6 Burst results for "Doug Mccullough"

"doug mccullough" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:33 min | Last month

"doug mccullough" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"One of his friends came to him. He said. Got a deal for you Dad had brought about in 74 had mostly paid it off. But as all commercial fishermen find out hearts, couple horse stays and you need new engine or something happens. They are from my dad. If he would come make a certain amount of runs for him. Run out me a mothership come back and go up into the base and unload. Away from prying eyes. Carl says his dead He never went to any of these meetings never took the offer. But a lot of people that Carl knew did so you know the temptation was there and they knew that they knew the temptation was there that they could offer to pay someone's boat off. You know, when 30 months you're both pay for and universes again. So this is pirate Town. U s A. A place where pirates smugglers have been plying their trade for well, centuries And this only made me wonder more. What exactly went wrong with the ghost ship? If these smugglers were such probes in this setting was so perfect. What the hell happened? Why was the ship of abandoned £29,000 of drugs in the hold? To find out. I visited Doug McCullough, who at the time was the first assistant U. S attorney in the eastern District of North Carolina. He still lives in Beaufort. We met down at the harbour. Just a storm was coming in. Some wind up. It looks like there's some weather coming in here. So where are we were standing in both for downtown Doug points out to spot where the ghost ship first appeared on the horizon as it was coming in from C. And there was another boat with it to a small skiff almost like a guide boat leading it in. They came through this narrow passageway known as Beaufort Inlet, and Doug Kind of pointed out to me in the distance. And there's something else that Doug wants to show me a cz. You and I look out. There's an island right in front of us. Over the top of that island. You could see a big flag pole with the American flag, and that's at the US Coast Guard station. That station was here back in 82. In fact, that night to Coast Guard men known as coast, he's noticed the shrimper and little guide boat coming in through the inland. And both vessels appeared to be drifting out of the channel. They were just a bit off course. So the coast Ys went out to investigate. First they pull up alongside the little guide boat, and in it, they see someone who is clearly not a fisherman. He was dressed.

Doug Carl Doug McCullough US Coast Guard Doug Kind Beaufort Beaufort Inlet pirate Town North Carolina attorney U. S
"doug mccullough" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

08:28 min | 6 months ago

"doug mccullough" Discussed on People Helping People

"Step back to and beyond talking about diversity isn't always visible. I think diversity of thought is something that also kind of gets left behind and so someone who grew up in. A you know a different socioeconomic area than you someone who grew up in a rural versus urban plays like those present different challenges Different obstacles and kind of different different ways of overcoming them and I think a lot of that gets left out or forgotten about sometimes. And that's something that we kind of coach companies clients onto is when we ask what is diversity mean to you and they say well you know people color and women we say. Okay Loudwar. Yeah let's let's start with that. I had a client who was a white man. Say so your company what it just helps everybody but me and I kind of laughed hours. Like that's like the attitude that were working to fight against because for example your from the hilltop and guarantee you think a lot differently than somebody who's from Worthington even though you might look the same. Yeah even though you're both white men and that's diversity of thought and that's what we're trying to create equality for is just a platform where everybody no matter what color religion gender at that it's all equal and everybody feels included. So I have a question so if you're starting with a company that really lack diversity of any kind what's what's the starting point for them to you. Know Really Start taking initiative on this I think recognition They have to be willing because not that. It's an intrusive process because it's really not. It's not going to interrupt their day to day but like I mentioned earlier that productive discomfort it does cause discomfort within an organization to have people in there looking over your benefits and your salary structures and the amount of people have been in Iran numbers. Yeah and looking at exit interviews and all of these things that maybe don't shine the brightest light on a company but the goal is to improve that company over also so if they can recognize that this is a process that needs to happen and will be better for doing it Both internally and the external view of our company will be better. I think that's the first step and then I think from there what are step would be once we get kind of the go ahead to Is Why is there a diversity problem here is it? Are you able to get people in the door? And then they don't stay. Are you not able to get people in the door at all? And that's when we start to look at water your benefits. What are your facilities? What is what is the view. Put out there. Your commercials all Blake Hetero Normative White Families White picket fence like Mom Dad. Two Kids and you know what? I mean just kind of looking at like. What is the message that you put into the community? And why is that not attracting the diverse population you? Why and then from there. We can kind of address. How do we correct this because some people might just want to say okay? Well we're just going to bring on a ton of people of color and a ton of women and just throw him in and that's going to do it but right now. There aren't inclusion practices that you know if there aren't employee resource groups are associated resource groups where they can feel comfortable if there isn't representation and leadership than those people probably aren't going to stay and so then it's just kind of a waste of time for everyone so it's frustrating so if there isn't representation and leadership like what do you need to do in order to change that company culture so. I think that part of what we do is the executive search. We try to put that representation leadership and I think also just having paths to leadership within the organization so some companies are putting forward like leadership programs where it's an accelerated path or though work in different areas of the business and they'll accelerate that growth. I think that's really helpful. Especially if you're prioritizing diversity to get that into the leadership in your company But there's a lot of things you can do. I mean just going outside to recruit most promote from within for leadership And I think it's important to bring outside perspectives diverse or not because that's a diverse perspective and we work with a ton of clients that the average tenure of their employees is like twenty plus years. Which is awesome. It says a lot about your culture but for Niagara for innovation. That's not good at all. I mean that is a stagnant culture. So things need to change as the world changes and we don't expect a company to be fifty percent diversity When it comes to like ethnicity or gender or whatever because maybe gender well yeah probably gender but it depends on the area because there aren't as many women in tech as there are men. That's just right now. That's just the world we live in but it should be reflective of the amount of people that aren't tax a thirty five percent of tech graduates. Are Women so at least thirty? Five percent of your tech workforce should be women. Yeah and a lot of tech. Jobs are coding so there should be more women in Business Analysis and Quality Assurance and project management And is eighty percent white so we expect that we're going to have a lot of black and brown people that are within all of these organizations and equal to the amount of white people? It's just unreal. Not every organization can have fifty percent of that space. Yeah just the numbers. Aren't there no but Dylan an urban environment diversity? Yeah and it should be reflective of the culture and if we can create these inclusive environments. That's when you get people who migrate to Columbus. That's when you get people who here. Columbus is innovative and they are socially forward thinking and moving. That's a place where I would be okay to live. You know what I mean. That's a place that I want to go But if if we can't even get that we can't even be representation of the population. That's already here. We're not going to attract a more diverse population and that's bad for us as a city back to innovation and revenue and it puts us at a deficit. You see pockets of that happening around the city especially with the Honda plant here. Bringing in a lot of people from Japanese companies and a lot of the technology stuff that has moved here has brought in people from different areas just because the demand has been there to to hire people. And that's why I think it's more important now than ever if we want that to keep happening. We can't just supply them with only have one type of candidate for them. That's not gonNa work across industries and company sizes and company cultures and. Everything's just GonNa fizzle out a student that with a company to get people to kind of go across cultures to form those bonds where you know from your own Peer Group. You know if you're very much the same. It's very hard to kind of cross cultural boundary by the city of Columbus. Doing an awesome job with that already. I think we're just trying to take it to the next level no pun intended But there are so many groups in Columbus that are focused on bringing different sectors of people. Together Doug McCullough with the city of Dublin is a huge champion of this and the economic workforce development team in. Dublin is really trying to bring together not only the companies but also all the advocacy groups that are doing really great things in the city And I think that we're just trying to expand on that and create an umbrella over all these advocacy groups with direct clear pipelines into the company whether that's hiring into the company or helping them improve or attracting people from other cities to move to Columbus But yeah we're just trying to expand on that what already exists. There are so many meet ups and different networking groups and Columbus and sometimes it can feel a little disjointed and segmented and it's hard to know where is the one platform can see everything that's happening and then it's like oh no. This group is on that platform and so that's something again with Doug and with the city of Columbus that we're trying to work on. How do we present a really unified kind of FRY to not only people who are currently in Columbus with people who are looking to move here where they can say? These are the resources available to me and then again with level just creating that umbrella where at our event the reason we had such a diverse audience and panel at selection was because we worked with existing advocacy groups. We get.

Columbus Business Analysis and Quality Doug McCullough Iran Worthington Dublin Honda Blake executive Niagara Dylan Peer Group development team
"doug mccullough" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

15:59 min | 8 months ago

"doug mccullough" Discussed on Insureblocks

"Smart contracts. I'm will lead also your host for this week's podcast. We'll be discussing discussing the very interesting project called the Dublin Digital Identity Project and I'm very pleased to have doug McCullough chief information officer her for the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Doug thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. Quick introduction on yourself sure so my name is Doug McCullough chief information officer for the city of Dublin Ohio. It is a small city really a suburb on the North West Corner of Columbus Ohio which is in the middle of the state I am a private sector guy and I may government guy. I've worked for four different state of Ohio agencies and two cities in the united estates and I really love municipalities into innovation into smart cities. I'm into smart ability obviously into blockchain. A it just really interested in sort of emerging technologies and how I can help public sector organizations integrate them into their daily operations Excellent excellent and I think also inside you're going to be able to share with our audience later in this podcast so straight off the bat as it has cost me here in Intra entre blocks. Could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work. Well I'm sure that many have gone before me and failed. I probably will fail as well and I take no credit for getting it right but I will say that I can tell you what it is to me and from my perspective because this is one of the most simple technologies while also being one of the most complex and I don't want to oversimplify it but you Kinda have to a small Description I see. blockchain obtain is a technology infrastructure innovation that combines existing technologies like databases peer to peer networks encryption distributed computing algorithms to form a different way of distributing compute data storage and data security so in its most basic form it works by recording pieces pieces of data into structures. We've taken to calling blocks. The definition of these structures is such that they exist within a chain in that if they do not not come after another block or not part of another block they by definition do not exist. This structural definition allows the existence of a block to carry certain certain cities simply by the fact that they exist in other words to bear Fi. The data of a block one needs to verify its position in a chain that contains other defined blocks each addition to this chain makes the entire structure more and more difficult to invalidating. But if you did and there is a press process process for invalidating a chain the fact that a change to this basic infrastructure would invalidate the whole further makes scenario more trustworthy so that certainly is over technical and quite possibly wrong But the important thing to me and from my perspective is that as an infrastructure it is superior to other databases databases networks or distributing distributed computing models for certain uses and the High find it to be superior for is data transactions injections not necessarily data storage but data transactions. What happened when where and with perfect while if this was was an incorrect or definition what correct one is so thank you so much for that it was it was really good definition? I'm GonNa will definitely always As he knows. So well you know. There are many different schools of thought when it comes to blockchain and different tribes who who liked to defend their view of it right so so could you tell us a little bit about the city of Dublin and just in our Irish listeners where referring here to the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Not Dublin. Orlands so I love to hear more about your lovely city. There are folks in Ohio. We know Dublin wealth and the rest of the world who have heard about it but for a lot of the world people people are like. I don't know what you're talking about. Here's a bunch of Dublin's in the United States as well But as I said we're a small community of around fifty thousand and up apply. Some years ago started along the path towards innovation through fiber optics in developing one of the first publicly-owned city owned fiber optic networks networks. And so we're kind of a techno-centric kind of a place that has embraced using technology to advance its economic development interests from air. We've been kind of a leader or innovator when it comes to smart cities up whether it be a sitting next to smart Columbus on being part of that same region or being being a part of the Intelligence Communities Forum in which we compete and go for awards where that is the city has an institute the Global Institute for the study the of the intelligence community to help share some of what we've learned about intelligent communities in smart city development and derive more from around the world and share those lessons since with other communities so we kind of want to be a conduit and in a light in showing how communities can use technology to improve the lives absorb their citizens. And that's kind of our brand at this point. I mean it's fascinating because you know just to remind him what the point is said of the city of fifty thousand people and you are quite forefront of developing new technology and. I'm sharing your best practice. What you've learned for me you know you sound very much like a city similar to Silicon Valley and also what is amazing because as it is a subject of our podcast that you've managed to develop a digital identity project based blockchain technology? Why how did your city managed to get to this point to be so tax heavy? Well well there are a few advantages and a few good moves some investments that the city of Dublin made that strategically placed us in a different position. So if there's there's any other cities out there listening you'll recognize some of this first of all. We did introduce me as a chief information officer. and honestly if you're not a very large arch city like a Boston or New York or Los Angeles or Atlanta or a London. You don't have a chief information officer you have an. It director director whose job it is to keep the technology running. Not necessarily to envision. What's next in what's new and so- Dublin Did that they invested in that in part because we're small there's less to run and there's a lot of innovation happening here in our region. We've got a great research institution Asian in in Ohio University and the Ohio State University. And there's just a lot of resources here that make it possible for us to do it. But if you're another city Anderson later saying it. We're not doing that it in part. It's because it's difficult for a city to hire someone in give them that job so hello. Dublin is benefiting from brilliant brilliant now so you've developed a digital identity project based on blockchain technology. What problem were you looking to address? This is interesting Because I WANNA put you in your listeners in the in the stance of considering what a city is we tend to look look at cities and say Stay in your lane plows. Snow Mow the grass. Fix The potholes and cut my taxes. And I'll be happy happy. And we don't think about all the various services and things that a city doesn't in has been doing but if cities do not innovate than we are going to be disrupted roughed it just like any other business. If he didn't think that the United States post office could be disrupted and of course. It is being disrupted because we always thought that we will deliver letters in boxes and Amazon changed all that you know taxes are being disrupted. Everybody's being disrupted cities can be disrupted and I think that that could be devastating for us. So it's my job to try and stay ahead of that and to continue to. Innovate we are candidates for innovation. Just like anybody else. I do believe that there's going to be a new distributed data environment just as the web changed to everything Blockchain the distributed data environment is going to change everything and we don't want to get caught off guard We were concerned about and remained concerned about preparing for kind of leaner government. government As it is now may not look the way. It is automation boxer. We're subject to impact by those as well. So what happens if we have far fewer people in a lot more automation. They're a how're we going to build the service model that serves people I mentioned you know sort of a digital disruption Russian of government just like anybody else right. Now I'm out in the Wilderness crying about this. Nobody believes it but I think we're going to see it happen Also mentioned sort of a declining in degrading trust in a sort of a more dangerous data privacy in firemen for people and we expect this to have but negative impact on citizens in public transactions. If we don't prepare for that Mrs all before thinking about blockchain as a potential solution But then also generally just as a person who uses technology I desire new level control or autonomy Regarding my data and I think that cities are local governments or even national governments can play a role in providing that security and privacy to citizens perhaps through some sort of a service but then finally there's a huge amount of pressure for cities to become smart cities to become programmable to use data to make decisions and I'm afraid that we're all gonna run into a big brick wall if we can't identify people or other private things that need to be identified in order to program around them We're all very excited about cars. Driving down the street being automated but if we don't have a mechanism for identity that's going to be a problem so should have government Create a new identity Regime I feel that blockchain gives a lot of control and privacy obviously back to citizens so that if we do need to program aspects of our lives that we would control of privacy back into citizens hands Eh. That's brilliant. I love the way you explained it what. I'm very curious to hear your views about is. How can cities be disrupted erupted? I mean who causes the disruption that we touched on a lot of points right right nine are around trust around technology. That is a pushing in on FM. Paul Thomas Cars but how do you see. Actually city itself being disrupted interesting nobody sees disruption. That's the thing I mean it often disruption we use the word disruption because everybody thought it couldn't happen like we will always be this and we will always have that So we don't see it coming but if you think of interesting things like Google ways in in maps We now listen to Google about whether or not we can travel along a road and not necessarily that government and there's some interesting stories about global ways. I don't want to center on a bit of it as a example but you know if if ways tells you that a road is open. You think it's opened in may be a sign there but somebody moved but it only sees. He's traffic moving through someplace. And so It advises people to undertake actions according to itself that's a disruption. You know we. We are no longer in control of where people drive or restricting roads in some senses but I look at things like package delivery and in really roadways if if you look into smart cities you will find that they are very centered around transportation and the nature of transportation. The roads the traffic lights. How fast people go? A lot of that stuff is being moved into technology. Benders if you look at the technology that's going into vehicles to make connected vehicles These are software companies. They're not necessarily governments and win. Software companies get better at directing people. Traffic perfect keeping them safer than governments are no longer doing that. They are not the primary safety or life safety partner in your life life. What happens if that goes across a whole different sector of Things that happen and by the way. I'm not saying it's a bad thing I think it's good that You know you could find technology that could do a better job at keeping you safe. The question is who controls that what is is. Where does a citizen have a some direction capability in that scenario and governments are not in a position to even speak digital digital language than the private sector will become the primary source of what we used to think? Governments do understood understood so even in a scenario canario where the public sector works was software companies or digital native companies. There's always a question in terms of WHO's GonNa be on the data and I guess the identity around them that data and I can get another person's I think so I think we all hopefully we all kind of agree that individuals should have some lever level of sovereignty or control over their own data but make no mistakes Big companies as our building cities now building whole cities. They're building schools. Why is that happening? But you know there's a lot of money and investment and opportunity and they have the ability the of innovating in ways that what used to be government does not. We've got to keep up so that we stay at the table and we are a part of things in in a digital way not just the creators of laws legislation of course. It's like non incumbent industry whether it's insurance banking of her marsupials in you always have the large incumbents who run. The risk of been disrupted by digital native company with us. Google facebook Amazon here. You're just taking this from a safety perspective where you want to make sure that you're not in incumbency that you can take the lead and I find it interesting. That in some ways you started arriving for structure was so. You're you're fiber optics and now you're moving in terms of identity Now when you look at identity why felt that blockchain was the right technology not to address this opportunity. Well and I'll get into some personal feelings here as a sort of a privacy advocate and not a representative of government government But I I do feel that individuals should have some control. They should be in charge of this question I I think that as a local government we can have influence over how this is created in. I feel that this is a great service to people like. Who's going do this in people's interest and I fear that Having a prophet motive could color. Or you know disrupt disrupt sort of the opportunity for Helping people be the sovereign Sort of democratic leader of their own lives where this is concerned and so honestly I wanted to get there. I wanted to help create an identity conversation I station before Our package delivery.

Dublin Ohio chief information officer Google doug McCullough United States Columbus Ohio Amazon Blockchain Ohio University Silicon Valley Orlands publicly-owned USA. Ohio State University Anderson
The Dublin Digital Identity Project

Insureblocks

10:33 min | 8 months ago

The Dublin Digital Identity Project

"For this week's podcast. We'll be discussing discussing the very interesting project called the Dublin Digital Identity Project and I'm very pleased to have doug McCullough chief information officer her for the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Doug thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. Quick introduction on yourself sure so my name is Doug McCullough chief information officer for the city of Dublin Ohio. It is a small city really a suburb on the North West Corner of Columbus Ohio which is in the middle of the state I am a private sector guy and I may government guy. I've worked for four different state of Ohio agencies and two cities in the united estates and I really love municipalities into innovation into smart cities. I'm into smart ability obviously into blockchain. A it just really interested in sort of emerging technologies and how I can help public sector organizations integrate them into their daily operations Excellent excellent and I think also inside you're going to be able to share with our audience later in this podcast so straight off the bat as it has cost me here in Intra entre blocks. Could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work. Well I'm sure that many have gone before me and failed. I probably will fail as well and I take no credit for getting it right but I will say that I can tell you what it is to me and from my perspective because this is one of the most simple technologies while also being one of the most complex and I don't want to oversimplify it but you Kinda have to a small Description I see. blockchain obtain is a technology infrastructure innovation that combines existing technologies like databases peer to peer networks encryption distributed computing algorithms to form a different way of distributing compute data storage and data security so in its most basic form it works by recording pieces pieces of data into structures. We've taken to calling blocks. The definition of these structures is such that they exist within a chain in that if they do not not come after another block or not part of another block they by definition do not exist. This structural definition allows the existence of a block to carry certain certain cities simply by the fact that they exist in other words to bear Fi. The data of a block one needs to verify its position in a chain that contains other defined blocks each addition to this chain makes the entire structure more and more difficult to invalidating. But if you did and there is a press process process for invalidating a chain the fact that a change to this basic infrastructure would invalidate the whole further makes scenario more trustworthy so that certainly is over technical and quite possibly wrong But the important thing to me and from my perspective is that as an infrastructure it is superior to other databases databases networks or distributing distributed computing models for certain uses and the High find it to be superior for is data transactions injections not necessarily data storage but data transactions. What happened when where and with perfect while if this was was an incorrect or definition what correct one is so thank you so much for that it was it was really good definition? I'm GonNa will definitely always As he knows. So well you know. There are many different schools of thought when it comes to blockchain and different tribes who who liked to defend their view of it right so so could you tell us a little bit about the city of Dublin and just in our Irish listeners where referring here to the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Not Dublin. Orlands so I love to hear more about your lovely city. There are folks in Ohio. We know Dublin wealth and the rest of the world who have heard about it but for a lot of the world people people are like. I don't know what you're talking about. Here's a bunch of Dublin's in the United States as well But as I said we're a small community of around fifty thousand and up apply. Some years ago started along the path towards innovation through fiber optics in developing one of the first publicly-owned city owned fiber optic networks networks. And so we're kind of a techno-centric kind of a place that has embraced using technology to advance its economic development interests from air. We've been kind of a leader or innovator when it comes to smart cities up whether it be a sitting next to smart Columbus on being part of that same region or being being a part of the Intelligence Communities Forum in which we compete and go for awards where that is the city has an institute the Global Institute for the study the of the intelligence community to help share some of what we've learned about intelligent communities in smart city development and derive more from around the world and share those lessons since with other communities so we kind of want to be a conduit and in a light in showing how communities can use technology to improve the lives absorb their citizens. And that's kind of our brand at this point. I mean it's fascinating because you know just to remind him what the point is said of the city of fifty thousand people and you are quite forefront of developing new technology and. I'm sharing your best practice. What you've learned for me you know you sound very much like a city similar to Silicon Valley and also what is amazing because as it is a subject of our podcast that you've managed to develop a digital identity project based blockchain technology? Why how did your city managed to get to this point to be so tax heavy? Well well there are a few advantages and a few good moves some investments that the city of Dublin made that strategically placed us in a different position. So if there's there's any other cities out there listening you'll recognize some of this first of all. We did introduce me as a chief information officer. and honestly if you're not a very large arch city like a Boston or New York or Los Angeles or Atlanta or a London. You don't have a chief information officer you have an. It director director whose job it is to keep the technology running. Not necessarily to envision. What's next in what's new and so- Dublin Did that they invested in that in part because we're small there's less to run and there's a lot of innovation happening here in our region. We've got a great research institution Asian in in Ohio University and the Ohio State University. And there's just a lot of resources here that make it possible for us to do it. But if you're another city Anderson later saying it. We're not doing that it in part. It's because it's difficult for a city to hire someone in give them that job so hello. Dublin is benefiting from brilliant brilliant now so you've developed a digital identity project based on blockchain technology. What problem were you looking to address? This is interesting Because I WANNA put you in your listeners in the in the stance of considering what a city is we tend to look look at cities and say Stay in your lane plows. Snow Mow the grass. Fix The potholes and cut my taxes. And I'll be happy happy. And we don't think about all the various services and things that a city doesn't in has been doing but if cities do not innovate than we are going to be disrupted roughed it just like any other business. If he didn't think that the United States post office could be disrupted and of course. It is being disrupted because we always thought that we will deliver letters in boxes and Amazon changed all that you know taxes are being disrupted. Everybody's being disrupted cities can be disrupted and I think that that could be devastating for us. So it's my job to try and stay ahead of that and to continue to. Innovate we are candidates for innovation. Just like anybody else. I do believe that there's going to be a new distributed data environment just as the web changed to everything Blockchain the distributed data environment is going to change everything and we don't want to get caught off guard We were concerned about and remained concerned about preparing for kind of leaner government. government As it is now may not look the way. It is automation boxer. We're subject to impact by those as well. So what happens if we have far fewer people in a lot more automation. They're a how're we going to build the service model that serves people I mentioned you know sort of a digital disruption Russian of government just like anybody else right. Now I'm out in the Wilderness crying about this. Nobody believes it but I think we're going to see it happen Also mentioned sort of a declining in degrading trust in a sort of a more dangerous data privacy in firemen for people and we expect this to have but negative impact on citizens in public transactions. If we don't prepare for that Mrs all before thinking about blockchain as a potential solution But then also generally just as a person who uses technology I desire new level control or autonomy Regarding my data and I think that cities are local governments or even national governments can play a role in providing that security and privacy to citizens perhaps through some sort of a service but then finally there's a huge amount of pressure for cities to become smart cities to become programmable to use data to make decisions and I'm afraid that we're all gonna run into a big brick wall if we can't identify people or other private things that need to be identified in order to program around them We're all very excited about cars. Driving down the street being automated but if we don't have a mechanism for identity that's going to be a problem so should have government Create a new identity Regime I feel that blockchain gives a lot of control and privacy obviously back to citizens so that if we do need to program aspects of our lives that we would control of privacy back into citizens hands Eh.

Dublin Ohio Chief Information Officer Doug Mccullough Columbus Ohio United States Ohio University Blockchain Usa. Silicon Valley Amazon Publicly-Owned Orlands Ohio Usa. Ohio State University Intelligence Communities Forum
"doug mccullough" Discussed on WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"doug mccullough" Discussed on WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

"Bill writer and people can't stop listening, man. But when you said. Jumped out of my chair. Man, I hope and you jumped out of your Jerry didn't like Paul Hammy. I did that today. One of my kid like, maybe. Hear them all again all fairly it's whiter than you with Bill lighter. Welcome back into the show, Bill Reiter with you talking. Kevin durant? Eight five five two one two four CBS Doug McCullough tweets, sportswriter, sports REIT. Are I agree completely? I feel Katie is this generation Scottie Pippen, he needs a Michael Jordan to win a title and get into the hall of fame. I think he would have gone to the whole by himself because of his scoring his prodigious scoring and he's better player than Pippen. But I don't think he's going to win an NBA championship on a team in which on which is the best player. And I think we're gonna we're gonna find out if I'm wrong around, right? When he's a Nick. I really hope it's Kadian kyri. That's the kind of team that could could shocked the world by winning forty three games or more likely win sixty one games and then lose and five in the first or second round of the playoffs. The the new lob city clippers really dangerous until it really matters. Eight five five two one two four CBS. We want to share your perspective. Richard and Virginia. Appreciate you. Listen to man, you're on CBS sports radio. I'm good. Did it just want to give you a little tidbit of historically on on? Kevin. You know, I think you're probably familiar with Oak Hill academy in Virginia, which produced a lot of damage it in an NBA players. Kevin was his junior year, but didn't come back for his senior year, and the primary reason or released one of the key reasons told to me by the coach was the influence on his mother saying that hey didn't get quite showcased enough. India too, many good players around him. They wanted to go someplace where he would be kind of the obsolete dog, you know, go on the team. So some of these seeds about being kind of ego Centric may have been planted very very early and not try to play amateur psychiatrists or anything like that. But there is a little bit of a pattern here. And I know for fact, some started very early in his career. Richard really interesting. I mean, the I I am familiar with Oak Hill because I used to as a newspaper guy in Kansas City right about a lot of college basketball programs, like Kansas, Missouri and K state were the main ones, and they would recruit kids out of there. The childhood star thing, I think is really important and people handle it differently. Michael Beasley was a a young man than I told the story. I don't need to tell it again. But who? Who did not grow into maybe the person in the leader in the player, you could have been because of some things that involve fame at age seventeen LeBron's handled it so well considering guys love covers Sports Illustrated a teenager chosen one above his head. You do that to me? Right now right now, I'm going to Vegas and gutter r-minot guttering Vegas. Still can't talk in that situation too. I really I really am. And Kevin Durant. Great, son. I thought his speech about his mom at the MVP. At the MVP ceremony was really moving and really cool poor complicated. Right. I mean, we can love the people in our lives, and they can also sometimes perhaps point is interactions that aren't the best for us being something other than self absorbed. I got two kids, and I'm not judging the other parent, I'm just saying the balance being loving your kids a ton and trying to set boundaries in which you sometimes have to be the bad guy. Tough thing to do. It's really amazing perspective. Thank you.

Kevin durant Scottie Pippen CBS Bill Reiter Michael Jordan NBA Virginia Richard MVP Oak Hill academy Michael Beasley writer Kadian kyri Doug McCullough Paul Hammy Jerry India Vegas sportswriter
"doug mccullough" Discussed on KGAB

KGAB

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"doug mccullough" Discussed on KGAB

"For life in watching i'm deeply how the sam before you today vice president might pence now the highest ranking government official to address the crowd in person telling them they've come to a historic moment in the cause for life he has a stellar record in the view of these folks here he was the first congressman as a cogs with from indiana to introduce legislation a bad federal funding to planned parenthood he has a one hundred percent approval reading from the national right to life committee boxes doug mccullough president trump gets his first born leader visit at the white house british prime minister threesome a and a move to tighten security and high speed train team europe belgium ceiling agreement with france and the netherlands to drop passenger lists and introduced passport checks and some international very all services we report you decide the best news and talk around the clock on am six fifty cagey ab the worst green cross moving happen will quickly rose do the rams in hollywood after steven spielberg cast him in the small ball in a film called satan private ryan the did you know the spielberg hired diesel after of my hearing his burkett a short from the keys of himself wrote and directed the found tailed off like they were shot in three days we just three thousand dollars fisher and was widely acclaim and even played at them festivals around the we're out that's just one of the facts featured in the new was episode of you think you nobody's watching now it's been crushed dot com i'm back any search shoring on merit the united states has established itself as the strongest military in the world.

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