18 Burst results for "Dorothy Fields"

"dorothy fields" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:41 min | 3 weeks ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"W. ABC come swing with me some gems. I'm telling you, I grab some of these songs. We learn about these songs, and then I would play them here and there. But then I started looking at all that comes swing of the albums of swinging Affair songs for swinging lovers. You know, Billy May Nelson Riddle, So I had this dream. This is how weird I am. I I don't know what you can figure it out. We should have a psychoanalyst on the show so unlike and this was it's clear as day I had this dream. Listen. So I'm working. I see Frank Sinatra welcomed by my side in my dream, and he's walking there and I kind of took his elbow. He was to my left, and I took his elbow with my left hand. Clear as day and I was kind of not help. The Mulumba walked him along as I would My father. You know, in his older years, and I'm walking along and we sat and then we go to like a restaurant. I don't know where it was, but he was in front of me. I was right off to the side. And I said, You know, Mr Sinatra, you know, campaign she was the guy we know that And this isn't until Frank's about you. This is my dream. I'm going like this. I'm going Can't busy that of course, I think just for your music, and I think you said it yourself The way Mr basically just rose to the level that you would with Quincy Jones. Sunny paint on drums and the great man and and he's looking at me is 90. And I say, and Nelson Riddle I always consider Nelson Riddle the the Like I said the Bach of arrangers. You know, he was the greatest understand. And the old man is Mr S is looking at me. You know that? I said. But Billy May man I said I said, Mister, I didn't say man. I said, sir, I said Billy Mason. I said I had no idea how great Billy maybe didn't dream ended. I wanted to hear Frank Sinatra's You know, Episcopal, your your Kuku kid, and he wasn't going to say to me, you know? So so I find this Billy may the last couple of months. I've just kind of rediscovered if you will. Billy May so he was just swinging. He hit it. He popped it, and it was just one of those things. So maybe that was a message from my dad. Maybe that was a message from Frank Sinatra. But we're going to swing it tonight In the name of Francis, Albert Sinatra and certainly my father, you know who introduced me to the greatness of Mr Sinatra. This is something that was written by Jimmy McCue. Jimmy McCue is Dina Martin's godfather. She'll tell you that Indiana don't forget comes up at nine o'clock tonight. I'm a plethora of information for you aren't I? And this is lyrics by Jimmy McHugh. Lyrics by Dorothy Fields music by Jimmy and some. Some authors say that Fats Waller was the composer of the song, but he sold the rights to the song, but right now I think I've got to give Jimmy McCue and Dorothy Fields of credit. One of the greatest songwriting teams of all time. Check this out Frank Sinatra on the sunny.

Jimmy McHugh Frank Sinatra Jimmy McCue Dina Martin Jimmy Nelson Riddle Francis Sinatra Dorothy Fields Quincy Jones Billy Mason Albert Sinatra Frank Billy tonight Billy May nine o'clock tonight Fats Waller Episcopal Billy May Nelson Riddle
"dorothy fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:30 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mm hmm. Someday. When I'm awfully low when the world is cold. I will feel a glow just thinking of Oh, you And the way No. Tonight. But you're lovely. With your smile so and your cheeks so soft. There is nothing for me, but I love you. Yeah. Just the way I look. To night. With each word. Your tenderness. Krul's Terry. My fear. Off. And that laugh. Head wrinkles. You know who's Touches. My foolish Lovely. Never never change. Sure. Keep that breathless charm. Won't you please arrange it? Cause I I love you. Just the way Good night. Just Wait, look. To night. Tony Bennett performing Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields affectionate the way you look tonight, introduced on the silver screen by Fred Astaire. One.

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

07:24 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"Then in the late nineteen fifties. She like. I said several collaborators died. Herbert died very suddenly and was that was a devastating blow to her and she began to wonder as all of those greats did irving berlin. The chief of them. Cole porter's while struggling with wait a minute music. Exchanging rock and roll is coming out in terms of popular music. We're hearing rock and roll as opposed to broadway setting the tone for the hit parade. It's now elvis presley setting that tone and they began to wonder. Is this that we've been selling for all these years. Does this no longer do people no longer want to buy this. And you know irving berlin kind of closeted himself up and became a hermit in reaction to that but not worth. Dorothy continued to hustle and trying to find new collaborators. And in fact. That's how she connected with cy coleman was. They were at a dinner party. Dorothy in her home for songwriters and si- came over to her he was in his mid twenties. She was in her mid fifties probably late fifties by that point and he said. Would you like to write a song and she said. I thought you'd never ask me. Of course. I want to write a song so she was ready to go and there was. No there was no thought of i'm done. I've i've had my success. I've written all. I can ride. No no no was always ready for the next thing. Even if that meant writing in a style she'd never written him before. I mean it's just incredible what she was able to accomplish but there is a slowdown. That was intentional. When she had her children her children were born in nineteen forty and nineteen forty four so she was riding but but she slowed down to maybe one co border show a year. She would write the libretto with herbert at that point. We see she really stops writing lyrics for broadway and the lyrics that writing for film but those are the kinds of things like i said where she can write those on her own and then they send them off to the filmmakers and she's at home in new york with their kids the whole time. That's when she started riding libretto's she could collaborate with her brother. Herbert she stayed in new york. That's where her kids were. And so you see that slowdown but it. But it was at her. It was her choice to to do that so that she could be there for her kids. Did she find that. Adjustment going from lyrics to dialogue difficult. She loved it. Should it a dream come true. Heaven heaven writing. Because like i said she was a storyteller at her core so could be able to tell stories and to have a full for musical to taliban and not just you know two and a half minutes that that was her word was heaven. It was heavenly. She absolutely loved it that she could do. What with her brother. Herbert who was so dear to her was icing on the cake and one of those collaborations that they worked on together was head. Yes think about that you know. She had worked on something like up in central park which was created to look like a career and is painting and then all of a sudden she writing red head which she had been working on for a long time like from the early fifties. And it didn't make it to broadway until the late fifties and it was because it just kept going through different iterations and different producers. Different composers. And i am finally even when they brought him. Bob fosse it was significantly changed. But as you can imagine. Career knives and bob fosse are very different styles right but it was not only fossey's directorial debut but it was also Gwen verdon like a breakout role for her. She had been on broadway before but in supporting roles. And this was a breakout role for gwen. Verdon so Dorsey will is right. There at the at the cusp of what would be you know. Kind of a guiding light for the next generation of broadway with fossey and in their collaboration and richard. Carl was in that before he became an of the mancha. That's right richard kiley. That's exactly right. There was definitely a generation gap but it was one that she was very emphatic about bridging so that she could continue to work for as long as she could continue to work and did she ever take a chance on writing something all by herself because she collaborated with a lot of people but did she ever have a solo work of her own. She did not and in fact after herbert died. She never wrote another libretto back to writing lyrics. Her next two shows were sweet charity. Which was neil. Simon on libretto. And cy coleman for music and then seesaw which was psycho man on music and michael. Stuart wrote the book for that so she never wrote another bulk without herbert. That was that was something that was too painful for her to do that. Process without him. She really accomplished so much over her. Forty eight years in the business and you know including the academy award for the way you look tonight that the best musical. Tony ward for redhead. Would you say that she ever felt like that. She made it that she that she met her own definition of success. I think so. I can't think of a time you know. I think that she was at the top of her game from the beginning of her career to the end of it. I mean you don't get more top of your game then coming home from a rehearsal for a national tour of a show that you wrote a and getting a message on your machine that you have been nominated for a tony award for that show and then dying that night. I mean you can't you can't have it any better than that in terms of going out on top so i think that she was very. She was always able to provide for herself anything that she wanted she was always able to. There may have been a dry period where. She was looking for the collaborator after albert. Hague until she met cy coleman but she pushed through and she found that next collaborator and that collaboration was one of the most successful of her careers and it was the last so i think that she probably was very very pleased with what she was able to do. I think it's also fair to say that the world of musical theatre has also been quite pleased with what she was able to accomplish in the works that she presented to audiences from the nineteen twenty s all the way through the nineteen seventies and beyond and her persistence through. Those decades is a lesson for all of us from pushing past or father's objections to dealing with her brothers and other collaborators passing away as she continued to write songs. Dorothy fields is a true testament to that saying work. Hard and silence and let success make the noise. Kristen deny continue our conversation about fields in this week's final five bonus episode which is a little different from the previous final fives. I've done this season and before instead of kristen answering the five questions about herself. I've asked her to take on the role of dorothy fields and answer the questions from her perspective. It's a unique and inciteful final five episode for access to that members only episode as well as all of the bonus content. Go to join dot. Wow never make it dot com for as little as three dollars a month. You can get these extra episodes and deeper dives into.

Stuart Gwen verdon Dorothy new york Carl Herbert richard Dorsey five questions richard kiley herbert michael cy coleman Forty eight years Verdon two and a half minutes two shows five episode Bob fosse neil. Simon
"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"Fifty years ago this month ten people were inducted into the songwriters hall of fame included on that list or well known. Names like duke. Ellington is worse when alan jay lerner and johnny mercer. The only woman in that group was dorothy fields but despite her talents for lyrics and story telling her journey to becoming a songwriter wasn't easy in fact there were some pretty big roadblocks in her way as she was hoofing it around tin pan alley in the nineteen twenties trying to sell songs. Her father very famous lou field was going behind her. Saying if you hire my.

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

03:41 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"But i took dorothy with me. When i went from lexington to athens. Dorothy came along for the ride. You basically were looking at her life from you. Know more academic educational standpoint. So what makes this different from those dissertations. That's actually a great question you know. It's funny because when people ask me what the book is about or have asked me over the past twenty years what. I was researching. And i would mention dorothy fields. And everybody's i don't know her but then you mentioned song titles you say hey big spender. She wrote that or pick yourself up. She wrote that or on the sunnyside of the street. She wrote that everybody gets that same. Like a ha. I know her but they didn't know that they knew her in my master's thesis. That's one question that i asked was why her name. Not as well known as porter and all of those men not only were they collaborators of hers they were very well loved colleagues who esteemed. Dorothy is one of them. And there's a couple of suggestions for that one is. She was never part of a team that that lasted for a long time. So by that. I mean rodgers and hammerstein that that is an iconic dua were Rodgers and hart even or irving berlin wrote music and lyrics cole porter music and lyrics but dorthy fields for it with eighteen different composers over a five decade long career so there was never easy to pinpoint her as. Oh well. that's i mean the closest would be jimmy. Mccue who was first collaborator of fields in. Bq song where it just it just there. That never happened with her. It never became a catchphrase. Another suggestion is because she was very self effacing. You know if she was asking an interview. Oh we'll tell us about this experience. Riding with arthur schwartz or whatever she would immediately turn it around and said well let me tell you how great. It is work with arthur. You know she would always shine. The spotlight on her collaborator And so that's another reason..

arthur schwartz Dorothy arthur Rodgers hammerstein jimmy rodgers Mccue one one question lexington eighteen different composers first collaborator dorothy hart five decade dorthy past twenty years spender irving berlin
"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

05:35 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"Well hello kristin welcome back to the podcast while it is so good to be back with you. Thank you for having me. I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your podcast as it has grown. You've done some really exciting things and talk to some incredible people and so it's been a real joy to watch it will relations by the way. Thank you for being a listener as well as a guest but yeah it's good to have you back and so what was it. That drew you to dorothy fields. And why did you want to write a book about her well. To be honest. I started studying. Dorthy fields a master's candidate at the university of kentucky and one of the bugaboos about graduate school. They expect you to have a research project and the real catch is. It needs to be something. No one else's ever researched before so it can be pretty tricky because If it's something that no one's ever researched before how are you going to know about it right. And how are you gonna find research about exactly so you're really starting from scratch. So i went to graduate school bride. Probably twenty three twenty four year old new. I wanted to study. Musical theater was in the theater. Department had no idea what that specific topic would be that. I would research for the next two years. Actually i was planning on doing a phd. So would have been the next four years. I knew it would be related to musicals. I knew what related to the golden age of musical. So i was thinking cole. Porter irving berlin oscar hammerstein. I loved lyrics and Each of these wrote lyrics so that was something that was already drawn to. But every time i talk with my advisor she was We know everything about quarter. Everything's been done about oscar hammerstein. There've been books written about and by irving berlin says she would just keep shooting down and rightfully so. Because i needed what was going to be my contribution right. What was what was going to be my something that i could add to the academy so to speak. And so as a person of faith. I literally prayed and prayed and prayed and prayed and one day in her office. It was as if i saw this blinding vision across my eyes and it just was the name dorothy fields and i knew nothing about dorothy fields. Except that i recognized her name from the show card from sweet charity. Nineteen sixty six charity And i had seen that show card. So much of course had the cd collection. So i am the the cd case very much like the show card. And so i just blurted out. What about dorothy fields adviser stopped. And said i don't know anything about dorothy fields and so that was two thousand three. I went home and it was the very early days of googling there. There was not much on the internet yet. But there was enough that i could see my goodness. This woman wrote the way you look tonight. This woman wrote. I'm in the mood for love. This woman wrote on sunny side of the street. This woman was the brain power behind any. Get your gun. She came up with the idea to do a show about any oakley. And so i went back to my adviser at a different class to that night and told her. What do you think about this. This is what i found out. She says let's do it so it's been almost two decades that i've been at this but i continued that work not only for masters but also for my doctoral dissertation which i ended up doing my phd at the university of georgia. But i took dorothy with me. When i went from lexington to athens. Dorothy came along for the ride. You basically were looking at her life from you. Know more academic educational standpoint. So what makes this different from those dissertations. That's actually a great question you know. It's funny because when people ask me what the book is about or have asked me over the past twenty years what. I was researching. And i would mention dorothy fields. And everybody's i don't know her but then you mentioned song titles you say hey big spender. She wrote that or pick yourself up. She wrote that or on the sunnyside of the street. She wrote that everybody gets that same. Like a ha. I know her but they didn't know that they knew her in my master's thesis. That's one question that i asked was why her name. Not as well known as porter and all of those men not only were they collaborators of hers they were very well loved colleagues who esteemed. Dorothy is one of them. And there's a couple of suggestions for that one is. She was never part of a team that that lasted for a long time. So by that. I mean rodgers and hammerstein that that is an iconic dua were Rodgers and hart even or irving berlin wrote music and lyrics cole porter music and lyrics but dorthy fields for it with eighteen different composers over a five decade long career so there was never easy to pinpoint her as. Oh well. that's i mean the closest would be jimmy. Mccue who was first collaborator of fields in. Bq song where it just it just there. That never happened with her. It never became a catchphrase. Another suggestion is because she was very self effacing. You know if she was asking an interview. Oh we'll tell us about this experience. Riding with arthur schwartz or whatever she would immediately turn it around and said well let me tell you how great. It is work with arthur. You know she would always shine. The spotlight on her collaborator And so that's another reason. Why perhaps she didn't seek the spotlight and it wasn't until later in her career. She became concerned with legacy and she hired a publicist at and that happened in the late. Nineteen fifties as. I think her her brother died unexpectedly. Her husband died unexpectedly her her dear friends and collaborators beginning to die and i think she realized at that point. Hey maybe i am concerned with being. And i do need help to accomplish that.

forty seven years one tonight season two first big hit Ridden fifty years one of the artists american enduring songs annie kristen stoltze
Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

05:35 min | 6 months ago

Kristin Stultz Pressley On Dorothy Fields And Her Impact On Broadway Musical Theater

"Well hello kristin welcome back to the podcast while it is so good to be back with you. Thank you for having me. I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your podcast as it has grown. You've done some really exciting things and talk to some incredible people and so it's been a real joy to watch it will relations by the way. Thank you for being a listener as well as a guest but yeah it's good to have you back and so what was it. That drew you to dorothy fields. And why did you want to write a book about her well. To be honest. I started studying. Dorthy fields a master's candidate at the university of kentucky and one of the bugaboos about graduate school. They expect you to have a research project and the real catch is. It needs to be something. No one else's ever researched before so it can be pretty tricky because If it's something that no one's ever researched before how are you going to know about it right. And how are you gonna find research about exactly so you're really starting from scratch. So i went to graduate school bride. Probably twenty three twenty four year old new. I wanted to study. Musical theater was in the theater. Department had no idea what that specific topic would be that. I would research for the next two years. Actually i was planning on doing a phd. So would have been the next four years. I knew it would be related to musicals. I knew what related to the golden age of musical. So i was thinking cole. Porter irving berlin oscar hammerstein. I loved lyrics and Each of these wrote lyrics so that was something that was already drawn to. But every time i talk with my advisor she was We know everything about quarter. Everything's been done about oscar hammerstein. There've been books written about and by irving berlin says she would just keep shooting down and rightfully so. Because i needed what was going to be my contribution right. What was what was going to be my something that i could add to the academy so to speak. And so as a person of faith. I literally prayed and prayed and prayed and prayed and one day in her office. It was as if i saw this blinding vision across my eyes and it just was the name dorothy fields and i knew nothing about dorothy fields. Except that i recognized her name from the show card from sweet charity. Nineteen sixty six charity And i had seen that show card. So much of course had the cd collection. So i am the the cd case very much like the show card. And so i just blurted out. What about dorothy fields adviser stopped. And said i don't know anything about dorothy fields and so that was two thousand three. I went home and it was the very early days of googling there. There was not much on the internet yet. But there was enough that i could see my goodness. This woman wrote the way you look tonight. This woman wrote. I'm in the mood for love. This woman wrote on sunny side of the street. This woman was the brain power behind any. Get your gun. She came up with the idea to do a show about any oakley. And so i went back to my adviser at a different class to that night and told her. What do you think about this. This is what i found out. She says let's do it so it's been almost two decades that i've been at this but i continued that work not only for masters but also for my doctoral dissertation which i ended up doing my phd at the university of georgia. But i took dorothy with me. When i went from lexington to athens. Dorothy came along for the ride. You basically were looking at her life from you. Know more academic educational standpoint. So what makes this different from those dissertations. That's actually a great question you know. It's funny because when people ask me what the book is about or have asked me over the past twenty years what. I was researching. And i would mention dorothy fields. And everybody's i don't know her but then you mentioned song titles you say hey big spender. She wrote that or pick yourself up. She wrote that or on the sunnyside of the street. She wrote that everybody gets that same. Like a ha. I know her but they didn't know that they knew her in my master's thesis. That's one question that i asked was why her name. Not as well known as porter and all of those men not only were they collaborators of hers they were very well loved colleagues who esteemed. Dorothy is one of them. And there's a couple of suggestions for that one is. She was never part of a team that that lasted for a long time. So by that. I mean rodgers and hammerstein that that is an iconic dua were Rodgers and hart even or irving berlin wrote music and lyrics cole porter music and lyrics but dorthy fields for it with eighteen different composers over a five decade long career so there was never easy to pinpoint her as. Oh well. that's i mean the closest would be jimmy. Mccue who was first collaborator of fields in. Bq song where it just it just there. That never happened with her. It never became a catchphrase. Another suggestion is because she was very self effacing. You know if she was asking an interview. Oh we'll tell us about this experience. Riding with arthur schwartz or whatever she would immediately turn it around and said well let me tell you how great. It is work with arthur. You know she would always shine. The spotlight on her collaborator And so that's another reason. Why perhaps she didn't seek the spotlight and it wasn't until later in her career. She became concerned with legacy and she hired a publicist at and that happened in the late. Nineteen fifties as. I think her her brother died unexpectedly. Her husband died unexpectedly her her dear friends and collaborators beginning to die and i think she realized at that point. Hey maybe i am concerned with being. And i do need help to accomplish that.

Dorothy Fields Oscar Hammerstein Dorthy Fields Porter Irving Irving Berlin University Of Kentucky Kristin Musical Theater Cole Berlin Dorothy Oakley University Of Georgia Lexington Athens Hammerstein Cole Porter Porter
"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"With dr broadway about dorothy fields. A prolific writer collaborator with some of the most iconic and legendary composers and broadway. Now in our previous conversation back in season two kristen stoltze presley. And i talked about the tony awards and musical theater history in general and one of the artists. She mentioned was dorothy fields. Well she is now. Ridden an entire book about this lyricist and librettist and while the name may not be familiar to you. Her songs and musicals are certainly well known from her first big hit. I can't give you anything but love baby to one of her most enduring songs the way you look tonight. Her lyrics have appeared in many tunes from the great american. Songbook and her musicals. Like annie. get your gun. and sweet. Charity have received numerous broadway and regional productions. And even though it's been forty seven years since her passing. There is still a lot of work to do to showcase and highlight the important contributions of this remarkably versatile songwriter whose career spanned nearly fifty years.

forty seven years one tonight season two first big hit Ridden fifty years one of the artists american enduring songs annie kristen stoltze
"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

01:41 min | 6 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"I knew as women's history month came around. I wanted to bring back a former guest. Kristen stoltze presley. Better known as dr broadway now. She's a theater historian. Who has focused a lot of her time and studies on one particular and librettist dorothy fields. She is an amazing writer. Who worked before. During and after the golden age of the broadway. Musical and kristen has just written a new book covering the life and work of this amazing artist was very careful to help. Not just women that anyone who she could help whether it be. Another artist a collaborator in the theater. Or one of the many charities that she worked with throughout her career. Hello..

"dorothy fields" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:20 min | 7 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Piscopo on music Radio 77 w A. B C. Job is give fell on the radio. That's me Sunday night. Great to have you with us on this is Sunday night. Hopefully you're staying warm. Hopefully, the snow will be away until the next snowstorm, which is like Thursday. As you Listen, Tonto Ramsey, Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra on 77. W A B C I love having you with us. We're celebrating all the great black artists that Mr Sinatra played. We have had the honor of playing with. He learned so much from the black community and you know what he really blazed the path for so many you know, going through bigotry cause it's what Mr Sinatra experience as a young Italian American coming from Hoboken, New Jersey. It's hard to imagine you know his family coming from Sicily to Ellis Island, going the whole book, and he understood he understood the struggle. So, Nan, he would meet these great artists is artists in the African American community and one of the best I know our buddy Landau. Eugene Murphy touched on was not King Cole. Me. How great was not King Cole. This is an early recording. Of Nat King Cole and Mr Sinatra from you ready for this 1946. This is right after World War two. This was called songs by Sinatra Radio Variety show. You forget a powerful radio was And of course it is. Now It's back here on 77 W 80 ft just saying So. Here's a great classic from Jimmy McCue and Dorothy Fields, Mr Sinatra and that Cole singing exactly like you. Asking more guitar, Johnny Miller Basin that King called doubling on piano and tonsils double groovy That boy saying that I know that every chance you get you give a break to a promising young vocalist because I'm not so young and not so promising. But Good night. Sing one with you now, please. Hey, Hugs not is thinking it over. He's looking down at the keyboard. I'm in. I get to sing with the famous king called surreal. I know why I've waited. No, I've been blue. I prayed each night for someone exactly like.

Mr Sinatra Nat King Cole Sinatra Radio Variety Tonto Ramsey Sicily Mazda Hoboken Johnny Miller Basin Eugene Murphy African American community Ellis Island New Jersey Jimmy McCue Landau Nan Dorothy Fields
"dorothy fields" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:59 min | 8 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Fine. Romas, you won't Nessen. A fine romance. You won't even wrestle. I'm might as well play bridge with my old maid on I haven't got a chance. This is a fine Roma. Fine Roman hands will no kissing a fine romance, My friends. This is way too should be like plans in this ship child away. But we just his like parts of a set list powder. Five Roma with no question a fine romance. With no pinches your justice. Hard to land as friends. I haven't got time. It is a fine Roma. Radio Chicago Double your cheesy Tall and tan and young and lovely girl from even goes walking. And when she passes each one she passes goes When she walks his life, something that swings so cool and sways so gentle that when she passes each one she passes goes, but I watched your so sadly. Oh, can I tell her? I love you? Yes, I would give my heart I love you. But each day when she walks to the scene, she looks straight ahead. Not at me tall and tan and young and lovely girl from each leave of those walking. And when she passes, I smile, but she doesn't see Doesn't see Nicky because of my Linda. My grants pass. Most of the soul by name. Who said thank you, but I watch her so sadly. Keep to let three to give my heart glad each day when she walks. You see, she has not hit me. Town. Young, lovely. The girl from even nearly goes walking. And when she passes, I smile, but she doesn't see Move down! Move! Shit! Just doesn't see Laying on that demolition. She never sees me because The first song you heard was a fine romance composed by drum Kern with lyrics by Dorothy Fields. The road to the EPA. Nimah. The girl from Ipanema was a Brazilian bossa nova song recorded by Frank in 1967..

"dorothy fields" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:15 min | 9 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on WGN Radio

"That has two different sets of lyrics. The first written by Oscar Hammerstein, the second and Otto Harbach in 1934. The second written by Dorothy Fields in 1935. Two sets of lyrics share little, but the common refrain of I won't dance. The second set of lyrics is the much better known one and the song in this form has been covered by many artists, including Sinatra. Here's The Live version of I Won't Dance. E won't dance. Don't ask me I won't dance. Don't ask me. I want them with you, Madame. My heart won't let my feet do things that they should do. You know what? You're lovely. You know what you are so lovely on do what you do mean. I'm like an ocean wave that's bumped on Shaw. I feel so absolutely stumped. On the floor. But when you guys you're charming and you're gentle. Especially when you do the continental. But this feeling isn't surely metal because heaven rest us. I am not as investors on and that's why I won't dance. How could I? I won't dance. How should I know? I won't dance. Merci, Beau coup. I know that music leads the way to romance. So if I hold you in my eyes I won't dance. I won't dance. Don't ask me I will not dance. Don't ask me I won't dance with you, Madame. My heart won't let my feet do things that they want to do. You know what? You're a Gasser ring a ding ding. How real grabber. You know what You do to me? I'm like in ocean wave That's bumped on Shaw my field so absolutely stumped on long. When you dance, you charming and your general, especially when you do the Continental But this feeling isn't purely metal. Because heaven rest of I am not as best..

Sinatra Shaw Oscar Hammerstein Dorothy Fields Otto Harbach
"dorothy fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 11 months ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Know, Your image of me is what I hope to be. Treated you unkindly. But, darling, can't you see? There's no one more more to me. Darling came to please you through me. All will alone now and I'm singing this song for you. Your porn Me? Bread should secrets all the true withholding Nothing. You came out in front and I was having But now I'm so much better. Really my world don't come together. Listen to the melody gone my love him there, Maddie. How long you wanna plays? Well, there's no space and time. I love you for my life. You are friend of man. And will my love hold. Remember when we were together? We will launch them now was singing this song to you. But I love you have a place? Well, there's no space and time. I love you for my life. You are friend of man. You will my love over. Remember when we watch Gallo We will own them. Now. What? Singing this song for you. We will launch now What? Singing this song for you. We will long them now singing my song singing this song for you. Leon Russell's original a song for You. All Cavalcanti with us LS swings brightly with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields. Pick yourself up. Up things impossible I have found for when my chin is on the ground. I pick myself up dust myself off. Start all over again. Lose your confidence. If you slip, be grateful for a pleasant trip past. Pick yourself up, Dust yourself off. Start all over again. Work like a song. It's fired till the battle of the day is one. You may be sick and tired, but you be a man mice. Will you remember the famous man who had to fall to rise again? So take a deep breath. Pick yourself up. Dust yourself off. Start all over again. Hmm. Worked like a solar fire. Still, a battle over there is one You may be sick and tired, but you be a man. Yeah. Where do you remember the famous man who had too far to drive again? Okay, Deputy Fred Pick yourself up. Help yourself. Oh, on start might over. If you ever plan to motor.

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"On his radio show and gone out of his way to call him Paul and have all Rogerson call him being which was very controversial at the time you know and get in the mills brothers on his Radio Show. I mean these guys have done a lot for integration and to advance the cause of African American musicians but the rules had changed under their feet. You know they're middle aged guys in their forties. And so I think some of us have seen the rules change in the me too. Era can sympathize a little bit. Yes The rooms were changing under their feet. They were doing the best they could. They had They had good hearts but they had old fashioned instincts. They were products of their time and their culture and they were products of an America that for the first The first fifty five years at least of the Twentieth Century was deeply unapologetically racist unapologetically. It was a wasp dominated. Culture White anglo-saxon Protestant Italian Americans weren't even officially considered legally considered white until the nineteen forties It was It was an awful time in so many ways and again as you put it so eloquently it. The the culture was changing under their feet. They adapted at the best they could and this happened to Pearland and numerous ways not just culturally but the business changed under his feet multiple times like you know. We talked about how he came up in the sheet music era and it was sheet. Music and records were a secondary promotional tool but primarily. There were selling sheet music for people play and sing around their piano at home and also to listen to the record. If to a record of of the song by multiple performers any hit song have multiple versions. Come out by many performers and then the radio comes along in the nineteen twenties when he's well into his career and in the Broadway musical changes and you got people like drome current producing things like show boat In the late twentieth. And you get Gershwin up in any again. You Know Poor Game Bass into a full. On modern musical opera and Berlin rises to the challenge. She moved to Hollywood in the early thirties. And Ed's funny that you brought I kind of came to him and you talk about this in the forward through the Marx brothers and he provided the songs for one of the early movies coconuts. Which is a terrible gig because you know song is GonNa Shine in Marx brothers comedy but he they rise through this and and eventually hooks up with Fred astaire and goes on this amazing run of hit absolute classics absolute classics and yet at the same time Berlin missed Broadway badly. He felt like a fish out of water. In Hollywood he adored astaire where the same brilliance that he did the same kind of intense work ethic that Berlin did any adored writing for a stair. But again you felt very much out of place in Hollywood. He missed New York badly he wanted. He wanted to go back to Broadway. Let's hear Fred Astaire to putting on the Ritz Avenue on that famous thoroughfare with their noses in the air hi hats and our colors fight spats and lots of dollars spending every far. Rwanda ta with your blue and you know where to go to. I don't you go. Where fashion sits putting on the Ritz types aware. That was Fred astaire singing irving Berlin triumphant putting on the Ritz and he does get back to Broadway but it's not until after World War. Two that he writes his first modern musical. Annie get your gun. Tell us a little bit about. It was a coincidence. That Berlin got. That GIG was a terrible coincidence because The show that was to have been called. Annie Oakley out was to have been written by Jerome Kern in conjunction with the brother. Six great brother sister librettist's and lyricists Herbert and Dorothy fields and jerome. Kern was walking to lunch in Manhattan without is to meet his wife for lunch. One day in one thousand nine forty five and suddenly dropped to the pavement on Park Avenue. with a brain hemorrhage and he died a week later So the great current is dead at an early age and a Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. Who were were producing that show. They had written. They had ridden Oklahoma in South Pacific. And now they had they had sort of transition to becoming producers they were producing Annie Oakley. Try to think who they could hire to write to write the music for the show. And the first person everybody thought Rodgers Hammerstein and the fields is was early prevent. But the thing about Berlin was Two things one. His name was always above the title. He had achieved that level of of fame and power in Hollywood and on and on Broadway and to he wrote and should we should take note of this too. Because they're very few people stand alongside of them in this regard this Cole Frank Lesser but very few people he will use again lyrics. It's like double genius. Not just genius so But they persuaded themselves and they persuaded Berlin Anyway and Dorothy and Herbert fields very gracefully stepped back and let Berlin write the lyrics and Berlin went down to Atlantic City and produced a score of for Annie. Get your gun in some incredible time. Like two or three weeks the entire score and it was a great score from a guy at the beginning had no idea who any. Oakley was and said that he had he didn't know how to write hillbilly music but he wrote in you wrote a great and the phenomenon of that you're reading your account of that production and the fact that he almost pulled two of the great great songs from that number. There's nobody there's no business like show business and anything you can do. I could do better. Because he got mixed feedback from his his his team around him and that brings us back to the really big numbers. Which which Irving Berlin? You know as incredible catalogue that can match. Gershwin etc etc. Max. Any pop singer but he also wrote two songs y Christmas and God bless America that sort of transcend pop culture and inserted themselves right at the root of American culture. I mean God bless. America is basically the National Anthem and at various times there have been official attempts to replace the Star spangled banner with Berlin. Wouldn't have anything to do with that when he was alive But if I was a betting man I might bet even odds it in the next hundred years we change our mind and make God bless America. The official song and White Christmas is the most successful recording in history by a distance. You can't fathom it was a top ten hit for twenty straight years and the Bing crosby recording and what is the meaning of Irving Berlin this Jewish immigrant who comes in and writes these absolutely integral American songs and this was controversial people like Charles Lindbergh and the America First Movement? They were denouncing idea. That a Jew could write songs like this in America. Yes they didn't They they didn't They didn't denounce White Christmas. There was vigorous blowback against God bless America when it was introduced in nineteen thirty eight nine hundred thirty nine. This is a time. When there was a powerful America. First Movement a powerful movement to keep America out of the war that was beginning in Europe. It was only Pearl Harbor that drew us into the war. But for a buck for three years before that An awful lot of people in America didn't want to To go to war to shed a single drop was American blood to save England to save European Jews and And made a lot of powerful speeches on the radio and in In big big venues like Madison Square against Against any Any effort to to help out the Europeans or the British in this war and so when Berlin introduced God bless America and America took to it right away. America was so So joyous adhering most of America was so joyous at hearing this song but much of America at the same time. rebelled against hidden and yes said the nerve the nerve that this a Jewish immigrant had a writing a song about God. What did he know about God? God bless America. It was seen as an active presumption by a lot of people and I blew my segue there because the point I started make was Berlin. Kept God bless America in his drawer. Twenty years he routed the nineteen eighteen and thought. There are too many patriotic songs right now because of World War One and just the idea that seventy could I consider not not including. There's no business like show business in the play and then to sit on. God bless America for twenty years. I mean what? An incredible wealth.

Berlin America Annie Oakley Irving Berlin Fred astaire Hollywood Rodgers Hammerstein Gershwin Twentieth Century America First Movement Pearland Dorothy fields Rwanda hemorrhage Jerome Kern New York Oklahoma Herbert Paul
"dorothy fields" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Lyrics by Dorothy fields Garota de Ipanema the girl from Ipanema was a Brazilian bossa Nova song recorded by Frank in nineteen sixty seven here's a song by Cole Porter which was first sung in the nineteen thirty four Broadway musical anything goes here's I get a kick out of I get no kick from some may it doesn't move me at all so you should it be true that I get a he got a new some like the type re phrase I am sure that it heard the toward the bar figure eight to yeah get a got a you I get a kick every time the the fall I get a kick to me you obviously do though in the I get no kick in a way fly and with some do yeah kick other you get it every time the I get a kick to me you obviously the fly and so with yeah I guess yeah I could have done and and still have bank for a moment I could have spread and done a in the fall I'll never know what made it so.

Garota de Ipanema Frank Cole Porter
"dorothy fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In two thousand five just love Dorothy fields lyrics God, though the whole the whole score is just so it's so amazing. I mean and with size music I mean you can't go wrong when you hear like don't dude at him Buddha. I mean, come on. It's like I get chills. When I hear that it's just it's just perfect. So something really went terribly wrong for you during the pre Broadway tour of sweet charity, I think you were in Boston when during the Chicago, Chicago. Okay. I'm going to be March fifth when you broke. Well, not that you remember March, eleventh Marshall have March fifth, sorry you broke the fifth metatarsal of one of. Yes, I am. I right foot. What happened? Oh man. I we had changed which way I was entering. So I was usually entered from the left wing's, but this time we had entering from the right hadn't rehearsed yet I these weird shoes on and I was standing there back there. And I was like, you know what my ankles are too wobbly for these shoes. I'm gonna change them 'cause they weren't the shoes that I was dancing. And it was like the shoes that I get wet in 'cause I fall into a lake at the beginning of the of the show. And usually when I have thought like that, I'll usually stop in kind blessed myself like, oh, okay, wait. Don't fall down the stairs. You know what I mean? And curtain came up, I ran out, and I got up on the lamppost and my heel slipped off the side of the lamppost, and it just cracked just in half. Man, I felt it happened. And I was out there in front of two thousand people it was really, really scary, scary moment. And I was trying to signal to the stage managers that I broke my foot and we had actually this little box I would fall into like for the, the lake and there was a little window, where the stage manager would always Hanmi water to throw over my hair, and I went down a fellow into the lake. I looked at her, and I said, I broke my foot and she goes what and I came up said the line that I was supposed to say went back down and just dream. I broke my bleep Blakely foot, and she goes calling an ambulance, I said, okay. And I came out and I finished about half an hour of the show because charity doesn't leave the stage. So it was just the most like trying to navigate doing like a dance number and singing and try not to stand on my right foot for that half. Hour was really one of the most frightening things I've ever had to do. And then finally. When they started the Frugh, which is a big number that I'm not in. I went off stage and fainted, and those well and then they stopped the show. Yeah. Collapsed into beverly's arms our stage manager shouldn't. They have just stopped the show. When you said I broke my foot. Yeah. The kept saying, do you want us to, and I said, no. We need to get where I can get off the stage without being clumsy. Well I don't for half an hour. That is really weird things happen. When you have a gentleman going into, we're decision making happens. Do you think you hurt your foot any worse by having? You know did done some dancing on stage on stage for half hour probably. And I've, I mean I still have issues with it because I did come back six weeks later and did the show so before it was hailed. Oh, yeah. It was only about thirty percent by then. Oh, gosh. So, yeah, I had lots of tape underneath my in my boot, and boots. That didn't point which may might kicks horrible to look at I was so upset, especially coming from being a dancer and having worked so hard in the show. It was really heartbreaking if you had to do it over again. What would you do? Do it really. Yeah. Not at forty seven. Well, no. Bod- can't handle that at all. But no. I mean, of course, it was the most thrilling experience of my life. Yes. Coupled with incredible pain and backstage drama. But you know what for the most part that was the best one of the best years of my life? So at forty seven what you did do is dance in an episode of dead to me because your characters in a dance class, and that's one of the pleasures of her really angry sad, life. So what was it like for you to dance again? Onscreen frightening because I hadn't danced in ten years. And I didn't have a lot of time to rehearse, I had like an hour at my house to choreograph it and rehearse it. And then get on stage. I mean, get on the set and basically be performing in front of Mike, my whole crew, which are like now my friends, and now I'm like embarrassed because, you know, I'm not I'm not top of my game. Like I used to be so it was really it was having to face, like step into a lot of fear. But so is the character, you know, she hadn't danced in probably fifteen years or more. So it was all okay. I mean sore. Very sar. But exhilarate it I was like, oh my God. I miss, I miss this. I really do. So I'm stunned in, in this debating period of going back to dance class. Right. You've been critical in in tweets about President Trump. And you've been you've gotten a lot of hate tweets as a result. And some people say, like why does celebrities like way in with political opinions like this, like, what do you know what gives you the right? And, and you've had yet you look on their Twitter and they're doing the same thing. What gives you the right? Yes. Exactly. Which was a Bank that was talking about man. So one of the things you criticized for is like you don't get it, and I think what you get is. What is really like to be like a working American and, and you, you tweeted back I grew up in an abusive home now. I make a public don't you dare say I don't understand. Don't you dare say, I don't understand the struggles we lived on food stamps. Don't you dare say, I don't know. I was so mad that day. Yeah, I was in a Pissy mood. But what with this out an abusive? At home. I don't wanna get into that. But I will say that I come from my, my past is no different and also probably a lot darker than a lot of people's and I'm not going to say a lot darker than most people's I'm saying that I have lived along the same lines as, as some of the horror stories that you hear out there. And I've lived at I've seen it, I've, I've lived through it. So I don't I really do take offence when people think that I've had a silver spoon in my mouth, and that I haven't seen I haven't seen the dark side of life. Yeah. And you know what? In, if I hadn't, then I don't know if I could have played, Jen the way that I did. So like, that's how I feel about that. All right. Well, Christina Applegate, thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you, Christina Applegate stars in the new Netflix series dead. To me, it was just renewed for a second season after we take a short break. Our TV critic David in Cooley, will review the new season of the analogy series black mirror. This is fresh air..

Christina Applegate Chicago Boston Marshall Hanmi Twitter Netflix beverly Bod Jen TV critic President Trump Mike David Cooley thirty percent fifteen years six weeks ten years
"dorothy fields" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

12:04 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Conservatives. But back in the day, he wants got support from groups like labor unions market down as one of the worst things I've done my life. See you thought about over the years. You'll think about it every time I see his face Mitch McConnell new series from embedded subscribe, now, let's get back to my interview with Christina Applegate. She stars in the new Netflix series dead to me, as a woman, grieving, the sudden death of her husband. So in addition to doing movies, and TV you did a Broadway revival of sweet charity. The music in that show us so good. Isn't it? The best of my God. Yeah. And you had to basically audition for. For the composer Cy Coleman. What was that, like? Recipes Cy Coleman. But now I can talk about how it was. It was really difficult. The audition process was really it was something else. I really I you know, I'm a huge Vaasie fanatic. I've sweet charity was when my favorite movies, all the jazz is in my top five of all time. I mean, this is like was Mike. My dream come true that I went to New York to audition. And I was there for a minute felt like ten hours and probably was ten hours of. Singing, audition. And then, you know, the all the scenes I had to do, and then the dancing when I was there for it just for hours, but apparently the end of the day after the addition was over and berry Wieser came into the dressing, Barron. Fran came in and said, can you give us a year and I sat there and I said, can you give me a minute? I was like drenched in sweat. And I kind of wanted to go just to have the experience of having a New York audition. I didn't even know if I had wanted to really make the commitment to do this at that time. I just wanted the experience of that. So I needed a minute and then. I get the call that Cy was not convinced of my singing, which I don't blame him. I mean, it's not my strong suit, and he wanted to have another work session in Los Angeles with me, and it was really, really challenging the way they operate in, not everyone in New York. But the way they talk to you. It's not fluffy. Like they do out in Hollywood. He was tough on me really tough on me. And I thought I was going to, like burst into tears many times during that work session. It was really, really hard and I got back in the car, and I call them and I said, look, I really wanna do it because if they're going to be like this, like, I, you know, and they said, well, psych Coleman, just called and he completely like thinks you're magical, and you, you're, you got the job. It was like say what, how did that happen? I thought he hated me. It was so scary, but it was amazing to be around him. This man who's written? All this incredible music. You said he was tough on you. What did he do that seem? So tough start moving your arm. Stop doing it that way. Why are you seeing it like that? Start. Again. Start like really what you what you think would happen in those in a work session like lily lake like the on Jeju getting completely like verbally abused. But I think that's just who he was. You know, he was just very strong man with a he knew what he wanted. No one's like fuzzy in the Broadway world. You know, it's, it's a tough job. And they gotta make sure you're doing it. Right. So we, you know, when we got there was, it was wonderful. I mean incredible. The rehearsal process was so much fun and so filled with so much joy for me. But they're you know, they can be tough on you. Well, let's hear you saying from the cast recording. And this is if my friends could see me now, which is such a great lyric by Dorothy fields. So here's my guess Christina Applegate, if they could. Theme.

Cy Coleman psych Coleman Christina Applegate New York Fran Mitch McConnell Netflix Dorothy fields berry Wieser Mike Jeju lily lake Los Angeles Barron Hollywood ten hours
"dorothy fields" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"dorothy fields" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Anything but love written just down the street right you know just in the he and dorothy fields will walking down fifth avenue and over her this is you know depths of the depression actually late twenties like right after the stock market crash in the here here a young guy talking to his girlfriend looking in the window tiffen is saying i can't give you anything but love baby and that's often wrote the although there is a theory that that fats waller had something to do with musically to and sold them his contribution via the tiffany's story sounds much more romantic very romantic yeah he wrote i'm in the mood for love he he was actually wiped out by the stock market crash and was walking down the street here in manhattan ran into george gershwin schwinn said can i g need anything and he's could use a piano gush when gave him a piano his grandson lee still has in his office in gershwin's piano gush jimmy hughes piano and i think he wrote on that was i'm in the mood for love which put him back on his feet foul i would say so so who else are you looking at you know the greater so many years ago i got a gift from somebody which was ella fitzgerald sings the great american song and i think it's something like sixteen or twenty six cds and each cd or so is a different songwriter so it's gershwin and berlin and jerem currents and go down the whole the whole list i think berlin is is to song two discs in gershman might be for this but it's just one after another and it's every fantastic so how do you take that enormous collection music favorite songs and stuff that just feels right on the time you know i like ben stein i mean like.

waller manhattan lee gershman ben stein george gershwin ella fitzgerald berlin