5 Burst results for "Douglas Crimp"

"douglas crimp" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:30 min | 2 weeks ago

"douglas crimp" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I thought that i would be accepted in society. I carried that. Fear an internal homophobia within me and it didn't happen like legitimately until i moved to san francisco and i was sitting on a curb with my best friend dean at that moment in time dean moser who i had met at a residence club that i was working for my room and board. While i went to san francisco art institute and dean thought i had a crush on him and so dean said cathy. Something i have to tell you. I'm i'm i'm gay and i was like. Oh well i i am too you know. And that was the first time that it was actually spoken. And then there was no hesitation after speaking. What's so interesting to me. In terms of looking at your body of work is despite the difficulty that you might have experienced. And the inner homophobia you did seem right from the very beginning in your body of work to i. Embrace isn't even the right word. but celebrate. Celebrate your your sexuality and your gayness. Yeah no i think that i did but it wasn't right away actually took some time. I mean there was the side person kathy. Ob ride who everybody who is a friend called me calls me cathy by cathy opie published in on our backs magazine not catherine opie so i took on these different kinds of personas i suppose to again create a different compartments of my life and what is now. I guess that's in some ways like having multiple closets in one tiles. And i i think that you know Really beyond being kathy on our backs and celebrating that through a queer culture. It wasn't until becoming a part of act up and queer nation that i decided to make my work publicly about mike awareness. But i would have to say that. A good portion of my work was trying to be very serious street photographer in san francisco and then quickness within my work at cal arts was actually the dissemination and observation of master-plan communities in southern california which i kind of grew up. Been from moving. From sandusky to rancho bernardo pie california and watched that turn into masterplan community. So i think you know. The quickness was always also involved in relationship to how do we fit squirrelled. And you know if there's this kind of separation in relationship to idea of community than how do i portray my community and i think it was a quandary for quite some time. The quadri also. I think began even before you committed to photography as a profession. At at one point after you graduated high school you considered becoming a kindergarten teacher and even went to Virginia mont college to study early childhood education. I mean that's in thinking about the pathways of a life. You were on that. Pathway i was i profoundly love children like i really really loved children and i suppose that's even the other aspect of clearness is. How was i going to become a mom. Because that was always what i wanted to be. Even as a child. I would tell my mom that i was going to have twelve children for some reason that i saw Yeah that would have been too many. Yeah so kindergarten you know. Be a camp counselor for a long time. And i really liked kids so i just imagined that i would be pretty fun. Kindergarten teacher a year into your studies to become a teacher. You call your mom and said. I'm an artist and i need to go to art school. How did she respond. I mean she was both your parents really encourage you to be this kindergarten teacher. Had they respond to you wanting to be an artist. Well my mom was the one who was supporting my ability to go to college. My father was it was financially capable but chose to not financially support my endeavor of receiving a college degree. He kind of believed that when you turn eighteen. You're on your own kind of guy generous now right so so my mom you know. That was hard for her. She actually took a loan off of her car that she owned outright for me to go ahead and move to san francisco and i picked san francisco art institute. I wasn't thinking about. San francisco is being a very gay city. It was just like in california and a really good notable arts school that had like ansel adams and minor white and dorothea laying and the legacy of that program in terms of photography is is actually. Why chose it and mom's supported. She said okay. But i'm only going to be able to pay the tuition kathy. This is a really big tuition. And just so you know in nineteen eighty one. It was about seven thousand dollars a year and she was able to get me all the way through paying the tuition and i did get some scholarship money and then grad school was again up to me so if i was going to go to graduate school than i had to do it on my own. You left san francisco to pursue your mfa at california institute of the arts in valencia. You said that that transition sucked in. What way did it suck well. I was leaving a community. That was profoundly also becoming decimated from aids and i all of a sudden moved back into a very hot off southern california environment in the middle of a master plan community that i had exited when i was you know basically nineteen years old from from living with at home in in powei and to be all of a sudden going from the bay area of this incredible city. And it's the first time. I had ever lived in a city back to the suburbs where it was really hot and i couldn't wear my leather jacket year. Round like i could in san francisco and being kind of newly possessed of my my clearness my being dyke. It wasn't even queen s. I don't even think we use the word. Queer and in one thousand nine hundred five but my my kind of being a dyke and what that meant for me. Yeah and it was even i. Even though i had catherine lord and millie wilson and mazing people around me at cal arts who celebrated that and definitely added onto my ability to understand. Theory and feminism. And you know had. Douglas crimp come through the school enormous about people at that time period. It's still wasn't san francisco. Yeah as a way to cope. You started photographing planned community. That was being built across the road from your apartment which ultimately became part of your thesis portfolio in this work included photographs of quote matching.

catherine opie dean dean moser san francisco san francisco art institute kathy cathy quadri Virginia mont college rancho bernardo sandusky california cal southern california minor white mike ansel adams dorothea california institute of the ar
"douglas crimp" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:47 min | 1 year ago

"douglas crimp" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stuart if you're looking for an art show something unusual yet quintessentially part of the New York story you might want to head to the Bronx here's the scoop two thousand eight was the first year the Bronx born photographer Alvin ball truck to work was written about in any art magazine four years after the artist's death in that essay published an art form the creek Douglas crimp cold doll traps artwork quote where an indispensable evidence the recording Manhattan's west side peers in the gay culture that thrives there in the nineteen seventies the critical meant about trips inability to fully realize this document a project due to a lack of mainstream recognition or opportunities to exhibit his are in this lifetime crimp wrote that bell truck was quote almost completely unsuccessful at getting his work exhibited unlike other photographers who documented New York City around the same time like maple Thorpe or Gordon Matta Clark now Belgium is being honored posthumously in his home borough the life and times of Alvin bell job as an exhibition at the Bronx museum of the arch it features the photographers work from his early years when he was in the navy there is more mature photography of a part in New York City that no longer exists joining me in studio is Sergio Bessa he's director of curatorial programs at the Bronx museum of art Sir you're welcome to all of it thank you so this may be the first time some listeners have heard the name Alvin ball chop where did you grow up when did you grow up he grew up in the Bronx his mother came from the south from of Virginia I believe and the you go to New York we had the one son of James and and Alvin was born in nineteen forty eight in the Bronx and has spent his his early life found on the of the lessons in the Bronx until he went to the navy in I believe in nineteen sixty nine when did he first become interested in photography actually we we don't know a lot about his life you know but everything is very kind of Fadeley state it Hey but it seems that the that's the story that's going to me that he he was a guest of a camera by an uncle when he was a teen so the earliest photograph that we have in the exhibition is actually from the mid sixties so he's probably sixteen fifteen no that's a bill for photographs that he took of a family member in the cloisters in the in upper Manhattan and the and then when you went to the latest so he was already into photography and he kind of a have an opportunity to work in in the medical unit to him and the ship that he was he was in to continue his work so that's as much as we know so he began very early on the work in the exit exhibit begins with his photos from the navy what we know about that period of his life and why he decided to start taking pictures while he was in the navy right well there is something very interesting that came to our attention about his time in the navy it was the the height of the Vietnam War so we all think that he went to Vietnam but actually his ship never got to Asia his ship was always in the Atlantic and I think the farthest it went it was to the Mediterranean and it seems the story that we heard is that there was someone in the in the ship whose family was very connected and there was some strings boat for the ship never director get to to Asia so I think you there was a more like drills and the chores but it was really you know it was it was never like in combat so I think you have a lot of time to explore it his photography and then you'll see it's very interesting because you begin just see his develop in his gaze you know so he begins it's almost like a a war photographer some of the some of the images but them very quickly you begin to see his sifting his interest in looking up man young man some of them they are just you know in the cabin kind of a operating some equipment but there is clearly a very kind of let's say if we can use this expression a homosexual gazed about and then there's this beautiful Sears of photographs that he focus on of the sailors sunbathing on the back who just seems so surreal but reminds me of some images of Apocalypse Now the film by Coppola that it's like in the middle of all that crazy a moment you know people can have the porch and just a lot of different things so in a Cup to old yes some of the photos look like almost secret portraiture Mickey's capturing he's doing somebody's portrait they don't really look down the side of the sailors but they're not really aware of the very founder and I think this is something very important and of Jim's work there's some soon that he approaches the subject with the sort of a degree of familiarity but also respect so there's something very friendly about his case day is also as an assumption that he might have had an affair but we don't know for sure so everything about of in life in a sense of the you know it's a game of a gas in them piecing together listen to him my guess is Sergio bayside he is the cure director curatorial programs at the Bronx museum of arts we're talking about a new exhibition of the life and times of Alvin ball trap which is up through February ninth twenty twenty by the way so he comes back he comes back to New York and he's not working as a photographer he's just trying to survive just a ride he actually he went dress VA very early on I believe in nineteen seventy three seventy four and I think it was on the GI bill I don't know if he graduated from that we don't have and you're looking at the show that you know he got a degree of them but he went with it and I think it was around this time that he discovered the peers so I was very was round trip to third street and First Street and the I don't know that that kind of link it's got a lot of difficult for us to assert how he actually got to the peers but he gets the pure beers probably in nineteen seventy four seven five what do we need to know about the west side peers as we discuss Alvin well what happened was and these also relates to another exhibition that I did two years ago that was a Baltimore mother Clark and the the condition of New York in the nineteen seventy is so that was as we know there was a huge economical crisis and the the deeply impacted the infrastructure in the city so the outer boroughs of course it was the Bronx was in desert it was affected Hey how about Manhattan as well so that part of the peers which is pretty much the area where the with the museum is right now there was an elevated highway along the west side highway and the in nineteen seventy three seventy four there was a collapse of us a segment of the elevated highway and the the city could never cleaned up the area the left the left the debris and there was a right in front of fifty two so vamp up your fifty two became like this hot before mostly for gay men to to meet and engage in closing them on the altar of things so this is this is the background of the sort so it was almost like pure fifty two ways had a wall or separated from the rest of the world city area absolutely and the battle scores so the police to get there very very easily there was also the main mistaken this is Serra so that was a lot of trucks coming in and out to deliver the needs of pickup the meat or whatever and that so that that the whole zone Sir became sort of a on the ground kind of scenario so there was a lot of prostitution it was very desolate I think anyone who lives in New York in the silent as I was not here in the around the time I came in the eighties but I remember even in the ages walking around that area of the back and it was very pleasant very and there was a lot of gay clubs there was a lot of a they're usually most gay clubs and and so forth so that was kind of the center so the work that we see is Alvin's work of taking photographs of the community and the culture at this particular area of the Pierce right so what was he taking pictures of what are some of the photographs like well you know I think he is he was the ultimate the documentarian you know so he just goes there he discovers something and he becomes very obsessed with the command in that we know that around that time he was supporting himself as a cab driver and then when he begins to see let's say to find his subject he got so obsessed that he quit the job of the cab driver and he got a van he was a man in the van sort of managing his own time so that he could spend more time in the peers photograph and sometime you spend the whole night waiting for something to happen in interviews that we we have records of these interviews you'll see it that he was very aware of that the work that he was may have some importance you know of course we do them though it couldn't think of the time now that he is having a museum exhibition and has books published and so forth but he he was aware that there was a very important moment sort of very important cultural moment and he was probably difficult for him to articulate in words but he knew he what was that you know it was an interesting time it was posted on wall exactly and pre aids crisis exactly yeah it really is this it really is this unique moment in time it is it's kind of a point of the counter culture thank you know its it's a time yeah and it's a it's a in a global scale when the let's say the the social moors they're relaxin and the you know if you imagine those that people felt attempt held a comfortable enough to engaging in sex in public I mean this is just you know you can think of that in the nineteen fifties I mean if you got a little bit in the sixties with the heat the error and so forth but in the seventies became like you know very if you can kind of the more you know and in the in the in the home are you saying a global scale you know the there is a photographer in Japan who photographed the same kind of things in Japan in the seventies couples engaging slacks and parks we have narratives of the same kind of things happening in London in parks and on the so it was like oh this segments of of society that felt repressed until then they're kind of beginning to you know kind of a there to come to you know to the to public space so the name of the exhibition the life and times of Alvin ball traffic at the Bronx museum of art my guess is Sergio besa who is the director of curation up there either so if you his works were never displayed before how did you come to have them how are they save him he passed away people didn't actually know that his work existed yeah the is when you work in the in in museums that they were you always you know come to this question how these work survived he only had two exhibitions as well as in the in life one was in the because of the guidelines which was a sort of a game he lets a social club and the other one was in the gay club it was a it was in a bar so he really never had the opportunity to there was a lot of institutional racism I would say you know the fact that he was a black man he was probably not very articulate to kind of himself as a Sears artist so sort of things but what happened was that I think he create a network of people who knew his work so there is still a lot of people that remembers of in both dropped in the nine choose eight is it on and that when he was a approaching the end of his life in the early twenties to to thousands he befriended the young are as cold around the wheel **** and around though actually became the guard Jim of this state so this is an amazing thing because around just kept everything in my.

Stuart Bronx New York Alvin ball four years two years
"douglas crimp" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:50 min | 1 year ago

"douglas crimp" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all over the W. NYC analysis Stuart if you're looking for an art show something unusual yet quintessentially part of the New York story you might want to head to the Bronx here's the scoop two thousand eight was the first year the Bronx born photographer Alvin ball truck to work was written about in any art magazine four years after the artist's death in that essay published an art form the creek Douglas crimp cold dial traps artwork quote where an indispensable evidence that recorded Manhattan's west side peers in the gay culture that thrive there in the nineteen seventies the critic lament about trips inability to fully realize this document a project due to a lack of mainstream recognition or opportunities to exhibit his are in this lifetime crimp wrote that bell truck was quote almost completely unsuccessful at getting his work exhibited unlike other photographers who documented New York City around the same time like maple Thorpe for Gordon medic Clark now Belgium is being honored posthumously in his home borough the life and times of Albert bell job as an exhibition at the Bronx museum of the arch it features the photographers work from his early years when he was in the navy there is more mature photography of a part in New York City that no longer exists joining me in studio is Sergio Bessa he's director of curatorial programs at the Bronx museum of art Sir you're welcome to all of it thank you so this may be the first time some listeners have heard the name Alvin ball drop where did you grow up when did you grow up he grew up in the Bronx his mother came from the south from of Virginia I believe and the you go to New York with the once on Jones and and Alvin was born in nineteen forty eight in the Bronx and has spent his his early life and the of the lessons in the Bronx until he went to the navy in I believe in nineteen sixty nine when did he first become interested in photography actually we we don't know a lot about his life you know but everything is very kind of Fadeley stated Hey but it seems that the that's the start of going to me that he he was a guest of of a camera by an uncle when he was a teen so the earliest photograph that we have in the exhibition is actually from the mid sixties so he's probably sixteen fifteen minutes a bill for photographs that he took of a family member in the cloisters in the in upper Manhattan and the and then when you went to the latest so he was already into photography and he kind of a have an opportunity to work in in the medical unit in in the ship that he was he was in to continue his work so that's as much as in so he began very early on the work in the exhibit exhibit begins with his photos from the navy what we know about that period of his life and why he decided to start taking pictures while he was in the navy right well there is something very interesting that came to our attention about his time in the navy it was the height of the Vietnam War so we all think that he went to Vietnam but actually his ship never got to Asia his ship was always in the Atlantic and I think the farthest it went it was to the Mediterranean and it seems the story that we heard is that there was someone in the in the ship whose family was very connected and there was some strings both for the ship never director get to to Asia so I think you there was a more like drills and the chores but that was really you know it was it was never like in combat so I think you have a lot of time to explore it his photography and then you'll see it's very interesting because you begin just see his develop in his gaze you know so he begins it's almost like a a war photographer some of the some of the images but them very quickly you begin to see his sifting his interest in looking up man young man some of them they are just you know in the cabin kind of a operating some equipment but there is clearly a very kind of let's say if we can use this expression a homosexual gazed about and then there's this beautiful Sears of photographs that he focus on other sailors sunbathing on the back who just seems so surreal but remind me of some images of Apocalypse Now the film by Coppola that it's like in the middle of all that crazy a moment you know people can have the porch and just a lot of different things so in a Cup to old yes some of the photos look like almost secret portraiture Mickey's capturing he's doing somebody's portrait they don't really mean that down the side of the sailors but they're not really aware of the very founder and I think this is something very important and Alvin's work there's something that he approaches the subject with the sort of a degree of familiarity but also respect so there's something very friendly about his case day is also an assumption that he might have had an affair but we don't know for sure so do everything about of in life in a sense it's a you know it's a game of gas in the the piecing together listen to him my guess is Sergio bayside he is the cure director curatorial programs at the Bronx museum of art we're talking about a new exhibition at the life and times of Alvin ball trap which is up through February ninth twenty twenty by the way so he comes back he comes back to New York and he's not working as a photographer he's just trying to survive just to his right he actually he went dress VA very early on I believe in nineteen seventy three seventy four and I think it was on the GI bill I don't know if he graduated from that we don't have and you're looking at the show that you know he got a degree of them but he went with it and I think it was around this time that he discovered the peers so I was very was round trip to third street and First Street and the I don't know that that kind of link it's got a lot of difficult for us to assert how he actually got to the peers but he gets the pure beers probably in nineteen seventy four seven five or what do we need to know about the west side peers as we discuss Alvin well what happened was and these also relates to another exhibition that I did two years ago that was about to go another Clark and the the condition of New York in the nineteen seventy is so that was as we know there was a huge economical crisis and the the deeply affected the infrastructure in the city so the outer boroughs of course it was the Bronx was in just it was give defected Hey how about Manhattan as well so that part of the peers which is pretty much the area where the with the museum is right now there was an elevated highway along the west side highway and the in nineteen seventy three seventy four there was a collapse of US of a segment of the elevated highway and the the city could never clean up the area the left the left the debris and there was a right in front of fifty two so then up your fifty two became like this hot before mostly for gay men to to meet and engage in closing them on the altar of things so this is this is the background of the sort so it was almost like pure fifty two was had a wall or separated from the rest of the world city area absolutely and the that'll scores going to the police to get there very very easily there was also the main mistaken this is Serra so there was a lot of trucks coming in and out to deliver the needs of pickup the meat or whatever and that so that the whole zone her became sort of a on the ground kind of scenario so there was a lot of prostitution it was very desolate I think anyone who lives in New York in the seventies I was not here in the around the time I came in the eighties but I remember even in the ages walking around that area the meat packing it was very very and there was a lot of other gay clubs there was a lot of a there you from is gay clubs and and so forth so that was kind of the center so the work that we see is Alvin's work of taking photographs of the community and the culture at this particular area of the peers Russia so what was he taking pictures of what are some of the photographs like well you know I think he is he was the ultimate book documentarian you know so he just goes there he discovers something and he becomes very obsessed with the command in that we know that around that time he was supporting himself as a cab driver and then when he begins to see let's say to find his subject he got so obsessed that he quit the job of the cab driver and he got a van he was a man in the van sort of managing his own time so that he could spend more time in the peers photograph and sometime you spend the whole night waiting for something to happen in interviews that we we have records of these interviews you'll see it that he was very aware of that the work that he was going to have some importance you know of course he did them though it couldn't think of the time now that he is having a museum exhibition and has books published and so forth but he he was aware that there was a very important moment sort of very important cultural moment and he was probably difficult for him to articulate in words but he knew he what was that you know it was an interesting time it was posted on a wall exactly and pre aids crisis exactly yeah it really is this it really is this unique moment in time it is it's kind of a point of the counter culture thank you know its it's a time yeah and it's a it's a in a global scale when the let's say the the social moors they're relaxin and the you know if you imagine those that people felt held accountable amounts to engage in sex in public I mean this is just you know you can think of that in the nineteen fifties I mean if you got a little bit in the sixties with the heat the error and so forth but in the seventies became like you know very if you can kind of the more hello and in the in the in the are you would seem a global scale you know that there is a photographer in Japan who photographed the same kind of things in Japan in the seventies couples engaging in sex in parks we have narratives of a the same kind of things happening in London parks and the so it was like disagreements of of society that felt repressed until then they're kind of beginning to you know kind of a there to come to you know to the to public space the name of the exhibition the life and times of Alvin ball traffic that the Bronx museum of art my guess is Sergio base so who is the director of curation up there either so if you his works were never displayed before how did you come to have them how are they saved me he passed away people didn't actually know that his work existed yeah I do is when you work in the in in museums that they were you always you know come to this question how these work survived he only had two exhibitions as well as in the in life one was in the because of the guidelines which was a sort of a gave the lets a social club and the other one was in the gay club it was a it was in a bar so he really never had an opportunity to there was a lot of institutional racism I would say you know the fact that he has a black man it was probably not very articulate to kind of presenting himself as a Sears artist so sort of things but what happened was that I think he created them network of people who knew his work so there is still a lot of people there with members oven Bo truck in the nine choose eight is it on and that when he was a approaching the end of his life in the early twenties a two thousand he befriended the young are as cold around the wheel carts and around though actually became the guard Jim of this state so this is an amazing thing because around though just kept everything I am not.

NYC Stuart New York sixteen fifteen minutes four years two years
"douglas crimp" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

16:33 min | 2 years ago

"douglas crimp" Discussed on ART GAB

"Kids know like it's not really in the history and yet now history books so yeah. Oliver won't know a time before before. That impacted our society. But I do think yeah. We also need some distance is like that work is not the only person that's really been like the more we're there's several other people that her I've run into are also doing work around this time period around culture so I think it's sort of it's a pressing need a lot of are are sort of leadership writers from that Kevin Killian just died Douglas CRIMP just I and so are also Needing to do this work. Well that's amazing -gratulations for getting the program to exciting super exciting. You'll find a place. Yeah I I hear. It's really real estate in new ORCAS. No big deal easiest place to move in the world this side no a Stupid Show I. Don't watch other shows. I watch TV but for some reason when it decided to always like what's the dumbest things and and one of them was like the world most exciting houses and there was a guy on there in New York who converted a dumpster into a actually a really cool apartment was really cool and like as you drive down the street. You don't notice it but then he opened up. There's like Chandelier. Yeah I know grant was lovely so people are will at least. I'm not saying go live in the dumpster but I'm saying like there's some pretty creative places they're like you'll find something. Yeah there's cooperatives right the yeah. We're really coops APPS for sure. But that's kind of a little hunt in itself venture. Yeah we're really excited to try it out and he would have blank and I'm very excited for Yuli. He'll get to go to kindergarten in Queens and I think just all of the things to see in do for kids in that area is pretty exciting. Yeah let's superfan and diversity yes yes I think there's like eighty different different languages spoken in the home in the population for the schools. Were looking at so yeah awesome cool. Yeah I think doc They love Portland but definitely There it can be a little homogeneous and You know you kind of have to make some extra effort efforts with your kids to expose them to people and things that are not like your home And I think those opportunities will be a lot got more close at hand so yeah that will be exciting exciting and you have ties to your so. Yeah it'd be back and forth absolutely absolutely. Yeah my mom and her husband super close with easily and so on. We're really making it a priority to to visit every couple of months. This research as much fun like I don't know just getting on the subway is just like just so fun for him to and for you and and I saw a life change their and so before you leave what you wish for Portland such a big question. Hey I just wrote an essay for arts. Ecology called arranging aging the deck chairs which is not the most optimistic title. I mean it comes from the phrase arranging the deck chairs on the titanic. If you are not familiar with that Folks the term explaining that. Yeah so I I think one of the things. I'm really so the. The Essay is really just sort of breaking down that we've lost over seven major curatorial positions wins in the region in the last three years. So it sort of making an argument for what curator's do what their job is why it's so specialized feels sales. I mean I have people come up to me and ask me if I would recommend going to a curatorial focused like Ma program. They're very expensive. A lot of them. we they have grown in popularity museum studies programs have really Increased across across the US. And so we're turning out all of these curator's every year in these positions are going away. That is a national national problem and that is an international problem and I ultimately it hurts artists. Because the curator's role is really in doing studio visits Having conversations with artists really delving into their practice and then through writing an exhibition mission making presenting that in a way that the public can interface with. So it's a it's it's a totally a middle management job right. You're working between an institution and the artist to sort of create this project. A lot of my work has been around writing grants on. I'm and working with money and budgets and making sure Artists get paid. I don't work on projects. That's novel is weird. I thought we lived off of exposure. I don't know what you guys but my dinner exposure and I think it's good exposure right. I got onto the GIG in the first place because there were things I mean. This is why I want to be an art. Historian their the things I want to exist in there to be a record of an reckoning with and I want to be part of our history and and so I just wanted to have very small little corner of the world where I get to vote on that a little bit or put my time and effort and Labor Bert into that so I want to write our histories for the public to consider and I WANNA put ideas into the world about out. The work artists are doing that. I am particularly I mean. I think we were talking about the sublime mar or wonder Really chasing them. I think when you see really amazing work. It makes you feel this way. That isn't your day to day feeling and you just leave thinking like how do I feel again like. When is the next time that's going to happen? So let's super important for me and sort of what has driven we towards worm going But what the essay is really talking about the fact that You know we. We are losing those positions in this region. I think is a very very concerning trend especially because growing necessarily yeah. I mean there's more money is coming in and the money is not going to the arts and that has been You know since the mid eighties has been a trend right and so we we started getting any a cuts in the eighty s and then the real into the nineties really major. The biggest cut I think came in the early nineties. But don't quote me on that because in fact sheet so I mean your question was what do I want what you wish for it. What do I wish for? I think what I I wish for. Portland is kind of what I wish for a lot of these sort of arts communities in urban centers I had a similar feeling when we she had the market crash in two thousand seven. Two Thousand Eight and I mean that is part of what drove us to Oregon as we were in the bay the area and suddenly the job market just went away and nobody was leaving their positions were all getting Budget cuts kind of jumping all over the place but but I mean David I really do talk about because we're both myself and my partner work in the arts but we came up in a time of absolute economic crisis and so we have this scarcity belief flake. We were terrified. When we're working a budget or a nonprofit it's like just like how do we keep the relates on and sometimes if you have to take a step back and be like knowing there is money and we need to figure out how to get it in a different way then and just like you know putting everything together with duct tape all the time? Have you read Who moved my cheese? I have I think they might have. Okay Okay Yeah 'cause It's all about that. Yeah it's like being flexible enough and aware enough to see when things are changing and bullying to change with it and finding a way to make things happen that you you know what I mean. Yeah do you. Don't just let things happen for you. I think part the case I'm trying to make as I- artists always make art. There will always be amazing. We're OCULUS WEIRD PROJECTS PEOPLE. We'll make on fumes and exposure. But like we should not be putting our artistic and cultural creative destiny on the back of arts workers artists because they are often the most vulnerable. If you don't have dental you you should not be responsible for upholding culture for an entire city right and so I mean I think we need a much broader more national funding source than just like making it work. Yeah Yeah I mean we're really wealthy. Country should be able to take care of our creative class. Yes mm-hmm so yeah. I would like for Portland to have To be involved in that reckoning. Oh I know I was gonna say one of the things that I was really really concerned with when we had that economic crash in two thousand seven eight was that you know kids that were getting Outta College. Then we're not getting any jobs. He couldn't even get a job. You know at a hot dog stand graduated college in Two Thousand Eight. Yeah I ah jumped back into Grad school and was like just duck and cover like I hope it gets better in two years but I was really reading and I was sitting on a grandparent on all these creative rating pieces and it was all of these young people talking about how hard it wasn't. It was like sleeping on couches. They were moving back home. It was sort of this failure earlier to launch into adulthood that they had been promised. And I thought like this is sad but If you are thinking like I I am white middle class parents pay for college and now I can't get a job that I really felt I deserved and you aren't thinking there are people in this country. She that never had that destiny. Never had that opportunity that was never promised to them and they just like if you are raising all the boats and you're only thinking about it yourself then it's I i. I think that terrible I think we need examiner religion where we stand in these communities so I think for me the opportunity to Sing Lake. This system is broken. We're running on A The idea philanthropy that no longer exists in the idea of government funding. That no longer is happening. And we're running. nonprofits are art programs as if if this money and this system is happening in it's not and we have to really like frankly look at that and say this is you can't just get you know more development staff and can make this work like if a person could bring in as much money as you need to run your program. They should definitely not be working for you. Because you're you're paying them fifty thousand dollars and giving them really shitty healthcare right so lake. No are there any cities that are doing it so my belief is that a lot of things that that are happening in the world right now that I'm not happy with can be fixed Isley if we just look to the right models we don't have to reinvent the wheel is there. Is there model autophagy Portland. It could work. MINNEAPOLIS IS IN MINNESOTA. In general has some of the best arts funding in the United States. I mean that's why y you know. They have some Walker Walker. Really cool stuff they just have a lot of really co- programming Some of even is that sweet sweet target money Target has put a lot into the arts. I mean we have our free like target nights for a lot of museums across the country but they you know we'd have a Nike night. Yeah well yeah we could wall and it kind of brings up. A question like corporations could be doing more than a in a lot more. You know what Costco just throw this out. How about Apple Amazon actually pay taxes Yeah Apple and Amazon just paid taxes. Are you a socialist. Yes but yeah so I think it is. I mean that's sort of crisis is an opportunity for us to reexamine ourselves as citizens of the art community and say like who has never gotten stapleton's who has not been supported in institutions within paying their fair. Sheriff taps now I mean yeah but I think we can also really look around and see like how. How do we make this more equitable as a system in general instead of just saying like you know the the funding missing now? It's like well also they. What was the leadership? We've never had who hasn't ever gotten to drive this last it has. That's where I'm excited. Yeah Yeah Yeah. I just hope that there's a bus to drive. Yeah yeah no I'm worried. I'm very very worried. But social night. And Adidas listen up all and we do live in a city in that respect. I was thinking like you don't have a target you don't have you know we don't have what we we have Adidas Nike. We have Intel. Yeah we did have those but still hot of those. I'm just wondering what is target. Do differently they just put more money back into the funding of art art and things are more about just wondering what they do differently. I don't know I mean I think they gosh arena like speaking to something really tenjin understand but I think target for sure. It's part of their brand. They are willing a hey upper liberal upper middle class of great. So what do you see different. He said Minneapolis. Yeah so what's what's different there. That makes it Kinda thriving. Well one of the things that they have a huge arts tags but They partnered with a the hunting community to pass that so I want to say specifically duck hunters So it was a bill all that both brought in just tons of money for the arts to be spent but also protect protecting wildlife wilderness service areas for duck hunters so it was a very strange partnership that they were able to work out on this bill and the bill passed. So Oh that's really creative. Yeah yeah no it was a it was a very I would fact check all that but but my I understanding as it was a bill that was sort of a mix it was like a culture bill our our culture so it's going to be and then also Our unique wildlife areas. That's nice because it kind of put the two communities together yeah otherwise either similarity right..

Portland United States MINNEAPOLIS Kevin Killian Oliver New York Apple Douglas CRIMP Intel Adidas Nike Yuli Nike Queens Adidas Costco Grad school Sing Lake OCULUS Walker Walker
"douglas crimp" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"douglas crimp" Discussed on Slate's Working

"It it but i think it's interesting that you brought that up in in part because it it speaks to the way that some denigrate quicker that they've dismissed it as a field of economic feel that the kind of work you do the kind of questions your tackling some of the the issues that you brought up a moment ago is taken seriously within academia split it depends on where you go in academia i mean i do think that there are people who dismiss it is very much sort of a niche specialty and something that was trendy a while ago and is connected to a particular erin doesn't have any relevance beyond that but i think that's absolutely wrong um and just darling baptist a little bit you know you'd asked me that my teaching and they become clarifying something about the way that i teach chris theory might might be helpful um which is that he tend to teach hadn't sort of according to three critical genealogies and the first one is women of color feminism from the 1980s and 90s um where people like lori un's undo ountry maraga lorde were first theorizing what it meant to be um a sexual dissident in all somebody who um did not aligned themselves with either kind of normative heterosexuality or normative whiteness and who understood that how those two things inflicted one another and so when i begin with my students with that geology they're often very surprised because they think create theory began with judith butler if cedric um and then my second strand that i we then is um aids theory on people like douglas crimp um who were um doing act up the is coalition to unleash power the between that kind of activism trying to get drugs into bodies trying to fight the government certain neglect of the aids epidemic and i have my students read those you know theoretical materials boss of the activists materials that came about um during that that part of the aids epidemic and then the third is a kind of high critical theory knows derrida is understanding.

erin chris lori un judith butler cedric um douglas derrida