35 Burst results for "Dot Ai"

"dot ai" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:19 min | 2 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WTOP

"C three dot AI C three A. I. This is Enterprise AI. It's 6 38 time for traffic and weather on the AIDS and back over to Jack in the traffic centre building on the Beltway Now in Maryland, topside absolute from 95 headed over toward Georgia Avenue. But look at that slow down, trying to get south out of Laurel south on the BW Parkway, leaving Powder Mill and NASA Goddard Through the Beltway interchange. One broken down along the right side of the roadway after 4 95 to 70 a little bit of a stack up right there at I 70 before you get to 85. There's off road activity to the right side seems to be grabbing some attention. Slow again in Havana, headed down toward 19, but you're good at a German town all the way to the lane Divide. No hiccups yet on the Beltway, Prince George's County looking Good College Park all the way down toward the Wilson Bridge. 50 going north as you head up toward New York Avenue. As you leave off D. C to 95 passing Eastern Avenue. There's a crash. Absolutely no lane information yet Route one South Bend Oglethorpe Street in Riverdale. There's been a crash. There was a wreck earlier in Upper Marlboro and our house road and old Marlboro Pike. You'll find you're in good shape by the Southern Maryland. No big worries on 45 to 10 coming north. Um, but watch down in Calvert County. Southbound near Plum Point. Road utility work still sits there in the far right lane Beltway. Still without delay in Virginia between Alexandria and McLean, 66 is heavy Manassas East into Centerville, Then again at the Beltway 95 slowing Woodbridge, often on north into Newington, getting a little busy around 3 95, through landmark getting north of Duke headed up toward King Street. Earlier police activity in Alexandria. Unclear if they're still in the roadway. But be careful. Glebe Road up near Valley Drive downtown. We're getting slower on DC 2 95 South Asia, leaving any Helen Burrows Avenue headed toward East Capitol Street. No slowdown yet Oxon Cove north on I 2 95 still looking good on the freeway, both sides between the 14th and the 11th good writerly along New York Avenue, but get a little heavier, Third Street tunnel. Same thing. A little busier as you approach the light North Bong. Headed up toward New York Avenue. This traffic reporter sponsored by Burke and Herbert Bank, local knowledge local decisions for commercial banking. It's better at Burke and Herbert Bank at your service since 18 52 Jack Taylor. W T o P. Traffic. Lauryn Ricketts has a steamy forecast for us. Another hot went today and today looks to be the hottest out of this week. Temperatures are going to be a degree or two warmer than yesterday and yesterday made it up.

Newington today Georgia Avenue Calvert County New York Avenue Lauryn Ricketts East Capitol Street Centerville yesterday Maryland Alexandria Havana Plum Point Valley Drive Upper Marlboro Virginia Laurel Oxon Cove Wilson Bridge King Street
"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 5 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is slated to be a women part. It's an area larger than the state of Rhode Island. Fishing advocacy group. The Responsible Offshore Development Alliance says fishing vessels could strike one of the massive wind farm turbines in bad weather. The spinning blades interfere with the radar. They used to find their catch. And fishermen like Gilbert worried that the structures will alter the ocean ecosystem and we're racing forward without the proper science to evaluate if this is good, or if this is bad. But there is research from Europe, says Amanda Lefton, director of the Federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will offer wind is new to us in the United States. It's certainly not a new technology and other places. The federal agency is in charge of leasing tracts of the ocean for wind projects. As we actually seek to look at what will we actually lease or even furthering, narrowing those areas to do our best to avoid conflicts with open users? Forst said. Danish giant in the wind farm business recently signed an agreement with one fishing industry group to help with research as the wind farms are built out. And John O'Keefe or studs, head of Marine Affairs, says the wind industry has made concessions on the sighting of turbines The spacing has agreed to is the largest spacing in the world, one nautical mile spacing. It does not exist anywhere else. The coexistence of these two industries is still in doubt. In it's part of a recent approval of one project, the federal Army Corps of Engineers said The difficulty of navigation means it's likely commercial fishing will be abandoned within the new wind farms. Back in Stonington. That's exactly what Joe Gilbert fears. This is an existential threat to US. Some Atlantic Coast wind farm companies are in talks to establish compensation funds for economic damage to commercial fisheries. In Connecticut. I'm Harriet Jones for marketplace. MARKETPLACE Morning reporters supported by C three A. I. C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at C three dot AI This is Enterprise Ai and buy packs Jar committed to making the complex world of sales tax compliance. Simple for e commerce, business says Learn more attacks jar dot com and by progressive.

Amanda Lefton Harriet Jones John O'Keefe United States Joe Gilbert Rhode Island Army Corps of Engineers Stonington Connecticut Atlantic Coast Europe Federal Bureau of Ocean Energy dot AI Marine Affairs two industries one project US Danish one nautical mile spacing Responsible Offshore Developme
Current and Future Trends of Conversational AI

The Future is Spoken

01:49 min | 7 months ago

Current and Future Trends of Conversational AI

"Welcome to the future to spoken today. I have already special guest with me. Brit kinsella people. Who don't know bread. He is the founder and ceo of voice dot. Ai and weisbart is a leading research analysis company focusing more on voice fake industry. That's right yes your voice. Ai wasted yeah. We'll come. how are you doing today. i'm doing very well. Thanks shumur so why. Don't you tell our audience a little bit about yourself your background and how did you get into the industry shirt by accident. I've worked in new technologies since the mid nineties but wasn't necessarily looking to get into voice. I've been looking at a. I but frankly a friend of mine had founded a company and was looking for some assistance. So i started helping them out and then wound up becoming pretty significant mar matta my effort for several years and this was round voice interactive advertising. So the idea is with your phone. When you're listening to music or the radio or something you interact with the ads that come up or not without having to take it out of your pocket and all these other pieces which are these other steps that entr introduced friction and so voice interactivities so the prompt and then we'll just respond with your voice. Seems like a very logical thing to do But in practice a lot more complicated than you would think. Because you have to have microphones permission you have to then be able to essentially have a speech recognition system and then some nfl. You in the background at least at a basic level in order to be able to do that and so i've been doing that for several years and during that period of time amazon echo came out which was interesting and that company that i'd been helping out through some friends decided to spend more time in that

Brit Kinsella Mar Matta NFL Amazon
"dot ai" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:44 min | 10 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KCRW

"Problems. Learn Maurizi three dot ai It's 6 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm No. Well, King. Good morning. This CDC says vaccine hesitancy is dropping. That means fewer people are saying they won't take the covert vaccine. And yet some people are still suspicious, including some people you might not expect. Dr Asif Merchant works in a cluster of four nursing homes outside of Boston. He's also an advisor to the governor of Massachusetts. He told me that some of his nursing home colleagues are still hesitant to take the vaccine despite everything they've seen since last spring. It was hard. I mean, you know, we were still trying to understand the disease. The transmission what the best practices are. This was all new, and it was almost learning to fly in the middle of a flight or building a plane the middle off a flight. It was extremely difficult. Patients were falling sake staff was calling out some staff for the sake. And then you know you had almost a perfect storm, where there were very few staff members taking care off multiple, multiple sick residents. And because it was so busy with such poor staffing levels, it was extremely difficult and it was, you know, very painful sight. Did you lose patients? Doctor Merchant. Yes. Unfortunately, I lost a lot of patients. During the last year. And it was heartbreaking because You would see somebody who was sick and we wouldn't get results in time. You know the beginning of the pandemic. Testing was done only if somebody was symptomatic, and many of these residents were not symptomatic initially, but then they suddenly when they got symptomatic. It was a sudden crash. Almost Like falling off the edge of a cliff. You've been a doctor for many years. You've obviously lost patients before throughout your career. How different was covert, though? Being a geriatrician working with the elderly. I see a lot of death, but this was You know, four or five times off that it was at such a rapid pace. You know, you didn't have time to sit and think. If I just sat and thought about it, I would have broken down. It was it was that bad. And then, as we headed into the winter, we learned all of us. Basically, at the same time that vaccines were being approved. You had some colleagues then who wanted to get the vaccine, But you have also written Publicly that you had many colleagues who did not want to get the vaccine, which seems surprising to me what was happening. It is surprising, but not really because you know, in the early 2020. The whole code pandemic was very political in many ways. About different treatments. You know drugs that were not really studied for it. Being Bush by certain politicians and talking about vaccines before The election in November, and it almost seemed like you know, scientists are being strong, armed into, you know, getting something out and available to the public, and it created a lot of mistrust. I was skeptical at one point because you know, no other vaccine has been developed this quickly and the history off modern medicine. It seemed, you know, rough estimates. It will take. You know, at least a couple of years before we got a successful vaccine now, couple that with the political jargon and world which that was spread We'll have a vaccine before the election. It seemed like more of a political stunt, then real science. And I think that was you know why I was skeptical when you had conversations with your colleagues and you spoke to people who said I'm not going to take this thing? What were some of the reasons that they gave There were a lot of reasons and a lot of it could be boiled down to mistrust didn't really trust. You know the science behind it didn't trust you know the politicians and government You know who works in nursing homes and who are the CNN's and nurses? You know, in Massachusetts, At least we see ah, large amount off Haitian Creole speaking co workers that I have or blacks in Africans who worked as CNN's or nurses and They haven't been billed mistrust of the system due to historic reasons. Also, they were concerned about how can a vaccine be download this quickly when there is no cure for many of the other illnesses, certain cancers Even influence off. The influence of vaccine is not very effective every year when they take it, so there's a lot of historical perspective to some of their concerns. At the end of the day. Do you believe that you're convincing people that the vaccine is safe? I certainly think I've made a difference. Dr Merchant. Thank you so much for your time today. Thank you so much. Dr. Asif Merchant specializes in geriatric medicine and teaches it toughs. He also works in a nursing home community outside of Boston. People in Myanmar are finding more ways to protest a military coup and the military is seeking new ways to crack down. The armed forces were always powerful in Myanmar,.

Steve Inskeep CNN Boston Bush Myanmar Asif Merchant four last year Maurizi early 2020 November NPR News today Haitian Creole five times Merchant last spring four nursing homes one point Dr.
"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 10 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Allegations that his nursing home directive helped spread the virus and led to the preventable deaths of residents at long term care facilities. New York City is rolling out a new approach to fight housing discrimination against low income tenants who rely on vouchers to help pay the rent. Katherine Carol is this an assistant commissioner at the city's Commission on Human Rights. He says landlords caught denying housing Two tenants taking part and rental assistance programs can have their penalties reduced if they're willing to set aside units for New Yorkers reliant on housing subsidies. Of people who are interacting with us come to the process with an open mind about getting at the heart of discrimination rather than just paying a fee, Then I think there's a lot of opportunity for creative solutions that are gonna make the city a more equitable place. 58 apartments have been set aside through the program and its 1st 18 months it has been illegal for landlords in the city to refuse to rent apartments to voucher holders for more than a decade. Legendary jazz pianist and composer Chick Corea has died of cancer. His parting words on his Facebook page called for anyone who has the desire to play or perform. Do so quote, if not for yourself, then for the rest of us because, he said, the world needs more artists. Korea's formative jazz years were spent in New York in 2011. He told WN my seas, John Schaefer that the city's diverse musicians led to his own fusion style when you haven't area Like New York, where the musicians and artists can share their ideas real quickly and play with one another things developed, You know things developed. Chick Corea was 79. Mm hmm. 20 degrees. Now, partly sunny skies heading up to behind your 30 Today It's w N Y. C. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from C three c three dot AI.

New York John Schaefer Chick Corea 2011 20 degrees 58 apartments Katherine Carol 1st 18 months Commission on Human Rights NPR 79 more than a decade Two tenants New York City Korea 30 Today WN Facebook three c three
"dot ai" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:07 min | 10 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KCRW

"Maurizi three dot ai It's 5 35 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin, and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. Constitutional law professor whose work is cited extensively by Trump's lawyers and their impeachment defense Brief says his work has been seriously misrepresented NPR's Nina Totenberg reports. The seminal article about impeachment of a former president was written in 2001 by Michigan State University legal scholar Brian called. He is cited 15 times in the Trump brief, often for the proposition that the Senate does not have the authority into the Constitution. Try an impeached ex presidente. The problem is that called in his book Length Law Review article concluded that on balance, the historical evidence is against the president's argument. The worst part is the three places where they said they said something when In fact, I said the opposite called argues that impeachment is about more than removal. It's about accountability and deterrence, the framers worried about people abusing their power. To keep themselves in office. The point is the timing of the conduct. Not the timing of the legal proceedings called is among more than 170, leading constitutional scholars, liberal and conservative who have formally weighed in on this issue, telling the Senate that, contrary to Trump's assertion, it does have the authority to try an ex president. There are relatively few scholars on the other side. The most respected by far is Columbia law Professor Philip Bobbitt, co author of Impeachment. Ah, Handbook. If you look at the Federalist papers Getting the person out of office is the object. But those who are you for the Senate trial contend that it makes no sense to allow a president who commit serious offenses in the final weeks or months in office and who was impeached by the House of Representatives while he is in office to escape sent a trial. Here's Yale law professor Akil Amar. When you give someone to get out of jail free card at the end of the administration so they can do anything they like and be immune from the high Court of impeachment. The scholar's 0.2 presidents both ways former Senator William Blount was expelled from the Senate in 17 97 and still impeached. And tried afterwards by a Senate that included some of the founders in 18 76, secretary of war, William Belknap, who resigned just minutes before his impeachment was still tried by the Senate. In both cases, the Senate voted it had the authority to hold a trial but failed to amass the necessary two thirds vote for conviction. If there is a precedent the other way, it's President Nixon, who resigned rather than face certain impeachment in the House and conviction in the Senate. After he left office. There was no attempt to revive the impeachment proceedings. There's another legal defense, the Trump lawyers are pushing hard. They contend that a Senate trial and conviction would violate his free speech rights. The UN supported idea that because Mr Trump was an elected official, he has fewer rights under the First Amendment than anyone else is sophistry, they say, and they contend that nothing, Trump said on January 6th there before was any different than what Democratic members of the House said in urging on black lives matter, protestors Not so, says Peter Keisler, a conservative Republican who served as acting attorney general in the George W. Bush administration. The First Amendment's protection of freedom of speech simply doesn't apply to impeachment. This isn't a criminal prosecution, which seeks to render someone speech. Illegal. Trump, he says, is entitled to hold whatever opinions he wants and to express them. But he's not entitled to assert a First Amendment defense against removal or disqualification from office. Take, for example, the incendiary speech that the Supreme Court upheld in 1969 as constitutionally protected from prosecution. Speech given by Acute Klux Klan leader called for black citizens to be sent to Africa and Jewish Americans to be sent to Israel. While the Supreme Court throughout the criminal prosecution, Keisler says those same opinions would nonetheless be grounds for impeachment and conviction if uttered by a president. Suppose, ask Eisler. The president just announced publicly. I intend to use my office for personal profit. And I don't regard myself as bound by the Constitution. Those are speech activities. Those are all protected from criminal prosecution. But of course Any president who did her said such things could and should be removed from office. Indeed, if convicted, the worst that could happen to such a president would be that the Senate could by majority vote ban him from future federal office. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington.

Senate Mr Trump president President Nixon Peter Keisler NPR News Nina Totenberg Trump professor Brian Professor Philip Bobbitt Rachel Martin NPR Supreme Court Senator William Blount Sasha Pfeiffer Length Law Review Eisler
A Conversation With Suki with Punit Singh Soni, CEO

The Voice of Healthcare

04:21 min | 10 months ago

A Conversation With Suki with Punit Singh Soni, CEO

"We are joined by a special guest today from a company that's making some waves and creating some ripple effect while they're doing it. They're ceo puneet joins us today. Caen introduce yourself. Tell us about sukey dot ai and star with your vision and how you gotta go in plus madeline reid. Thank you for having me on the on the show. It's a pleasure to be here talking about this journey. I start by giving you a very quick background on on where i come from. I have all of three years of experience in healthcare so many of the folks who are interested in healthcare listening and probably have way more to teach me tonight. I have to say A my background is google. Most of it is from google. I was Before enterprise software startup it some venture investing Which i strongly recommend you not do if you want to actually build a company and be an operator and I in google in the search team then ended up actually running the mobile apps group for little bit Welcome games Social which you know has a whole different story it probably a good subject for different podcast And then we tried. Motorola was actually astern software. Their software product management. So did that for a little bit built a bunch of very interesting phones. One of them was the. I always on wise form. You could say okay moto x. navigate me to starbucks and this was before alexa. And siri and google assistant other things. Were even a a Even idea and so I kinda saw the evolution of boys and You know the whole voice tack especially when it comes to listening and ambient all of these things from the days when it was very early on And i ended up actually going to. India was the chief product officer flip guard which is india's largest e-commerce company. Came back and thought it would be very interesting to see how they apply some of this voice technology in alternative another spaces beyond dispute consumer. I had this thesis That the largest most interesting influential tech of emory ever is going to be in healthcare. Now i don't know if it's going to be now or five years from now or a decade from now but but i do believe that there is a very interesting company especially with the evolution of machine learning and artificial intelligence. And that's going to happen in in this space. And so that was the genesis in some ways of expirations in healthcare Obviously happy to tell you a lot more about you know how we chose this idea but that was basically how we got into a into the space and ended up putting together sukey. Yes ended up actually running Software product management at motorola and built a bunch of different phones. As part of it one phone that was probably very much well received in the market was moto x. Which was d. I always on phone. You could say things. Like ok moto x. Navigate we do starbucks and it will do that. This was before alexa and siri and the assistant from google even ideas. And so i've kind of seen a ambient passive listening and conversational voice from the days when it was barely technology and not really even a product and so ended up finishing motorola going to india. Where i was running a product for india's largest e-commerce company came back After we sold it to walmart. And i had this idea that there must be a way to use this trend that we're seeing machine learning and boys and why and apply that to healthcare

Ceo Puneet Joins Madeline Reid Google Caen Motorola Siri India Starbucks Alexa Walmart
"dot ai" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:35 min | 10 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WTOP

"63% with Vetra Vectra threat detection and response hunts for attacker behavior. And shuts them down. It's what government organizations count on. See threats. Stop reaches Vectra dot ai slash federal It's 11 35 young investors fueled what has been built as a David against Goliath trading war on Wall Street. It involves the trading platform. Robin Hood and Gamestop stocks. Katie K. A TV reporter, Andy she and reports these traders could be endangering themselves, creating a trading bubble for the general population. In the past six months, These young investors have been major drivers in the stock market's dizzying rise. Robin Hood investors have helped Get up stocks like Tesla's and Bitcoin crypto currency more than 400% and justice. We quadrupled the price of game stop in just three days, taking major head funds who shorted the stock to the cleaners and causing general alarm on Wall Street. Stocks from struggling company companies like AMC, Nokia, BlackBerry and others have also seen an explosive jump in their stock prices this week. Tracking the biggest storm to hit our region in a couple of years. Traffic and weather. Next on W T O P. It's 11 37. We have a 12 year old German shepherd named Sophie and she became over way stinky, greasy coat and lifeless. Almost. Then, about four years ago, we found out she had several.

Robin Hood Sophie Goliath David Gamestop Katie K. AMC Andy reporter Tesla Nokia
"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:35 min | 10 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Previously unsolvable business problems. Learn Maurizi three dot ai From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Elsa Chang. Joe Biden's first full week as president has been a gusher of executive orders, some big legislative proposals and a very different model of presidential leadership. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports in the first week, New president set a tone With President Biden. It's been disciplined, orderly, a lot like the way he campaigned, says Barbara Perry, the director of presidential studies that you've a Miller center. Moderate liberalism, Ah, moderate persona and personality, someone who's not a great or a tour. Not going to set the world on fire but is well meaning a good soul empathetic. Feels people's pain President Trump style of leadership was chaotic bent on keeping the cameras rolling and eyeballs glued to his Twitter feed. Biden is hoping that steadiness and decency do better lacking in charisma, but Just calm comforting in the Biden White House. There are lots of briefings and fact sheets and returned to what you could call regular order. Biden keeps his public appearances short. He doesn't always take questions when he does tweet. His tweets are pretty basic. Like today we rejoined the Paris climate Agreement. No caps, no exclamation points, no stoking of the culture wars and is, Biden keeps saying his top priority is to get things done for the American people today, his climate day at the White House and Which means that today is jobs Day at the White House. And just like Trump put his personal stamp on everything. Biden takes every opportunity to demonstrate that his presidency is about treating everyone with dignity. Here. He is addressing hundreds of political appointees during a virtual swearing in ceremony. If you ever worked with May and I hear you treat another colleague with disrespect Talk down to someone. I promise you, I will fire you on the spot. Another core Biden message. He prefers bipartisanship of possible and he's always open to compromise. Whether we get it all done exactly the way I want. It remains to be saved. But I'm confident that we can work our way through and Biden's Northstar unity In his definition. It's not bipartisan agreement on everything. It's just camping down the partisan Dumpster fire. All that makes it hard to demonize Biden. Although Republicans they're still trying with the same playbook they used during the campaign. Here's Florida Senator Marco Rubio. President Biden is talking like a centrist. He's using the words of the center talking about unity. He's governing like someone from the far left. Biden may not succeed in the long run, but for now he's enjoying a little honeymoon. He has an approval rating in the mid fifties, something trump never achieved in four years. Biden's challenges are daunting. Still, says David Axelrod, who was president Obama's top strategist. There is a potential upside for Biden. Great presidents emerged from great crises. This is bides opportunity. He is facing a set of circumstances that are as severe as any president since Franklin Roosevelt. Huge challenges, but also the opportunity to leave the country out of this morass. Biden success will be measured by two simple metrics. How quickly can you get the country vaccinated? How quickly can you get the economy moving again? He's trying to achieve both with a big $1.9 trillion relief plan, Axelrod says. Biden has to decide soon exactly how he'll try to get that bill through Congress. He has two competing imperatives. One is to do things quickly to get the country move. And the second is to do them in a way that doesn't CA note this unity. He wants to show that he can work across the aisle. That's something that people are hungering for. And he's got the way these equities How much is cooperation worth versus speed? If he can't get Republican support in the Senate, he can pass parts of his plan with a legislative maneuver called Budget reconciliation. That would allow him to pass it with a bare majority of Democratic votes. Only. How long will he wait to make that decision doesn't sound like very long and I don't expect we'll know whether we have an agreement with what extent the entire package will be able to pass or not pass. Until we get right down to the very end of this process, which would be probably in a couple weeks. For Biden. This is a kind of do over. He was in the White House just five years ago, and the two big lessons his team took away from the Obama years were one. Don't wait too long to find out whether enough Republican senators will work with you and two if you want to fix an economic crisis. It's better to spend too much than too little. Now. Biden has given himself just a couple of weeks to see if he can get bipartisan buy in on his first big initiative and to decide how much of that proposal he's willing to put off for another day. Mara Liasson NPR news Denzel Washington, Rommie Malik Jared Leto for a film called The Little Things. That's a big name, Caste critic mob. Bob Mondello says the little things is a police procedural. That's among the films that this year are opening simultaneously in theaters and on HBO, Max. Smooth, smartly tailored LAPD detective played by Romney. Malik sounds plenty authoritative when he gives.

President Biden Biden White House president Mara Liasson White House David Axelrod Audie Cornish NPR Obama Barbara Perry Elsa Chang Trump Rommie Malik Jared Leto Bob Mondello Senator Marco Rubio national political corresponde Twitter LAPD Miller center Paris
"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At sea three dot ai From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Elsa Chang, Joe Biden's first full week as president has been a gusher of executive orders, some big legislative proposals and a very different model of presidential leadership. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports in the first week, new president set a tone with President Biden. It's been disciplined, orderly, a lot like the way he campaigned, says Barbara Perry, the director of presidential studies that you've a Miller center, moderate liberalism, a moderate persona and personality, someone who's not a great or a tour. Not going to set the world on fire but is well meaning a good soul empathetic. Feels people's pain President Trump style of leadership was chaotic bent on keeping the cameras rolling and eyeballs glued to his Twitter feed. Biden is hoping that steadiness and decency do better lacking in charisma, but Just calm comforting in the Biden White House. There are lots of briefings, in fact sheets a return to what you could call regular order. Biden keeps his public appearances short. He doesn't always take questions when he does tweet. His tweets are pretty basic. Like today we rejoined the Paris climate Agreement. No caps, no exclamation points, No stoking of the culture wars and his Biden keeps saying his top priority is to get things done for the American people today, his climate day at the White House and Which means that today is jobs Day at the White House. And just like Trump put his personal stamp on everything. Biden takes every opportunity to demonstrate that his presidency is about treating everyone with dignity. Here. He is addressing hundreds of political appointees during a virtual swearing in ceremony. If you ever worked with May and I hear you treat another colleague with disrespect Talk down to someone. I promise you, I will fire you on the spot. Another core Biden message. He prefers bipartisanship of possible and he's always open to compromise. Whether we get it all done exactly the way I want. It remains to be saved. But I'm confident that we can work our way through and Biden's Northstar unity In his definition. It's not bipartisan agreement on everything. It's just camping down the partisan Dumpster fire. All that makes it hard to demonize Biden. Although Republicans air still trying with the same playbook they used during the campaign, here's Florida Senator Marco Rubio. President Biden is talking like a centrist. He's using the words of the center talking about unity. He's governing like someone from the far left. Biden may not succeed in the long run, but for now he's enjoying a little honeymoon. He has an approval rating in the mid fifties, something trump never achieved in four years. Biden's challenges are daunting. Still, says David Axelrod, who was president Obama's top strategist. There is a potential upside for Biden. Great presidents emerged from great crises. This is Biden's opportunity. He is facing a set of circumstances that are as severe as any president since Franklin Roosevelt. Huge challenges, but also the opportunity to leave the country out of this morass. Biden success will be measured by two simple metrics. How quickly can you get the country vaccinated? How quickly can you get the economy moving again? He's trying to achieve both with a big $1.9 trillion relief plan, Axelrod says. Biden has to decide soon exactly how he'll try to get that bill through Congress. He has two competing imperatives. One is to do things quickly to get the country moving, and the second is to do them in a way that doesn't CA note disunity. He wants to show that he can work across the aisle. That's something that people are hungering for, And he's got the way these equities How much is cooperation worth versus speed? If he can't get Republican support in the Senate, he can pass parts of his plan with a legislative maneuver called Budget reconciliation. That would allow him to pass it with a bare majority of Democratic votes. Only. How long will he wait to make that decision doesn't sound like very long and I don't expect we'll know whether we have an agreement with what extent the entire package will be able to pass or not pass. Until we get right down to the very end of this process, which would be probably in a couple weeks. For Biden. This is a kind of do over. He was in the White House just five years ago, and the two big lessons his team took away from the Obama years were one. Don't wait too long to find out whether enough Republican senators will work with you and two if you want to fix an economic crisis. It's better to spend too much than too little. Now. Biden has given himself just a couple of weeks to see if he can get bipartisan buy in on his first big initiative and to decide how much of that proposal he's willing to put off for another day. Mara Liasson NPR news Denzel Washington, Rommie Malik Jared Leto for a film called The Little Things. That's a big name, Caste critic mob. Bob Mondello says the little things is a police procedural. That's among the films that this year are opening simultaneously in theaters and on HBO, Max. Smooth, smartly tailored LAPD detective played by Romney. Malik sounds plenty authoritative when he gives a homicide press briefing. I can assure you.

President Biden Biden White House president Mara Liasson White House David Axelrod Audie Cornish NPR Obama Barbara Perry Trump Rommie Malik Jared Leto Bob Mondello Senator Marco Rubio Elsa Chang national political corresponde Twitter LAPD Miller center Paris
"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 11 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Learn more at sea three dot ai This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Tanya mostly, and I'm Rachel Martin. It's a new year and hopefully that means a lot of new great music is coming our way. We've asked some of our colleagues at NPR music to highlight a few the albums that they're looking forward to Hi. I'm Ursula Russo. I'm a writer and editor for NPR Music and one album that I'm really excited about this year is collapsed in some games by Arlo Parks, which comes out January 29th. On rice and beans may highest budge. True, Thanks. You want a green? So this album is our lawyer Park's debut album. She's a British singer songwriter, and her sound is kind of like Bedroom Pa. Mixed with a little bit of indie folk and a little bit of R and B. I personally really love the way that she drops references to the music that she loves in her songs. She named drops the lead singer of the cure on her song, Black Dog, the lead singer of my chemical romance on the Song Cola and the rapper MF Doom on her son, George. I think this song Green eyes is a perfect example of the really soothing way that she sings and the little lyrical details that she includes that really put you in a time and place. Are you gonna trust? How you feeling? Artists like Billy, I'll ish and Phoebe Bridgers are already fans of hers. And I think that this debut album is going to earn her a lot more fans also, I think this is just gonna be a really big here for her. Remember when they call us making our office. Another record That I'm really excited about is little oblivion is by Julian Baker, which comes out February 26. Her debut album was really centered around just her and her kid hard had this very beautiful spar sound. And then on her second album, she added piano and a little bit of woodwinds and strings. Now for her third album, she cranks up the volume. There is based drums, synthesizers and more on this record. I think you can definitely hear that on the album's first single faith healer. She's a Tennessee based songwriter and multi instrumentalist who writes these extremely honest, vulnerable songs that grapple with self worth relationships, Mental health and her faith. I think she's definitely drawing on a lineage of fans that she grew up listening to in the early two thousands who combined lyrics about Christianity, which weren't necessarily super straightforward. You wouldn't necessarily know that they were lyrics about faith if you weren't looking for that, but then combine that with this kind of Alternative rock he most sound, so she's definitely continuing in in that particular language. Julian is an artist who's always pushing herself. Always growing, so it's always exciting to see what next step she's going to take and where it will take her. That's NPR Music's Marissa Lo Russo with two albums she's looking forward to in the New year. Julian Baker's Little Oblivion is and Arlo Parks collapsed in some beams. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Tanya, mostly Let.

NPR music Julian Baker NPR News Phoebe Bridgers Rachel Martin Arlo Parks Tanya Ursula Russo Marissa Lo Russo writer and editor George Tennessee Billy Julian
"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 11 months ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Learn Maurizi three dot ai And by the listeners and members of KQED Public radio coming up now on 6 46. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Leyla Father. Ah Group of Catholic peace activists are being sent to prison. That's because they broke into a U. S Navy base to stage a protest against nuclear weapons. MPR's Emma Peasley spoke with some of them and their families before their sentences begin. Wanna go higher? Yeah. Alright. Ah, white haired man wearing a black beret pushes a girl on a swing at a playground in Gardner, North Carolina. Swing is for Children with special needs. All right, hold on. Hold on, girl. So when Mary oven was little, you know, because she has down syndrome. She used to go on them. Then before she got good at riding the regular schools, But she still likes them. They seem come here. Yes, This is the Cadillac of swings. Patrick O'Neill is the father of eight. A devout Catholic, Ah, hospital chaplain, and in less than a month, he's going to prison. In 2018. He and six other protesters cut through a fence at the nuclear naval submarine base, Kings Bay in Georgia. They poured their own blood on the base logo and attached a poster of Martin Luther King Jr to a towering replica of a Trident ballistic missile. The protesters are part of a faith based movement, known as the Plow shares that in the past have done actual damage to military armaments. People are always astounded that a bunch of old people can gain access to these weapons at all. The youngest member of the group is in his late fifties, and the oldest is 81. Their name comes from the verse in Scripture that talks about beating swords into plowshares. So they took a hammer and tried to damage the statue of the missile. That sound is from the video that took while stealing across the base. O'Neill says they passed through a restricted area where a loudspeaker played a warning was creepy. I know deadly force is what their eyes I mean deadly forces want to write hearing it. Dozens of times. Deadly force is authorized. The group was arrested and O'Neill sentenced to 14 months in prison. The others have so far been given terms of up to 33 months. Yes, this will be my longest in prison sentence. Martha Hennessy has already been in prison three times. She's the granddaughter of Dorothy Day who founded the antiwar Catholic Worker movement in the 19 thirties. Hennessy is now in prison in Danbury, Connecticut. When we spoke a few weeks ago, she was still at home, preferring to talk about the injustices she sees in mass incarceration. I'm looking at serving eight months at this point in time, which is really nothing. I mean, there are people being thrown into prison for years for You know things that are not even crimes. Many of the plowshares talk about prison this way, but their families are worried. I'm afraid that my dad might die in prison. More. O'Neill is another of Patrick O'Neill's Children. I worry that He might contract covert and get really sick. It feels like a real possibility. But in these last weeks before Patrick O'Neill sentence begins, the family is making the most of their time with him, like 15 year old Mary Evelyn did that afternoon on the playground day Ever, and the Peasley NPR News.

Patrick O'Neill NPR News Martha Hennessy Emma Peasley KQED Public Martin Luther King Jr U. S Navy David Greene Mary oven North Carolina Kings Bay Gardner Catholic Worker Mary Evelyn Danbury Connecticut Georgia Dorothy Day
Amanda Peer On Selling Yourself

Daily Sales Tips

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Amanda Peer On Selling Yourself

"Dot Ai where she's building the sales process for a facial recognition startup that developing responsible ai here she is Ni- sales tip today is about the value and importance selling yourself. So, the last time I was featured on daily sales tips. I spoke about resume hacking explaining the importance of writing a resume to be read by robots and not by human beings I think that I'm gonNA stick with the career theme here and discuss the next step of the process in your sales interview once scheduled on the calendar so. You literally are. In. A position to be judged interviews are just sessions to judge you and you could put nicer words on that or label at something differently or quote unquote see if someone's a fit but it's all tied to judgment and that's the perception of whether or not. You're right for the role quote unquote culture fit I hate that term by the way I'll speak to that another time but I have interviewed probably more than. Anyone I know I've been infamous for job hopping over the years and has sales people. I think that it's pretty common for out of any department. Ours is the highest turnover that sales reps tend to make the most moves whether those are. decided by US, oil by companies and you know one thing that. I've realized in. Having to sell myself having to do it constantly is that situational? Circus like a circumstances sometimes dictate the level of confidence you have in selling yourself as a product. When tons of recruiters are reaching out and you're happily employed it's like all of these great companies are reaching out to you, and if you take an interview, your super confident, you don't really care if you get a job there because you're probably not going to take it you're possibly looking whatever the case is, and for some reason, you're ten times more attractive to a recruiter. But if we look at a situation where you're actively looking for a new cells role whether that is because you're unhappy and your current company or because you got, let go from a job and that happens. It could really have a lot of impact on how we feel about ourselves and. A doesn't help to have judgment session interviews where recruiters are asking you. Oh well, you know why did you? Decide to leave or why are you looking to make a move and you have to kind of refine your pitch over time in order to get it right. The one thing that I have realized is why my like trying to come up with the right things to say there is no right thing to say the right thing to do is to sell yourself and standard ground and don't feel like pressured by a situation to feel like you're undeserving of something or that your value has decreased when selling a product company, they always say you don't sell. The product but the solution, but definitely holds some truth to it, but you can't sell a solution to a customer without first selling yourself so whether you're speaking to a recruiter whether you're speaking to a customer or prospect or whether you're just in your personal life navigating any adversity or difficult situation, realize that you need to have your own back and you need to stand your ground with confidence and. Doing that you automatically set yourself up for. Success in a way by. No matter the outcome you know that you're proud of what you did. So sell yourself. fake, t make it until you actually believe it and great things will come. Don't let any situation or person devalue your worth and confidence in sales is one of the most underrated. I guess quality is her things that you need to possess in order to succeed and to

United States NI
New Alexa products may be shown off soon

Talking Tech

05:03 min | 1 year ago

New Alexa products may be shown off soon

"Heard apple we heard from Samsung. Now it's Amazon's turn Amazon stymied to have their event on Thursday September twenty four announcing a whole new slate of Alexa products I'm here with consider he runs the voice dot ai blog and weird and have some fun talking about what we might see. Now last year we had glasses. We had the ear buds. We had the fancy speaker that sounded better than any Alexa. Speaker ever sounded the studio. What do you think? What do you think we could possibly see this year. I think it's going to be light on hardware. Actually I. THINK WE'RE GONNA see a lot more applications and services this year it just seems like that's the way they're headed right now we're starting to see them call their portfolio a little bit I do expect to see an upgraded. Amazon Echo for example, because we're a couple years since that last updated So we might see that we might see an echo plus update and we could potentially see another round of updates to the smart displays because they've been updating those each year. but for the most part I, think the stories are GONNA be around. Is and features. Okay. Would you say the New Echo? That's the entry level basic of seventy, nine dollar. Speaker that started it all. That is the one and eight. When it started at all I think it was one, hundred, eighty, nine dollars when it first launched might have been one, hundred, ninety nine then they brought it down. So yeah, it should be somewhere between seventy nine and ninety nine dollars. It's not the echo dot, which is the one that people will see for twenty to thirty dollars when it's on sale but that is really the flagship of the of the portfolio and it's due for an upgrade. What could they do what they do to make it interesting To make it interesting. I'm not sure. I mean the the most recent one was actually quite good They could increase the audio quality a little bit more but then it's GonNa be in competition with Echo Studio, which was a device i. know you like a great deal last year I expect them to potentially have some do safeguards at a hardware level around privacy that would be something that could do with. Better Processing Power they might announce something with performance and speed. In fact, most likely they will I'm not sure that that will be specific to the device though probably more likely will be impact based on the cloud processing and ultimately the natural language understanding layer of the Alexa Service. Now, what I think they need to do is really put a lot of effort onto video and the echo show which. You know as we've moved to everything's online, every trade shows online every classes online all of our work is online. That Lil unit has been left out of the equation. We should just be saying Hey Alexa start my meeting and they did announced that there can be working with zoom on one of the units but I think they really need to put a lot of effort into putting video I what what's your thoughts? Yeah I I suspect that we're to see some services along those lines although you have to look at what Amazon has to bring to the table. So Zoom is a nice integration. It's it is available now and echo show not as tight is the integration as they have for the conference room they already had many people don't know this already had integration with zoom for conference room setting. That was Alexa for business, and what they're doing now is available for consumers because that's a new swing on the way things have changed recently, people need that at home more I'm interested to see what they do with the television. So I think that that's likely to be a more fruitful area for them to explore the use of video and the integration with Alexa. So bring zoom and Google or whatever whatever program into the into the fire TV edition. Yes. Okay, well, that sounds like fun. I have one of those in my living room and it sure would be a really convenient. Well if you think about it too like people are using these devices now. To talk to loved ones right and so we have an echo show and I, and I gave one to my parents first edition when it came out of him to my my brothers. So we can. We can all get together and we can have these one one calls with each other. They're Nice. But the ECHO show is like a small screen even the larger ones are small compared to the television and in it's not necessarily in a place where it's easy for everyone to sit around the television. Is actually much better setup for that. If you'RE GONNA do family to family calling and I. Hope that will allow you to be able to do a multi-party calling for that as well. So zoom allows multi-party calling very useful feature for people during the pandemic they WANNA get get together with people. They can't see echo show is one to one right now, and so if they could do multi-party off of that, that would be a big step up if they can do it through the TV even better.

Alexa Amazon Echo Studio Echo Samsung Apple Google
"dot ai" Discussed on The AI Future Show with Professor Andy Pardoe

The AI Future Show with Professor Andy Pardoe

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"dot ai" Discussed on The AI Future Show with Professor Andy Pardoe

"Careful with their data cannot security in the hard drives that kind of thing or having a good passwords. So I think they governance piece tends to commend. Is Organization and start to grow I think some things, Sam companies confused copy governance with GDP are again these are the same things and those who think that seems to medium stand the data I think we have seen people using that is that we of having? An organism reasons Xuewen company I. What? I was trying to get hold of somebody who knew about ticket system to understand was and the person I was speaking to. You said, Ala L. A. Pit you in touch with them, and the monthly was still up in touch with Kassim Ananta found out that because looking for actually sat chewed was Dan for me And the office I was. And I was being these deliberate bodies because I didn't know where this passing loops like and it was a chance conversation said still haven't spoken too soon. So yet is it does she misses at different bassim? So I do think m win that sort of thing happens you think. I am not being empowered to my job here. I'm just thinking so they ended up. Is If I can get to do. In pillow the pieces of information together each going executives full flat job, and that doesn't mean fortunately kneecaps Evan with the privacy I. You just say I'm sorry but your team mapping values. So seeing corporate governance being sometimes quite misused That's not what it's for. It's very asking I. Think for her might mistake and coming back to the not great projects. something. That people are starting to thank you both with your project is what made Mr and will risk mate. That rescue be reputational financial, it could be physical Israelian. An employee getting heart. Some wave is not had crooked famous on think it could be legal and. And I think companies thinking about these things get more ridge impacts. Because the something unknown about. This companies don't feel. That is confident abate in the same way as the do with during a how did read pretty. Interesting. Okay. So we're coming up to so the tend to to the hour. So obviously, this shows called the IRS future show. So I I need to sort of ask a little bit in terms of what's your view of the future in terms of data analytics Heidi do you see that impacting the commercial world? What what would you like to see happen? What advice would you give to companies that are be just starting out on their adoption of some of the more sort of predictive analytics? Thing, that's going to be a digital divide I. Think there is no and I think organizations may meet shield eight on the right side of that debate. And a Jew thing that's important that everybody understands data Beta. Sometimes gas equation. What skills she people have to get into design nothing decent analysis. Statistics seasons assume important thing is not just important for organizations that businesses thing that's important for his all we live in about in facts invest hand lanes. And we need to scratch under the surface. So I believe quite strongly in the power of things like investigative journalism done properly in order to bring things to the surface nothing only to be investigative journalists is well become. Moody's is happy and organizations need to remain below that decent technology a two different things. and. Amid, of thing, would be to start thinking about the biggest impacts that you can making your business and much of that you can automate. And So, things can you fire mate and make sure you stick to your core business principles? So as sometimes acetate things which, I'm not an idea she appoint for example, nothing when she went into still do but it gives that to other people because it's not lane with what I do sure nothing sticking to what you do in doing it really wasn't. Know. That's pretty good point and I think for me just summarizing the conversation rarely. So I think some of the key things that have come of this conversation has been understand your deterrent I think for me that's always been a key element to any project, understand the data and understand that it's not going to be one hundred percent perfect daters while. that. You know I've seen projects where failed have been loaded to mean things different types of. Data Sir, and and all of those little nuances that can really sort of knock you sideways if you don't, if you're not aware of it and understand those wasp in done and there is that. History to data I won't say versions but history because as people come and go in the organization, the data gets used in different ways and processed in different ways. All of that causes can cause problems but. The way to avoid I guess is to sort of do a deep dive understand the data make sure you really sort of know the nuances so that you can factor that into anything that you build on top of that. So I think that's one of the key. So the takeaways from today I think the I love that sort of phrase of the my regrets projects. That's that's where the entrusting consent. I think really important for analytics projects that the United by then nature has that element of of trial and era and potential failure but lessons led to essentially from that from that. So I think that's been thus been super super useful to taste those two of Maine's points for me. Is there is there anything else from your side that you just like to share with the audience before we close the show? Can keep your. again thank you. Thank you very much and thank you to everyone who's been listening. I've definitely tried to sort of bring in some of the questions that we've had all fade say thank you for joining this episode of the future show and. More. will be coming through the pub cost on the live shows in the coming months as well. Thank you for joining and Jen. Thank you very much. Feel fascinating conversation some great insights. For people working in the data. Mellow. Let's spice I. Thank you very much. It's. My book, the continuum of intelligence is due to publish next year. If, you'd like to be notified when it's available. Please sign up to my newsletter. If you like this show, it would be great if you could follow and share on social media, all links are available on padre dot AI. I would also be very grateful if you would take the opportunity to subscribe to this podcast on your.

Kassim Ananta Sam Israelian L. A. Pit padre dot AI IRS Dan Evan Heidi Moody Maine Jen
10 really cool Zoom add-on apps

Talking Tech

01:38 min | 1 year ago

10 really cool Zoom add-on apps

"You know that zoom has an APP store that lets you put in plug ins to enhance the zoom experience? Well, I, stumbled onto with the other day I want to tell you about some of the kind of fun zoom plug, ins that are out there I'm Jefferson Graham you're listening to talking tech. Here's a sampling of ten plug INS. I'm going to tell you about WICCA pedia. You can search for answers on the communal encyclopedia from within zoom chat event right you can do during your zoom call where you can now sell or give away tickets to your event. There's a new APP called Lingo translate where you use the text translator to conduct conversations in multiple languages within the chat section. Zoom Lingo says, it works with eighty of them. Side door is an online concert venue that let's artists. Zoom rooms and talk directly to ticket purchasers as. A value add. One of my favorites called Otter Dot ai where you can have meetings transcribed in real time. However, it only works with the pro version of zoom which cost fifteen dollars. Monthly Survey Monkey lets you take a poll directly from within zoom wicks is a really popular APP to create your own web sites, and now you can offer zoom webinars and classes directly under your website with wis website tools. Qalinle is a calendar APP for scheduling meetings. Once connected video conference details are edited each calendar events and meeting reminders or generated I. Think all of these are a lot of fun listeners. What's your favorite of all them and love to hear from you on twitter where I'm Jefferson Graham

Jefferson Graham Qalinle
The Logic of People

Between the Slides

08:13 min | 1 year ago

The Logic of People

"Everybody welcome back to the people process. Progress PODCASTS I'm your host Kevin Panel this episode twenty the logic of people in. We'll see why I'm calling that here in a little bit as we talk more with my Matt Schmitt. Ceo OF PEOPLE DOT AI. And thank you again for everyone. That's listen download subscribe. Please give us a rating out. There obviously more stars as good. Help US bump up to the top and share more great stories. Like we're GONNA get today talking with that and so today we'll learn about Matt where he grew up those kind of things Matt. Thank you again for being on the PODCAST. Really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you this evening. No Problem Kevin. Thanks so much for having me cool. So he mentioned. Let's you know the people process progress right so we're learning about you. Cover in the people component obviously a lot of process which is great. I'm excited to have that conversation and share that with other people all the processes you've been through in in in the industries that you've been part of and then of course share with folks As we make progress so kind of jumping into it. Where where are you from? And where did you grow up? Yeah so grew up in eastern North Carolina North Carolina's one of those interesting states. That has this island in the middle between the beaches and the mountains and everything in between is a farm country in in SPLAT and So I grew up in the farming country and was driven to build to get into technology and build a way to escape from the lack of of technology and progress in So came up to to the island here in Raleigh and went to College at NC State. That really kick me off in my My Journey Nice did you were you into technology. Maybe a lot. Were you excited about it or into it when you were younger like did you enjoy like Atari intendo or things like that? Did you have kind of a? You know an attraction to that and I'm GONNA be dated. I'm forty six. I may be older than ordering us. No totally totally had had all those things and you know we had. We had dial up internet. Remember getting my first computer and being intrigued by the potential of that and quickly taught myself how to program and That was really the first you know way to to begin. Escaping on started helping people build websites Back when I was a teenager and so that I've always had that sort of that entrepreneur. Draw ever since I was really young and That seems I've carried well for me did you. Did you get into any particular kind of code you know doing websites begging HMO or or just kind of a little bit everything a little bit of everything early on You know heavily into html and you know even before this was before there was really CSS and early into Java script and then quickly into building programs in basic and And then moving into languages like Java as I taught myself more and more about how to program it was really the I in the early days. It was really driven by You know funny enough as I had a an early computer and we had this. We had the dial up internet and I was really one of the things I was really driven by was. Hey you know. We don't have Microsoft word. I really think I could build something like that. That was foolish of me in the early days while ambitious vision ambition. Never Was Never Short on my in my youth man edge and that with Imagine right now what we're going through with dial up all. I don't understand the true pain that that is a you know when you had to have a separate phone line just so you get kicked off right Yeah that I I think I told some of the other day guys. We head this pandemic during the eighties or even the early nineties How much worse it would be and you didn't get your free Internet. Cd in the mail may trying to figure out how to get into AOL right. You're it'd be along in. Would you know what that's also included that bug of doing that making Got TO NC state and so did you major in computer science or similar a major there. Eso majored in computer engineering and computer and electrical engineering because Foolish me I thought I wanted to actually build the parts of the computer that I wanted to program them until I learned that I hated. Physics hunts so that that really kinda pointedly you know. I still went through with the computer engineering and the electrical engineering but was really focused on programming. And the more computer science aspect of it was doing that all throughout college and That was really where I found a guy connected with my partner. These on Long before it was called We started to build a business together. So were you you met at college. Yeah so he had a business that was had relocated from New York and was in Kerry and he was looking for some people to join his team. And this was in. You know I guess. Mid Dot Com crash Here And so you know. I joined in. You know everything plummeted as know. Our customers lost their customers. And so on and we had this great website called Java lobby and We figured out how to sell ads around and that was really the start of it as we built some interesting technology and learned how to publishers in turn that into a building one of the world's largest developer portals Diese wow I mean that's pioneering stuff right and then there weren't as many tools right to be able to that kind of wrote a lot of scripts for you or helped you along. So did you all have to do a lot of you know just a lot of hours in front of the keyboard. And you know mapping and work like that. Yeah this was you know long before you could really you know there were You had to build everything in those days send so there were know the early days of even things like Google ad sense in go blab words in those types of things. But you know we were. We had to build our own community software And so it was. This was even probably before the May have even been before blogs but certainly before blogs became the place that everybody Trying to put their communities. How did you find Many like minded in in school folks at school they are or were you able to against still pretty. I guess earliest days kind of reach out to other where their user communities than that you all could kind of bounce ideas off each other as well. you know. So that's what we provided primarily and so job lobby had been started by my partner as we scanned it. But in those days you know. The the developing world is much more fragmented job lobby really provided a place for developers have an independent voice in an independent community that was separate from the vendors who were really controlling the messaging Peru tools and development. The is in those days Which is is somewhat different than than what you get. These days and open source was what it was. You know what it is now. It was a big deal if he were open source back so everything is sorta come much further much more quickly than it was in those days.

Matt Schmitt NC Partner North Carolina Kevin Panel United States CEO Raleigh ESO AOL Google New York Developer Kerry
Help Detect Coronavirus by Voice

Voice in Canada

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Help Detect Coronavirus by Voice

"I want to tell you a little bit about an initiative. That's going on right smack in the middle of voice technology and covert nineteen or the crow virus and I have to admit this. This initiative isn't directly related to Amazon. Lexi however I think it's such an important thing that I wanted to bring it to your attention knowing that the listeners of the slash re-figure interested in voice technology. And here's the deal. There are a number of organizations a number of companies a number of researchers. That are all right now looking at whether or not we can detect if somebody is infected with the novel Corona virus by the sound of their voice and what they need to do to push this research. Ford is get a whole bunch of samples of people speaking whether or not you have the krona virus Because they need to know what a person sounds like. That doesn't have the virus and what a person sounds like that does have the virus and so? I want to kind of put this out. There is a public service announcement today to encourage you to go and check out a particular website where you have the opportunity to simply record your voice. It's very very simple. And so the way you do this. Is You simply go to the website? Voca DOT COM SLASH CORONA DASH virus. I'm GonNa say that again VOCA DOT. Ai Vito C. A. Dot Ai Ford Slash Corona Dash Virus. And when you go to that then you will see. It's very simple. You simply hit the record button. It's going to ask you some questions and you have the ability to contribute to this really really important research like I say right in the middle of voice technology and what is going on with this pandemic so I encourage you to check it out if you have your mobile phone handing that's Cheer Amazon Lexi Count. Then the card will have the Lincoln you just click on that it'll take you there but however I'll say that one more time for you VOCA dot. Ai Voc a dot AI. Slash CORONA DASH virus and. Encourage you to become part of this really important

Vito C. A. Dot Lexi Amazon Ford
"dot ai" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WTOP

"Dot AI that seat three dot a I double the GOP at three fifty one president trump's four point eight trillion dollar budget is giving some insight into what he's planning for a possible second term calling for big reductions in social safety net programs and more money for defense of the space program it also assumes tax cuts will be extended taking a deeper dive with this this morning return to the call of Crisco with federal news network to get hurt him the defense department is a big winner with the president's budget proposal was seven hundred five billion dollar request FOR D. O. D. in twenty twenty one that's actually largely flat from what the defense department got the previous year but included in that is fifteen billion dollars more for the president's new space for switch the Pentagon is standing up as we speak other agencies the did well in this request include the department of homeland security no surprise there really and the department of Veterans Affairs part of that is the actual big deal increase for a new electronic health record which is a big priority for the trump administration and veterans as well some other agencies that didn't do as well and these are honestly predictable at this point given the previous budget request agencies like health and Human Services agriculture as well as education and and housing also see some cuts now what kind of changes might federal employees seem to things like their pay and the benefits well it's a big one this year and the president has proposed a one percent pay raise for civilian employees in twenty twenty one that's a pretty stark contrast to what they got last year which was a three point one percent raise and what the president is proposing for members of the military in twenty twenty one which is a three percent raise and the ministrations really trying to prioritize pay for performance so rewarding you let's just based on you being in your job more on how you're actually performing so generally speaking what's the likelihood this all will see the light of day well it is a good question Congress will start to look through these proposals and honestly it rejects a lot of V. as civilian spending cuts just based on how they reacted in previous years to the president's proposals with interesting on the pay raise front is the president actually just put out a a final plan for that one percent raise it's not official Congress can still block it and implement their own raise but that's not something that typically happens in February.

GOP trump president D. O. D. Pentagon Congress Dot department of homeland department of Veterans Affairs official
"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Three dot AI and the listeners and members of KQED public radio it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I may tell Martin the results of the Iowa caucuses are still up in the air the impeachment trial is still happening in the middle of all of it president trump will give his third state of the union address that's happening tonight and as custom holds Democrats will respond with remarks of their own this year Michigan governor Gretchen Witmer will deliver a bottle in English and Veronica Escobar a first term congresswoman from el Paso will give a rebuttal in Spanish as Mallory fall from member station K. E. R. A. reports Escobar and her city have recently been thrown in the spotlight almost immediately after she took office for Annika Escobar started leading congressional delegations to the border last January she stood with several lawmakers near a newly built section of border wall tall steel slats that cut through the desert for people who live on the border she said it's frustrating to know that we are being painted as a dangerous place to be in control when what we see is a place of complexity and beauty Escobar was elected to fill the seat previously held by battle a work one of the first to the T. nuts to represent Texas in Congress but what's truly put her in the spotlight is criticism of the trump administration's immigration policies at a time when the border and I'll pass so have dominated the news here she is speaking at a house hearing about family separation and migrants detention mind district is ground zero for these atrocities these policies have created the humanitarian crisis and a moral one last August await gunmen from North Texas who said he was targeting Mexicans killed twenty two people I did not pass a Walmart when president trump announced plans to visit days after the shooting Escobar told MSNBC he wasn't welcome the president has made my community and my people the enemy she has told the country that we are people to be feared people said he hated those who've known Escobar throughout her career say they're not surprised about her outspokenness she is way of speaking that is not insulting and yet you know where she stands she's not wishy washy in the least that's Raymond's Calero a former mayor of el Paso Escobar volunteered for his campaign back in two thousand one and made such a strong impression he hired her as his communications director she eventually became county commissioner than county judge top positions in the place where her family's run a dairy farm for several generations Escobar hasn't joined some fellow Democrats who want to abolish ice instead it she's pushing for increased oversight and accountability well I think she takes realistic and pragmatic view Alliot Shapley is a former state senator from el Paso whose long worked with Escobar there is gonna be a homeland security agency that relates to border enforcement issues so she knows that so what she do she's less reformas tonight show.

KQED NPR
Apple nixed Xnor.ai's involvement in Pentagon's Project Maven following acquisition

Techmeme Ride Home

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Apple nixed Xnor.ai's involvement in Pentagon's Project Maven following acquisition

"Remember Apple's purchase of X. nor dot ai the A.. I. Photo and other things start up that we told you about recently well sources are telling the information that as a part of taking over x nor apple has terminated that startups involvement in the Pentagon project Maven the same project even that sparked sparked protests at Google when Google was involved with it quote until apple acquired it ex nor dot a I was a little known Seattle startup that had spun out of the Allen Institute for artificial intelligence. It's a research lab formed by Microsoft Co founder Paul Allen who died in two thousand eighteen extra data. I made machine learning algorithms. That could run on low power devices instead of relying on and connectivity to the cloud that technology could be especially useful on devices like drones which sometimes operate with unreliable intermediate network connections according to the person familiar with the matter exner dot. Ai Worked on project moving in conjunction with another startup clarify which has publicly spoken about. Its work on. The Pentagon effort clarify executives didn't respond to requests for comment but ex nor is technology could also be used inside consumer electronics devices for applications like image recognition. Listen it software could fit in with Abbas broader effort to run a algorithms locally on devices rather than in the cloud a practice that raises privacy concerns and quote

Apple Pentagon Google Paul Allen Allen Institute AI Seattle Abbas Co Founder Microsoft
Amazon Alexa for Healthcare?

Voice in Canada

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Amazon Alexa for Healthcare?

"Today. I want to share with you a little bit of research that just came Mota voice bought dot Ai. I was very fortunate to be asked to appear on their Webinar specifically about voice technology and Smart Smart Speakers and one of the most interesting stats that came out of their research. was that nearly fifty. Two percent of people would like to use the voice assistance for healthcare uses but only seven point five percent and I have to admit this is in the United States but only seven point five percent of US consumers have we used voices since like Lexi for healthcare. So why is that and are you part of the fifty two percent that would like to use it personally. I think the issue is just that because healthcare is such a risk averse sector that there are relatively fewer skills that are available particularly really really useful skills that can tap into personal the health information but on the other hand I find it very encouraging that essentially more than half of people want to use it want to use these devices for healthcare.

Smart Smart Speakers Mota United States Lexi Five Percent Fifty Two Percent Two Percent
"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Three dot AI and the listeners of cake he we day it's morning edition from NPR news good morning I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington DC and I'm David green in Culver city California in Baghdad Iraq protesters are gathering for a huge anti government demonstration this is the latest in spreading civil unrest that is threatened the Iraqi government almost a hundred and fifty protesters were shot dead by security forces in previous demonstrations and this one today the prime minister has pledged his forces will keep people safe and let's find out what is actually happening in pairs chain around his at the protest as its gathering joins us from Baghdad and Jane if if you could start by just telling us what what it's like there what you're seeing I mean one is centered on a bridge that leads the reader why do you ask about around our government industry and that's why we are okay keeping protesters out as they've been firing tear gas walking all over the edge of the park that's where we are you might be hearing in the background those are down but it's not the during the protesters because and there are thousands and thousands of people they're waiting the lackey flags and shouting slogans always for the government the fall I'm talking to a man in front of me yeah one way I what he wants and he said I want my country back a lot of these people that they thought nothing that they can promise wow okay so a lot to unpack there I I just want to make it clear for listeners of so far the authorities have not fired any sort of lethal weapons I mean this is been tear gas and and you said sound booms as it is loud sounds to deter people from gathering yeah yeah keep them away from the entrance to the green zone on the bridge that lead are there have been one unconfirmed reports that a protester has been killed but even on the tear gas was fired earlier this morning as I was talking you're ready people came up to me one of the security forces and handed me a plastic rose I was there under orders to protect the protesters most of this is being secure five wide in Chinese New Year so far there have been any like fire although some people come up short but that seems to be from previous protests here in the where was the main part that take place yeah now I'm on a low life I just think about that dramatic thing that that man who had who had fought isis and and been so injured said that he wants his country back what what does that tell us about what people want and why they're out there fascinating because country bring one young people all over the Arab world runs out as they had them the base is two thousand three and then they were told they could have not alive your love to get married as they get you all they could do what people everywhere if you all four are really simple thing to be they want water they want John and what the government that they face the government to back here's another one and so would I said the people just gathering I mean this is expected to go through the day and and could get even even bigger at some point that what what what does it look like if this is all coming together I'm a little bit so you might be able to your account you know yeah from the moment we have not yet one of them are the forces the whole moral the father and report back what what happened some of the names what do you think command this will certainly changed held right now it's very people gathering here from all over Iraq but that will change I that is the scene in Baghdad describe to us by and here is correspondent Jane a rafting thanks so much for your reporting thank you in this country prosecutors want the death penalty for the man accused of killing eleven people of the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh last year to those prosecutors that's a fitting penalty for a man motivated by hatred of Jews to some survivors and execution would conflict with their principles on the hearing reports from our station W. E. SS federal prosecutors have to consult with victims of crimes and surviving family members before deciding whether to seek capital punishment but Rory little who previously served on the U. S. department of justice's capital case review committee says that's only one factor prosecutor must consider the obligation of department justice lawyers is to sort of execute federal law the way it's been written and it's and my moral position as to whether it's a good law are bad laws supposedly not part of the neck little says if ours is found guilty and victims choose to give impact statements at sentencing jurors could hear from those who oppose the death penalty the jury would decide whether he sentenced to death Judy and awaits who worshipped at the tree of life synagogue says she's morally opposed to capital punishment I think it comes from a basic value in a human life on the possibility that you can ask for forgiveness I asked him awaits whether she could find it within herself to forgive the accused shooter I don't know the answer to that rabbi Jeffrey Meyers leads the congregation that was housed a tree of life the news conference a reporter asked if he had thoughts on the decision to seek the death penalty no I have complete faith in the department justice to act professionally and do the right thing wide many Jewish leaders say their faith generally condemns capital punishment this Sheva Nicorette hold on it rabbi says Addison of Pittsburgh's congregation Beth Shalom just blocks from tree of lyfe reads in Hebrew from the Jewish Talmud well the Torah calls for capital punishment for a range of offenses adults and says later writings denounce the practice in almost all cases as quote blood thirsty we really believe that it's not up to us as humans to take a life that really only god can do that yet Adil sending knowledges some Jews believe in capital punishment Stephen Cohen worshipped at tree of life and dreads the publicity a death penalty trial would bring he says there are congregants you want the defendant to.

"dot ai" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"dot ai" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Three dot AI and from the any easy Casey foundation on a Tuesday it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelley and I'm ari Shapiro many lawmakers are returning to Capitol Hill this week and they are largely United in their opposition to the president's shifting policy in the Middle East bipartisan groups in the house and Senate are pushing new legislation to sanction Turkey as it attacks the Kurds in northeastern Syria they're strong push back to the president's withdrawal of US troops from that region making this the rare issue where Republicans are breaking with president trump and peers to Mack joins us from Capitol Hill hi Tim Hey there so what if you were on hold today so it's really remarkable that at a time where the president faces political peril in the form of an impeachment inquiry he's also alienated some of his strongest political allies on Capitol Hill for example senator Lindsey Graham he's one of the president's strongest said it analyzed but he's been critical about the president's decisions to withdraw troops from northern Syria Graham has been working with democratic senator Chris van Hollen to expand sanctions on Turkey here's what van Hollen told NPR earlier today you've heard strong negative reactions across the political spectrum and our proposed sanctions will be very biting and they will stay in a fact Intel Turkey ends its aggression against the Syrian Kurds and withdraws its forces in proxies from the areas that it's taken explain why this would be the issue where Republicans are breaking with president trump Republicans and the president have over the past few years simply not seen eye to eye on national security policy many favor a more hawkish view and they already had an overwhelming vote on this issue earlier this year here's Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell reminding the Senate of this today when I look by president trump would withdraw from Sir at the beginning of the year seventy seven dissenters joined in warning of the risk of precipitously withdrawing from Syria or Afghanistan so on the on the latest developments it really does appear that lawmakers not brief they weren't warned it was unexpected it was sudden and it caught a lot of the president's strongest supporters off guard the White House says it is responding by sending vice president pence and secretary of state Pompeii to Turkey to negotiate cease fire the president has also impose some sanctions on Turkey by executive order how does what's being proposed in Congress differ from the step the administration's taken so trump has touted those sanctions here's what he said today about them we put the stronger sanctions that you can imagine but they get a lot we have a lot in store if they don't have they don't have an impact so the framework being written now and proposed by van Hollen and Graham would expand the sanctions against Turkey beyond what it currently what currently we take a fact with that executive order it would be more expansive it would target the eight energy sector of Turkey for example it would prohibit US military assistance to Turkey and would bar Turkish leadership from coming to the United States and it passed a law and it passed into law it would mandate that the president enforce the sanctions unlike an executive order it could not be as easily withdraw of course I would have to pass with a veto proof majority what's the chance that Congress would be able to do it to do that before the session is over you know that's interesting there is a really strong bipartisan approach to this in an effort behind this we talked about earlier how there had already been eight large veto proof majority in the Senate who had voted on a resolution on sanctions but on a resolution Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell open to the idea of sanctions although he didn't commit to a date for a vote on them he did kind of take a jab at the president's worldview exercising leadership in trouble regions and advancing US interests around the world does not make us an evil empire or the world's policeman it makes us a prudent and responsible world power supporters of of sanctions say this needs to be done very quickly because the reality on the ground is changing fast and pierced him back thank you thanks a lot okay to Ohio now Ohio's long been considered the key presidential battleground state president trump one there comfortably in twenty sixteen though raising questions about Democrats prospects for the state in twenty twenty well Ohio democratic leaders are now pushing back harder they are using tonight's debate in the Columbus suburbs to organize and harness voters energy NPR's don Gonyea reports sit down with the Ohio Democratic Party chairman David pepper and the first thing he wants to do is disabuse you of any notion that Ohio is now a red state we believe strongly this can be the state that ends the trump presidency if we have the right candidates in the right message cappers as evidence of Ohio's competitiveness comes in polls showing president trump's low approval rating here and the fact that trump keeps coming to the state he's been here more than a dozen times as president there's some folks said say we don't bother in Ohio don't ill will that's like an invitation to for him to be Wisconsin every week that's the last thing we want we want him having to fight it out of places like here it's almost for us a badge of honor to sign that things are going well that he's here all the time and this latest democratic debate is another chance to reach out to Ohio voters unhappy with the trump presidency all week there have been events large and small scattered around the state most are actually pretty low key like this one at a dairy farm in rural Raymond Ohio about forty five minutes outside hello all thank you all for being here and we're we're honored to be your farm in democratic activists in office holders from rural Ohio are here farmers teachers a former minister a small town lawyer for generations Joe reads family has far twelve hundred acres near the town of bell centre population about eight hundred and bell centre used to have doctor used to have two grocery stores you have a hardware store it's all gone the hollowing out of rural rural towns has been so dramatic there's discussion of how the opioid crisis has hit rural communities and lack of support for struggling rural hospitals in even the trade wars but another common complaint is that Democrats nationally too often ignore rural voters here's bring bird a local township trustee and the Democrat whose family runs a produce farm there's a feeling that it's a urban centric Democrats coming into our world means telling us how to live telling us how to treat the environment telling us what programs we need and it now back in Columbus and another event tied to debate week its focus training volunteers to register voters but also to recognize any suspected cases of voter suppression congresswoman joys Beatty ran this set up fortunately there are a lot of people out there that want to suppress the vote we believe that everyone should be able to exercise their right to vote because their voice is there both and that is our path finally we go to the suburbs of place many Democrats see as the key to any success they might have one seating Donald Trump next year despite trump's easy victory in Ohio last time the suburbs here are trending toward Democrats in part that's because of moderate women voters fifty three year old Stephanie Peyser lives in Dublin Ohio she'd never been active in politics until Donald Trump got elected it started out with three women at dinner saying what can we do we decided to call our friends and start a group and look at how we could be more involved and now we have three hundred and ten members and they are teaming up with other groups of activists suburban women in other towns around the state under the name of red wine in blue visor says the debate gives them even more opportunities to connect with volunteers and she says the DNC's decision to bring the presidential candidates to the Columbus suburbs validates the work that these activists are already doing don Gonyea NPR news Columbus you're listening to All Things Considered.

Weekend edition: All those Alexa announcements

Talking Tech

06:34 min | 2 years ago

Weekend edition: All those Alexa announcements

"Talking Tech is brought to you by Wicks Dot com create and publish a stunning website all from one powerful platform go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today. That's W I X DOT COM in. Stay tuned after the show to here. Are you can take advantage of Wick special offer for talking tech listeners. Okay we're on the weekend edition of talking attack here where we look back at the biggest stories of the week and we're still in Seattle and this is Jefferson Graham here with Brett can Scylla from the voice spot. Ai Website he looks at all all things voice computing and we have sat through this week. A whole on a new Amazon Alexa products were basically designed to take on apple and Google Google and get into the mobile world. Get outside of places where you have to plug in products. Brett why is Amazon so keen on getting out of the home well it's essential because they created this idea of voice interactivity in the home and it was amazing how they were able to put all these end points into consumers homes uh-huh and Google and apple two setback for two years waiting to see if it would be a thing by the time they reacted Amazon already had that space but one thing the Amazon was on absolutely lacks is that on the go capability that on the go access they talk about having Alexa everywhere but they have Alexa everywhere in the home or are in places now they've been moving into the car and we saw some announcements today about the car and we see like Cadillac or GM more broadly across brands is actually using the full Alexa SDK and that's a significant move forward but we need to talk about the person and that's where apple really excels. They've got the IPHONE. They've got the watch to got the air pods odds and in terms of that personal area network of Computing Technology Apple's really strong. Google tried to match them although with in each case in in each case maybe products that are slightly less effective than what apple's putting out with the exception of the assistant so they've got two really good assistant. Amazon is really good. Assistant distant apple does not have a very good assistant but apple's got all that personal stuff in the biggest move today was Amazon from a portfolio standpoint expanded where they're already strong wrong in the home and they moved into this on the go area and they're creating now a new access point for on the go users for Alexa. That's going to be easy to use is not going to to be stopped or inter mediated by the mobile. Os players eyeglasses a ring that goes on your finger with Alexa ear buds that has Alexa Alexa talking to you too car product. It's been invite only for a year is now available and they're getting deals other cars. those are some of the big things things are getting out of the home. Yeah it's really Alexa on the go is the biggest story I will say. Just talking to the vice president oversees smart home here and I look at smart at home is like the vegetables right so eat your vegetables. It's actually probably the most nutritious the most effective thing that they've done so far and they really are pushing some of those things forward with the microwave last year. The oven is a reference product. That'll get into more into in a more devices. That's GonNa make them stronger but the biggest gap they have and the way they need to really drive consumer loyalty in consumer habituation around Alexa is to be able to track that person throughout the day and so far people don't use the Alexa APP. Even though it's on the phone now if view put ear buds in or maybe glasses. I'm not as hot on that is I am on the ear buds but I think the glasses there's an argument to be made for that. Maybe not the ring. That's a whole nother the story but that's a way to actually bypass natural gates that IOS and android put in front of you and so that you because you have those devices connected you can ask Alexa immediately. You don't have to go through Syria. You don't have to swipe or anything and that is the most important thing that Amazon's been lacking in today they took a big step up towards closing that gap and for those of us with iphones who ask Siri for directions and ended up with apple maps which we hate now the the Amazon ear buds echo buds will default to Google maps if you ask a two and you'll actually get directions from Google which I love absolutely and you can use ways so you just go into the Alexa APP. You can figure it and you can choose it. I think that's really important. We see that would Samsung Galaxy. They're really good about this idea that you can finally the one product that made you wanna go onto Amazon and add into your card whether that be today or when you get home I would say say not the ECHO. I don't care about time now. I always have a watch. That's no big deal. I would probably say the echo buds because they really were high equality. It's one hundred twenty nine dollars and there's one hundred twenty nine dollar. STRAT OF WIRELESS EAR BUDS and they're not very good right in the one hundred sixty one hundred seventy strata. They're good. He's one hundred twenty nine dollars and maybe the setups not as great. We weren't able to see that the performance seemed every bit as good as anything I've seen from apple yeah the the buds and the Echo Stereo so the I'm sorry the Buzz in the Echo Studio Jefferson Graham. USA Day here with Brett Concil from invoice spot dot ai as Brett said on his podcast annual event for us to get together and talk about the events of the week. Thanks Brad. Thank you already ready. You've been listening to talking tech. You could find me on twitter at Jefferson. Graham and I believe it's out bread consoler. Am I correct reconciler on the twitter and that's K. K. I. N. S. E. L. L. A. in case. You don't know decks everyone for listening. Talking Tech is supported by WICKS DOT COM if you're ready to build your own website there's no better place to get started than DOT com. Whether you're promoting your business showcasing your work opening your store or starting a blog anyone can create a professional national website with wicks. You have the freedom to start a site from scratch or choose a designer made template then customize it to suit your needs and if you need to get online fast vast just answer a few simple questions and wicks will instantly build a personalized website just for you complete with design images and text choose. Your style changed the layout out and add any features. You need like an online store or booking system. Now's the time to tell your story which dot com can help get started today and build a website it you'll be proud of and if you go to. Wicks DOT COM and use the coupon code talking. You'll get ten percent off when you're ready to go premium. That's Wicks DOT com code talking for ten percent off any premium plan.

Alexa Amazon Apple Wicks Dot Com Alexa Alexa Google Brett Concil Dot Com Jefferson Graham Echo Studio Jefferson Graham Seattle Twitter Samsung Vice President Syria USA
Rebooting AI: What's Missing and What's Next With Gary Marcus

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:11 min | 2 years ago

Rebooting AI: What's Missing and What's Next With Gary Marcus

"I am on the line with Gary. Marcus Gary is the CEO and founder at robust dot ai I also the a CEO and founder of the machine learning startup geometric intelligence which was acquired by Uber in two thousand sixteen. Gary is the author of five books including putting his latest rebooting ai which will be available on the day. This podcast is published Gary. Welcome to this week she learning and at thanks for having me I'm really excited to jump in and chat with you about this book. I had a chance to dig into it and awesome awesome booklets. Let's just jump in before we really dive into talking about the book. I'd love to explore a little bit about your background. You spent quite a bit of your career at and why you as a professor of psychology and neuroscience you tell us a little bit about your background and the perspective that this creates for you so I'm trained primarily as a cognitive scientists my research for many years and my PhD with St Thinker was all about how children learn language and and how children's start to understand the world so developmental cognitive scientist by training and at the same time I've been interested in is since I was about eight years old when I learned about programming computers and in the last seven years or so I've focused almost exclusively on answering the question what can cognitive science bring to. Ai I so a is currently dominated by certain statistical approaches that from my perspective as a cognitive scientist someone who studies how humans work seem a little weird to me so I don't think of children as giant data machines but the way that they I is kind of rolling right now. It's all about big data and I've been trying to see what I can contribute the two from the perspective of cognitive science so when you were when you create a geometric intelligence. Was that a company that really commercialized live cognitive science based approach or was there a statistical approach involved in your work their geometric intelligence which was my first company was inspired in some ways by cognitive science. It wasn't slavish to it. So there's always this tension of you know if you building airplanes you don't want to fly exactly like birds it 'cause that wouldn't make any sense who wants to flap their wings so many times a minute but you also want to understand something about the dynamics of flight in in my last company and also in this company were trying to take some lessons from biology in particular from how humans think and apply those to a problem so we're not in last company was not trying to be narrow scientifically perfectly accurate. We're not trying to be faithful to the brain. We're trying to take inspiration from the brain. The last company the broad problem that it was trying to address how do you learn from small amounts of data and that question itself in some ways comes from cognitive science. I think machine learning earning is catching up to it now in the last couple of years but it's always been clear from cognitive science especially from the field of language acquisition that learning from small data's the name of the game children can generalize from tiny amounts of examples. My dissertation was about how children learn the addy rule for forming the past tense which take sometimes use incorrectly they'll say goad or went to things like that. They learned that from a small amount of data sometimes they make mistakes over apply it but they don't have the gigabytes of data the way to save the GP tee system does now to the last company was really focused on one particular way a of solving this small data problem at our. I think most impressive results were we were beating deep learning in terms of data efficiency so we could learn things things with half as much data without having specific briars about the nature of the things. We're learning so we take 'em nist which is a benchmark. Probably a lot of your audience knows recognizing characters we could do amnesty have as much data without having to build in anything about the nature of letters or anything like that so we were working towards a general way of doing supervised learning. Maybe some other things using less data and we were inspired there by humans. We weren't necessarily doing it exactly the way humans do but I think the core intellectual property is something that is being Garan I developed and I sort of set a direction that was based on some things that made sense to me from a cognitive science perspective and Tuban been brilliant mathematician figured out how to apply it and so I think a lot of our listeners when they hear the idea of creating a unlimited data. We'll think about things like one shot. Learning zero shot learning but sounds like your approach was very different from these or was it. I mean there's some into relations and I can't say too much because Uber owns the IP and there's NDA's okay kind of stuff but I would say it. Zero shot learning in one shot learning first of all our names of problems. They're not names of techniques and people use different kinds of techniques to do them. They're often I think narrowly construed so there are lots of problems in the world where you have some data. It's not the zero data but you just don't have that much. It's something I often like to talk about is what my daughter did when she climbed through a chair so we were sitting in a whole foods about a year ago she was about four and a half years old or four years old at the time we sat in a chair that had a back in the gap between the back and the base of the chair if you can kind of visualize that and and she'd never seen the TV program the dukes of Hazzard with climb through the windows so she didn't have any data from like a model of doing wacky things sticking their bodies through an aperture inside of there so this was not a big data problem or at least there wasn't a lot of directly relevant big data. She had data about how her body worked the size of her body and she probably explored other apertures before she did what a lot of people might call at abstractly unsupervised supervised learning but he didn't use any of the techniques that we would call unsupervised learning so it was unsupervised in the sense that she didn't have training example saying this is the right you know. Torque to apply to your torso in order to spin through chair right in the way a reinforcement learning robot might try it a million sometimes and get reinforcement stuck this way it didn't get stuck that way and so forth she just did it in the space of like a minute and then the second time that she did. I I asked her to reenact it and I took pictures the second time I wish I had taken pictures the first time or taken video the second but anyway you look you look at this sequence of pictures that I took and she actually got stuck doc at one point and then she figured out how to get unstuck and so there was problem solving process there and it was also kind of leveraging modest amounts of data. She had no direct data on this problem except what she got from trying herself in that moment and then she had a bunch of background data from other kinds of problems that she had solved and she knew enough committee not consciously but unconsciously about physics and our body moved and so forth that you can integrate all of that so that doesn't fall into the paradigm of zero shot learning although you could sort sort of call it a zero shot problem but it's not like the things that people do in literature and it doesn't fall into the one shot learning and it doesn't really fit with how people think about unsupervised learning where they take take clusters of things or predict the next frames in the video. It's not really like any of those problems and yet it's kind of what little kids like. My children do all the time. They say here's some challenge that I have never confronted before. I'm going to figure it out. That's like eighty percent probably exaggerated but it's a large fraction of what my kids do is. They set new challenges right now. My son's a little older he's six and a half my daughter's five now. They like play Games all day long and they don't all play existing games. They play games that they invent until like well. Let's pretend you can't fly anymore because you broke your wing or whatever they're constantly making up assumptions and then doing problem salving relative to those reference points and that's just completely far away from what people are doing and they. I now part of the reason the Ernie Davis and I wrote this book rebooting. I I like reorient. The feel and reboot is like start over so we're doing great on all the supervised learning stuff where we have a ton of data ton of labeled data but but the reality is that's not really what the real world is like and it's certainly not like what children do as they come to understand the world and there's a gap right now between I I think memorizing doing something a little bit better than memorization and understanding so deep learning is like a better way of doing memorization you can Tripoli between examples. You've seen gene before but it's not really about comprehension. It's not really about building a model of chairs apertures and bodies and understanding how those interrelate into what earning an is trying to do is to get the field to look in different direction. That's more about comprehension and understanding and so forth did my going back to your question for second me did my last company. We do all of that. No I mean we were small startup. We were when we thought we were fifteen. People we at one very specific way of solving a supervised learning problem with less data. There's a lot that goes into human approach to less data another thing that goes into it that we didn't work on last compete at all is in eight nece so Chomsky's arguments which I think are correct is that we start with something that constrains how we learn language we don't. We're not open to any possible. I was reborn knowing certain things about language. I differ from him a little bit about what those things are but I would say we're probably born knowing that you can see candy. Symbols in order to express things is going in the right word or is it something you know as about the same conscious but I'll tell you about an experiment that I did which is probably not my best known result in psychology literature. I one of the two I taught seven kids in artificial language and I didn't tell them the rules as for the language it is give them examples two minutes and that

Marcus Gary CEO Scientist Founder Professor Of Psychology Goad Tuban Chomsky Hazzard Ernie Davis Tripoli Eighty Percent Eight Years Seven Years Two Minutes Four Years
"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"dot ai" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NJ transit's north Jersey coast and Pascack valley lines also B. and Q. subway trains are experiencing some delays partly sunny skies expected today highs near seventy six degrees some clouds tonight lows around sixty three and then tomorrow there's a forty percent chance of rain mainly in the afternoon into the evening sixty five degrees right now in New York. support for NPR comes from member stations and from Ballard's far and national law firm providing services in litigation compliance and transactions to clients across industries assessing the impact of national events and legal developments to keep clients informed learn more at Ballard's far dot com see three dot a I see three dot a I software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems learn more at C. three dot AI and tire rack family owned and operated for forty years since nineteen seventy nine tire rack has been committed to helping people find the right tires for their vehicles more at tire rack dot com. it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin pain like death is a universal phenomenon that's the first line of reporter serve our needs two part series for the guardian newspaper about the opioid boom in India and that line says so much right whether you're a factory worker in Ohio with chronic pain or cancer patient in room by the pain can be the same what is also similar some of the big pharma names behind the drugs Johnson and Johnson Purdue pharma.

NPR Ballard Steve Inskeep reporter India Ohio Johnson NJ north Jersey Pascack valley New York. Rachel Martin Johnson Purdue pharma seventy six degrees sixty five degrees forty percent forty years
Apple, Keijo Joey And Jason Middleton discussed on Dr. Drew

Dr. Drew

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Apple, Keijo Joey And Jason Middleton discussed on Dr. Drew

"Apple is looking to up it smart car game. Here's Keijo Joey ten Jason Middleton. The old business conundrum is do we build it? Or do we buy it looks like Apple's going to buy it, aka Akwa higher? When it comes to Thomas. Driving apple is reportedly looking to acquire. A new autonomous vehicle startup drive dot is, is according to the information dot com drive dot AI a self driving

Apple Keijo Joey Jason Middleton Thomas
Life in the future: Tech that will change the way we live

WSJ Tech News Briefing

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Life in the future: Tech that will change the way we live

"This week in New York City, a merging of the minds of the future, as it takes place before us, we refer, of course, to WSJ's future of everything festival. Let's dive headfirst into it, and who better to take a head dive with other than one Martha Stewart who, of course, just partnered with food delivery. Business post mates for a new set of commercials, encouraging people to quote just post made it and quote and for all the talk at FOE kicking off an exciting week Martha Stewart's thoughts on the new digital food space as well as her delivery habits captured much of the attention last night. I live in Bedford, New York, and I was thinking last night, why the heck didn't I order post mates or at least why didn't I have a Martha and morally spoon kit in my fridge, because there was nothing in the fridge, I was starving and had Mexican. So it's very inconvenient. If you don't have all these new convenience. And I think there's just fantastic such a such a great thing for families for singles for dating whatever smart cars are still fighting for the future spotlight as well. And NFO e an interesting conversation about the new wave of emotionally intelligent cars has sparked up debate when over psychology privacy and big tech in recent months, computer vision software has come under criticism for being optimized for white faces with claims that the technology falls short at recognizing minorities at the future of everything festival. Carol Riley co founder of drive dot AI said buys technology, like artificial intelligence, the kind that sometimes fails to recognize darker. Skinned women is crucial to advancing autonomous vehicles as the discussion on an bias facial recognition, how it is almost a solved problem for white males. It's ninety nine point nine nine nine percent accurate. But for darker skin females particularly at sixty. Seven percent and for use case like self driving cars if we deploy that product, that's not good enough. We need ways that these cars need to communicate in signal to the world around it, it's intention is and how it's behavior is going to affect everyone around it. So in really I mean we've broken down the bias problem and it's from like the data that you collect how you label it. Your engine years, building it the product team, deployment and testing it. So there's blind spots all over smart, cars, need, dwell, and smart cities. And the future of cities is proving to be another controversial subject. But one that's got a bright future in front of it, as well brighter than it was for New York in February, at least that, of course, is when Amazon abandoned its plan to build it's two point five billion dollar New York City headquarters in queens, this major blow then caused a corporate welfare debate that ended up leaving the spotlight on Hudson yards. Stephen Ross founder of. Related companies. That's the developer of Hudson yards. Spoke at the future of everything festival and addressed these smart city controversy. I think these type of projects is large mix us live work, play type of projects are really the future for cities, because the cities will be growing, and how will they grow, you know, and how would they be sustainable? And to me, you wanna be in a place where, you know, it's kind of a live were playing vitamin, you can get there easily and have everything your fingertips, because that's the band, is about living in cities, something, the scale of Hudson yards won't work everywhere else, because this is New York City. We had to build it at, at about the highest income level, you could get,

New York City Martha Stewart WSJ New York Vision Software Hudson Carol Riley Bedford Co Founder Stephen Ross Founder AI Developer Amazon Queens Nine Nine Nine Percent Five Billion Dollar Seven Percent
"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"dot ai" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Business problems. Learn more at C three dot AI and from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene. Many lawmakers and policy experts agree that the surge of migrants at the southern US border has become a crisis, and is the number of families and children apprehended by border patrol grows. So do questions about how to keep them safe while in custody, a sixteen year old died out of a silly from migrant children last week. He is the third migrant child to die in US custody since December for more on this. And for more on the status of other child migrants were joined by out avocado. She's an investigative reporter at the news organization reveal thanks for being here. Thanks for having data. I definitely want to start with the sixteen year old who died in custody recently. What what do we know about him? And what happened? So we need we know that his name was wonda lung, Gutierrez I and his family called him quantity. Though. He's from a rural community in wet the Malakal come up done. And that's in the department of cheating Mola, and it's a place that's experience pretty severe drought likely from extreme effects of climate change. And what we understand from his family in from officials in both countries is that third left within my LA in early April and made his way north to at bustle where he was taken into a into custody by border patrol agents on April nineteen and the following day on the twentieth of April ice or likely it's private contractor at took him to a shelter contracted by the office of refugee resettlement and this shelter is operated by south west key, which is also a private contractor, and it's located in Brownsville, Texas and ten days. Later Honey died in Corpus Christi children's hospital. Something new that. I think that I can share with listeners today is that a couple of sources who are close to what's what's happening told me that what he thought likely died from what's called a puffy tumor. It's not cancerous. But it's instead, it's it's a pretty severe swelling that happens in the frontal lobe has sort of in the forehead area, and it can be caused by sinus, infection or trauma, and puffy tumor, isn't it's not all that common. But when we do see it, it must likely affects people who are around those age, and we'll just miss this. I mean what what are the conditions at the facility in terms of. I don't know the medical care to to catch something like this and make sure it's it's treated so it doesn't get to the point where where he dies. Right. Well, that's a great question. And we still haven't confirmed. What's happened? But puffy is tweet abo-. Is treatable if it's life threatening in it certainly can kill. But it is treatable with antibiotics. It just has to be diagnosed in time, and then you know, in terms of the facilities. We don't know exactly what happened when at which vicinity, right? This is a child who's who's being passed from? One agency to another to another to another. There's contract with hospital. Yeah. Well, is there something we can learn from one NATO's case? I mean, you have children on this treacherous journey maybe with medical conditions there in I mean walking on foot for hundreds of miles. Does is there something the government could be doing to to make sure that they stay healthier the conditions. Like this are caught in time. They're probably very likely as as you know, that he is that the third child that has died at in the last five months that we know of I say that we know of because we don't know how many children have died crossing the border. We do know that as there has been increased enforcement on the border death also increases, but those little bones. We may not find ever oily may not find them for five or ten years. But in terms of what? Improve in terms of custody. It probably is each and every single point. And again, it's important to keep in mind that we have an enforcement answer for a social crisis. These are children and adults who are coming here to seek refuge from problems often not of their own making. And again, the focus keeps being enforcement in to try to tackle these huge social issues. Outer bow Gado is an investigative reporter with the news organization. Reveals speaking this morning, thanks a lot. Thank you, David several communities in the midwest are still underwater after rain and melting snow drove the Mississippi River beyond its banks last week in Davenport, Iowa the river crested at seven point seven feet. Above.

investigative reporter Gutierrez US NPR Rachel Martin Mississippi River Corpus Christi Outer bow Gado Brownsville NATO Texas Honey Davenport Iowa David sixteen year five months seven feet
Australia leads the world in smart speaker adoption

podnews

02:44 min | 2 years ago

Australia leads the world in smart speaker adoption

"Aliens love this smut speakers. We have more than the Americans fair dinkum Australians love their smart. Speakers twenty nine point three percent of all Austrailia NHS have access to one which is the highest percentage in the world's beating even the US. Google home has dominant market share of over sixty eight percent and fifty five percent of Australian say they use their smart speakers for podcasts. That's new data from voice bought dot AI who released its Australia. Smart speaker consumer adoption reports twenty nineteen patriot is launching new payment plans for new creators in may, including a simpler way of joining the service. Hot part is out covering burn out and the Gimblett union. Congratulations to Nick coir for two hundred additions of his in his words comically lengthy newsletter. We listen to this the other day, I heart Todd cast AM fourteen seventy it's iheartradio's new AM. Station in Allentown in the US, and we quite liked it. So we reviewed it. You'll find a link to that in our show notes and in our newsletter. The audio crafts podcast festival in Sydney in New South Wales in Australia at the end of may has just announced its initial lineup including speakers from ninety nine percent invisible. Vox nest and Spotify. Soundcloud has partnered with Southern Cross stereo for at representation in Australia. Jacobs media is once more bringing the radio industry to podcast movements with their now. Well, known broadcasters, meet podcasters portion of the conference one of those broadcasters that goes Cumulus who owns the Westwood One podcast network last year. It ends twelve point five million dollars in profitable podcasting revenue according to CEO Mary burner in new data. Nielsen says that ninety nine percent of US adults. Listen to podcasts every week at us in research is recent infinite dials has twenty two percent of US adults. Listen weekly. The two independently researched figures look close enough to us both excellent news. The folks at radio link also own a podcast newsletter. Headline this as only nineteen percent. A million ads. A clever dynamic ads pot company has opened a New York office and announce new hires anchor has produced with training company. Skill share a free introductory course on podcasting. If you want equivalent to pod news, but for China, you want just part it's put together by Yang. Ye and if you want to decent press kit fuel podcast, we would recommend the one from this podcast hand and man. No, it's got everything writer needs to write about their podcast and Woolworth copying.

United States Australia Gimblett Union Google New York Westwood One New South Wales Soundcloud Nick Todd Jacobs Media Allentown Sydney Mary Burner China CEO Nielsen Writer Southern Cross Ninety Nine Percent
Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census

All Things Considered

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census

"This is NPR. And you're listening to WNYC in New York at five oh four. I'm Jamie Floyd legalizing, recreational marijuana, passing congestion pricing and rapidly increasing renewable energy usage. These are just some of the items on New York governor Andrew Cuomo to do list for this legislative session at the state of the union address this afternoon governor Cuomo conceded, the laundry list may seem ambitious. It's a lot no doubt about it. But there's been a lot that has been bottled up for many many years that we couldn't get done. And in many ways, I feel the state is now liberated with the Senate Democratic caucus. And of course, it's the state of the state the governor called on lawmakers to continue passing progressive legislation in the coming weeks among his top budget priorities. Cuomo said our public transportation and infrastructure, healthcare and cutting taxes for the middle class. For years, the NYPD's response to questions about its use of surveillance technology has been to neither confirm nor deny whether records bowed. It exists. It's called the glow more response. But now in New York state court judge has ruled in a case over whether NYPD spied on the cell phones of people attending black lives matter protests that the police can no longer keep that claim of confidentiality. It's a win for civil libertarians. And state supreme court Justice, Arlene, blue shot down, the NYPD argument that responding to complaints would compromise counterterrorism or criminal efforts because the police in question, we're not the people in question rather were not breaking the law at the time New York Times reporter, Ali Watson covered the case. Judge's ruling right now, depending on whether or not the NYPD appeals actually puts a very firm boot the neck of his response. They can't really use it in the future. The NYPD does have thirty days to appeal. The ruling. A statement a spokeswoman said that it uses the global response exceedingly sparingly and only after careful consideration of the interests involved tonight, mostly clear, a low around twenty seven degrees. Currently, it's thirty four degrees. The time is five oh six support for NPR comes from C three providing a software platform that enables organizations to deploy artificial intelligence in IOT solutions at industrial scale. Learn more at C three dot AI. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro in a Senate hearing room today attorney general nominee William bar has been walking a fine line bar is pledging to protect the Justice department. But he also says the president has sweeping constitutional authority NPR national Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been following these confirmation hearings and joins us now to talk about them. Hi, hey, okay. He has been nominated to lead the Justice department at a time when the president is attacking it. So how did bar address that tension today? Well, Bill Maher said he has a very high opinion of deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, he says he has no reason to doubt that the Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. And he says he doesn't believe that special counsel. Robert Muller would be conducting a witch hunt in fact, Barr says he would quit rather than fire Muller. If there were no good cause to get rid of him. And as one of Muller's friends for thirty years Barr says it's unimaginable that. Muller would do anything to prompt? A firing Senate Democrats went into this hearing wanting bar firmly committed to protecting the Russia investigation. Did they get that commitment? Not affirm one Ari Dianne Feinstein, the top democrat on the committee was pressing Bill bar a lot about what people will learn in the end about the Russia probe. Will you commit to making any report Muller produces at the conclusion of his investigation available to congress and to the public as as I said, my statement, I am going to make as much information available as I can consistent with the rules and regulations now Bill bar talked about wanting transparency, but he also said that he s the attorney general make the ultimate call about what becomes public and later on Senator amazing. Geraldo, Hawaii said just asking us to trust. You is not enough. She said this president will do anything to protect himself, and Mr. bar was kind of tough in his response. He said, I'm not going to surrender the responsibility of the attorney general. To get this title. We know that bar has had some contact with lawyers involved in the investigation. Did we learn anything new today about his interactions with the White House? We did bar told lawmakers he actually met with President Trump awhile ago, and the president seemed to want bar to join his legal defence team bar politely declined. He said he didn't want to stick his head in a meat grinder bar. Also said he discussed some legal theories with attorneys for the president the vice president and with Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, but bar said he didn't recall learning anything of substance. Anything confidential about the pro from the beginning of this investigation. The issue of recusals has been a very big deal. What had bar say about recusals today? He said he thinks Jeff Sessions. The former attorney general probably did the right thing to recuse himself in Democrats pressed bar to step aside to given this context with lawyers involved in this investigation and a memo he wrote criticizing the investigation, but here again, far would not commit. He says he will ask career. Ethics officials at Justice to evaluate the question, but he won't necessarily do what they advise. He also said the president is not above the law. The president can't for example, offer pardons to people who promise now to incriminate him taking a step back. There is one question about Bill bar that people on both sides of the aisle have which is why would he come back to lead the Justice department after twenty seven years to be attorney general again in excellent question bar, basically says because he loves the Justice department as an institution he says, he's sixty eight years old, and he has nothing to lose. If you take this job, you have to be ready to make decisions and spend all your political capital and have no future because you have to have that freedom of action, and I feel I'm gonna position in life where I can do the right thing and not really care about the consequences and Ari so far nothing has emerged to block Boris path confirmation. NPR national. Justice. Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Thank you. My pleasure for analysis of the hearing and of what Bill bar may do if he's confirmed. Let's bring in Jennifer dascomb. She's an associate professor of law at American University. She used to work at the Justice department. Professor Daska welcome. Thank you. So to the central question today, which is whether bar will protect the Muller investigation based on what you heard from his testimony. Are you persuaded that he will? So he he answered that pretty clearly he said that he he likely I mean, he had he would protect mother and the absence. Something extraordinary that mother would be allowed to continue. I think the key question and the one that several senators pushed on the a question of what is going to be made public, and what's going to be made available congress. We heard Bill bars say repeatedly that he was committed to transparency, but transparency considered students consistent with the law transparency consistent with rules and regulations and bar. Has a very broad view of executive privilege and a very broad view of executive power including power over criminal investigation. So when he says he needs to be consistent with rules and regulations on the question of whether whatever final report Muller producers should be made public. That's what he would be referring to executive privilege that the president might say, no, exactly executive privilege abroad claims our national security, our range of different reasons. Why transparency would be limited according to his his views and the president's articulation of of what's necessary to keep private secret. He also as we just heard there from Carrie Johnson did not seem to suggest that he's likely to recuse himself from overseeing the Mueller investigation. Did that surprise you in any way? It comprises me only because it seems like a clear case where recusals would be appropriate, but he has been consistent on along in suggesting that he would not recuse himself. And I wasn't surprised that he didn't change his mind today. But giving his engagement given the nemo that was that he chose to write and to send to the president about concerned about obstruction of Justice charges targeting the president and given what he acknowledged today about conversations, it seems like this would be a clear case for recusal has been consistent about that. Well, that prompts my next question, and it's one that he was asked today by senators in in one way or the other a number of times, which is would he protect the independence of the Justice department against executive overreach. Do you think when push comes to shove Bill would tell the president? No, no, sir. You can't do that. So again, I think it depends on what's being asked. And he did get today that there were certain red lines that he went cross, but that being said he has an expressed repeatedly previously very broad views of executive power and executive privilege, and there are certainly in a whole range of areas in which the president could assert executive privilege in my assumption is and based on bars previous, writings and statements. That bar would agree. Did you learn anything about Bill today that you didn't already know? Some of the contacts that he's had were interesting to hear about you know, he is as as expected he was incredibly articulate and and respectful. I think that the key is is reading the testimony in light of what he started written in the past. Did you hear anything today that might derail this confirmation that poses a serious threat to his chances of being confirmed? I'm just given given the politics and given the makeup of the Senate unlikely at this point is there a question to you to you would have asked him that the senators did not. Again, I think that really pushing him on this question of transparency what happens when the president asserts a claim of national security what happens when the president says, you know, we just want a very brief cursory summary of this report sent up to congress. What do you do? Then you would have liked to have heard an iron clad, whatever Muller wants to be made public. I'll back. Exactly, that's Jennifer Gasco. She she choose constitutional and national security law at American University Jennifer desk, thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you.

President Trump Bill Bar Justice Department Robert Muller William Bar NPR Attorney Executive Nypd Bill Carrie Johnson New York Senate Democratic Caucus Senator Senate Andrew Cuomo Bill Maher American University
Hey Google, who won the CES war? Alexa or you?

Talking Tech

04:27 min | 3 years ago

Hey Google, who won the CES war? Alexa or you?

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. So the Google team was seemingly everywhere at CS twenty nineteen both inside at the main convention center. A large booth presence in hundreds of people dressed in white. Hey, Google jumpsuits topped off with matching. Hey, Google beanies arch rival Amazon on the other hand had a small understated ballroom at the lower traffic sands convention expo, showcasing a potpourri of products from Amazon and other vendors that use the Alexa voice commands staffers were adorned in blue, Alexa, sport shirts. So this is a tale of Amazon versus Google at the consumer electronic show on the eve of the companies laid down the gauntlet Amazon EPO speakers in third party vendors using the system have sold over one hundred million units. That's what Amazon said, and that's ten times less than doubles announced that which is that one billion people have the Google assistant in Android and apple IOS phones, the Google home speakers and third. Party products. So both companies are said about dominating the next stage of computing voice style, whether that's via announcements, hey, Google or graphical routine set up to have the assistance work with us auto medically who won the ward CS. Well, it's funny because Google had a much much larger presence in Sinek. But Amazon was on seemingly every product. Let me run you through them. Some of the new Google products include a seventy nine dollar alarm clock from Lenovo, it's cute, but at seventy nine dollars, the promise of the assistant finally coming to the Sonos one speaker in two thousand nineteen year and a half after the company announced it and hey, Google on Samsung TV's and the instant pot. Okay. Take that boob. Will here's from Amazon and electric piano from Roland that answers to Alexa, commands. Alexa, play a song for me as a player, piano or record my own tickling, the ivories. I saw smart glasses from focal by north and views. Eq that answer to Alexa commands I saw others. A lawnmower connected by Carson Audi and China's Biden headphones mirror and the return of the eight thousand dollar toilet from color that you can say Alexa, flush for me. Please. So usage wise, Google claims the largest audience at nearly a billion apple Siri has due to the size of the iphone universe. Five hundred million people compared to four hundred million who have Microsoft's Kartana installed windows computers and finally one hundred million for Alexa. But who is actually using him? I think we seeing more people using Alexa, and the companies are pushing so hard to get their position voice computing because the battles for clicks for pinches and zooms or over says Brett concil who edits the voice bought dot AI blog that chronicles voice computing, the assistant will decide which website you go to which shopping site you visit who is controlling. These choices Google Amazon Samsung, apple or Microsoft, this says my friend Brett is a battle for survival. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA day, you've been listening to talking tech. And please subscribe to the show on apple podcast. Please favorite us on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show and his always. Thanks, everyone. For listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com. Got you covered they developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Google Alexa Amazon Apple Samsung Jefferson Graham Lenovo Sinek Microsoft Brett Concil Carson Audi China USA Roland Biden
Musks big spend; Blue Apron becomes penny stock; ex-Uber exec drives startup

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

02:02 min | 3 years ago

Musks big spend; Blue Apron becomes penny stock; ex-Uber exec drives startup

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Musk's big spend blue apron becomes penny. Stock X Kubrick drives startup by chronicle staff and new services from business number of the day forty million dollars. That's how much of his own money. Tesla CEO Elon Musk says he has spent on the boring company, which he started after becoming frustrated with traffic Tuesday night musk unveiled his first effort at a network of tunnels that will whisk Thomas electric cars, not just Tesla's underneath Los Angeles. With guide wheels attached to the front tires the trip and a model X through the nearly mile long tunnel near space x headquarters was reported to be a bumpy ride. Other number of the day, seventy eight cents. That's where blue apron stock closed Wednesday. After the fish Lee became a penny stock a day earlier the meal kit company, which went public in June twenty seventeen at ten dollars per share has seen a long slide since then at the time of. It's last infusion of private capital. Blue apron was valued at about two billion dollars. It's worth less than a tenth of that. Now hands off the wheel. Anthony Levin, douse gave the former Google engineer and key character in the lawsuit against Uber. From the tech giant's self-driving spinoff has a new trucking startup called pronto dot AI. The company plans to release its five thousand dollars seven cameras system that helps keep commercial trucks in their lane. In the first half of twenty nineteen pronto dot AI says it system works only when drivers are engaged in watching the road. Them douse key left. Google in two thousand sixteen to co found self-driving trucking company auto which Uber acquired later that year. Google spin up Waymo sued Hoover, alleging theft of critical technology the ride hailing company settled by agreeing to give way mo- about two hundred forty five million dollars in stock.

Elon Musk Google San Francisco Chronicle Tesla AI Kubrick Los Angeles Anthony Levin LEE CEO Thomas Electric Theft Hoover Waymo Engineer Two Hundred Forty Five Million Five Thousand Dollars Forty Million Dollars Two Billion Dollars Ten Dollars
Comma.ai's driver assist system is a robot chauffeur for the rest of us

Your Weekly Tech Update

09:50 min | 3 years ago

Comma.ai's driver assist system is a robot chauffeur for the rest of us

"The company encourages its users to not only upload their driver to limit data to the coma dot AI servers, but also noted any incidents win. The assist had to return control to the driver that the team

Facebook Japan Bloomberg Richie Washington University Google Shooting Stars Boeing St Louis Phil Ray Mcneil Queensland Rossi Neil