls on occasion her legs cave and she won't climb the stairs like she used to. Occasionally she has a particular bark she uses if she wants to get up and there's nobody nearby but she still smiles. She still happy. She's never been very reactive to anything including US but brought her. Behavior hasn't changed if she has any dementia. It doesn't show and she comes up smile yes she eats great. She's a happy dog. We're GONNA get our back on meds and you know any day. I expect to walk in and I will first thing in the morning and oftentimes I will. I'll stand there and look and say. Is She breathing. And sometimes it can take me five or six seconds because I tend to see it more. We're at the back of her chest. Rather than you know where in people you would look for see some chest movement so sometimes it takes me a second. Oh yes she's alive and then she'll move and you know who you know. Everything's okay this morning. So yeah she'll her. Name is Britney why because when we found her walking down the street we expected that somebody would rescue her and take her from US within seventy two hours so she was Britney Britney Brittany and by the time it was clear her owner who really does exist but didn't find her for three months showed up well. We named her Britney so she's Britney Brittany. Oh that's great well. Congratulations because I I personally don't think dogs live For you know just anyone you have to be a special caregiver and You got to you know be doing a lot of things right nor can have a patient you know a pet lived that long. Well she sat. Ah We've had her for five or six years now. She did have what looked like a life poma kind up on her shoulder. That busted did and we didn't end up doing anything for. I thought it was a tumor or something and the calm. Everybody we didn't do pathology but it's SORTA healed hold up and scabbed over this giant SCAB and most people I talked to said yes including vets. Older dogs do that sometimes and she hasn't done it sense. I and it never hurt. You know never was painful. We wiped it off. We had bandaged it and she is just you know no worse for wear and Eh her age and this was like three years ago. We weren't going to take her in and have surgery. I mean should she ever need surgery and she may have some little tumors down anal area. We're not you know there's no sense in doing anything about anything that might upset. This dogs homies stasis. Because she's alive now. Well that's one of the things that I very careful with With my older patients. My book is about Geriatric Dogs and caps APPs that have cancer. And it's called. Canine and Feline Geriatric Oncology honoring the human animal bond. And that's where we want to try to make sensible decisions nations for our patients are at the end of life. The one that we go over the warning signs of Uh Cancer and let me reintroduce you really Dr. Alice via lobos correct correct. Good is a veterinarian in southern California Dub Dub Dub Dub possumus which is spelled a pause spice. Paws C. E. DOT COM. You can find her at that site. She practices and yes you could drive down to L. A. Ain't get consultation and she could look at your dog and help you plan treatment. If that's what you would like to do and you can call. Her Office are have your vet call her office and make that arrangement okay. Let's do the warning. Signs of cancer will start with dogs and then we'll move to felines. Well I'm going to combine in them both to because I actually have one body and one health and this would also apply to people. So we'll just go over the warning signs and and In both dogs captain humans. Because all these signs that I'm GonNa talk about our common to toomer so okay so go ahead. People don't don't know where the lymph glands are located and it's good to know where lymph glands are located you know. Under the neck and the Chin area the right in front of the SCAPULA Woah. You know the shoulders. Those are called pre Scapula's and the armpits and the Groin and the behind the knees and so those are areas. You want to know where the lymph glands are located. He also want to know that in female dogs you want to check their breast areas little nipples take a look and make sure they don't have tumors and feel around there To make sure that There's no lumps and bumps because all they like to get bigger and half of them are malignant in an in In female dogs. And then you want to do an oral exam. I know you told me that. Your dog has squamous Cell Carcinoma on the upper The A man double the mouth well often enough. People don't realize that they could look at the mouth of their pets especially when they're feeding the dog or doing a bath or or just generally Brushing up you want to do a full physical exam and then you WanNa make sure you don't have swelling of the belly and the testicles So these are areas that you can feel while you're coming your dog or brushing or bathing and then you want to look at the skin. There should be no sores or ulcers and if they are present and they don't heal in two weeks then we should be suspicious and if this is a white capped With a white face and pink lips and pink ears. We know that they're very sensitive to sun and the ear tips So we WANNA make sure that they are not Going to go without a doctor taking a look and taking a sample or telling you whether or not they think it's skin cancer. Cancer squamous Cell Carcinoma. Is that kind of cancer. which is the same when your dog ask but your your dogs tumor in the mouth has nothing to do with the sun? It's it's a completely completely different origin or cause but the same kind of cancer and then we go to look looking. Animals are wait if they lose weight. that can be a warning sign of cancer or illness and if they have a loss of appetite a loss of energy or if they're color your look at their lips Or the whites of their eyes and if they're if they look Pale that is not a good sign. You WanNa take your dog or cat into see the doctor if they have any of these problems. Weight loss loss of appetite energy loss or pale membranes and then a lot of people tolerate Bad breath in their pets And loose teeth and offensive odor for many years which is really sad. Because many many dogs and cats out chronic dental disease that they can also have tumors of the mouth and chronic sneezing Like one nostril have a discharge and it might be months Jason Bunch before a diagnosis of nasal cancer is made in these pets. So look for that. Look for a discharge from one nostril. That's usually not a good sign nine unless it's both of them and they're just using because of maybe allergies or something you know that's bothering.

cancer skin cancer Britney Britney Brittany nasal cancer US Los Angeles Dr Villalobos Dr Gordon Deal Alf CBD Uc Davis pre Scapula Mike SCAB Jason Bunch cancer. SCAPULA toomer
Brexit: What does proroguing parliament mean?

Correspondents Report

07:23 min | 2 years ago

Brexit: What does proroguing parliament mean?

"Now the history of proroguing parliament goes all the way back to the fifteenth century. Essentially it's the act of suspending the parliament allowing the monarch to introduce a new session but the ancient practice is freshly controversial after Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson convinced the queen to Baroque parliament just weeks before what could be a cataclysmic explicit with the European Union this week a Scottish court ruled the move unlawful suggesting Mr Johnson lied to the Queen to get her to approve the move he he denies that for British parliamentary historians there are new pages being written as a European correspondent Bridget Brennan found out the lights have gone off waist minster at a time in the United Kingdom's history law authorized by Her Majesty's Commission to Declare Her Royal Center Apiece Week Black Rod ended the House of Commons to Perot AG- parliament to the cries of no for main pays wanted disdain the states this is pain one of the most dramatic wayside covered at Westminster and in the middle of breaks. Is that saying something if it were to be the case that the government had misled is let the Queen about the reasons for suspending parliament and the motives for right that would be a very serious matter indeed my view then being the moment for Mister Johnson awesome to resign. We've been going on in this parliament nine for longer than any time. Since the civil war we need a queen speech. Look the whole thing's a mess now for every moment. Parliament argument remains prorogued. The British government are breaking the law. He's the pot where I'd meet. I had no idea what it meant to Perot Parliament before these last few weeks. I've have come to meet someone who does have an in depth understanding of the procedure and the wine which it's been used over the centuries and always interested in politics and less so in in parliament. I don't think people in the tend to pay necessarily huge amounts of attention to the kind of every details of what happens in parliament but I I stayed academia for a while I was historian and then I ended up leaving academia. I wanted to be in a think tank came here. Toy of gene ended up working on parliament just just about the time that parliament became the big story in British politics yeah parliament's Bain days story this week because nope for what what's happening but for what's not happening coming because it's essentially a shutdown explained for us. We'll happened in what's been the reaction so Monday of this week. Parliament was paroled and that's basically a fancy term mm for saying that it's been temporarily suspended between the end of one session of parliament and the beginning of a new session of parliament and that's due to happen on the fourteenth of October Ebba but this is obviously been hugely controversial here. Perturbation is entirely routine. It happens at the end of every session of parliament so in itself. It's not controversial measure but the fact that parliament is being prayed for so long for five weeks which is very unusual in terms of ext link on the fact that this is happening at a time where a brexit headline is leaving has been hugely. He key controversial. This is an exciting week for Dr Alice Lee. She's a senior near researcher from the Institute for Government A- parliamentary GEIC and historian so we've seen people out in the streets would normally be keeping an eye on parliament but it seems sort of sparked real fury papal to say maybe we don't watch him curious every week. We really want the parliament to be. I've been at such a crucial time. I mean was to be expected that people were going to be really affronted by this. I think it was to some extent be expected there were rumors earlier this summer that parliament might be perused correct actually over the thirty first of October said the date on which Britain's going to leave the EU deal or no deal on that certainly sparked a lot of public anger now. That's not quite what's happened. Parliament will still have time between when it comes back on the thirty first of October. MP's have already pasta law that will make it essentially impossible. I leave on the thirty first with no deal unless they've agreed to it but I think it really has sparked quite a significant level of anger and it's put a really big focus actually onto what parliament does so we've seen that the viewing figures for live parliaments during the last couple of weeks of being absolutely eighty three fist. It's like the new box. Full can't get enough of series. One and took brexit went so good and Alor into series three and there's lots of twists and turns so what is the Queen's role in all of this because there have been some comments on that this week after a pretty significant decision from the Scottish court that's right the Scottish court obsession ruled that the probation happened no Monday was unlawful and essentially they found that the advice that the government gave to the Queen when they all step to Peru parliament they did nothing not advice was essentially accurate they th the reason that the government was giving our Gatien which is they wanted to have a queen's speech and invalid big new legislative agenda. They did not think that was the real reason and they wanted to try to limit parliament's role discreet nice government so the Queen is the person who provokes parliament ultimately but it's really important to remember that she only does that on the advice of her government and big convention invention for the Queen's role in all of these things is that the queen is always supposed to be kept out of politics because obviously she does not want to be put in a situation where she as potentially making political judgments but the idea that the the advice that might have been offered to the queen was in some way misleading is obviously a bad looking at raises a lot of significant questions. My government's vegetated program. We'll continue to long-term in recent history has definitely definitely been a couple of decades governments of being accused of using their power to provoke parliament for slightly political controversial purposes so back in nineteen ninety seven John Major when he was Minnesota. Keep roaring parliament just before it was actually about to be dissolved before an election anyway and that it was alleged by many to be so that he could delay the publication of a fairly damning report into a big scandal and then back in nineteen forty eight Clement Atlee the Labor Prime Minister he worked parliament in order to essentially circumvent lords opposition to a piece of legislation that he was trying to pass but certainly the length of this probation is something that we've not seen since at least nineteen forty-five prorogation was first introduced in the fifteenth century when a monarch could dismiss parliament they wished and to look at the longest spell ordered by King or Queen. You have to go back to sixteen twenty nine so the very very longest example is actually if you go back several hundred years when we sort of had the big showdown between parliament and the monarchy under Charles I Charles I essentially suspended parliament for very very long time and ultimately it was that big showdown that the English civil war but certainly in modern history. It's something that's been far far less. Controversial used Prichard Brennan that historical update from

Parliament Perot Ag- Parliament Prichard Brennan Prime Minister European Union British Government Mister Johnson Scottish Court Britain Institute For Government United Kingdom Perot Clement Atlee Dr Alice Lee Researcher Bain John Major
"dr alice" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr alice" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Sure your child's shot records are up to date Dr Alice gong a UT health says the growing number of parents opting their children ouch is very concerning and she says the state is making it easy for I don't know if any religion that says you can't Paxson eight so it would be nice if we had our C. that addresses that she's talking about mandates so she feels Texas should follow the lead of other states to do away with religious vaccination exemptions since to many parents are abusing us I don't think parents are opting out because of religion they're opting out because of misinformation about you know the dirty shots making your kids you know have a mental health issues autism Nazism which is nothing to do with you know religion yeah I mean she she's trying to get make sure she wants all the kids to get back to that's the bottom line well that's how it works the best when that is done yes that sets out just look at the measles outbreak right now doing it don't even have to tell you about that so it's it's still I I just I just shake my head I I cannot get people that have children and it's like having a car just now I'm not ever going to change the wall not getting not gonna get service not gonna do any maintenance on that thing it'll be fine that same thing don't get vaccinated psyche to me it's like you don't give a rip did you did you watch that golf tournament over the weekend I watched some of it but I wasn't able to the British open British in the open they always a guy's name at once yeah it was and hang.

Texas Dr Alice gong Paxson golf
Why Lead Used to Be Added To Gasoline

Curiosity Daily

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Why Lead Used to Be Added To Gasoline

"You've ever filled up your. Car's gas tank with unleaded gasoline. You might have wondered why did we ever use lead in gasoline in the first place believe it or not we did it to make cars safer? Here's a little bit of chemistry and a little bit of history. All in one way back in the day. You didn't turn key or push a button to start your car. You used a hand crank? You'd literally attach a crank handle to the engine crankshaft. And then turn it repeatedly. Until the engine got the energy it needed to run on its own. The only problem besides the physical effort was that crank engines were incredibly dangerous if the engine kicked back while you were cranking the handle could kick back to pummeling you in the process and on one fateful day. In April nineteen o eight a car engine kicked back on auto manufacturer. Byron Carter so hard complications from his injury led to his death. Just days later Carter had been a close personal friend of Henry, Emily Lind who was the founder of Cadillac and leave. Swore his company would build a crank lists car to prevent a tragedy like that from ever happening again leeland made the nineteen twelve Cadillac the first car to use an electric starter. But its engine was deafening and inefficient fuel chemistry quirks made pockets of air and fuel ignite when they weren't supposed to scientists worked for years on fixing the problem, but they didn't come up with a solution until nineteen twenty one nearly a decade later, they discovered that when you mix it with kerosene fuel the magic ingredient to make an engine per was you guessed it Tetra ethyl lead soon companies began manufacturing the new ethyl gasoline and nearly as soon workers in factories began hallucinating at best or dying at worst. And unfortunately auto manufacturers knew about the dangers. They just didn't make it public. Scientists looked into the risks associated with lead in gasoline, but their industry funders required approval of their findings before they were published in one thousand nine hundred. I five Dr Alice Hamilton testified at a government conference that when it came to lead any amount was too much. And this wasn't new information for scientists still it wasn't until the nineteen seventies. That lead was finally banned from gasoline in the US, and it's made a big difference. The average blood lead level in the US has dropped to barely detectable levels. One study found the preschool children in the nineteen nineties had IQ's up to four point seven points higher than children in the nineteen seventies today only three countries in the world. Use leaded gasoline of far cry from the nineteen sixties when more than one hundred countries did mistakes can be devastating. But sometimes we bounce

Byron Carter United States Cadillac Dr Alice Hamilton Founder Emily Lind Henry
"dr alice" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"dr alice" Discussed on KCRW

"With writers than because of package fees agencies. Make all their money without actually having to do the work of increasing this allergies writers, and our members know that are struggling members understand that. But you can know that and still be struggling members still nervous. So what do you say to them? The unfortunate nature of of the Gill doing anything. There's disruption. And we we want to get through this and the writers of red as heavy pets. Then again that was WG president David Goodman, the union announced last week that its members were firing their ages and mass the move was followed by the WG a filing a lawsuit against the four biggest talent agencies in Hollywood accusing them of illegal business practices twenty years ago. Public health officials declared they eliminated measles in the US. Well, it's back this year. There are more than five hundred cases of the highly communicable diseases in twenty states is includes California health officials say one reason for the outbreaks is the spread of anti vaccination information with little basis in science pediatrician and UCLA. Professor, Dr Alice Quogue blames the sheer quantity of miss information online. I think definitely the presence of social media. I read on the internet. I heard from my friends on social media. I read on Facebook. And so I think social media. Has been a game changer for this debate. Because you know, there's always been vaccine skeptics ever since vaccines have been on the scene. There have been people questioning why we would introduce purposely introduced a potential pathogen in order to elicit immune response. And there have always been people concerned about that. But social media has given that very very small minority large voice a large megaphone to promote their message. I think has caused a lot of confusion amongst parents once again that was Dr Alice quo view CLA in California. There have been two dozen cases of confirmed measles, according to the state's department of public health support for NPR comes from Belleville charitable trust driven by one goal.

Dr Alice Quogue California allergies Dr Alice Facebook Gill UCLA US David Goodman president Professor Belleville Hollywood NPR twenty years
"dr alice" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Veterinary nutritionist that you see. Davis. It's free. It's really kind of fun to maneuver. If you get someone wants to home for their pets you go into Dallas dot com. You've put your pets. Wait you pick. What disease? It has. Okay. Say it doesn't have a disease. You know, I wanna cook for my pet. I wanna know what's going into their body. I love that idea. Pull up it dot com. You pick from the okay, I wanna do tofu protein or I wanna do beef is the protein there's just a whole list, and you check that then you go into the car side. And there's things like were or corner, oats, anything like that. And you check that. And then you put your pets weighed in and then they give you a printout of how much protein versus car versus say canola oil or corn oiler sapphire oil, and then they also sell a plant based supplement called balance at supplement, which has all the vitamins and minerals. I think fabulous if your dog has kidney disease, if food allergic there's also columns for that as well. So in my clients that want to cook for their pets. I tell him balance it dot com. If you have any trouble with the website, I'll be happy to go on it for you. And get you a couple of different recipes. I love it. And it's good to know that my patients are getting the correct nutritionally balanced diet as opposed to well. Well, I'll just give them a pound of this and throw some race in. I mean, that's totally incorrect. Long-term not good so balance at that time. It's it's a free valuable source, and I just love it. And it's for dogs as well as cats 'cause I know cats trying to put them on a limitation diet, a novel protein diet can be stressful and dangerous because you know, you're not supplementing with tarring. So yes, it cats catches, well fabulous. Well, I had a great learning experience. And hopefully, all my listeners have also we've been listening to Dr Alice Jerome on a board certified veterinary dermatologist adjunct, professor at case Western Reserve University college of medicine international lecturer, author, and I can tell very much a pet lover. If you have any questions that you want answered please drop.

Dr Alice Jerome Davis Western Reserve University col lecturer professor
"dr alice" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"As a scientist, Dr Alice specialized in movement disorders. So she was fascinated with problems like Styron's problems that fall in that mysterious gap between the body and the brain you can so often do diagnosis just from how people are sitting in the chair and how they walked towards you from the waiting room. And he moved really slowly and he had this was kind of a stately southern slowly nece and it was kind of a parking Sonian slowly and it was kind of a depressive slowness. So. Although he was a toll man, he was no longer a big man. By the time I met him, he was really quite gaunt. And what I had heard from the doctors that had taken care of him at McLean at the psycho Spital was that he had stopped eating for months when he was catatonic and lost a lot of weight, then. You know, we spoke just very briefly in the waiting room and they came in together, rose, trusted Alice, right from that first moment. Finally, there was Dr Who would talk to me and who I could talk to who is least curious about my perceptions which no other doctor had ever been interested in. Alice began by examining his hands. They were both very thin hands and there was some muscle wasting that would make sense since he'd been really bed bound for a couple of months. But when I handed him something, he was easily able to hold it in his right hand. And as I did a neuro exam, looking for what might be going on, he didn't in any way treated as if it was paralysed. He was able to hold things and follow the usual neurological commands like touching use news and my finger. And and so then I ended in pencil and he took the pencil and he wrote his name in a sort of the scrawl of someone who signed about three billion title pages. And so asked him to write a sentence. Alice watched as his hand slowly scrawled out a message. This is what it said. My writing hand is no longer part of my body. His hand had reported its own rebellion. It had gone rogue. And now Alice had to figure out why..

Dr Alice Styron scientist Dr Who McLean
"dr alice" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"dr alice" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"Just a quick note before we start this series discusses mental illness and some other sensitive topics that might not be appropriate for all audiences. Chapter two, the angel of death. It was nine hundred ninety nine Dr Alice flirty a brain scientist rummaged through the supply closet in the hospital where she worked and. And. There wasn't a shortage of IV fluids though either is now, so it would be like bringing home a plastic comb or something. This was only months after a devastating, miscarriage, and Alice was pregnant again by had a whole lot of nausea and vomiting, and I would I'd rate myself and that's why the IV bags. Because in the middle of the night, I was just so dizzy and dehydrated. But she had a bigger problem than dizziness. Alice had just been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She cycled between mania and depression. Mostly mania had a sense that I was this helium balloon that had gotten way too high, and that was just maybe one little thread holding me to the earth. The thoughts piled up in our mind. They demanded to be put on paper. She felt compelled to write five or ten even twenty hours a day. She would creep out of bed. Careful not to wake up her husband and Hooker self up to a fluid drip, then she'd type furiously. I was sitting at my computer and the bag. I had hung the bag on like the bookcase because it had to be above may and it was a little bit precarious and I was trying to get the avian and something slipped, and, oh, man, blood just started spurting out of the needle. All of them keyboard. How was was driven to right because she was chasing a big question. What is the connection between madness and creativity. One day she pulled a book offer shelf. I recall thinking that even if this were one of those warmly Senate and passionate evenings for which Paris is celebrated. I would respond like zombie. I had become she saw clues everywhere in its pages. The weather of depression is unmarked related. It's light Brown out. That's actor Jack gilpin reading from darkness visible. The author of this memoir William Styron told the story of his breakdown. He used himself as a case study to understand the depressed mind in Styron. Alice found a new and interesting way of going mad. He had observed himself like a scientist and help to change the way millions of people, including top psychiatrists thought about depression. He was like the great God of depression. He wrote the book that was really the. Only book that I knew of that I could look to for someone who had gone through it in a way that made sense to me. At this point in our story, William Styron. It's just an idea in Alice's head, but ideas can be magical wormholes that connect us to strangers and within a few years, Alice's life will become intertwined with Styron's and she will try to save him..

Dr Alice William Styron scientist depression Jack gilpin bipolar disorder nausea Senate Hooker Paris twenty hours One day