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"dorothy parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Dorothy Parker I can like everyone to listen to just how funky this track is how funky is that Susannah Melvoin she taught prince a lot the one of the things she taught him about was Dorothy Parker at this American poet and short story writer and essayist who was renowned for her quick wit prince was really eager to get the song recorded but as it turned out as we're recording this song I'm recognizing this console sounds awful the whole thing sounded like it was muffled like it was under a blanket and prince was okay with that it's not that he didn't hear it is that he was cool with it because the song had come to him in a dream so the whole thing is about this dream state he had a dream he told me about it he had it you wrote about it you can hear what he said he had a dream that he met someone and she had a really quick wit and he really liked that and she tried to seduce him but he said no I'm kind of going with someone else Suzanne at that time and now she says well let's take a bath nieces great cancel that was so that's again prince was very honest lyric writer and windy what he tells you when this lyric is what he was thinking you really hear his roots on this album if you listen closely to the ballad of Dorothy Parker it reads as a pure narrative he's telling you a story but that is one funky story what a great track our final song in this gateway to prince's sign of the times album is called a door when we were making door with prince he spoke out loan he wanted to win back his core audience meaning the folks who listen to R&B and soul.

Dorothy Parker Susannah Melvoin writer prince Suzanne
Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

Bookworm

09:37 min | 6 months ago

Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

"I'm Michael Silver Blah this bookworm arm and today I'm very pleased to have as my guest. Adina Hoffman the Dina has written a life of the great almost mind boggling screenwriter Ben. Hecht the book has the Subtitle Fighting Words moving pictures this Ben Hecht had his. Oh would you say finger in so many tries He starts out now having moved with his family to the mid West as soon as he graduates from high school. He realizes this is. The college is not for him and he high tails it to Chicago where he becomes a very well-known newspaper this paper Man Song well known that his adventures in the newspaper business but come perhaps the most is famous play ever to be written about newspapers that he wrote with Charles MacArthur. Yes called the front page. The the front page becomes his girl Friday with cary grant and Rosalind Russell and thereby hangs a tale every the time Ben Hecht turns around. There's a revision of something. He's done a new who've version of it by someone else that he in turn revise right even his own memoirs has multiple versions of what happened to him in his own life life. He's kind of astonishing. This came from the days when face at a writer wrote right. These were people who wrote all the time there's also literary life that Hecht has in Chicago and actually this was one of the fascinating things for me is where his kind of the big city You know newspaper world met the world of the Chicago Renaissance and a lot of the people who were in that newspaper world. People like Carl Sandberg. who was a really good friend of Heck's you know he was also a reporter and they were sort of Newspaperman by day and then by night they were writing their poems in their novels and Hecht was not only hanging around with people like Sherwood Anderson Jason and he was also publishing in the little review which is unbelievable magazine? Push some of the first chapters of James Joyce's ulysses and they felt. What was her name? Margaret Anderson Anderson felt that Ben Heck was every bit as much a member of of the little review says dream straight. And he's there on almost every single issue. He was a kind of a pet of hers. He was sort of in love with her. She was unfortunately Very distracted by high art and she was also a lesbian was not interested in in that way but she loved him and she published him. Ben Has a great fiction writer. I mean he was. He fancied himself self novelist But he was very devoted to that calling but at the same time that he was writing. These very heavy breathing stories for Margaret Anderson. He was also writing he. He was whipping off these commercials stories for Lincoln at the smart set. HMO MINKIN was one of his heroes. Mencken was a cynic cynic and a sophisticated and he had every bit of hostility toward the dumb aspects of American culture. He was trying to make America smart op. He wrote fascinating essays sason books on the American language as opposed to British. We don't get an American writer per se until until Mark Twain who's writing the Mississippi River. Talk that he learned when he was a boatman. Well by the time you've got the middle of the country Chicago you've got gangsters you've got prohibition you've got flappers you've got an American language wood jr that was invented here and Hecht loved. -actly yeah and I think for me. That was one of the wonderful things about spending time with him. I was reading. This book was spending time with his language. I mean whatever you WANNA say about. Whether his books are wonderful books or not so wonderful books he was a wonderful maker of sentences and paragraphs graphs and just terrific wit on top of it and he and Macarthur wrote the front page. which was kind of Valentine to that newspaper World of Chicago? You go where they've both been cub reporters you see. He comes in to the newspaper office. Writing these things. In Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy as as you quote them right they are made of twenty three delight phrases. He's putting them together hurling them together and eventually he's going to have some fame as the newspaper Komo's rining calms every every day made up of just what he heard some Hobo say right or what some very wealthy people were saying in a casino no to be a writer then will start out as journalists. That's where Hemingway starts. He proposed this idea of. But this daily column that you've mentioned which would become known as a thousand and one afternoons in Chicago and they're kind of remarkable pieces they're just little snippets and there's a sense that the news is not just test the news of the grant headline it's also all these sort of marginal lives and people. You know the guy who runs the laundromat and the woman who works as a manicurist and has to fend off her lecherous clients. There's a way in which he's tossing this stuff off in a very casual way reading them daily. They're published on the back page of the newspaper next to the to the comic strips and he's not taking them too seriously or taking himself too seriously and there's so much better than the fiction into which he was pouring his all of his artistic ambition. That just is not the effective whereas these things that he was doing kind of on the fly as you say they're wonderful and they're incredibly generous and sympathetic. You feel him identifying with all of the city of Chicago In a way they kind of anticipate the work of later colonists people like beat Hamill and Jimmy Breslin. Who would become more famous in a way for doing doing that? who may also by now have been forgotten but act. was doing that early on. I'm talking to Adina Hoffman about. Don't her book Ben. Hecht its subtitle fighting. Words moving pictures and it's published in the Jewish writers series series published by Yale University. Press you mention that a lot of these people have been forgotten even people more recent Jonathan head so why Ben Hair. Well IT'S A. It's the question that I get all the time. And it's a good question and I mean basically at some level I feel like I've known Ben Hecht before before I knew Ben Hecht if you grow up watching American movies. He's his words are in your head even if you've never heard his name and so and I used to watch a lot of old movies as a kid but it was only when I became more conscious conscious and started to read about film history I actually worked as a film critic throughout most of the ninety s Then I was very aware of who Ben Hecht was and I I read his wonderful memoir child trial of the century. And I thought wow you know okay the movies he's known as you know. Pauline Kale called him the greatest American screenwriter Gianluca Dard said he invented eighty percent percent. Of what is used in Hollywood movies today called him a genius and all of that is true but the fact is that for heck the movies were really just a piece of it and in some ways they were actually may be one of the smaller pieces pieces of it in that memoir is full of all these other lives that we've just been talking about so I was first of all fascinated by that multiplicity of his the fact that he could contain multitudes dude but I also was drawn to heck in terms of his relationship to Jewish things. And here's a place where he basically an American Jew who claims not to have really paid much attention to the fact of his Jewishness until his consciousness was sort of raised by the Holocaust there. He's been in Chicago. He knows the woman. Editing the little review he knows call Sandberg. He knows Sherwood Anderson he moves to New York becomes friends with Herman Mankiewicz Herman Mankiewicz and also the roundtable tape Dorothy Parker and Benchley and S J Perelman and the Algonquin New Yorker Gang. He he moves to Los Angeles. He does what's so many do he has nothing but contempt damned for the people who started the motion picture industry. You say that you're interested in Hicks. Judaism with those were hits Jews. He didn't like them. There are a lot of Jews in heck's life he was actually born on the lower east side and he spent the first few years of his life. There and I don't actually think that that's Unimportant I mean. He grew up in Racine Wisconsin. which is this pastoral American American place etc but there is a way in which those tenements were in him in a very deep

Ben Hecht Chicago Writer BEN Margaret Anderson Anderson Adina Hoffman Ben Heck Charles Macarthur Cary Grant Sherwood Anderson Michael Silver Herman Mankiewicz Herman Manki James Joyce Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy Rosalind Russell Sherwood Anderson Jason Los Angeles Yale University Mississippi River America
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Plz Advise

Plz Advise

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Plz Advise

"And it's about four women, including her and EDNA savings malay- and Dorothy, Parker and statements malay- a who else Zolder, FitzGerald and one other person who I can't remember right now, and it's about them and their lives and Dorothy Parker had a hard she dealt with some shit. Yeah. It was she had a hard life. And then I think she left all her money to like civil rights. I believe she left it to the end of Lacey pe-. Yeah. I think she left everything. So she had which is bugging dope. So she turned out all right in the end. But she was all right along the way at the hotel just to give there. I did. It was I was still drinking. So I sure did I had several more. I it was interesting. I was like it was so wild. So I was like, wow. A lot of people here. Don't know the history of this place. Very clearly do and it was it's cool. It's great staff. That's very well trained and educated in the history of the place. So it was neat. Wow. We really we really went to town on this literary shit. They you speaking I won't be reading any for several months coming up because they're fucking airing the ARA Kelly trial on television. Going to as a tweeted, die of untreated bed sores process. Like you. It's very rare. We get like a Casey Anthony summer or like J moment. This is a real this feels like that very much. So I wanted that so badly with Chris watts but he led guilty. Like he admitted he did it, which is I guess good. But I I'm looking forward to to watching this, arcade. Triable they show it probably on like every station. I mean, it's probably court TV is if they have court TV land TV show. Yeah. And do that anymore. They'll probably maybe like, I mean, they might be transitioning back to doing that..

Dorothy Parker Chris watts Lacey pe FitzGerald Casey Anthony Kelly
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Dorothy Parker hers is one of the only three portable series, including volumes to voted to William Shakespeare in the bible that have remained in Hinton 'esprit forties during the nineteen thirties and forties. Parker became an increasingly vocal advocate of civil liberties and civil rights and frequent critic of authority figures during the great depression. She was among numerous intellectuals and artists who became involved in related social movements. She reported in nineteen thirty seven on the loyalist causing Spain for the communist magazine, the new masses Pirker help to establish the Hollywood anti Nazi league nineteen thirty six which the FBI suspected of being a communist party front. Parker also served as chair of the joint anti-fascist rescue committees fundraising arm. Spanish refugee appeal, she organized project rescue ship Till's transport loyalist veterans to Mexico headed Spanish children's relief and lend her name various left wing causes and organizations her former roundtable friends saw her less and less in the publication red channels in nineteen fifty Parker was listed as a say it with me calmly. Sorry say trying to blacklist list, but I think of it in time, and I got nervous. So going out is like blood. Is the answer copy? I was on the right track. The I had a thousand page dossier on her because of her suspected moment in communism. Because remember it was the aero and Senator Joseph McCarthy was freaking out about suspected communist government in Hollywood. Remember to check out sixty eight Joe McCarthy and the second red scare it's very good. As a result of the FBI Intel movie studio bosses placed her on the Hollywood blacklist her final screenplay was the fan and nineteen forty-nine adaptation of Oscar Wilde's lady Windermere's fan..

Dorothy Parker Hollywood Hinton 'esprit forties Senator Joseph McCarthy FBI Parker communist magazine William Shakespeare Oscar Wilde Spain Mexico
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Regulars at the game included Kaufman Adams Brown Ross and Woolcott with non roundtable or sometimes sitting in the Rupe also played charades. So that they called the game and the can give you a sentence game that spawned Dorothy Parker's memorable sentence using the word horticulture. She said you can lead a horticulture, but you can't make her think that's pretty good. All that's very good. Wow. So members often visited into Shoghi island, which was a private island co by several the Elgon cts and located on several acres in the middle of lake Bouma seen in for Mont there. They would engage in their usual Ray of games, including wink, murder and croquet. A number of tables were also inveterate practical jokers who constantly pulled pranks one another as. Time on the jokes became ever more elaborate herald Ross Jane grant once spent weeks playing a particularly member we'll joke on Woolcott that involved apprised portrait of himself. They had several copies made each slightly more askew than the last and they would periodically secretly. Swap them out later comment to Woolcott what on earth is wrong with your portrait. Until like ready to lose. That is so good great. That is the best use the best fun. Use of gas lighting. I have never heard all my gosh. They sound like a fun bunch like rich people. So as members of the roundtable moved into ventures outside New York City heavily the group drifted apart by the early nineteen thirties, the vicious circle was broken EDNA. Ferber said she realized when she arrived at the rose room for lunch. One day nineteen thirty two and found the group's table occupied by a family from Kansas. Some members of the group remained friends after its dissolution. Parker and Benchley in particular remained close up until his death in nineteen forty five though her political leanings did strain their relationship others as the group itself would come to understand when it gathered following Woolcott staff in nineteen forty-three simply realized they had nothing to say to one another. Because the number of the members of the round table had regular newspaper columns, the activities and quips of various round table. Members were reported in the national press this brought roundtable is widely into the public consciousness as renowned wits, but not all their contemporaries for fans at the group. Their critics accuse them of log rolling or exchanging favorable plugs of one another's work and rehearsing their witticisms in advance James Thurber who lived in. The hotel was detractors of the group accusing them of being too consumed by their elaborate, practical jokes, the reporter H L Mankin who is like much admired by many in the circle was also actually critic commenting that quote, their ideals were those of vaudeville actor one who is extremely in the know and inordinately trashy Groucho Marx, the brother of Harpo Marx was never comfortable. Amidst the well viciousness of the vicious circle. And he wants remarked, quote, the price of admission is a serpent's tongue and a half concealed stiletto. Wow. So sounds fun. Still pretty onto me. But back to the in one thousand thirty two Parker Matt Allen Campbell and actor who wanted to also be screenwriter. He was by sexual and Dorothy proclaimed in public that he was queer as Billy goat together. The pair moved to Hollywood and sign ten week contracts. With Paramount Pictures with Campbell who is also expected to act earning two hundred fifty dollars week and Parker earning thousand dollars a week house. Pretty nice. They would eventually earn two thousand dollars and in some instances upward five thousand dollars per week. As freelancers very studios. I'm Cheian Campbell. Worked on more than fifteen films and nineteen thirty six Pirker contributed lyrics for the song. I wished on the moon with music by Ralph ranger, and that song was introduced in the comedy film. The big broadcast of nineteen thirty six sung by Bing Crosby with Campbell. And Robert Carson. She wrote the script for the nineteen thirty seven film. A star is born for which they were nominated for an Academy Award for best writing. God. Yes, that's crazy. After the us entered World War, Two Parker in Alexander will collaborated to produce in theology of her work as part of a series published by Viking press for servicemen stationed overseas. The volume compiled over two dozen Parker short stories along with selected poems from enough rope sunset gun and death in Texas. It was published in nineteen forty four under the title, the portable..

Dorothy Parker Matt Allen Campbell Woolcott Kaufman Adams Brown Ross Harpo Marx Academy Award Shoghi island croquet Rupe James Thurber Cheian Campbell Ferber Ross Jane New York City Groucho Marx murder lake Bouma us Bing Crosby H L Mankin
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Those needs supporting disadvantage, foster children and helping several families escape the Spanish civil war in World War Two. Oh, my talk about a little bit too. I'm in her personal life. Oh, big hit struggled with alcoholism and drug addiction, and she was infamous for her uninhibited sex life. So exactly like me. Again, I'm not seeing it. Though, a transient member, sir. Knoll coward. Oh, wow. Did English playwright composer director actor and singer known for his wit flamboyance end, what time magazine called a sense of personal style accommodation of cheek and chic pose and poise. Okay. I see what you did their time. Many of his works including hay fever private lives. Designed for living. Present laughter in Blake spirit have remained in the regular theater. Repertoire he composed hundreds of songs in addition to well. Over our dozen musical theater works, including the operatic called bittersweet. Also screenplays poetry short stories. The novel pomp and circumstance in a three volume. Autobiography a coward's stage and film acting in directing career spanned six cades, which he started many his own works. So that's amazing. He's a guy know also EDNA Ferber. So she's an author and playwright whose novels included the Pulitzer prize winning so big in nineteen twenty four showboat from nineteen twenty six that was made. Into the nineteen twenty seven musical. Yeah. Cimarron in nineteen twenty nine made into the nineteen thirty one film that won best picture. The Oscars giant in nineteen fifty two and is palace in nineteen fifty eight. Wow. Ferber never married had no children and is not known to have engaged in a romance or sexual relationship in her early novel. Donna Hera, the title, character's aunt is said to have remarked, quote, being an old maid was a great deal. Like death by drowning a really delightful sensation. When you see struggling. She was like good. I'm doing fine. I'm living my life. I'm gonna Pulitzer prize left, and right and other guy that hung out with these guys all the time was Harpo. Marx o k the comedian in films starter he was born Adolph marks. But change his name to earth er in nine hundred eleven because didn't like the name Adolf. This was like way before Hitler. Oh, he just didn't like it. So he was like the clown slash pantomime. Mark's brother curly, reddish blonde wig. And he never spoke during performances either like blow a horn, or whistle to communicate. So by do, you know, the names of all the barks others 'cause I didn't I didn't know the mall before this. You got Groucho you got Harpo and he got. Mungo three more. Oh my God. There are three more thought there were only three five of them Mungo. You got Bongo you got beans. The funny ones the funny one so remarks brothers were Groucho Harpo, Chico Chico gum, Gumbo and zippo zeppelin. I did nose up. Well, obviously to me. But yeah. So I dunno beans chose first name was really Julius Harpo. First name was Arthur, but previously Adolf Chico was Leonard Gumma was Milton and zippo was Herbert. Oh, so not much better. I guess so I don't know. Maybe we have to do on the Marx brothers 'cause they still come up like they're still like an inspiration for so many things. So yeah. A lot of quotes from Groucho Marx. Yeah. Did you know that that wasn't a mustache that wasn't mustache? It's grease paint. Yeah. Like he'd have a moustache you If you see see. a like a headshot. Okay. It's just black grease paint. A cool. I didn't know that was. Yeah, it's amazing. How about all? Right. Well, look for coming up. Marcus brothers after we watch all of their back catalogue. So other people that hung out with them were included actresses Blake daily IGLA Gallian, Margo Gilmore, a Selwyn wouldn't Peggy would also writers Jane grant, Herman Mankiewicz Alice. Duer Miller frig Sullivan, Margaret Leech, playwrights, Beatrice Kaufman, and Donald Ogden, Stewart, the magazine illustrator Neesa MC, mine and composer deems.

Groucho Harpo Groucho Marx EDNA Ferber Pulitzer prize Blake time magazine Chico Chico Knoll Hitler Mungo Donna Hera director Groucho Marcus brothers Adolph marks Mark Duer Miller Neesa MC
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"I haven't recovered from your last episode yet. I know it's ju- to give you nightmares because doing sometimes gives me word worms. Let's say the worm man that were mad really did it for me. You know, what I'm going to give you a sheet of paper. I'm gonna need you to draw that that San where man at during our next break. Yes, I have a blank one right here. So please use your powers we will post that to both Facebook and Twitter on that episode. But yeah, dunes a lot. I know. No. Yeah. So does thinking like what's opposite of dude? Like, a nice lady. Okay. So who what who who is this nice lady who has a so nice today? I'm going to talk about Dorothy Parker and the vicious circle. Who I love that? I've always wanted to know more about Dorothy Parker because she was same. She was like, sesame and smart and had great one liners. Yes. But and was a writer, but that's all I know. Yes. So Dorothy Rothschild was born in eighteen ninety three to Jacob allies Rothschild near long branch, New Jersey, where her parents had a summer beach cottage. They properly moved back to Manhattan within a few weeks. So that she could be raised in the city. You know properly I wouldn't want anything else for my child just before Dorothy fifth birthday in eighteen ninety eight her mother passed away about after that Dorothy wasn't very happy in her in her household her father remarried in one thousand nine hundred Dorothy hated her father, and she accused him of a lot of physical abuse. She also despised her stepmother, whom she refused to call mother or stepmother, but instead referred to whereas the housekeeper wow. From a young age. So she started early. Zolt in Lau. So Dorothy attended a Roman Catholic elementary school on west seventy ninth street with her sister. Helen, even their father was Jewish and their stepmother was Protestant. Well, she didn't really have an evil stepmother for long her stepmother died in nineteen three when Parker was nine. She killer. You know, what you don't know. I don't know. Okay. Well, maybe my head cannon. Dorothy Parker killed her step at nine years old. Parker later attended mistake school which was a finishing school in Morristown New Jersey, and she graduated at age eighteen and nineteen eleven following her father's death in nineteen thirteen. She played piano at a dancing school to earn a living while she worked on her poetry on the side. Oh, Dorothy Rothschild sold her first poem to Vanity Fair magazine in nineteen fourteen. And she was later hired as an editorial system for vogue. And then she moved to entity ferries a staff writer following two years at folk. Yeah. Geez, man. I wish it was that easy. It just always seemed like way back when I think there were like less people or something that people were just like I started out as a secretary. And then I was the. Like what the most influential fashion magazine in the world. Yeah. The planet. Sure. Just writing just writing lay in nineteen seventeen Dorothy, married. A Wall Street stockbroker named Edwin pond. Parker the second, but they were soon separated by his army service during World War One. Apparently Dorothy hit always had ambivalent feelings about her Jewish heritage. And later joked that she married to escape her name. Oh, wow. And the pair actually didn't they were they've split up like very quickly after they were married, but they didn't officially divorced until nineteen twenty eight so more than ten years later while perks crew took off in nineteen eighteen while she was writing theatre criticism for Vanity Fair. She was filling in for PG Wodehouse who was taking a little PTO at the magazine, she first met, Robert Benchley who became a close friend and Robert E Sherwood and the trio began lunching at the Gwen hotel on a near daily basis, and they became founding members of what became known as the outgun roundtable. Right. Yeah. Picture it. Oh, here New York. Nineteen nineteen group that would become the roundtable began meeting as the result of a practical joke carried out by the ask press agent. John Peter TUI, so he was annoyed at the New York Times..

Dorothy Parker Vanity Fair magazine Facebook New York New Jersey Manhattan Twitter Vanity Fair PG Wodehouse writer New York Times Roman Catholic elementary scho Lau Helen Gwen hotel Morristown New Jersey Edwin pond Robert Benchley Jacob secretary
Can You Ever Forgive Lee Israel?

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

11:32 min | 1 year ago

Can You Ever Forgive Lee Israel?

"I came across this letter in a collection with the signature of one of my favorites, the writer and wit, Dorothy Parker and the letter is so her eighty three Norma place Hollywood, California, the Joshua Allen told me to write an apologize. I'm doing that. Now while he dresses for Turkey dinner with the boys across the road. I have a hangover that as a real museum piece. I'm sure that I must have said something terrible the year this kind of exertion in the future. I'm thinking of having little letters runoff saying can you ever forgive me? Dr. Except that Dorothy Parker didn't actually write or sign that letter Lee Israel, did her book called can you ever? Forgive me tells the story of her years as a literary con-artist forging letters by all sorts of famous writers, then selling the memoir was just Apted into terrific new film, also called can you ever forgive me. It stars Melissa McCarthy as Israel. This. One line. Here was particularly clever. Don't you think it's wonderful. I love his writing and Dorothy Parker's while caustic wit. Caustic wit is my religion. With the film. Now in theaters I wanted to revisit my conversation with the real Li Israel. She died in two thousand fourteen but I talked to her when her memoir came out in two thousand eight so that isn't by Dorothy Parker at all. Well, there's one line the best line. Can you guess which it is? That's really Dorothy this have hangover that as a real museum piece. So the title of your book is from this purported letter by Dorothy Parker, but it's a real realign. Yes, I imagine Dorothy apologizing her waif-like way for some misdeed, and and I sat down, and I wrote it's in the spirit of kind of Judah spree. So how did you get the idea for this this racket of forging famous people's letters and selling them to dealers started? It was incremental as most things are in life. I I was in the library where I spent most of my time foraging, and they gave me a group. Of of letters. And I thought perhaps even one or two of those could pay for from Mike my kitties tests, and I shoot it. I took it a walked out of the library. And I sold it. I was told by the the woman who bought my letters that which I didn't know anything about the business, but she would pay more for better content. So I went home, and I typed up some better content. And then when you started forging after that instead of stealing what was the first thing before actually, I don't remember where I started. I have a feeling let me think I know it wasn't. I think of the first things I fought would know account letters and you bought not just one but a whole series of antique typewriters on which to do. We'll finally if I had knoll type on one typewriter Dorothy on another and and EDNA Ferber on yet another and Finally I had about six or seven of them in locker I rented on Amsterdam have Aminu looked like a very classy porn shop, but his pawnshop not a porn shop. Not a foreign chef. And it's amazing. How little regulation there is. I mean, for instance, the Noel coward letters, some of them were published in an anthology of his correspondent. That's right recently in highly regarded, well, reviewed book, cool, the letters of no coward. And they were two of my lettuce showed up in that volume. Can we hear one of your letters? Okay. Gotta find it. All right. I'll just this. Dear Kevin Sunday. And at the the letterhead as lays of all sumo shoes. Pardon my French, dear Kevin, I who doesn't exist. I am feeling years younger having lose this morning over perfectly packed snow. There is no substitute for oxygen in the lungs. It seems to release something very like morphine Marlene Marlene as perhaps mentioned to you. When we spoke was here for almost two week. She will never change in Detroit a four service folly, she moans endlessly about the ravages of aging the betrayal of friends the lonely. Of celebrity the Silio crowd addresses each of these problems, if she were the only beautiful and celebrated creature to experience reversals, I intend to have her in my life until one of us crooks, but she is possibly the most June grandmother in the history of our planet. It's a very good thing that I love her. I laughed uproariously at show dog dog arrow yours ever know flea. Israel's version of no account, and they were among the best letters. I think of his well what you don't I'll tell you why? Because he Kurt guess he didn't have to be knoll coward. When he wrote letters. He was writing letters. I had to try hard. I had to be no coward. And so they were lay will cavorted they camped they jumped high jet Jade around. I mean, he didn't write letters like that. I was I was doing it to please dealers and to do an imitation of disturbed sick man who didn't have to try to be no coward. How did you? Did you have to try to get into character? How much did? Immerse yourself in their work. Did you put on a hat like they were support yourself drink? What did you do? I'd never put myself drink because who was it who said John Cheever that old womanising alcoholic said even Sipa Sherry shows in his prose. So I never I never drank. When I ride I just I immersed myself in that wonderful thing that happens grade of people kind of trance the creative transits it's as good as it gets. We'll have more of my interview with Lee Israel in just a minute. But first I wanted to take this opportunity to remind you to follow us on Twitter and Instagram at studio three sixty show. And now back to the podcast now, let's let's rewind before you ever got into this. You were of successful bog refer when I was in my early thirties. I wrote a book about Dorothy Kilgallen, I wrote a book about to Lula Bankhead. I did finally book that wasn't so good about Estee Lauder after the Lord of book, my lights dimmed a bit, and they stopped taking me to Lynch, and and you were on welfare. And and it was it was really rough. It wasn't. It wasn't just that. You were no longer a bestseller. What is rough? I mean, I wasn't eating roots and Niger, but in terms of my life. It was bad. It was I was alone. She was alone. And you and you had a sick cat as well. I had. Sick the romance of the whole thing, and how much did you get for that those? I I think the forty dollars a piece something like that. So it wasn't a lot of money per letter. Forty bucks, forty bucks. Allowed me to take my cat to the vet and find out baby. What was wrong with her? It was enough to keep me as I say finally in in lunch and cigarettes and rent. It was not a lot of money in terms of the letters you forge a part from the marketability of a given author or figure how how did you choose who you wanted to do? I've been thinking about that. I I know that I have certain hide certain criteria which had to be bet they the signature mostly had to be doable, easy, so EDNA, for instance, EDNA Ferber or some EDNA Ferber. She signed her letters with a period. Very simple writing. No, no loops. No swirls. No, no were jumps. Same thing. Knowles was a little harder. Dorothy, Parker had an easy signature. They had to present a challenge to me. They had to have literary epistolary styles that I thought I could duplicate and have fun doing. And I guess those are the criteria fun is interesting to me because they are also nearly all sort of swan. You naughty, people of a certain period and certain certain habits with alcohol and certain age, which meant that if I shook a little in the signature, it wouldn't tell so much, but they would all you. No, one would want to go to the cocktail party with all most of these people all of them, maybe EDNA Ferber. I was gonna say. How many letters did you right now? I think about four hundred really, yeah. You can see you can see as we sit. There's a loosely with copies basically two or three a week for the three years something like that. I guess I didn't you do the math. I did. I did whatever I needed to do them. There was one deal in New Hampshire who would call and say, do you have something Greta Garbo will have you something which George q-car is mentioned. Now, I always satisfied is demands that what did he think I mean, really? And where would you say? Yeah. Maybe I do I have a feeling maybe they may be in the country. You know, like I had a country home. I'll check and I o. I always I wasn't. I not even smart enough to say, oh, no. I couldn't I always was eighty ninety one hundred dollars. Ed was the Noel coward letters that finally done me in because I overdid and because one of the one of his friends who was in the market to buy Noel coward. That is was shown some of mine in new. Full. Well, that know having lived at a time when homosexuality was jailing offense never would've put so many campy funny allusions in his letters and the stuff that's homoerotic etcetera. I got from his his diaries, but Noah would have been much too careful to disclose his. I did what happened. Finally is that one. Once the man friend of Knowles discerned that there was something rotten in Denmark. He told the dealer who told other dealers and finally the well was toxic, and I could no longer sale. And then as soon as the the federal agents showed themselves didn't arrest you mmediately. You went off trying to thinking we're going to get rid of the typewriters destroy the guy rid of everything I could get my hands on scissored everything. I I took the typewriters from the locker one by one and they were very heavy. You know, we're talking nineteen forties. Nineteen fifties at I place them up and down various trash receptacles on Amsterdam avenue. So you were you were. Finally nabbed prosecuted went to trial. You got off pretty easy. I did. Well, I had I got six months house arrest, which is not so easy. If you saw my apartment at the time, not only did you not go to jail. You you have this lovely book. That's come out. That is getting good reviews and kind of kind attention, nobody that I've seen seems to be saying how dare this thief and forger getaway with this. I know, and I'm really, but I I have a knowledge that what I did was was wrong. But I don't I don't feel that in the pit of my stomach the bloggers not being so so kind blinders do, yeah, I know one of them called twit, and I hope he spelled it right? Somebody else called me, an intellectual terrorist. I beat so that happens, but mostly the the community of writers and not so much scholars of writers. And peers of of a liking it and are being very kind to me non-judgmental. I know what I did was for honest, Ana.

Dorothy Parker Edna Ferber Dorothy Noel Coward Lee Israel Israel Dorothy Kilgallen Kevin Sunday Li Israel Amsterdam Knowles Melissa Mccarthy Joshua Allen Writer Twitter Detroit Kurt John Cheever Niger
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Omnibus

"The genes to have some dads jeans to have more daughters no but that animals who are in stressful situations are more likely to have a female that may wonder what what's the evolutionary advantage of that why think adding more males to the population maybe destabilizes yeah i think if you have if you have all female children and inbreeding isn't a concern of yours you can continue the population more readily than if you have a bunch of boys who are just fighting for dominance and trying to because it's much it takes much longer i mean a a boy pygmy hippopotamus can impregnate a lot of different females in short amount of time but a female bottomless can only have a baby a year even when they're really cooking like hanan until i don't actually know what the station area they have offices but i bet it's long it's yeah it's a couple hundred days so now the vast majority of pygmy hippopotamuses in captivity are the science of bill hanna and mattel there it from billy and one or more gumdrops that's right and what happened to billy well along what's what's hippopotamuses lifespan i don't even know so billy was born some indeterminate time in the twenties and lived until nineteen fifty five key outlive cooler g outlived coolidge he lived edison he outlived henry ford probably dorothy parker he did i think well wait a minute how long dorothy parker live this is important allah she probably drank a little less no she lived in nineteen sixty seven hippo in a cold cold grave but you know what billy had a lot more children than dorothy parker let left in the world and i don't recall her leading any great jokes billy the hippo died so who gets the last laugh now dorothy and that concludes billy the pygmy hippo entry one twenty two gb four zero to four certificate number four seven one five nine in the omnibus listeners we hope that pygmy hippos are not extinct in your time but that social media is in our day we were avid practitioners of the art form to discredit yes me to give the gift of light knowledge of the world and john to complain about nothing shops and that's super mad at various different companies including most recently i yelled at lift a yelled at lift because they're app was sending notifications on my phone that i didn't request this is the modern version of the just the old person writing crackpot letters to his local paper so mad at the power company what happened to hi and lois not as a joke really targeted to a very small segment of our listenership dear jiffy lube no so you could find complaining about all kinds of brands at ken jennings john roderick and are important economic project was at omnibus project on facebook instagram and twitter we answered email from all interested parties at omnibus project at how stuff works dot com and we supported the doings of like minded into future ling's at a facebook fan group called future that's right of listeners wherever you fall on the political spectrum do not at me but also i'm sure in the future there there will be just as we have posited there will be a utopian future and the future conservatives and liberals will come back together probably not in the center but on the opposite side where radicals and reactionaries meet in the in the middle we just glowing show about a republican president maybe we're going to bring about this new golden age that's right maybe we are the nixon's go to china maybe this is the only enter the of us at the national review will review seventy years from now people will instead of the nixon goes to china metaphor people will talk about the trump goes to north korea metaphor and they and they will say only omnibus could go to coolidge the second rehabilitation of calvin coolidge in our modern age we have no idea whether this show will be our last or whether we will do tens of thousands of these shows but if this is our last show we hope that what am i even trying to say if this is our last show we hope it isn't if we there's probably not going to be an appendix or an index because we died shortly after recording this is our last show i've never gonna pay off my debt i'm going to die owing the banks a lot of money but hopefully like the fight club bill yeah you're just gonna imagine jiffy lube after jiffy lube just collapsing as.

one twenty two gb seventy years hundred days
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Kevin Pollak's Chat Show

Kevin Pollak's Chat Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Kevin Pollak's Chat Show

"There we have it there's that i think it's a dorothy parker quote like right to write is awful having written is wonderful yeah and i agree with that like when i've gotten something down i'm like there's no better feeling but going through it it's just a fight this fight i have to figure out different like physical ways to put myself is that right in the space to like get stuff going yeah all pile up the the quote unquote real excuses yeah to put in between myself and the writing but when i do hunker down i actually love it more than everything really do love it yeah i do i do but i but mostly i'm writing fiction for scripts yeah as opposed to trying to create carve out and evolve the next hour of stand up yeah it it so i found more joy in inscriptions yeah i find i find them both i mean i'm doing them constantly no both at the same time like that's the one thing that i've been trying to work on his being having multiple things that i need to create in four different worlds and being able to shift from them like even in the same day you know i find that to be like fascinating like all right we have to just right now we're in this project and it's not my stand up anymore but it's not the movie it's the tv you know do we think it's just the.

dorothy parker
"dorothy parker" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The wgn chicago weather center rest of the overnight we should have some showers coming into the area after about one o'clock in the morning might have some thunderstorms embedded within those showers it'll be breezy alone around forty seven on monday those showers should be scattered throughout the day patchy fog windy conditions a high near lake front only fifty nine about seventy further inland temperatures around the area right now forty eight at o'hare and forty nine at midway and mid lowthian fortysix along the lakefront forty fifty sixers your lake michigan water temperature wins out of the north at six i'm roger badesch wgn radio newsroom this is the stuff that matters on chicago's very own seven twenty wgn welcome back to after hours with me recognize my unbelievable pleasure to have in the studio jennifer inks from i have so many favorite actresses and all of them seem to work for a red orchid amy morton word is at steppenwolf but you and natalie was welcome and time vic she wants to join the yeah amy there's a free to youtube billy youtube billy can come over there he is performing at the monday night at seven o'clock at the american writers theater which american writers museum or hall of fame or whatever it's called the one eighty north michigan it's new space on the second floor of a of a high rise on michigan it's a nice new space have you seen i have i've see i've star attraction well we're gonna go in early tomorrow her set up the space to accommodate a performance because that wasn't you know built in to the museum but there is one sort of open room that will lend itself well to that we're we're hoping you're gonna do dorothy parker again that is how we first met you came on one of the previous radio thing early in my career yes the early curlers in my hair i remember that part of your costume literally curling my hair overnight and you were so early that i still had my hair did bits from the.

chicago dorothy parker roger badesch natalie youtube michigan
"dorothy parker" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on KOMO

"A lot of glamour and appeal to me you know the great photographs by striking and statelets and all of these great people and the pieces by clapper's loosen dorothy parker and it was a very glamorous erin publishing so when i heard about the launch of it i began to get a little sort of tingle thinking wow i wonder what that's going to be like then when it was launched it was total turkey they got the first editor wrong they put another editor brennan he was wrong and it just went from being this glamorous icon of being a bit of a laughing stock which point they thought communist well let's just give this young woman in london go you know we bought this magazine on them why don't we just give her ago they brought me in i as as a sort of consultant for the first few months and i was able to therefore it's a bit like being at some account before real school i was able to look around and realize what it was that what they were doing wrong i mean it just seem that they had misconceived entirely the way the magazine should go with concern you at all that going into a loser could be the downfall i think when you're young and sort of a very ambitious which was i mean in many ways this book is a kind of serenade young i'm bishen i was very sort of full of aspirated and full of energy and full of self confidence in a way i just thought this is ridiculous i mean i guys can't later order magazines i know what a good magazine is because tatler would was a very good magazine we have no budget but we did have britain young staff and they were doing amazing things my motto there was if you don't have a budget get yourself a point of view that's abc's rebecca jarvis with tina brown komo news time one fifty propel insurance money update here's bruce vaile mixed economic news sent stocks to a lower close today and knocked the dow jones industrial average back into negative territory for the year the blue chip index fell one hundred ninety three points closing at twenty four thousand seven zero six the nasdaq composite lost fifty nine points and the s and p five hundred dropped eighteen points twitter shares closed down about two percent the company is turning to greater automation.

clapper dorothy parker editor consultant london britain abc rebecca jarvis tina brown bruce vaile twitter two percent
"dorothy parker" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"That sounds like dorothy parker now reminds me of something parker would say um but anyway so so so when gloria graham was in her fifties which of course then in those days was considered the downs flight of your career something where she was in english she was doing a lot of theater in so he met her while she was doing a play and they thought they really fell in love i mean here was this twenty followed kid ultra and 55 yeah so this is tom this is a this based on a true story at a that banning plays the uh fifty something gloria clam jamie belt lays peter turner and what happened was that the the romance was relatively short live but the friendship remained and when she became deathly ill in while she was doing a play in england she called him and said i need to come to your house cook she has grown very close with his family and he ended up they ended up taking her end to their little working class house in liverpool and it's just a charming story the memoir itself is a very sweet book the movie you know i wanted we were talking about the other day day arch and i were agreeing to we wanted to like it more than we actually did uh i mean it's a it's a very sweet story and um both of the actors i think we're swell i i wanted a little bit more i don't think people who don't know who gloria graham is we'll get it at all you know like who she was and why this is extraordinary sown so this movie that will appeal two point three percent of the world then maybe but you know but it's the point three that still goes to movies i'll cut out i mean like it's the people who still do go to the movie theater um and and go to the art house to go see movies so it's a nice it's a it's a nice sweetnatured story i think i wanted a little bit more substance of from it i like that banning i've always she's loving it's a it's a great performance i mean i i was a little bit he kind of plays are a little bit kitten ish and i kind of felt like gloria graham was more catlike you know what i mean like he was a grown up caps utilize the.

dorothy parker gloria graham peter turner liverpool three percent
"dorothy parker" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Key one trying to be here to your call it ubuntu hitting bad three shouting down the quiet streets cussing up some bad words and throwing her breakfast on the floor a more reasonable person would have stopped the behavior things on a very fine gael is completely different the pairs of new podcast episode eight questionable behavior featured a poem by elena wilkinson a short story by alexia arthurs and too true stories one about an evening spent with j d salinger by blair fuller and another by either novi about language burritos and the pursuit of happiness we begin with selections from our art of fiction interview with dorothy parker reenacted by our special guests anna sale as the interviewer and stockard channing as dorothy parker the year is nineteen 56 the place is new york city dorothy parker is in her early 60s and lives in a midtown hotel she shares the small apartment with a youthful poodle that has the run of the place newspapers spread about the floor picked lamb chops here in there and a rubber doll it's throat torn from eartoear which mrs parker lobs left handed from her chair into corners of the room for the poodle to retrieve which it does never tiring of the opportunity one drew brees i will say of the writers of today that some of them had gone have the sense to adapt to their times but for most of my reading i go back to the old ones for comfort i love sherlock holmes my life is so untidy and he so neat.

alexia arthurs dorothy parker stockard channing ubuntu elena wilkinson blair fuller mrs parker
"dorothy parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"How funky is that john the the now susannah melvoin she taught prince a lot but one of the things she taught him about was dorothy parker at this american poet and shortstory writer and essayist who was renowned for her quick wit prints was really eager to get this song recorded but as it turned out as we recording this song i'm recognizing this consul sounds awful the whole thing sounded like it was muffled bike was under a blanket and prince was okay with that it's not that he didn't hear it is that he was cool with it because the song had come to him in a dream so the whole things about this dream state he had a dream a ito me about it he had a you wrote about it you can here when he said he had a dream that he met some one and she had a really quick wit and he really liked that and she tried to seduce him but he said no i'm kinda going with some someone and that was suzanne at that time and now she said well let's take a bath and he says great come liliana pants on that was so that's again prints was a very honest lyric writer and windy what he tells you in this lyric has what he was thinking you really hear his roots on this album and if you listen closely to the ballot of dorothy parker it reads as appear narrative he's telling you a story but that is one funky story what a great trial our final song in this gateway to is sign of the times album is called a door.

dorothy parker writer john suzanne
"dorothy parker" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"I mean i think it's quite as elegant as i'm going to eat your baby but know i see what you're saying and obviously trash talking at war might be slightly different circumstances than in a game but i think when i found funny was that in some of the articles there was almost this maybe like a romanticism for this golden age of trash talking and cricket back when it was all super witty and exit here let let me read you a few examples this is from a site called the conversation one of the more famous sledges was between australian cricketer rod marsh and then this guy from england ian botham apparently they were friends off the pitch but according to the anecdote marched tried to get botham off his game by saying quote so how's your wife and my kids which you could see how botham might be offended but then botham replied with a common of something like wife's fine but the kids are a little dim so he yes added a exactly i mean that was always my a tactic to playing sports rate you just let the comments roelof were used them to motivate you and talk back on the scoreboard but that comment actually reminds me of the roundtable at the elgon quinn did you ever see that movie about dorothy parker i think it was called mrs parker and the vicious circle no i'd heard about it but i i never actually saw it i director reverend movie that well but there was this once seen where they show the round table at the el konkan club and this one guy joins the table and picks on a bald writer who's sitting there like he just starts rubbing his head and he says it feels just like my wife's barebottom and then the writer rubs his own head and says while yes yes it dice.

rod marsh ian botham quinn dorothy parker writer director
"dorothy parker" Discussed on The Incomparable

The Incomparable

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on The Incomparable

"Kind of one and more in a good way i wish there was more of that because i like that it shows that the film stirred as three different scripts that nobody way than they gave when gren capper bought the rights to all the stuff they threw in the scripts for free and then he said then with uh francis goodridge numbered hackett and dorothy parker who didn't get any credit and joe swirling and they all kinda cobbled stuff from all of these groups and added a bunch of other stuff and made magic yards for a few on us off of up there are good things in this movie the but it's it's the pacing of it and the sort of lopsidedness of at the bothers me as a writer it's just it's yeah okay for those who like the movie uh how do you how do you feel about this part about the alternate reality and then the final like moment of of yes take me back take me back is this is this the highlight of the movie for you or is this just you know the pivot point but you've enjoyed a movie up i just i'm wondering about when you get to this plenty like all right here we go or you're like just kind of preceding on with the film how do you how to proceed on it's just i just president has to me it's just another piece and to me the highly of the movie is his relationship with donna read that we hadn't really talk much about but i love how this part of the movie even though it is the hallmark this is the thing that all the sitcoms rip off this is the thing that one talks about after but i love that despite all of that the emotions are what hidden i really think about the mechanics of it at all yeah it's just another part of the movie and likewise the ending the ultimate ending where everyone wants to be happy only works because of this alternate dimension and this alternate dimension only works because of the ninety previous minutes we've hacked bryant is such a smart guy.

hackett dorothy parker joe writer president donna bryant francis goodridge
"dorothy parker" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I can go dark i think i am also jan most delicate well last time generals and i were on the radio together she was doing a dorothy parker there's a there's a brilliant but also dark character nothing i acting gend if you're big things that you go for broke and a that's what those two also i have in common which is just the there you have that frigate lack of boundary that is true i i really don't know my on strength as an mike one of those people that when i was a kid like when you did your homework like i always just rope nearly two hard on the paper you know what i mean like every a if liquor whether would and that's not to say that i'm a hammi over actor but maybe directing missing and how the i i would think that when you put the coal out or let people know that you're doing this yeah that the people jumped i mean really jumped on board yes it it it was very it was a very he quick guesting press all that and uh yeah events phenomenal as usually this plays done with uh it actors and everyone plays multiple parts and you've got by five men and three women and we're instead we decided that especially like an stage reading wearing when people are are are are are standing at a music stance that it would be confusing to have a people play multiple parts in really being able to track as they all agree i agree and then also we really call at this time and if we're doing this today sale you ask as many people as possible in plain one actor per character so we have twenty actors who are going to be in the show all volunteer all volunteering their time actors equity gave us waivers so a all the actors could donate their time everyone's doing this for free out of their passion for it and we wanted it to be a show that really was throwing men's in semedo women's roles in women and some of the men's roles in getting more people.

dorothy parker semedo
"dorothy parker" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"dorothy parker" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Seles home performed i live on your visits by dorothy parker when i was first introduced to dorothy parker's work when i was in high school it was presented to us as are these stories funny and they were funny but i think what made me love dorothy parker is how sad and how de per stories are often letting people are funny people don't give them credit for their writing when you look at dorothy parker sentence by sentence she's an astonishing writer and a writer who still feel some mater i think as modern day as she did in twenty he's thirty when she wrote her best material i mean i've seen a couple of movies based on things that dorothy parker wrote the mother okay them come close to the pleasure of reading her because what you don't get in film adaptations is you don't get the rhythm and the exactitude of her writing and the sorrow shines through either way there does on the page or your hand somebody her allah i'm david said aris after a brief break snakebite you're listening to selected short recorded live in performance at symphony space and new york city and other venues nationwide for p r i public radio international.

dorothy parker writer david aris new york