17 Burst results for "Dostoevsky"

"dostoevsky" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Home for original reporting. I'm Deborah Rodriguez. He's done it in Portland, Oregon. Now President Trump is threatening to send federal troops into monitor Black lives matter. Protests in Chicago, New York and other cities last night parents from the group walls of Mom's joined demonstrators in Portland. Mother, Bev Barnum. It's to protect human rights. That's what we're doing. We're there for George Floyd, where therefore, Shay India, where they're for Briana Taylor were there for Elijah McClane. We're in there and we're there for the long local officials claim federal agents have been using tear gas and putting demonstrators in unmarked vans. Corona virus cases continue to climb and President Trump is bringing back daily White House briefings for the first time since April. CBS's Manuel Bohorquez is in Miami. 53 of the state's hospitals have reached I seeyou capacity eight of those in my Auntie Dade County. Dr Andrew Dostoevsky works for the county's largest health system. There's no sense that anything slowing down every day. There's a need for more patients who need that Florida's largest teachers union is suing governor descent is to try to stop schools from reopening. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin meets with lawmakers today on another Koven stimulus bill. CBS's Natalie brand. Senate Republicans have said the priorities include getting kids back in the classroom jobs and then also some health care funding. Leaders across both sides have said they need more money for testing in individual states and also money to prepare the United States to deploy a vaccine. If that becomes available, you leaders have agreed on a mask. Civ relief package. Correspondent Vicki Barker is at the Foreign desk as day five of this often ill tempered marathon summit. Daunt 27. Exhausted, EU leaders announced they have finally agreed on an $850 billion.

President Trump Auntie Dade County CBS Portland Deborah Rodriguez Bev Barnum Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Dr Andrew Dostoevsky Vicki Barker George Floyd Oregon United States Elijah McClane Senate Briana Taylor Shay India Manuel Bohorquez EU
"dostoevsky" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:12 min | Last month

"dostoevsky" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Heritage power, Dell's what the historical, too cold, a tunnel recurrence or the eternal return attempt to will everything that happens to you and everything that happens around you to will, as though it's exactly what you wanted. Exactly what you would have affirmed in the first place after this trick my car to meet Ya WanNa transfigure the meaning of the suburbs to actually make it a meaningful life to live in the suburbs. It's Roth at improbable project, but notice. In the one, the historic nature sorta realize in his own life, and he's own philosophy I wanNA talk about a couple of other writers, the feature in the story and talk about you know what they're. Well. That's the role is in a and I. Guess You mentioned Dostoyevsky and? Becomes Consumed by the idea. Tell us something more about Dostoevsky in this story, Yeah! Me In bodies, a Christianity which elaborately find in western Christianity to me is distinctly Orthodox. Form. Christianity which I suppose in in many ways resemble Franz. If it's easy that sort of Christianity, Christianity which. Looked to the natural world, nukes to animals and birds looks to plants and flowers, and finds in them some evidence of supposed grace with all the divine something of that kind is almost a panatheist and Christianity. At least that's how I, understand. Dostoevsky I'm always thinking of industrial work was a character. The idiot and the idea of dusk is in his novel. The idiot. He's going to embody a pure human being someone someone. Christ, like some. Kind of Messiah what's fascinating by Dostoyevsky is that he doesn't allow this idiot his redemptive role. He's not simply a reborn Jesus because whatever the idiot of the. Novel and his name, the novelist Prince Mishkin whenever Prince Michigan the idiots of the novel, every comes into a new situation. Things seemed to go wrong. Things seem to fall apart. His very presence destabilizes the world, and far from redeeming the world, the idiot leads to a double murder and to the insanity of the idiot. He goes back to live in a in a mental institution..

Dostoevsky Dostoyevsky Roth Dell Prince Mishkin Prince Michigan murder
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

03:57 min | 4 months ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"So I appreciate you some ground rules. Keep things rational and I think that's going to help us. What I'm wondering is so for instance you had said elsewhere the New Testament from the best from what you can see. It's psychologically correct and not quite astounding. I would say there's a lot of truth and in your depictions of these stories elsewhere. You've pointed out like deep truce. The real powerful. So what my question would be is if we can say NICCI. Toca like an order of magnitude of intelligence in depth to be able to predict what would happen the next century. You know rationally. If the Bible's not the inherent word of God what's going on. That's a good question. That's a really good question I mean I'm going to try to answer that rationally but as we move forward but as I said I don't want to leave people with the notion because know some ways this is something I've thought about what I've been thinking about for a long time as I can't tell if I'm like an advocate of the religious viewpoint or its worst possible critic because I am doing my best to make it rational and there's an reductionist element to that but I think that I'm doing that while also leaving the door open to things that I don't understand because I know that there's there's more to this story than I understand or can't understand. I'm laying out what I can understand that. I'm making it rational but I do not believe for an instant that that exhausts the round like there. There are ways of interpreting these stories that work in the conceptual universe. We inhabit right now. But there's a lot of things that we don't understand what I'm saying. I found about digging into these stories. Is that the deeper. You dig the more you find. And that's pretty damned. That's one of the things that convinced me that there was more to them than I had originally suspected because things would click and I think wow. That's that's really something and then I would take it apart further and I think oh well that was something but this is. This is even more remarkable. Just keeps opening opening. And so I'm GonNa make it rational. I'm going to try to provide an answer to and it is. I think you're right about speaking about nature and his capacity for prophecy Dostoevsky's in the same category. It's like there are prophetic elements to the old and New Testament. That seem to stretch over much vaster spans of time and I'm going to try to produce a rational account of that but it mean one of the reasons that I think the New Testament is psychologically true. Let's say because and this is one of the things that's it's deeply embedded in the structure of the Bible in in the Old Testament. There's this idea and I'm skipping ahead that through a succession of states. The people who behave properly will eventually established the proper state and so the state is viewed in some sense as the the entity of salvation. But what happens in the New Testament? Is that idea gets you could say deconstructed. And instead of a state being the place of redemption a state of being becomes the State of redemption and so the idea that human beings will be redeemed moves from the Utopian state vision to the responsibility of the individual. And I think that's correct. I mean I. I believe that. That's the right answer and I think that the West in particular is predicated on that idea because it makes the state subservient to the individual. I mean there's a. There's a what a dialogue continual dialogue but in the final analysis. The locus of the divine is individual. Not The state. And I believe that. That's so true that if we don't it out and believe then we all die painfully. And that's true enough for me. So.

Dostoevsky
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"It's staggeringly beautiful. One thinks of a white environment and actually actually the play of light on it makes it a blue yellow red every color of the rainbow reading astonishing colors and where our camp was Stein on the Ice Shelf and so about one hundred fifty miles from Land Simon and I were in a bad side of the caravan just with ice beneath ice in every direction. Listen and see is beyond an extraordinary sort of bubble. It's easy to wonder whether you are in a paper Bag Anto and Simon had never met before they spent February till November together crammed into the hut with two desks. Two bunks and over two hundred books penguin. The publisher had offered to sponsor them. I knew I would be there with a heck of a lot to do over winter so I set myself the task of reading a heck of a lot. I guess I alternate between Philosophy Literature and poetry it. It was a very eclectic mix so a lot of the Russians tolstoy Dostoevsky to gain if major Brits Elliott's and hardy the and the Kim's and then Plato and Aristotle and human cans and and so on I was just really astonished by the depth and breadth of the reading that they did having been given this opportunity which actually sounds kinds of blissful to me to shot themselves away with books and on pretty much nothing else to disturb them. They got through an enormous amounts of the great literature of many civilizations. Patience books are a form of escape. We travel when we read. And actually if you think about the necessity of escape in a landscape where you cannot often step outside of the door because okay the strength of the winds because of the temperature because of the real risk of not coming coming back then you have to find ways of escaping. I was quite young. Raised me naive. I think it was a great introduction to a whole field of thinking I guess I sat are looking for good or God or purpose and became more and more taken with nature existentialism by the end of the yeah and rather docker and bleaker and more introspective. I guess it was completely extraordinary because we were like a couple of rats in a cage and didn't really talk much Simon and I avoided each other like the plague through the winter and got more and more each other's nerves. It's taken years to unpack it. I think we probably both went to the command. Small things would get on one's nerves. I had a habit of putting a pulse on the stave in forgetting was there and it would start rattling and he would storm across and take it off slam it on the floor and that might have been the only sort of action in the day and so we had this extraordinary months of mainly silence quite small space surrounded by is just reading and so you get completely absorbed in whatever it is that you're involved because there are no distractions. The I am mocked by an experienced that have difficulty knowing. How real it was. As time has elapsed I had got very very involved in crime and punishment and being festering in rest colony coughs mind and he then kills the moneylender bludgeoned her to death with an axe and I remember walking behind Simon. As I'd finished the book with an ice axe in my hand and then I can still sort of see the back of his head. I don't know how close he came to death but that's fairly well imprinted on my mind..

Simon Bag Anto Stein Philosophy Literature publisher tolstoy Dostoevsky Russians Elliott Kim
"dostoevsky" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on WBAI

"Understand this to understand the context that Daschle eski was writing and the idea with the rational bus will not say strongly by council by much of the philosophy he inspired was taken up by a tradition known as rational egoism in eighteen sixty three Nikolai Chernyshevsky published the novel what is to be done an instant success what is to be done is a paragon of rational enlightenment through the rational egoist and the characters of the novel argued this if people simply rationally calculated what was in their own self interest and acted accordingly each person self interest would parlance the others right this was similar to Smith's invisible hand of the market supply and demand and if all this happened a utopia would develop humans onto or shouldn't be altruistic he argued all I might help you the tiny if it benefits me in some way only if it pleases me Dostoevsky was so disgusted by the novel the ten eighteen sixty four he wrote his second novel notes from underground as a response the novel is split into two parts first a philosophical monologue by a beta and see here the second recalls brief events that spring from the sounds he arrives egoistic but confused world view he tries to gain respect from old school friends who he actually hates at the dinner and he psychologically torments a prostitute about Dostoyevsky's primary concern is this rational egoism is dangerous people aunts rational the confused spiteful spontaneous among other things and so if you encourage individuals to simply act in their own self interest while abandoning altruism chaos would ensue he argues that mandate no you what's in that self interest they run off to war with desire that which is harmful to them and is the underground mines says it's sometimes very pleasant to smash things up James Scanlon describes the underground man is self indulgence malevolence envious feign imprudence inconsiderate boastful roots dominate rings they stick vengeful callously manipulative inconsistent compute and tongue grateful lazy stubborn destructive capricious mendacious to run a cool Dostoevsky emphasizes the neuroticism sin that deep an unknown influences of a rustic human behavior.

Nikolai Chernyshevsky Smith Dostoevsky Dostoyevsky James Scanlon Daschle
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

The Weekly Planet

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

"I'm just saying. That's it. How you could be confused. You know what I mean? No, I can understand that. So yeah, I think when I watched it at the time it definitely plays as you. If you kind of break it up and you do like, three minutes, three minutes. They and they self contained stories, but see I had no idea that was the case it's almost like plowing through and I'm like, there's a lot of there's a lot of really fos by type of battles where it's one dude. This is like fifty robots and then he swaps. It all the robots legs come off. And then he'd like force pushes them more robot sharp and he's like kill as robots to. And then you're talking about the vice we do I'm talking about the whole thing and the whole Jimmy standup sections or characters the one the one that popped. I think was obe- one kanobi versus like some sort of re slug, man. Yeah, I love that one. So that's the first introduction of a couple of things. Everyone can be in the clone trooper outfits USA. I love that. I love that. Look it's been adopted numerous. Time since but I like writing flowing hair. It's so good series. This episode two. Hey, we moved to volume tone. They change it up. He cuts the mullet. But yeah, I love that whole section do mistake of all of all the terrible actions and eras my during the clone wars, everyone can I be cutting his mullet office, probably number one. I agree. I'm mean had to for the desert anyway, he can't keep that in the Tissot landed. Right. You get saying code in taught. It keeps the sign up unit heights saying, you know, what? I mean. I know you said. It's rough and it gets in my Mullen. That dude character though, he's not canon for the moment guy when he was introduced the Audie was that he was tortured by Mandel orients for like hundreds of years and imprisoned because he kind of these mortal regenerating bane, he just keeps coming back. And so he's always hatred man to Lawrence because the Cloyne troupe is our Mason day. And they technically not me more. It's being changed. I'm not gonna get into sorry event. So. At the time. This came out ahead as to why why they not gender fits, not real Mandal orient. Thanks. So yes, he's on a fool's errand buddy, fool's errand mall, but hate feels like a bit of an idiot. He's on he's on a big old tear though to kinda much like Dostoevsky's the idiot. Nobody cares. My sixty nine. What about this guys though? He's got it just keeps coming back. Like he gets. You gets impaled at one point. It gets gotten off exam comes off comes off just comes like all these. He's got. He's got the different weapons. He's joined blasted. He gets some cotton. Then he's got the shields on his is pretty sick..

Lawrence Mullen Mandal orient obe Jimmy Dostoevsky Mandel three minutes
"dostoevsky" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It's still possible to find some peace and quiet. At the Dostoevsky library and one of Moscow's hippest neighborhoods. The main reading hall has wooden floors, white, walls and large windows facing the street. What's most impressive is every seat? Here is taken an almost everybody looks like they're under the age of thirty five. It's one of the best libraries here in Moscow. Just because it has changed so much. Also took is an English teacher and a frequent visitor. I suppose that right now. Mosque is one of the Sanchez of laboratory culture, the Dostoyevsky library is a showcase for the sweeping overhaul of Moscow's libraries from musty houses of Soviet learning into bustling workspaces for first century city. Dwellers Andrea creator aspiring stand up comedian from out of town says he spent three to four hours a day in the library, of course, delete them. He says he lives in a hostile. So he's appreciates the solitude to concentrate on his work Russian. Zayn based in another Lund's were responsible for the library's renovation students. In freelancers tap away on their laptops by day, young professionals attend foreign language clubs readings and lectures in the evenings Maria Rogachova, a thirty nine year old musician by training is a city official in charge of rejuvenating Moscow's libraries of that show. It's our job is to develop most democratic and acceptable cultural locations for Muscovites. This isn't about libraries for the sake of libraries as it sometimes seemed in the past we need to listen to what Muscovites needs are. So they start loving us Chavez says that's meant expanding opening hours to accommodate working people and families putting catalogues online and even opening coffeeshops on site. There are certainly employees who preferred knitting an empty library. She says, but most of the changes have taken place, thanks to the initiative of the librarians themselves and not because of any extra funding. On the format. Niche to be better Cacak Rogachova says the rise of electronic media shouldn't spell the death of libraries as public spaces where people can experience as she puts it living literature. The more. We have a different idea from the way things used to be a library can be allowed place. Of course, there should be some quiet nooks where you can focus on your reading the libraries also host a huge amount of loud events. Yesterday. Does fifty library. A theater group is rehearsing in one of the halls specifically up nap stomach actress, Lydia. Says the library is a wonderful location of practice.

Dostoevsky library Moscow Maria Rogachova Chavez Sanchez Muscovites Lydia Andrea Lund official thirty nine year four hours
"dostoevsky" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One of the Soviet Union's lasting legacies. In Moscow was a dense network of hundreds of public libraries after Russia's. Rocky transition from communism and the rise of the internet. The city's libraries looked like they were doomed to become relics of an analog past. But as NPR's Lucian Kim reports Moscow's libraries are experiencing an unexpected revival. Moscow is easy place. It's boulevards jammed with impatient. Drivers. But it's still possible to find some peace and quiet. At the Dostoevsky library of Moscow's, hippest neighborhoods. The main reading hall has wooden floors, white, walls and large windows facing the street. But what's most impressive is every seat is taken. And almost everybody looks like they're under the age of thirty five. It's one of the best labs here in Moscow. Just because it has changed so much. Also got by Chuck is an English teacher and a frequent visitor. I suppose that right now. Mosque is one of the centers of laboratory culture, the dust AFC library is a showcase for the sweeping overhaul of Moscow's libraries from musty houses of Soviet learning into bustling workspaces for century city. Dwellers Andrea creative aspiring stand up. Comedian from out of town says he spent three to four hours a day in the library. He says he lives in a hostile. So the solitude to concentrate on his work Russian designers based in another Lund's were responsible for the library's renovation students. In freelancers tap away on their laptops by day, young professionals attend foreign language clubs readings and lectures in the evenings Maria. Rugged Chilver, a thirty nine year old musician by training is a city official in charge of rejuvenating Moscow's libraries shows that show. Our job is to develop most democratic and accessible cultural locations Muscovites. This isn't about libraries for the sake of libraries as it sometimes seemed in the past we need to listen to what Muscovites needs are. So they start loving us broker Tova says that's meant expanding opening hours to accommodate working people and families putting catalogues online and even opening coffeeshops on site. There are certainly employees who preferred knitting an empty library. She says, but most of the changes have taken place thanks to the initiative of the librarians themselves and not because of any extra funding chronic formats of niche to be Belichick, a cockroach over says, the rise of electronic media shouldn't spell the death of libraries as public spaces where people can experience as she puts it living literature another guy. Moore's we have a different idea from the way things used to be a library can be allowed place. Of course, there should be some quiet nooks where you can focus on your reading the, but our libraries also host a huge amount of loud events. Yes. Love this goes. At the library. A theater group is rehearsing in one of the halls civically of naps tunnel. Actress Lydia says the library is a wonderful location of practice because of its intimate atmosphere. A few years ago. A boisterous rehearsal would have been unheard of in a Moscow library..

Moscow Dostoevsky library of Moscow Soviet Union Tova Russia AFC NPR Lucian Kim Chuck Lydia Muscovites Lund Andrea Belichick Moore official thirty nine year
"dostoevsky" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on Unorthodox

"If not unconstitutional, we have forgotten our Dostoevsky in our haste to seek guaranteed safety, which is of course, ridiculous. There is no safety. From dust. We all came into dust. We all return. I'm sincerely hopeful that you win you're released. But I am amazed by the grace with which you have lived your life. Thank you for being who you are. And I hope we all live to see the day when people are not judged by the worst moment of their lives. And just know that sneaky was so touched by this letter. That's why I have it because he sent it onto Alex to then send it to us sneaky know that we're with you, and we're gonna we're gonna stick by your case. Speaking of cases, here's a case in news of the Jews of somebody who was never tried in a an actual court of law, but has been tried in the court of public opinion. This is a very interesting case that came came across our radar screen in the last week. It's about a guy named Trayvon free. Who's a comedian and comedy writer and TV producer? He's worked on among other shows the reason HBO camping which is the new Lena Dunham creation. Lena Dunham from girls. And okay. Josh what what happened exactly somebody dug up some old anti-seismic twi-? Tweets of his from like ten years ago. All right. So apparently, he got into it a little bit with Ben Shapiro of all people this right wing journalist. Ben Shapiro, right? They were arguing over something about Beto Aurora or God knows what. And shortly thereafter, some people who followed Ben Shapiro dug up these tweets from almost a decade ago. He's thirty three. Now, he was twenty three at the time. And he was making some offensive tweets. There's no question they were offensive than HBO sends out a press release saying he's no longer affiliated with us. We don't do any work with him. And it seems like it's career is kind of you know, going to have some major setbacks to be fair. These tweets were horrible, like what were some of these anti semitic tweets that Trayvon free tweeted out a decade ago? I can't even believe there's been Twitter for a decade. But I I guess I guess there has been so what are some of the tweets? Well, back April fifth twenty ten. He said got got cut off in traffic by Jew, WW HD. What would Hitler do? Yeah. And the Hitler thing seems to be a theme. He's like how come no one ever channels their inner Hitler anymore. Let's remember he was younger, and you can see that. There's some kind of tempt to be funny in particular. There's the happy one hundred twenty second birthday Hitler. It's a good thing. You're not around to see how much you motivated the Jewish community to run everything. That's like a kernel of a stupid joke that then gets does three backflips and ends up a truly horrible joke and anti semitic and defensive it's yeah. It's like a bad comic earliest career on his worst day. They're not borderline right? There's there's some sometimes people use comedians. You stereotypes all the time. And sometimes you know, you can see. Okay. They were really just trying to be funny. And they crossed the line accidentally, these are really, you know, it's terrible. Right. Not funny at all. But but Josh you went and talked to him didn't you? Yeah. We reached out to him. And he was. More than willing to talk to us, and we agree conversation. So here it is as a Representative of the world's quote, unquote,.

Ben Shapiro Josh Hitler Lena Dunham Trayvon HBO Twitter Beto Aurora Alex writer Representative one hundred twenty second ten years
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And then as I started to develop these ideas, like I had to let go of things, you know, one of the. Ideas that I've been promoting to people is that you have to let the dead would burn off and you do that. You do that as a consequence of necessity in the pursuit of responsibility. When I started writing seriously, I stopped drinking. Because it couldn't think properly. So that was it. It was either like you're going to do one of these. The other. You're gonna continue wasting your time. I was having a fine time. I was in graduate school and and had a very social. I was very, very social and a lot of that involved drinking and and that sort of thing couldn't do both. Especially when I was editing. I couldn't get my thoughts down, pristine leeann, precisely enough. Plus the emotional magnitude of the things that I was dealing with were more overwhelming. If I was in the aftermath of party. So decided I was like twenty five or so to just start. I've been caught off guard by how politicized you've become an I. As I read of your youth, I know that you had your run with religion, which a lot of people do that. She got politically active, but on the left, not the right. Help me understand what went down. Well, I in in the little town. I grew up in the member of parliament. The provincial parliament quivalent American state was a democratic socialist. He was the only one in the entire province. Everyone else was conservative, which would be sort of moderate Republican, I would say, and. You know, there's something to be said for political voice for the working class and for the dispossessed, and it certainly is the case that hierarchical structures, higher structures that compose our society do produce dispossession. They stacked people up at the bottom. And so people at the bottom need to have a political voice in. So I was very attracted to that end of the political spectrum. But as I came to investigate some of the problems I've been discussing more deeply, I started to understand that mere economic rectification was insufficient that that wasn't the level of analysis that was appropriate for my inquiry anyways, translated redistribution of income. There's a work. Well, think about it this way. The guaranteed basic income idea. It's like, well, that's predicated on the idea that man lives by bread loan. Well, that isn't how it works. And I certainly seen that my clinical practice I've had clients, especially addicts. If you gave them money, they would die. And the reason for that one guy that I remember in particular, I liked him quite a bit. It had a bad cocaine problem. And as long as he was flat broke. He wasn't dead, but as soon as his, he was on disability. As soon as disability check came in, he was face down in the ditch three days later. So well, and you think, well, maybe that's a consequence of his overwhelming poverty at cetera. You could come up with some social reason for the that path that you talk, but it wasn't by any stretch of the imagination that simple. It's like people need purpose more than money even. I mean, obviously we don't want people starving and actually we're doing pretty good job of solving that problem where wide, you know, the UN projects that there won't be anyone in absolute poverty by the year twenty thirty, which is really quite the bloody miracle that's for sure. So we're doing pretty good job of getting rid of abject privation, but then it isn't the provision of material well-being with ease that allows people to live properly even though a certain amount of material. Wealth is necessary, precondition its purpose. That's a much more difficult problem to solve. It's like we need something to grapple with. We needed meaning to justify our lives. And some of that is to be found in while the struggle against. Against privation and and malevolence the MIR. Offering of material sustenance to people isn't going to solve the problem. Dostoevsky new. This one hundred fifty years ago. He said, if you gave people everything they wanted. So all they had to do eat cakes and busy themselves with a continuation of the species. The first thing they do is smashed all to hell so that something interesting could happen..

Dostoevsky UN cocaine one hundred fifty years three days
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"You can't quit smoking unless you believe in the mystical so that sucks for the rationalist for the secular humanist for the non religious people the non spiritual people at their out you're screwed you'll never be able to quit smoking because you don't believe in mystical and the supernatural but you know watch this guy and then ask yourself why is he so globally famous on issues beyond psychology and even as i qala just is this the guy is this guy rooted in rationality rational thinking in actual science i mean it's obvious that he has what i call in the human brain he has a very large place in the brain where the weird shit lives okay you know what let me play you a short clip for context dr peterson's talking about morality but he's essentially talking about the universal moral laws put in place by a law giver now he's very vague about who the law giver might be jordan peterson's coming off a reference in this clip of one of his favorite novels crime and punishment in which someone is contemplating the murder of genuinely horrible human being like we would be better off without this horrible person and there is the contemplation of murder should we kill this person so that they can do no more horrific things to the rest of humanity and the murder of that person is sort of like a tear in the fabric of moral space are so this is that statement from peterson and then i've included kind of an abridged versions along response but an abridged answer from matt dhillon dostoevsky sets up the stage here's the perfect situation for murder and all of the rational choices point in that direction and risk old nicole who's also sort of torturing himself or sort of tortured because he sort of hungry and not very well not thinking very clearly he undertakes.

jordan peterson murder matt dhillon dostoevsky nicole
"dostoevsky" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"I tend to talk so pinker is a good person to read because pinkers making a very powerful pro enlightenment pro reason pro science pro progress case well documented empirically i mean the apparel evidence is pretty clear although there is some evidence that inequality is increasing first of all no one knows what to do about that right or left there's a new book by walter shy del called the great leveling which i would also much recommended because much because he analyzes the problem of inequality with dead seriousness and traces back thousands of years and points out quite clearly that it's a problem but that it can't be laid at the feet of capitalism that's just foolish it's a way deeper problem the math and but despite the fact that there's increasing inequality to some degree in the west overall the entire world is getting richer and and there are fewer poor people there are way fewer people in absolute poverty than there were fifteen years ago far fewer and so what's happening is our economic system is generating a motive surplus and it's been quite effectively distributed even to the lowest end of the socio economic spectrum but inequality still remains a problem you know that drives a fair bit of theorising on the left but i would i'd very much recommend show dell's book the great leveling it's it's very bright and then there's there's pinker and then you know i'm very much a fan of of of greek classic literature i'm great meyer of dostoevsky dostoevsky's novels in particular are unbelievably profound exploration of the rule of human responsibility in the face of the tragedy in malevolence of existence so and i have a reading list of jordan be peterson dot com that has about forty books on it that i've recommended that some of them are psychological in nature and other literary summer philosophical so so let me let me take a quick break and then i wanna come back in and would you define what a good man is what what is the goal to be a man and what is a good man look like when we come back with jordan peterson.

pinker dell dostoevsky dostoevsky jordan peterson walter fifteen years
"dostoevsky" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"Would you like to be taken him anyway everywhere just tell me what to do me to you what to do i'm ordering you to autumn e yes get that as i am more invested in peepers lady dodo relationship then people are invested in like claire and amy and outlander that's so lovely and i can i pitch i just wanna pitch quickly please commodore has a heart attack late dodo has to go buy a coffin big mahogany with dead maybe or is close to planning ahead love it she she brings peepers with her they end up making love in the coffin which by the way the the top falls or was it push they get buried alive and oh my god is both frightened but also really turned on because he might spend eternity oh my god lady dodo that is so much better than anything we ever came up with that's brilliant i wanted to talk about letterman and it's such an interesting he's a fascinating guy i think a lot of ways and you worked he's i think because he is so successful and yet still so miserable yeah right which i think is the key to it which i think is the key to kind of everything about that whole show his miserable miserable two lovers it's loosely based on a novel by dostoevsky is that correct don't know i mean i think it might say that in the opening credits i haven't seen the movie yeah surprise.

claire amy dostoevsky
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"It's it is it is a mystery it's it's it is a mystery because it is the case that there's something about the nazi doctrine that seems to have a visceral impact that that the communist doctrine doesn't have and i said when i opened my remarks tonight that it might be the issue of racial superiority you know it's it's something single that you can put your finger on whereas what's happening on the left that's horrifying is murky it might even be multidimensional maybe there isn't a single radical leftist idea that's murderous like the racial superiority doctrine maybe it's a combination of three or maybe at some said of four out of ten who knows so and because of that it doesn't seem as repugnant and there was also universalising tendency among the communists that seem to be less morally reprehensible than the ethnic nationalism of the nazis so you think if you go back to nineteen fourteen it's complicated but if you go back to say nineteen eighteen at the time of the russian revolution it's not like the communists knew that their attempts to bring about the socialist utopia would be doomed to absolute murderess catastrophe right they were they were working in it's now it's not that simple because by that time dostoevsky had already written the devils possessed and he outlined very very clearly what he thought would happen if people like that got the reins of power and each had done the same thing in his writing so people knew that there was something toxic let's say and deadly about the doctrine but it hadn't been played out on the world stage but now it's like well this is why said what i said at the beginning fine if.

dostoevsky
"dostoevsky" Discussed on Exvangelical

Exvangelical

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on Exvangelical

"Um i remember reading dostoevsky's a crime and punishment in um ap history in high school and we'll ask him moves on the stranger and i just fell in love with it just the questions he where he was asked me about good and evil uh humanity on right and wrong of it was just so it was so depressing but it was sold in good add fln law specifically will see us he's work and dumb didn't really know what philosophy was but a kind of fell like that's what he was hinting at in his work um so the second i was able to choose a major of for college unlike gap that's undue i and i i never changed it i just added onto it but um yeah gis asking the big questions are about life in general way in creation in the universe saying no eccentric central whatever's so yeah it all started with knee loving in general but specifically those folks in a high school really drove uh that passion year in there i add curb i loved him i love current orange merge lee road uh i had a really i worked at a call center in one summer and it there is a lot of dead time in so because it was a catalogue call center so i got to read mike brothers kromlau of during one summer and then i uh i was really amnestying undergrads personally so i really love dead notes underground um.

dostoevsky
"dostoevsky" Discussed on X96

X96

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on X96

"And take it back door but we stock up on toilet paper and wind i go to my book club today i'm in charge of some some part of the refresh oh do have one bottle of wine but to is preferred what's your book dostoevsky notes from underground so i now they always do you know little snacks we take up we talk about the book for about a 45 minutes are now and we take a break and drink wine and eat snacks and i think i'm the only person who's done this i am bringing russian appetizer i looked up russian appetizers and i made them and they're horrible laughter horror i'm taking them well one is called russian caviar and it's because they can't afford caviar so they made with egg plant and onions and demands and it just tastes like i know and then there's a summer russian bean salad which is not horrible i guess it's okay but i'm also taking them hamas and peter chips just cook russian tourism not necessarily driven by their food no no no no you don't go to russia for fine cuisine net all right when you get the show officially underway here i guess will last for you to call in check in but i've sir i don't know if you will because a lot of you just aren't working all the holidays a few of our regulars chat room i have a prize if you call in check in the tickets to the gym now gymnastics these chimneys yeah red rocks so 8776 to 9696 the number to call in check in with the radio from el trail i also have a checking from norway oh in my email okay so we'll we'll do that as well 8776 o 29690 calling check in ran lifecoms the website by s ran lie for good friends the local mortgage folks that ran life i have a mortgage through them and they're just so easy to deal with yeah they were therefore you them every step of the way are not only that but i remember they got a hold of you when rates changed its inhale you might want to refinance it and i said i can't i can't bring the papers down to your office and the guy who is working he said i'll come and get them from you rain life fast loan closings house advantage.

hamas peter chips chat room el trail norway dostoevsky russia 45 minutes
"dostoevsky" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"dostoevsky" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"If this were all there were to the character whose brilliantly portrayed by freddie highmore the good doctor would be an uplifting fish out of water story which given most of what's on tv would be a welcome change of pace but it's more than that in many ways sean murphy is a kind of holy fool in russian orthodoxy holy fools posed the question are we keeping heaven at a distance by clinging to the good regard of others prudence and with those around us regard as sanity a classic example of the holy fool is dustiev skis novel the idiot in it a kind guileless and compassionate prince mishkin is taken by his cynical egotistical in worldly acquaintances to be well an idiot but he's nothing of the sort he is as dostoevsky puts it the embodiment of the positively good and beautiful man as industy yes these novel the presence of murphy's holy fool causes some people to do some long overdue selfexamination as we learn in flashbacks murphy cannot lie even if lying means the difference between eating in going hungry he may say inappropriate things but his sincerity and honesty are never in doubt in contrast his colleagues have no problems with dishonesty they take credit for his accomplishments or failed to report those who do because it will further their careers while murphy has no discernible ego they are driven by little else when one character who had initially dismissed him as weird and threw him out of the hospital acts friendly toward him after seeing his skills in practice he points out the differences and asks her which is the real you it turns out that the good in the show's title refers to much more than murphy's medical abilities the most important differences between him and his colleagues have nothing to do with his autism and that makes the good doctor which is pulling in terrific numbers despite some negative critics reviews well worth checking out for breakpoint this is eric metaxas this month if you'd like a free download of johnstone streets latest book a practical guide to culture go to breakpoint dot org slash free.

prince mishkin eric metaxas freddie highmore sean murphy dostoevsky johnstone