35 Burst results for "Dorothy"

Mark Shaw: The Cover up That Let Carlos Marcello Get Away With Murder

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:47 min | Last month

Mark Shaw: The Cover up That Let Carlos Marcello Get Away With Murder

"Was it wolf? Yeah, Morris. Morrison, why do you suppose he did nothing when he could have done something? Well, I think that you can see a stream of information about senator Cooper, who was one of JFK's closest friends. And that's where Morris Wolfe met Dorothy kill gallon at these parties at senator Cooper's home in Georgetown. And I've confirmed all of that. You can see a stream through there where he's having second thoughts, of course. He submitted, he writes a letter of resignation, which he doesn't send because they aren't inviting him to the hearings. They're not telling them when the hearings are. If you can imagine that. And then he starts to question things. And if you look at what Morris wolf said, he is continuing to have doubts about all of this. And then he decides, okay, I'm going to go along with it, Eric, because I'm going to get the dissent that senator Richard Russell and Georgia want that we both want in the final report. It's going to say we don't believe in the silver bullet theory. We don't believe in the Oswald alone theory, and we've been guaranteed by none other than chief justice Warren that that will be in the final report. The reason he's hiding in this photograph is because they never put that in there. And you imagine how history would have changed if that would have been in the report. Things would still have been open. Marcelo and his people got away with murder, basically, of the president of the United States because they covered all this up. And that's I think why Cooper kept quiet. You know, they had a coat of silence. LBJ and Hoover made them basically sign the fact. I don't know if it was an actual document. They would never talk about this. And if you look at the media coverage of the Warren commission, they never did. For all those years, they never did anything.

Senator Cooper Morris Wolfe Dorothy Kill Morris Wolf Senator Richard Russell Morrison Morris Justice Warren Georgetown Oswald Eric Georgia Marcelo LBJ Cooper Hoover United States Warren Commission
Mark Shaw: The Kind of People RFK & JFK Were

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:53 min | Last month

Mark Shaw: The Kind of People RFK & JFK Were

"The only thing, I mean, when I was reading the book, I was thinking it's sad that marital and Monroe died. It said, particularly that Dorothy kilgallen died. It's less sad that JFK died because when you look at his life, the depravity is astonishing. It is absolutely astonishing that the level of entitlement, the idea that his father and his family had extreme extraordinary power and that they used it to rig an election, which is an abomination in the United States of America, all crime is wrong, but to steal an election is really, really dirty. And then of course, as a young man, married to a beautiful woman, he is bringing prostitutes into The White House. It's just so dark. And so awful. So it seems a tragic tale, whether he's assassinated or not. It's just so filthy. Well, it all comes around, you know, in life. And I have new information in fighting for justice. JFK's a senator. He's obviously having sex with his secretary. And it's in a building in Georgetown. And he goes over there, and there's a woman who lives next door. And she decides to go ahead and let him know that she's going to tell the media about it. He confronts her on the street on the street the next day with his finger in her nose. You go ahead and you do that, you'll never work in this country again. Okay? That's what kind of a person he was. And then Joe Kennedy just covers all this up. I mean, JFK was married before he married the Jackie. And Joe covered that up. That was his greatest, but of course the least. It's almost funny. That seems like a charming thing, you know,

Dorothy Kilgallen Monroe United States Of America White House JFK Georgetown Joe Kennedy Jackie JOE
Mark Shaw: A Journey to Investigate JFK, Marilyn Monroe's Death

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:54 min | Last month

Mark Shaw: A Journey to Investigate JFK, Marilyn Monroe's Death

"This book you obviously your journalist, your investigative reporter, you've written many books on the subject of the JFK assassination and Marilyn Monroe, Dorothy gallon. In this book, you take the different tack, really, of telling your story so that people can understand how it is that you of all people would find yourself being able to figure out what innumerable people have been trying to figure out for low these many decades. And in the course of telling your story, you of course tell about when you lived in the 70s in Denver, you were mistaken for another famous Denver resident at that time. None other than the famous John Dutch endorf whom we know as John Denver. Yeah, what I decided to do, I have so many people who've gotten in touch with me and I'm sure they will after listening to your broadcast here. I must crowd sorcerer they call me because when I've sent all my material out there into the world, I get all these tips from people who've watched the presentations on YouTube or the book read the book or whatever. And so I've been asked, how did I do this? Because people who know me well realize I almost dropped out of Purdue. I couldn't pass a physics class, so I almost dropped out. It took me 6 years to get through. It took me a long time to get through law school. And then I've had this incredible improbable journey to where I felt like that somehow or another I was supposed to investigate JFK's death and that of Maryland and Dorothy. So it is an improbable journey. I hope it's an inspiring one. Because I'm not the smartest guy. You're able to go after this material.

Dorothy Gallon John Dutch Denver Marilyn Monroe John Denver Purdue Youtube Dorothy Maryland
'Fighting for Justice' Author Mark Shaw Exposes the Truth

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:53 min | 2 months ago

'Fighting for Justice' Author Mark Shaw Exposes the Truth

"Folks, I am so excited to have as my guest this hour mark Shaw. He's the bestselling author of the reporter who knew too much, the new book absolutely fascinating. It's called fighting for justice, the improbable journaling journey to exposing cover ups about the JFK assassination, the deaths and the deaths of Marilyn Monroe and Dorothy kilgallen. We're getting into it here. So it is really fascinating stuff Mark and we had Johnny Russo on this program a few times and he said, you were absolutely dead on and he was somebody that was deeply connected with the mob and Frank Costello's boy, so to speak. Very nice kind of amazing to have him ratify what you're saying. But let's just keep going. Well, I'm probably one of the most least likely people who could have ever done this area. I was a college dropout at Purdue. It took me 6 years. I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I was a criminal defense lawyer for a number of years and then a network legal analyst for the Tyson case and other kinds of Bryant and OJ and all that. I always look at motive when you're looking at who's responsible for a homicide. And so the next book, as you mentioned, it was the reporter who knew too much. And that's where I met this incredible human being journalist, media icon, Dorothy kilgallen. Most people know about her from what my line, the quiz show on CBS for ten years. That's all that I knew. And then I started looking into it and I found out that she had really gotten involved in the JFK assassination. They called her the most powerful female voice in America, the post did. And so I found out that, hey, wait a minute, Dorothy got into this. And she decided that she needed to go ahead and look into it because she and JFK were very close friends.

Dorothy Kilgallen Mark Shaw Johnny Russo Frank Costello Marilyn Monroe Purdue Mark Tyson Bryant CBS Dorothy America
Why Author Mark Shaw Sought the Truth in the JFK Assassination

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Why Author Mark Shaw Sought the Truth in the JFK Assassination

"For folks who don't know anything about you, how did you get into this? Because anybody who's been alive in our lifetimes know that there's been tremendous controversy and confusion around certainly the death of president Kennedy, the death of Marilyn Monroe, and many people haven't even heard of Dorothy kill gallon. What brought you? What is your background that brought you to investigate these things as you have done over the years? Well, you ask about how I got into all of this and I have no idea in some ways very Quinn. President Kennedy was killed 60 years ago, you know, nearly 60 years ago or a little bit more. You know, I like everybody else. I cried my ears out. I was a Purdue university as a freshman. And yet over the years then, I bought all this material about J. Edgar Hoover saying Oswald alone. Oswald alone all of that and everything else. And then I had a real break with this because I knew Melvin Belli, who represented Jack Ruby, who shot Lee Harvey Oswald. I practiced law with him in San Francisco in the 80s. And when Belle I died, I started to look into his life and times and I found out that I could have a book there. So I wrote Melvin bell I king of the courtroom. And what I found out was the alarming, a couple things. First of all, he was very close with the mafia, one of his main clients was Mickey Cohen, the Los Angeles gangster. You're talking about but more than talking about Bella, are you talking about Marvin belli was close with the mafia? Melvin bell. Melvin Belli. Bella. Yeah. San Francisco attorney, but also he was known as a tort lawyer. He was a personal injury lawyer. How in the world I asked myself, I mean, you're a curious guy. How did he become Jack Ruby's attorney? So I started looking into that and what I found out was that actually he was a hired by those who wanted to silence Jack Ruby for his participation in the killing of Oswald and the JFK assassination. So

Melvin Belli President Kennedy Melvin Bell Oswald Marilyn Monroe Jack Ruby Dorothy J. Edgar Hoover Confusion Purdue University Quinn Mickey Cohen Lee Harvey Oswald San Francisco Bella Belle Los Angeles JFK
Swedish cyclist pedals to Egypt to raise climate awareness

AP News Radio

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Swedish cyclist pedals to Egypt to raise climate awareness

"A 72 year old Swedish activist has cycled from Sweden to the cop 27 climate conference in Egypt to deliver a simple message stop climate change Dorothy hildebrandt traveled for four months from her hometown of Catherine home in Sweden to the cop 27 venue in Egypt She Cris crossed Europe and the Middle East until she arrived in shaman Sheik at the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula held a branch believes we all have to make sacrifices to save the planet and wanted to highlight this to world leaders To stop the change of the climate And even if it is uncomfortable for us we have to do it because it wasn't comfortable for me to see this long ride And I just made it to show you you can if you will Protests at this climate talk summit have been muted in comparison to previous summits Many activists blame Egyptian government restrictions on large protests as well as the high cost of travel and accommodation to the venue I'm Karen Chammas

Dorothy Hildebrandt Sweden Shaman Sheik Egypt Cris Sinai Peninsula Middle East Europe Egyptian Government Karen Chammas
 Officials: Virginia mom charged in son's THC gummy death

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Officials: Virginia mom charged in son's THC gummy death

"There are now murder charges in a young boy's THC gummy death I'm Lisa dwyer a Virginia mother has been charged with felony murder and felony child neglect in the death of her four year old son authorities believe the boy ate a large amount of THC gummies Dorothy Clements son was reportedly found unresponsive on May 6th and was taken to a hospital where he died two days later toxicology results showed the child had extremely high levels of THC in his system the mother said she thought she had bought CBD gummies which caused no high but said she didn't know that the gummies she bought contained THC the

Lisa Dwyer Dorothy Clements Virginia
UK Supreme Court hears case for Scottish independence vote

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

UK Supreme Court hears case for Scottish independence vote

"Britain's Supreme Court has heard a Scottish referendum case Scotland's top law officer Dorothy bane has put forward a case for a fresh referendum on the country's independence to the UK's Supreme Court saying it's necessary and in the public interest The issue of Scottish independence is alive and significant one in Scottish electoral politics Independence for Scotland has been rumbling since the last referendum in 2014 where the Scottish public voted against it however following the 2016 Brexit vote lawmakers who lead the Scottish government say the case for independence is back on track the Supreme Court president lord Reid said it was likely to be some months before we give our judgment Charles De Ledesma London

Dorothy Bane Supreme Court Scotland Britain UK Scottish Government Lord Reid Charles De Ledesma London
How Sammy Davis Jr and Kim Novak's Love Affair Started

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:13 min | 3 months ago

How Sammy Davis Jr and Kim Novak's Love Affair Started

"One night in 1957, Tony Curtis goes backstage and he tells Sammy that Kim Novak wants to meet him. And he invited him to sit ringside that night at the place called the shape Harry. And he didn't have a chance to talk to her. He didn't want to create any problems. So he says, look, I'm going to have a party at my house. Come on by and I'll invite Kim. That's what Tony Curtis said. And they both came over and they spent the night together deep, deep and talk. And right from the beginning, it was obvious they were getting along in a very intense way. And that was the beginning of the relationship. So you can blame Tony Curtis, I suppose. Well, Kim Novak also asked to meet him. But she wasn't alone in her being attracted to Sammy Davis magnetism. A lot of men might have considered a monthly because it was short and slight, and he had that flat nose, but chicks loved them. Chicks love his charisma. His stage presence was very sexually charged, and women were really drawn to him. But it hurt when men talked about his face being as far as his shovel and shit like that. And he'd say, yeah, it hurts me, but it gets me where I'm going. But Sammy knew how much women loved him. He liked his looks. He knew his face was ugly, but he worked on his body. He stayed trimmed he stayed athletic. Fantastic shape. He loved this little ass. That was his prized feature. He'd make a point of asking people how they liked his ass. Isn't it adorable? So he had a good time with himself. But after that meeting, the gossip industry started to hum. And went into high gear as it normally does when two big stars are seen together. Somebody makes a call as they still do today. And back then, somebody at Tony Curtis party put a phone call into Dorothy kill gallon, who worked for the Hearst newspaper chain. And she wrote in her column, which top female movie star initial kn is seriously dating which big name entertainer, initial SD. I mean, who the fuck's gonna get that wrong?

Tony Curtis Kim Novak Sammy Sammy Davis Harry KIM The Hearst Dorothy
The Star Crossed Love Affair of Sammy Davis Jr and Kim Novak

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:38 min | 3 months ago

The Star Crossed Love Affair of Sammy Davis Jr and Kim Novak

"This story is about Sammy Davis's lover fan with Kim Novak, the very white. I mean, the very beautiful white actress. And the problem was she was not taken, but back in those days, she kind of was because Kim Novak was the studio had Harry Collins revenge on Rita Hayworth. And Sammy Davis Jr. was Kim Novak's revenge on Harry Cohen. And it all began with the gossip item in Dorothy kill gowns column in the New York journal American and it became a national scandal on the eve of America's long struggle for civil rights. Started back in 1957, Chicago's most famous nightclub, the shade parade, and Sammy Davis Jr.'s on stage to smoke from his cigarette as all around his hand, had, you know, how he looked on stage. Gorgeous shirt, cufflink sparkling everywhere. He was in the dark and then a spotlight hit him. And it was almost sexual to the people in the audience. And he was saying to Kim Novak, who was sitting right in front of the stage in a table, and she just finished working on Alfred Hitchcock's vertigo. And that night would be the very first and virtually the last time that Kim Novak and Sammy Davis Jr. would be seen in public together. Because at the heart of their star crossed affair was the notorious bad motherfucker Harry Cohen.

Kim Novak Sammy Davis Jr. Harry Collins Harry Cohen The New York Journal Rita Hayworth Chicago America Alfred Hitchcock
"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:18 min | 5 months ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is what manica. This month on will manica were highlighting women who led extraordinary lives of resistance. Whether fighting tyranny, oppression, sexism, racism, or reproductive control. These women created paths for change. Today we're talking about the founder of the Catholic worker movement. A political and religious radical, she rejected institutional authority. Meet Dorothy day. Dorothy day was born in Brooklyn, New York on November 8th, 1897. In 1904, her father, John, took a job at a newspaper in California, and the family moved to Oakland. But when the 1906 San Francisco earthquake hit, John source of income also crumbled. So the day family decided to start over in Chicago. The earthquake had left them with nothing. They moved into a tenement department above a bar on Chicago's south side. Dorothy was just 8 years old, and she was embarrassed by her family's living situation. She would sometimes tell the bus driver to drop her off at another nicer building. These feelings of shame would drive Dorothy's work for the rest of her life. In Chicago, Dorothy discovered something else, too. Religion. Though her parents rarely went to church, Dorothy was drawn to the stories of the Bible. By the time she was 12, she'd been baptized in the Episcopal Church. And in high school, she practiced Greek by translating the New Testament. Dorothy grew into an exceptional writer and her new college scholarship to the University of Illinois. There, she wrote for both the local and school newspapers and joined a literary club. She also grew politically. She got involved with a socialist group and rejected the religion that had given her so much comfort as a child. She wanted saints who looked beyond the social order, who cared for the poor, but also questioned why there were so many in need in the first place. Despite her intellectual curiosity, Dorothy struggled academically. By the age of 19, she dropped out of school and moved to New York. Now back in the city of her birth, Dorothy needed a job. So she started writing for the call, a socialist newspaper. Her first headline read, girl reporter, with three cents in her purse, braves night court lawyers. Dorothy, it turns out, was fearless. She was arrested at a woman's suffrage protest at The White House. She was beaten by police at an anti war rally. By day, she was a radical left wing journalist. By night, she was a bar hopping bohemian, debating in dark corners with her Marxist Friends. At one point she had an abortion and for a while afterwards, she thought she couldn't have children. But when she was 29 years old, Dorothy gave birth to her only child, a daughter named Tamar. Dorothy thought it was a miracle, so much so that she spontaneously asked a nun on the street to baptize the baby. The non agreed to do the baptism if Dorothy converted to Catholicism. Dorothy spent months studying the catechism. And when she was 30 years old, she officially became a Catholic. Dorothy kept writing and in 1932 she traveled to Washington, D.C. to cover the Communist Party's hunger march. While she was there, she went to the basilica of the national shrine at Catholic university. And prayed for a way to support the poor and hungry. When she got back to New York, a man was waiting for her in her apartment. His name was Peter Moran, and he was an activist and a Catholic radical. Peter had heard about Dorothy from other leftists, and he had a pitch for her. A newspaper for those most in need. This was exactly what Dorothy had prayed for. The two joined forces and the first issue of the Catholic worker was published on May 1st, 1933. It sold for a penny. Today, you can buy it for the same price. The Catholic worker became a monthly newspaper distributed around the country. Its readers called themselves Catholic workers and became a movement. In 1934, Dorothy and Peter rented a four story 11 bedroom building. It was the height of The Great Depression, New York, like most American cities, was filled with people who'd lost their homes. So Dorothy and Peter began housing folks with nowhere else to go. These hospitality houses began cropping up across the country. They accepted everyone, including people struggling with mental health and substance abuse. Although Dorothy remained a devout Catholic until her death, she was often at odds with church authorities. She fought for radical equity, her activism was antiracist anti war and often anti government. She hated the system so much that she didn't even vote. And she had no tolerance for religious officials who she thought failed to center God's true teachings. Dorothy died on November 29th, 1980 in New York City. There's currently a long running campaign to officially make her a Catholic saint. But Dorothy often said, don't call me a saint, I don't want to be dismissed that easily. All month we're highlighting resistors. For.

Dorothy Jenny Kaplan Catholic worker movement Chicago University of Illinois New York John Washington, D.C. Oakland Episcopal Church Brooklyn earthquake Peter Moran San Francisco braves California saints Tamar Peter
"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:25 min | 5 months ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is will manica. This month on romantica, we're highlighting women who led extraordinary lives of resistance. Whether fighting tyranny, oppression, sexism, racism, reproductive control. These women created paths for change. Today's mannequin is a community organizer and child welfare advocate, who was a leader of the women's movement in the 1970s. Though many stories of second wave feminism center white women, Dorothy was there too, leading resistance rooted in community. Please welcome Dorothy Pittman Hughes. Dorothy pitman Hughes was born in 1938. She was the third of 6 sisters born into a farming community called Charles junction in lumpkin, Georgia. Dorothy later wrote, I was fortunate to have been raised in a time and place where the village raised the children. If Dorothy was playing in a friend's house, for example, and it was time for dinner, someone fed her. If she needed discipline and her parents weren't there, other parental figures stepped up. She grew up going to a school that was one big church room where all the children from all the grades sat together. Dorothy learned to listen to decide who she looked up to as a role model and to discuss big ideas with her classmates. It was there in the classroom that Dorothy's personality took shape. But school wasn't Dorothy's only formative experience. In 1948, when she was just ten years old, her father was badly beaten and left on the family's doorstep, presumably by members of the KKK. This too would shape Dorothy's perspective. 9 years later, when she was 19 years old, Dorothy moved to New York. She wanted to become a nightclub performer. To pay the bills she took on day jobs, she was a salesperson, a laundress, and a house cleaner. Then Dorothy became a mother. She had trouble finding care for her daughter while she was working. She also noticed that the children in her neighborhood often stayed home during the day while their parents worked. The kids were cooking, cleaning, and taking care of the babies. So Dorothy shifted her life to serve her community. She started a drop in day care at her apartment, an advocated for better housing conditions for working families. The tasks of my new career were daunting, she later wrote, but I was very young and very creative. Soon the day care center grew, and Dorothy moved it to a building on Manhattan's west side. It was the first coed and multiracial day care center in New York City. And Dorothy wanted to expand the services she offered to the community. There was little job training in the area. The housing was poorly maintained and Dorothy's neighbors faced racial discrimination in poverty. So the day care center became a community center, suited to address these needs. She created a network of community owned resources that focused on housing and food assistance. Adults could go to the center to take classes and get job training. 1 February day in 1969, a young reporter from New York magazine showed up at the day care center. She saw firsthand just how much the center provided for the community. The reporter was Gloria Steinem. And that was the beginning of a lifelong friendship between Gloria and Dorothy. Years later in an interview, Gloria described Dorothy as a genius street organizer. I knew that Dorothy was absolutely fearless, she said. It was always clear that if she was running the revolution, you wanted to go to it. In the 1970s, both Dorothy and Gloria got involved in the women's movement. Because Dorothy had experience as a performer, she gave Gloria advice on public speaking and helped Gloria get over her stage fright. The two toward the country speaking about feminism, civil rights, and issues affecting working families. They needed publicity to get more people to their talks. So a photographer named Dan wyn provided some for free. In 1971, Dorothy and Gloria stood in front of Dan's camera. They both wore turtlenecks and they both held their fists up. A symbol of resistance throughout the civil rights movement. You've probably seen this photograph. Today, it lives in the national portrait gallery. For many at the time, it represented a multiracial resistance to the oppressive status quo. Dorothy and Gloria went on to cofound miss magazine, and the women's action alliance together. By the 1980s, Dorothy transitioned to being a business owner and entrepreneur. But even after she left the west side, she still centered the needs of her community in everything she did. She wrote a book titled, wake up and smell the dollars, one woman struggle against sexism, classism, racism, gentrification in the empowerment zone. The empowerment zone referred to a government program started by Bill Clinton in 1994. At the time, Dorothy was living in Harlem, where she ran a community owned business supply store. She originally saw the empowerment zone as an opportunity for investment in community business. But she later realized that the program mostly benefited big chains. And her own Harlem office supply store was displaced by a Staples. Her book was a road map for other people. In the preface, she wrote, I have written this book to show that economic empowerment is achievable for our people, and that no matter how long it takes and what degree of hardship the struggle for it entails, it must be achieved. It is my hope that sharing my story and insights with you will quicken and ease the process for all of us. For they now lives in Florida, she continues to do community work, especially with community gardens to feed people. She's 84 years.

Dorothy Gloria Jenny Kaplan Dorothy Pittman Hughes Dorothy pitman Hughes Charles junction lumpkin KKK Dan wyn Georgia Gloria Steinem New York magazine day care center women's action alliance Manhattan New York City New York national portrait gallery Dan Bill Clinton
Deborah Cohen on the Journalists Who Changed the News Media Irrevocably

History Unplugged Podcast

02:32 min | 8 months ago

Deborah Cohen on the Journalists Who Changed the News Media Irrevocably

"The people in your book are mostly forgotten as you know, but at their time they were household names. Can you tell me briefly about Dorothy Thompson, John Guthrie, HR knickerbocker, and Vincent Sheehan? Absolutely. So Dorothy Thompson amassed a string of firsts. She was the first American woman to run a major overseas news bureau. She was the first American foreign correspondent to be kicked out of Hitler's Germany in 1934, and she was the first woman political columnist to have a syndicated column, political column of her own. And in the late 30s, she's reaching 8 to 10 million readers with her thrice weekly columns. John Gunther makes his name with a book inside Europe published in 1936 that this taboo breaking behind the scenes account of the foibles of European leaders. So Hitler is given to crying Jags. He reports and has as Gunther puts it an Oedipus complex as big as a house, Mussolini is very superstitious, and so on and so forth. And this is a huge book of the time. It sells more than a million copies. It's not just a bestseller in the United States. It's also a bestseller across Europe. And it's a book that makes Gunther's name. HR knickerbocker comes from Texas. He's born in Texas. And he's the son of a southern methodist minister. He always carries a Bible in his suitcase, though he can swear in all of the major European languages. He's reportedly the highest paid foreign correspondent in the world, as I said, mostly working for William Randolph Hearst's international news service and among other accomplishments he becomes the bet noir of Hitler's propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels. And then there's Vincent Sheehan, so she and is reporter he was working for a number of different outlets among them the Chicago Tribune and he writes a book entitled personal history, published in 1935 at wins the first national book award for biography inaugural award. And this book really captured the zeitgeist of the era in a way that no other book does. What she and his writing about is his own quest as a journalist. To figure out the relationship between his life and world events, or as he puts it, the one life that he has in the millions of lives into which it's cast.

Dorothy Thompson Vincent Sheehan John Guthrie Hitler John Gunther Gunther Europe Mussolini Texas Germany William Randolph Hearst Joseph Goebbels National Book Award For Biogra United States Chicago Tribune
The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

History Unplugged Podcast

01:33 min | 8 months ago

The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

"In the 1930s, the biggest American media celebrities were four foreign correspondents, Dorothy Thompson, John Gunther, HR knickerbocker, and Vincent Shea. They were household names in their day, and just as famous as their novel writing lost generation counterparts, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. These reporters helped shape what Americans knew about the world between the two world wars by landing exclusive interviews with the most important political figures of their day, including Hitler, Mussolini and Franco, as well as Trotsky, Gandhi, nehru, Churchill and FDR. But they also went beyond state press releases and listened closely to the dissidents in Europe and heard alarming reports of violence against anyone who opposed these authoritarian regimes. The reporting made waves at home and abroad. HR knickerbocker was the only foreign reporter whose dispatches Mussolini bothered to read. Joseph gobel is called knickerbocker in international liar and counterfeiter. John Guthrie shot to fame, but the book inside Europe published in 1936, arguing that, quote, unresolved personal conflicts in the lives of various European politicians may contribute to the collapse of our civilization. In the face of increasing violence in Europe, these reporters had to decide whether they would remain on the sidelines or advocate for their readers to respond. They were the readers of the dictators wouldn't be satisfied with their territories they conquered, and the objected to the policies of appeasement and predicted the coming of the Second World War. Putting together the stories they covered, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935, the Spanish Civil War broke out the next year, the German annexation of Austria and the karma book Czechoslovakia, and made very accurate judgments about what would come next.

Dorothy Thompson John Gunther Vincent Shea Mussolini F. Scott Fitzgerald Joseph Gobel Ernest Hemingway John Guthrie Europe Trotsky Franco Gandhi Churchill Hitler Ethiopia Austria Czechoslovakia
"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 10 months ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Their new community faced. A fellow sister at the time, sister Barbara English recalled by 1968. We were aware of the repression and violence promoted by the military dictatorship. People who worked for human rights and for the small farmers rights to the land were labeled subversive and the military dictatorship had them hunted down. The sisters reacted by stressing basic tenets of human rights in their lessons. With this Dorothy's work took on new meaning. In the early 1970s, the Brazilian government passed land reform laws that encouraged poor landless farmers to settle the Amazon. The government said they would offer 200 acres of land and money for tools to cultivate it. Brazil's poorest communities saw this opportunity as a chance to secure better lives for their families. Dorothy packed up her things and joined farmers moving to the state of Paul ra. With the intent of helping them start anew. They arrived to find loggers and ranchers occupying the land instead. And police paid to scare off any competitors. So the farmers moved further into the forest to escape the danger. Again, Dorothy moved with them. By 1980, the government announced a $10.5 billion development project that would encompass the three northern Brazilian states, including Paula. The plan was to open the land for oil refinery, minerals, and agribusiness. They were David facing Goliath, said sister Barbara in reference to Dorothy and the peasant farmers. She continued and Goliath came in the form of multinationals, big businesses, ranching and lumber companies. They began to devour the Amazon forest. By 1982, Dorothy had migrated with the farmers to on a pool. Another city in para. There they established a sustainable agrarian community. Dorothy became a leader. She helped foster a culture of respect for the land and for one another. She became a spokesperson for the sustainable development movement. And she became for some a major target. By 2001, Dorothy was receiving many death threats. She thought they might be from loggers or land speculators. The morning of February 12th, 2005 was rainy. Dorothy was walking along a path from Adam pooh to another village. By this time, she had lived in Brazil for 40 years. She was on her way to visit farmers whose homes had been burned down on their land. But she wasn't alone. From the forest emerged a pair of gunmen. They asked if she was armed. Dorothy opened her Bible and began to read the attitudes. Blessed are the poor, blessed those who seek justice blessed are those who work for justice because they will be persecuted. Before she could finish. They shot her. Dorothy's murder was a devastating escalation. Anna Paula Santa Sousa, a member of a group that Dorothy worked with, told The New York Times, were all incensed. But at the same time, were also very afraid. Sister Dorothy was an American citizen and a nun, and even with all that prominence, she was still killed publicly..

Dorothy Barbara English Paul ra David facing Goliath Brazilian government Brazil government Amazon forest Amazon Adam pooh Goliath Paula para Barbara Anna Paula Santa Sousa The New York Times Sister Dorothy
"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"With people who hate me, wherever you get your podcasts. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm an environmental activist, Erin Brockovich. This is romantica. This month, we're highlighting eco warriors. Women fighting for conservation and ecological justice. Today's woman dedicated her life to protecting the environment and fighting for the poor. She knew these struggles were interlinked and her religious faith informed her work until the very end. Please welcome Dorothy stang..

Teacher Says They're a Polysexual, Pagan Witch

Mark Levin

01:33 min | 10 months ago

Teacher Says They're a Polysexual, Pagan Witch

"It was crazy But not only that but they often know that I'm gender fluid At one point last year I had explained to them that I was not gonna flow as in mystery Lois just when I was not a boy or a girl And this was all I was good in October When I offered explained to him that I paged him so I am also aware and at one point I got my hair cut and I got in the 5s and I loved his face down and I come in the word ignore the children of those Are you a boy You have short hair And this is because there's no flow over the girl And a third child Know guys we've been over this Lowest is a boy or a girl Louis is a win All right holy smokes Dorothy We're not in Kansas anymore Is she a good witch or a bad witch No Lois is a gender fluid teacher That is polysexual And I don't mean her name is Polly I mean she's a pagan witch This is insanity But this is what's happening to children No I don't think every single child has a pagan witch teacher But that's what this one admitted to being that's what's going on here And this is the woke attack that's on our children in public schools across all of America

Lois Dorothy Louis Kansas Polly America
"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

"In the late 19th century, and where amidst the honey colored stone quadrangles, trim grass plots, a neat floral borders, something deeply unpleasant is making its presence felt. I'm John Richardson, the publisher on bound, the platform where readers crowdfund books they really want to read. And I'm Andy Miller author of the year of reading dangerously, and we are joined today by two new guests, Harriet Evans. I'm Francesca wade. Hello to both of you. Welcome. Hello. Harriet is the author of 13 novels. The most recent of which the beloved girls was published in hardback in August 2021. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked in publishing as an editor first penguin, then has shet. As a 16 year old she went to a fancy dress party as Harriet vain in claret love it. And for several years, was a member of the Dorothy Elsa's society. Now before we come on to Dorothy Elsa's Harriet Evans, what type of fancy dress? What year was this that you did this approximately? Okay, so first of all, it was the fancy dress party held by my parents.

Harriet Evans Francesca wade John Richardson Andy Miller Harriet Dorothy Elsa's society Dorothy Elsa
"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

Criminormal Activity

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

"Nope. It's not. Shortly after Dorothy's remains were discovered, the phone calls began again. The man would ask if Dorothy was home, which is so messed up because he's clearly the one who did this to her and he knows she's not home. Dorothy's father died in 1994, and her mother later in 2002. They both died never knowing who this man was that had stocked their daughter, kidnapped her, killed her, and then continued to torment them after her death. And we still don't know who this man is today. 41 years later and we have no answers as to who did this. As I said earlier, the police were never able to trace the phone calls, as he never stayed on the line long enough for them to get a trace. There are a few light theories as to who this man was, but they are very light, as I said. One theory looks at the dog bones that were found among Dorothy's. A lot of people kind of look at this and see it as a ritualistic slash occult activity type of thing. And some looked at this one local man who had alternate religious beliefs which, having different beliefs does not make you guilty so. I don't really know about this one. Another theory kind of follows another phone call that was made throughout the investigation. June 12th of 1980. An unidentified man called the Orange County register. This was a local newspaper that had been running stories about Dorothy's case. The caller told the editor quote I killed her. I killed Dorothy love. I caught her cheating with another man. She denied having someone else. I killed her. The collar also told the editor many details of the night that Dorothy went missing, such as the scarf change and Conrad having sustained a spider bite. These details were never released to the public. So these are details that very, very few people knew. And these are details that the person following Dorothy would have known. Police looked into this and they do believe that this may have been Dorothy's killer. Which I am definitely more inclined to go with this theory. When thinking about MO?.

Dorothy Orange County Conrad
"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

Criminormal Activity

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

"But she was. And this presented an unexpected opportunity. And he took it. Now, police tried to trace these phone calls, but they were never able to. Because remember, this guy was keeping the calls very short. He knew not to stay on the phone too long for fear of being discovered. These calls continued for four years. I repeat four years. This poor family had to go on receiving these calls with still no clear answers as to what actually happened to Dorothy. It wasn't until one day in April, 1984. I'll call came in. And this time Dorothy's father Jacob was home, and he was the one to answer the phone. When the caller heard Jacob answer the phone. He immediately hung up. And after this, the family didn't receive another call for four months. So for whatever reason, when this man heard Jacob's voice, he was immediately like nope and hung up and he didn't call again. For a lengthy period of time. And that's very odd and quite interesting to me. Now we are in August 6th of 1984. We are on the Santa Ana canyon road. A construction worker is out working when he sees something Bones. The bones were about 30 feet from the road and determined to be both dog and human bones. They were able to find a human skull, pelvis, arm, and two leg bones. And the bones were also partially burned. This actually was a little bit helpful because two years prior in 1982, there had been a very large brush fire in the area that the bones were found. So this told them that these remains had already been there when the fire took place. And then remained there two years later. Among the remains were also a watch and a Turquoise ring. The watch's time had stopped at 1230 a.m. on May 29th, 1980. And this was just over an hour after Pam and Conrad had last seen Dorothy. Which is very chilling. And I wonder if that was at all intentional. Unfortunately these remains were determined to be Dorothy's and they found this out via dental records. An autopsy couldn't determine her exact cause of death because there wasn't a whole lot left unfortunately. Her family did hold a funeral for her and they finally laid her to rest on August 22nd of 1984. Finally, they had some closure, but not all of the answers to their daughter's tragic death. You would think this is the end of the story and the end of their torment, but.

Dorothy Jacob Conrad Pam
"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

Criminormal Activity

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

"This paired with the missing persons report drove police to the conclusion that she had been kidnapped. Now it's just a little over a week since Dorothy's disappearance slash kidnapping, because at this point we don't know what it is. Her family receives a phone call. The call was from a man they didn't know. Dorothy's mom Vera was the one who answered the phone. When she answered, the man on the other end of the line asked her if she was related to Dorothy. When she said, yes, his only reply was I've got her. Before hanging up. Now this wasn't the end of the phone calls. From this point on every Wednesday. This man would call and torment Dorothy's family. The calls would usually come in when Dorothy's mother was home alone. Meaning he was now very likely watching Dorothy's family as well. He kept these calls very short and would either tell them that he had Dorothy or that he had already killed her. According to Dorothy's mother, Vera, this man knew a lot about Dorothy. Very specific details even. He even knew that she had changed her scarf the night that she had went missing. Now the only people who would know that would be Dorothy, her mom, and her dad. Now this tells me that he had been watching her the entire night. My guess is that he was waiting for her to leave work that night. Not necessarily to take her, but just to continue watching her. Then, when she stayed late for the work meeting, he stayed, too. Then when he saw her leaving with Pam and Conrad, he followed. He watched her, stop at her family's house, before making her way to the hospital. From here he waited outside the hospital in the parking lot for her to return to her car. But he didn't expect her to be alone when she came out..

Dorothy Vera Conrad Pam
"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

Criminormal Activity

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

"9 o'clock p.m. there was a staff meeting at work, so Dorothy and her coworkers were all at the shop together for the meeting. Suddenly, Dorothy noticed that one of her coworkers Conrad wasn't feeling very well. She also noted a very weird red mark on his arm. It looked like a bite of some kind and that coupled with how ill he was led to their decision to take him to the hospital. Dorothy, Conrad, and another coworker of theirs named Pam, made their way to the hospital. Now, along the way, Dorothy stopped at her parent's house. She wanted to check on her son and she wanted to let her family know the situation with Conrad, and that she was going to be home a little bit later than normal to pick up her son. On her way out, Dorothy took off the black neck scarf that she had been wearing. And she traded it out for a warmer red one. Then Dorothy Conrad and Pam arrived at the U.S. Irvine medical center. They took Conrad directly to the emergency department and luckily they acted quickly because that small red mark on Conrad's arm had actually come from a Black Widow spider. So the doctors acted fast and treated Conrad, and he was discharged around 11 p.m. that night of the 28th. When it was time to leave, Dorothy offered to pull the car around for Pam and Conrad. They didn't want him to walk all the way out into the parking lot to get to the car, and they had to wait for a prescription anyways. So Dorothy figured she would go get the car while they were doing that, and then they would all hop in, leave, and that would be that. So that's what she did. She left them inside the hospital and went out into the night to get her car. Now Pam and Conrad waited for Dorothy, but when she didn't reappear after a few minutes they went out into the parking lot to see if they could spot her. They didn't see her but suddenly her car came speeding towards them. Pam and Conrad waived so that they could be seen, but the car capped speeding past them. Then the car turned out of the parking lot and sped off, disappearing into the night. Pam and Conrad assumed that Dorothy was driving, but the headlights were too bright for them to see who was actually driving the car. Initially, Pam and Conrad assumed that there was some sort of emergency with her son, that led to her speeding off into the night without them, because this was weird. She wouldn't just leave them at the hospital, knowing what they had all just gone through. She would have stuck around and driven everybody home. But hours later no one had heard from Dorothy. There was no explanation as to why she had rushed out of the hospital parking lot like she did. Pam in Conrad actually ended up reporting Dorothea missing just a few hours after this incident. They knew that not hearing from her was a very bad sign. And good for them for actually going ahead and reporting her missing right away. Now we are at four 30 a.m. the morning of the 29th. A white 1972 Toyota station wagon was found? Burning? In an alley. And this was Dorothy's car. It was found roughly ten miles from the hospital. So we have the car, but no Dorothy. No sign of her in or around the vehicle..

Conrad Dorothy Pam Dorothy Conrad U.S. Irvine medical center Dorothea Toyota
"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

Criminormal Activity

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

"It could literally be anybody, and you wouldn't know. Now Dorothy did state that the voice seemed familiar, but she couldn't place it. It definitely wasn't someone she knew. Like actually new and could identify. One day, when he called he told Dorothy to go outside. He said he had left her something, and he wanted her to see what it was. Now, first, don't do that. If some body is calling you in there being threatening and scary and then they tell you to go outside and check something out, don't do that. Not safe. But Dorothy did. She went outside, she wanted to see what he was talking about, and when she went out, she found a single dead rose on the windshield of her car. Which is again very scary and so ominous. Another time this man over the phone actually told Dorothy that he planned to cut her up into bits, so no one would ever find her. Again, escalating and just getting more and more scary. And the thing with the rose, he's actually showing her just how close he is in that this is real. He's not just pranking her. He is physically there, and he's physically near her, near enough to find identify input or dead rose on her car. Now the menacing calls would be enough to scare any one, but the fact that this person actually had eyes on Dorothy, they knew who she was. Again, it wasn't someone just pranking her. They weren't calling a random number in saying these things to scare someone. This was a real dangerous person who had at some point targeted Dorothy for whatever reason. Dorothy started to feel so unsafe in her daily life that she started thinking about buying a gun for her own protection, and she even started taking karate lessons first off defense. Now we are in May of 1980. It is the 28th.

Dorothy karate
"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

Criminormal Activity

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Criminormal Activity

"Happy Thursday, everyone. I hope it has been a good week for you all so far. It's been a pretty regular one on my end. And honestly, regular is more than fine with me, but yeah, so I'm just going to jump right into this week's story because I don't really have much else to say. So today I'm going to be telling you the story of Dorothy Jane Scott, and how her very normal, quiet life came to a very shocking and scary end. This one is a doozy, so hold on tight. So our story takes place in Stanton, California in 1980. Dorothy Scott was a single mom to her four year old son, and she was living with her aunt at this time and just living life. According to those around her Dorothy was a homebody through and through which same girl I love being at home, all my stuff is here. I honestly don't have many reasons to leave the house. Along with being a home body, Dorothy was also a dedicated Christian and she was a very straight and narrow type of gal. She didn't do drugs. She didn't drink. She didn't party, none of that. Now she was a homebody, but she also went to work, being a single mom, she had to get out there and bring home some biscuits. So Dorothy was a secretary for two stores in Anaheim, California. This was about 6 miles away from where she was living in Stanton..

Dorothy Jane Scott Dorothy Scott Dorothy Stanton California Anaheim
"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

"At the telegraph is simply not a quint to be able to deal with. But I also think that this novel was way ahead of its time. One of the things when I read it was I was at that point reading British modern novels. I was reading nailed down and Margaret travel and all those women that were publishing the time and loving them. But this was something else. So the modernity of it, I think was exceptional. And that's why it doesn't feel dated in any way at all. And in fact, you know, later, you have Nora Ephron and there's a particular sort of layer of smart wise cracking women writers that come mainly out of America. But I think there's a novel that's so like this, it's extraordinary, which I adore, which is Miriam tapes, all my puny sorrows. Oh, yeah. One of my two or three favorite novels of the last 20 years. Isn't it incredible? And I was told to read incredible. I'm Meg rossoff who said, you must read this book and of course Meg writes brilliantly about families. It's a great cotton Hermes recent one, I think is exceptional about that. But all my puny sorrows is about a pianist at about sisters, Janice, and one tries to kill herself. And that that sort of crackle that dancing prose comes out of Dorothy baker, but I think Dorothy baker was obviously she does come out of Dorothy Parker's or Dorothy's around here. But there is a modernity that I think is completely new and sort of in 1962. Yes, the similarities with all my puny Soros is also a lot of the humor shouldn't work, which is why it's so funny. The crackle that you describe is coming from somebody facing down, bleak subject matter with absolute clear eyed truth. That is what makes it funny. There's not gags, the gags aren't the thing. It's like the same with Cassandra's narration, and Cassandra at the wedding is the thing I was talking about herself editing. That's where a lot of the humor comes from. It's that it's that apprehension of her own motives for saying what she's saying, well, while being able to analyze them while she's doing it. That seems very over piece with with all my puny sorrows. It also seems almost to be humor in the plotting that the wedding is such an afterthought. Is there in the title? And then it just sort of happens in a few minutes when castle does not even there despite being Cassandra at the wedding. That's really true. Yes, Cassandra at the wedding but not at the reception. Yes. Well, the other way around. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yes, yeah, yeah. I was just going to I just wondered why she didn't write more. There's an interesting review in the London review suggesting that she was kind of plagued by feelings of inadequacy. She had had many good reviews and she had had commercial.

Dorothy baker Meg rossoff Nora Ephron Cassandra Margaret Miriam Dorothy Parker Meg Janice Soros Dorothy America London
"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

"Could you expand on that Alexandra? Why is that devastating do you think? I think it's devastating because I believe it means that actually that the marriage can't last or if it lasts Judith soul will be squashed and she in a way as an artist won't survive. And it's interesting that Dorothy baker was a child with a violinist and she had polio and her hand was damaged, so she could never play it properly. But there must have been in her soul that a musician was in her soul as well. And I think she played the piano later on. But yeah, I just, I just think that at the end of it, you think, actually, Cassandra is going to find her way into life. She will, despite all the difficulties and Judith is the one in peril because her spirit is likely to be squashed. Like you're so right about that. That there's a brilliant passage where Judith imagines that the only thing that would help Cassie she says would be for me to go to paces the same way she has. And she says, if right now, there was nothing for me, but blankness and despair, meaningless, love, pleasure, less drinking, no faith in anything except the decayed memory of us as a family, living in a fortress, being self sufficient. And superior, if it were that way for me, Cass would take over and get me out of it, bring me back, convince me, get me to the shore, turn me into a great musician, a whole soul human being, a teetotal antibody true believer. She would. She'd do it for me. I think God, that's why that scene why she can't stay at the wedding reception. I mean, you're right. This is supposed to be the happy denouement, but she can see it. And I think what we haven't said is that is that Judith is the artist. I mean, she's an incredible pianist. She's a real artist. So it's not giving up a hobby. It's giving up everything that she is. So it's horrific that moment. And it's not that he just said he doesn't like it. He doesn't seem to respect it, isn't it?.

Judith Dorothy baker Alexandra polio Cassandra Cassie Cass
"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

"Calm, sweet, quiet, black velvet love. No receiving line, no friends to wishes all the happiness and success in the world and our new life, which of course is the wrong word. But how would they know enough to believe I could prefer the opposite number? It's just amazing, I think. Again, jazz, right? Yeah. No. You can hear it as mournful. The mournful. Solo piece. But still funny. She's still funny. She's still cracking jokes. So Dorothy baker's first novel was called young man with a horn and was published in 1938 and still thought of as being one of the great pieces of jazz writing based on the life of Bix by the Beck. The trumpet's a big spider back and it was made into a film in 1950 and starring Lauren Bacall Doris Day and Kirk Douglas. And we've got a little bit from the trailer here just to give you a flavor of that. And then we'll talk about the relationship between.

Dorothy baker Bix Beck Lauren Bacall Doris Day Kirk Douglas
"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

"At photos I could have saved myself 200 pounds. But one believes that one is. And I think what a lot of novelists do when they are writing about twins, they're either very exactly the same or their exact opposites. And the thing that really annoys me is that they're often surprised that they look like each other or surprise that their twins and you know, it's not a daily surprise to me that I'm a twin. And the thing that Dorothy baker does say well, is that she's not imagining what it would be like to be a twin from the outside. She somehow completely gets under the skin of what it's like to be a twin. I assume she was a twin when I was reading it. And it was only art with discovering that she was an only child. I was very surprised. It's that thing of having your own identity and a dual identity and those things coexisting for your whole life is truly wonderful how she manages to understand the glory and the tension of that relationship and my brother are married. So we haven't got to this point yet, but there's certainly been times in my life of leaving home. I found extremely difficult for that reason and she really captures how it's both a wonderful Bond, but also any bond is restricting in some ways. I think it's too early to go into a passage, but if I maybe I could read the passage, if you've got a bit of the book on being a twin, that would be wonderful. I have grannie looked sad. I've never been able to see anything wrong with your being, don't say it, I said. Don't say that word. Nobody else with one feels this way about it. Grand said in the agreed voice, she always uses for this particular conversation. The conversation about condition. So chocolate. I'm sorry to grieve her or deny her her pleasure, but I have to make things clear because no one of my grandmothers temperament and sensibilities can understand what it's like to be bound to a way of life like ours. A situation we inwardly glory in, but one that we have to protect at every turn from the menacing mass of cliches that are thrust in us from the outside to be like us isn't easy. It requires constant attention to detail. I thought it out. We thought it out together. I've tried to explain to my doctor, but it's a question of working ceaselessly being as different as possible because there must be a gap before it can be bridged and the bridge is the real project. So that's actually such a great passage to choose. I think Alexandra and Mitch because you get the flavor of the narrative voice and so much of the appeal of.

Dorothy baker grannie Grand Alexandra Mitch
Sotheby's Puts Rare U.S. Constitution Copy for Auction

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Sotheby's Puts Rare U.S. Constitution Copy for Auction

"Sotheby's will auction a rare copy of the US constitution it's one of only eleven surviving copies of the constitution from the official first printing it's the only copy that still in private hands and when it goes to auction in November it's expected to bring in as much as twenty million dollars Selby care for a senior specialist at Sotheby's who's handling this says it likely belong to either a member of the Continental Congress ordered one of the delegates to the Continental convention he says your eye is immediately drawn to that first line we the people of the United States the document is from the collection of Dorothy tapper proceeds from the sale will benefit her foundation which promotes the understanding of US democracy I'm ready to fall late

Sotheby Selby Continental Congress United States Dorothy Tapper
20 Years After 9/11, Work of Identifying Remains Continues

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 1 year ago

20 Years After 9/11, Work of Identifying Remains Continues

"Officials in New York or announcing they've identified the remains of two more victims of the September eleventh terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center just days before the twentieth anniversary of the devastating attacks that killed nearly three thousand people and jolted the nation the medical examiner's office says technicians using DNA were able to identify the remains of Dorothy Morgan of Hempstead New York she was a broker for marsh and McLennan officials also determined the identity of a man whose remains were recovered in separate fines in two thousand one two thousand two and two thousand six his family is asking the name be withheld it's the first time in two years new identifications have been made eleven hundred remains are still unidentified even though teams are still working to match DNA to fragments found chief medical examiner of New York Barbara Sampson says they pledge to do everything they can to make sure all those lost that day can be reunited with their families I'm Jackie Quinn

Dorothy Morgan New York World Trade Center Hempstead Mclennan Marsh Barbara Sampson Jackie Quinn
With the Americans Gone, Afghanistan Enters Its Uncertain, Taliban-Led Future

Politics and More Podcast

01:47 min | 1 year ago

With the Americans Gone, Afghanistan Enters Its Uncertain, Taliban-Led Future

"Robin wright a new yorker contributing writer who covers foreign policy joins me to discuss the unforeseen consequences of the war on terror and the future of afghanistan as a haven for al-qaeda and other terrorist groups. Hi robin welcome to the program. So good to talk to you again. A lovely to be with you dorothy you. I visited afghanistan in nineteen ninety nine when the taliban were in power. And you've been back several times since most recently in march. What have afghans had to say to you over the years about the american occupation. Well of course. Afghanistan is not one country it is a very divided country by ethnicity and tribes bisect. And so they don't have one united view. I do think that at the time of the. Us intervention there was a hope among many maybe even most afghans that repressive rule by religious extremists would end. And a new future would include participatory democracy perhaps a decentralisation of power so that the the divisive provinces would each have more autonomy in ruling themselves unfortunately the government that have succeeded the taliban have all been deeply corrupt and so it was a very flawed democracy. And i think that by the end of twenty years there were many afghans. Even those who didn't like the taliban who were disgusted by the government and that was reflected most of all by the collapse of the afghan army which at the end of the day. Just didn't want to fight for the central government.

Afghanistan Robin Wright United View Taliban Qaeda Dorothy Robin AL United States Afghan Army Government
The Disappearance of Joyce Yost

Cold

02:52 min | 1 year ago

The Disappearance of Joyce Yost

"Near as kim could tell her mother had last been seen late on the prior saturday night in her sister. Dorothy driveway to know if it had been twenty four hours. You be missing. Nobody you in twenty four hour started by the next day. When they're still wasn't anything. I begged them. Just meet me over there. Go in and see what's wrong you know. And so they met me over there but they made me go in. They didn't go in. I kim wriggled into her. Mother's apartment around noon on tuesday august thirteenth through a side window. She knew did not latch tight. She unlocked the door allowing her husband and a south ogden officer inside everything was clean just like she kept spotless. No sign of a struggle department was always tidy. Everything in the kitchen appeared as usual. She had a one of those automatic times. Copied kicked on and made coffee and the coffee pot was fool. They went into choices bedroom. All our jewelry and everything was on a dresser Anybody came in and robbed her. Everything just like normal. It's like joyce would keep it. Almost the bed was made. A single pillow sat at the top of the bed. It was a minor thing but joyce's bed usually had two pillows always used to falsely petillo that. Tv was right where it was supposed to be her toothbrush her cosmetics. All that stuff was in the bathroom. The pink dress. Joyce had worn to the officers club the prior saturday night sat draped over the back of a chair. Obviously she came home. Set the coffee pot. She had every intention to getting up on starting at her day and just never got to start. Kim looked in her mom's closet. Joyce had so many outfits it was impossible to tell if any of them were missing but she did notice something else. I found a wash cloth down between the dresser in the door and it was dried up and crumpled like had fallen down between detective. sergeant brad. Birch arrived at joyce's apartment that same afternoon to performing more thorough search. He stripped joyce's bed discovering the sheets and the pillow sham didn't match. He examined the wash cloth. It was crusty as happens when water slowly evaporates out of cotton. He smoothed it out. The front face had alternating stripes of pink brown green and gray. The back was tan with several rust colored stains dried blood.

Dorothy Driveway South Ogden KIM Joyce Petillo Sergeant Brad Birch
"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Backlisted

"He thinks that he's smarter than everybody else in the book and we can clearly see that he's not and it's this. I just think it's it's technically to to do that. So that i mean you ought to mind that you know that he's the murderer but the the skill of her writing is that your she's inviting you to understand how somebody can delude themselves into performing such terrible accident still and still going an order sandwiches which he does a hell of a lot. A lot of sandwiches in this novel. Your love the foods all the like you know like swiss an ham on rye. I love. I love the. It's an interesting about the about the sort of knowing more than he does. Because i felt like what dorothy hughes was doing was joined the portrait of someone in in in in ways that we saw things about himself that he showed us that he didn't realize he was showing is showing his hand without realizing and it was it was for me it were with a few things one of which was the. He's incredibly triggered completely fascinated by this and it comes up the whole way through by sounds like the electric razor and the coffee percolator and the grind of bus engine vacuum. He's like on edge all the time about these sounds and he doesn't realize he is not really an and we see that he is absolutely if pcc on the knife. Knife-edge has come back from the war and it's triggering quality and it's terrifying for him and i'm sure you know but but we see that i didn't think he does and the other thing is is booze and he drinks a lot of rye when he doesn't want it or doesn't need it but he drinks all the way through and he worried about going on a binge he's like just on the edge of self control but he's still drinking. It's sort of like you know that self-medication and that edginess so becky is he a classic example of unreliable narrator. While i mean is i started thinking that she ignore you said was inside silo elliot. When i reread it was the first thing is also that. Because he is he's crofting an ideology around his failings so you know he is women and he loves her and she rejected him and he destroyed and he's going nasty. Being actually destruction is what makes me happy. I don't need love. I don't need family identity wounds. I.

dorothy hughes silo elliot becky
Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Natural Communities With Patrick McMillan

"Patrick mcmillan came to herons would last fall from clemson university in south carolina where he ran the south carolina botanical garden and was a professor in the college of agriculture forestry in life sciences he also hosted a pbs series called expeditions with patrick mcmillan and led the development of the botanical gardens natural heritage garden. Which will hear more about so. Hi patrick. I'm so glad to make contact and get to know you a little bit. I margaret. it's it's wonderful to speak with you in wonderful be your. Yeah so i feel like it must have been a bit of like dorothy. Were not in kansas anymore. When you found yourself in the pacific northwest compared to south carolina. it really was. It really still is I've been a little shocked. How quickly of this area has started to just feel like home One of the. I mean herons would as one of the world's great gardens of with some of the best garden people in the world and into the area itself also to me just has this wonderful kind of maternal nece to it Seems to just envelope you and and convince you pretty quick that this is one of the best places on planet earth. Yeah so. I mean it's a distinctively different natural community or habitat from where you were and so besides being shift in zone and so forth. It's a distinguished place in many ways no thousands of different types of plants and so forth but also being i think one of the largest public gardens in the us that's wholly owned by native american tribes does. Did that influence your decision to come there and tell me a little bit about that absolutely You know when i when i was sort of looking around to to sort of slowdown and change and i know you know what that's like to to want to Get away for maybe six job. Titles down to one.

Patrick Mcmillan South Carolina Botanical Garde College Of Agriculture Forestr Botanical Gardens Natural Heri South Carolina Clemson University Pacific Northwest Dorothy Margaret Patrick Kansas United States
"dorothy" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"dorothy" Discussed on Ghost Town

"On the afternoon of december twelfth nineteen ten new york city was busy crowded alive a bustling usual except for one thing. A famous beautiful heiress had vanished in broad daylight. This is the story of the disappearance of dorthy arnold. Dorothy harriet camille. Arnold was born the second of four children of perfume. Importer francis rose arnold and his wife mary. The arnold side came from william brewster who came to america on the mayflower claim to fame. Dorothy was the second oldest. She had an older brother john and two younger siblings. Dan and margery. Arnold father was a harvard university graduate. He was the senior partner of f. R. arnold and co a company that imported quote fancy goods think perfumes luxury beauty items stuff that now a lot of people at the time could afford the were incredibly incredibly wealthy and very imbedded in. New york's elite society. They were listed in the new york city social register and enjoyed pretty much every privilege. One might have in new york at the time as a teenager. Dorothy went to velten school for girls which was a private school in the upper west side preparing rich new york. Young ladies for fancy women's colleges which is exactly what dorothy did. After velten she went. To bryn mawr college where she got a degree in literature and language. Dorothy is greatest. Passion or dream was really to become a writer so when she graduated in nineteen zero five. Dorothy move back into her parents home and got to it naturally. Her parents were more focused on her getting married and less thrilled that she wasn't doing that and wanted to write in the spring of nineteen ten. Dorothy submitted. a short story to mcclure's magazine. It was rejected and dorothy family. Pretty much like tore her a new one very very mean very maybe appropriate for the time but just like a lot of really bad ridicule for someone who again as a woman wouldn't of had an easy time in that career to begin with dorothy to her credit refocused and double down on her budding writing career of setting up a po box to secretly correspond with publishers and avoid her family's scrutiny around writing. Dorothy also asked her father if she can get an apartment in greenwich village so she could concentrate on improving her writing but he rejected that idea. Very quickly quote. A good writer can write anywhere. He said sure that fall. Dorothy submitted another story to mcclure's which also was rejected. She was pretty upset about the second failure. And when she disclosed the news to her friends and family again they were really really harsh and teased her and judged her for it. On december twelfth nineteen ten. Dorothy told her mother she was going out to buy. Address versus marjorie is coming out party. Debutante ball thing. According to the arnold family dorothy with had approximately twenty five to thirty dollars cash in her possession which is around seven hundred dollars today. Give or take. I'm not great with conversions. But it's a fair amount of money. She wore a tailor-made blue coat. A straight cut skirt and an ornate. Black velvet hat adorned with two white roses and a pale blue lining. She carried a large fox. Muffed warm her preparing her for the cold new york afternoon. So very get very upscale very fashionable very very moneyed daugherty's mother offered to go with but she declined her mother was ill. Dorothy was fine going alone. She said goodbye and walked out of her house. Dorothy i stopped at park until ford store on fifth avenue where she bought a box of chocolates. She then walked to burn tahoe's bookstore where she bought a book of humorous essays. Called engaged girl sketches by. Emily calvin blake. She left brittan oser on two pm. Ran into a friend. Gladys king gladys. Dorothy appeared. Happy that she seemed genuinely said from marjorie his debutante party gladys had to go meet her mom at the waldorf-astoria because of course she did and dorothy told gladys that she was going to take a walk through central park king last saw arnold twenty seven th street shortly before two pm where she turned to a goodbye for a second time again. She seemed really happy. Normal cordial social as one newspaper remarked. She disappeared from one of the busiest streets on earth at the sunniest our brilliant afternoon with thousands within sight and breach men and women who knew her on every side officers the law thickly strewn about her path.

jason horton Arnold Dorothy Dan america new york dorothy rebecca lieb thirty dollars dorthy arnold william brewster today second around seven hundred dollars Dorothy harriet camille john two younger siblings margery greenwich New york