18 Burst results for "Doris Kerns"

"doris kearns" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:54 min | 9 months ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on WJR 760

"Monday's date, Chuck? Oh, my God. She's looking around all that shortest day. That's why what's that the shortest days? Shortest day thing I'm going anniversary birthday opening day of deer Season which anniversary caribou killing L. What? I don't expect you to know my anniversary. Be little disturbed if you dead he had you know, Monday is winter solstice. I tell you, we've had a great fall him. We weigh have not had one major snowstorm this fall. Don't say that too loud. Don't put it out there and we had a great winner last year. Yes, Monday is the first day of winter which meets the shortest day of the year, which means Every day that every day after that gets longer. Yeah. Yeah, we get. I mean, I literally get excited about that, doctor. I really do because you've gotta pick your your your things to get you going, and that's a good thing to get you going And you know, everyone know I'm a hunter. I love the hunt. And I went out last week. I went down to our whole property and 100 a day down there. There's only like six hours a day light, So it's like you go out the more in your heart. You come home. We only got a minute to have lunch. Just got to get right back out because the sun's about to go back basket for half the year. Oh, yeah, thanks. You know, it makes sense. There's a lot of alcoholics and Alaska because I would be too If I was up there with video has a lot of things I would be okay, but we've had a great fall. We gonna have a great winner and spring, I think is gonna be phenomenal, especially No, I don't think I know it's gonna be phenomenal Doris Kearns next Tuesday, and the main reason is Chuck because there's still such a low amount of inventory out there when it comes in new housing, and as long as that's the case. Construction industry is going to be busy. Oh, It's got decades unless someone artificially shuts it down. Yeah, well, Organs rates go crazy. Yeah, Yeah. I don't want to go because the.

Chuck Doris Kearns Alaska
California monitoring 8,400 people for possible coronavirus and actively testing 33 people

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

02:48 min | 1 year ago

California monitoring 8,400 people for possible coronavirus and actively testing 33 people

"United States none of not doing so bad not doing so badly the United States has a we have about fifty cases and the fifteen of them are just an inexplicable but about about thirty five of those cases are people coming back from the Yokohama cruise and one of one in California they don't even know how they got that one person you don't know who I just I just saw on television the one L. thirty three cases in California no one will know thirty three people being quarantined and tested they don't know is that right about thirty three cases okay all right no but the point is this that do you remember of course you remember back when the CNN put out that tweet when the when the president had this a panel of experts doctors medical staff and CNN puts out a tweet a picture of that and says another example of the trump administration's a lack of diversity is what they were concerned with back then and this guy did the other night that his name is what a hot elite from The New York Times the other night when the president had his little event press conference bigger than it was and a great one to authorities very presidential and he was like take it easy everybody take it easy and we we should work together so much over and punk in a pantsuit net Nancy Pelosi stop sniping Abby let's work together anyway yeah this guy Wajahat Ali from New York times he says that the the the presentation was only one woman on stage surrounded by nine white men this is only see that these people are sick and I had a really really a second ed and then you had Jon Meacham but remember I told you I tried to watch Doris Kearns Goodwin's yes Washington you Washington special on the history channel and I saw John Avalon from CNN and then Jon Meacham I I got to meet him and then I turn that thing off I couldn't watch anymore because I know he's a raving that TDS afflicted lunatic John legion and I used to know the guy back in the M. S. N. B. C. day's gonna follow them all the time zone I miss all the time anyway this is not what this idiot said about the coronavirus yesterday on MSNBC migraines anxiety aside from the the impact of the virus itself is we're living in an age of xenophobia and it is not impossible to imagine a scenario where blame is cast in a short article in some country or group of people if this becomes worse you have this what is horribly normal what is this what they're worried about that that Americans might die or whatever they'll blame the pecans in here the woman there and I was making mmhm mmhm it Dave stick absolutely nuts out of their minds they hate this place the blame might be kids we should find out how this virus got started just it's it's it's it's just for knowledge sake it if it the blame falls on the Chinese it falls on the

United States
"doris kearns" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Job. like you didn't realize you. that's another fun thing because the even the Russians like a boy yeah guy's nose joke around he said he's gonna white that stain off of gold which has yeah right. you want him you're almost ready to put Donald Trump in the same class just frequently not from film history of four for Doris Kearns Goodwin in your opinion yeah you want to put Donald Trump in the same class as Ronald Reagan all right that's what I've done is the ultimate compliment it is but it's so hard to compare president because there's the right president for the right time you can have a president that was great during their tenure that wouldn't fit in another time so Reagan was perfect for the Cold War the eighties there and trump is perfect for this insanity that's been happening he's the only speed bump we even had for this this cavalcade to insanity that's been going on these kids are petrified data they have gotten children in this country petrified they're they're growing Xamax in little. like Johnny Appleseed their their mental patient that Claudia because they're petrified this and many other things is tell the safe spaces I mean just the very identity politics crap that's going on okay all its campuses I grew up with air raid sirens. under a desk which was going to say from Russian ICBMs they say these there were twelve years because of the call to try twelve men. they were going to launch of we have twelve minutes yeah yeah. yes could save us yeah well listen your brilliant again telling folks if you like Anthony right here with Bernie and myself we gonna love them every single day a compound media dot com at four PM he and Dave Landau both of those guys like pretty much and only will be at all big night of comedy coming up this Thursday night at the hard rock cafe and your great on stage will do a lot of stuff we don't have party and I right there on stage dies thank you. in his book of course permanently suspended you could get that compound media dot com thank you bye your great we will see a Thursday night okay all right the what if any call me a moral Bernie and sit here on talk radio somebody seven W. A. B. C. right after these short messages. be.

Donald Trump Doris Kearns Goodwin Ronald Reagan president Johnny Appleseed Claudia Anthony Bernie Dave Landau W. A. B. C. twelve minutes twelve years seven W
"doris kearns" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

"He actually wanted them to live in the white house to be ready for the cocktail hour. So the second floor of the white house becomes the most exclusive residential hotel. You can possibly imagine all the cocktail guys living there living there during world war two so it was pretty cool. I got to go back and stay in the room. Where winston churchill had lived during world war two. When hillary clinton was there she heard me talking about how i wished i knew where everyone hid live during world war two so she invited my husband and me to a sleepover in the white house and i figured out that yes chelsea clinton was sleeping. Were harry hopkins his foreign policy house advisor f._d._r.'s was the f._d._r.'s people were not his people f._d._r. Was sleeping in the room that clinton's latest leptin and we were in winston churchill's bedroom so i was sure he was in the corner. I wanna drinking his brand and smoking. A cigar. Churchill enjoyed a stiff drink. I'm sure was great f._d._r. His drink of choice. I'm gonna guess sloe region phys well. He had his own sort of weird concoction of the martini that he would make oh he was a mixologist of of sort of a special mixture and he is lame hipsters who go themselves. It was always a visionary always fees and you might do it someday. Sorry we're getting off track. Keep going doors. You're also considered a sports journalist of your a brooklyn dodgers fan growing up. I heard heard why baseball what's interesting about it. Just the good looking guys now. It's not really just i mean. They're not so hunky many of them no. It's got much much deeper roots. My father loved baseball. I was the third girl in the family. You taught me when i was i was he taught me how to keep score. You're so that he would come home from work in brooklyn during the day and i could record for him. The history of that afternoon's brooklyn dodger games so when your father listens to you for the play by play inning by inning he thinks any makes you think he's telling you a fat. I'm telling him a fabulous story. It makes you think something's magic about history. It's where my love of history came from. In fact i'm convinced i learned how to tell a story from those nightly sessions father because at first i'd be so excited i would blurt out the dodgers. The dodgers lost which took much of the drama of this as long telling away so i learned yet to tell the story from beginning to middle to end and then of course the dodgers abandoned us and went to just going to say when they left were were you able to to still you know pulled for them or did it did it. All now. Now bro. I knew more is to send letters to walter o'malley the owner we used to lease to have petitions against him when i was a little girl then finally i went to harvard and i went to fenway park and a park so reminiscent of ebbets field became an equally rational red sox fan and we've had had season tickets for more than thirty five years so baseball's huge part of my life. I wake up thinking about them in the morning when they lose. I don't even want to read the newspapers. It's it's unhealthy but it's a happy happy unhealthiness. I would've been way pork. One time i bought it was so excited to go. There and i sat behind a poll. The guy sold me a ticket that was behind a poll. I i mean that's the problem when you go to an old stadium but it's got charm right charm and i really studied the layers of paint on that in the rush that i bet you didn't you in grave something on it. That ron was there. I don't know how i'm gonna say this. I carved a little heart or be a plus d k g. I listen to it now. Finally i'm going to have to go through. It's in the right field woman. Cha cha rykiel. You've got this so doors are you. How are you feeling about the current..

winston churchill dodgers baseball brooklyn hillary clinton walter o'malley ebbets field fenway park advisor harry harvard ron f._d._r. thirty five years
"doris kearns" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"And then for a while. He did he was a new deal. Congress many brought rural electrification to the hill country. But then he just lost that first Senate race. And after that he had to become a conservative to win in Texas. And he went back on the new deal. But then what happened, and he becomes majority leader grise instead of the system most powerful ever, but without that sense of purpose that had I guided him, then he. Excel for power south, then he has a massive heart attack, six months after it becomes majority leader, and he wakes up, and he said if I died now, what would I be remembered for and I think that shifted that goal from the ambition for south to the MVP for some greater good. And he gets a civil rights Bill through the Senate. And then obviously goal you have the heart attack you have polio. And you hit the loss of Suns could anyone of them of -ccomplish the greatness without the personal anguish? I don't think. So I mean, I think it's almost critical for their drive for their empathy for their capacity that personal piece of their lives. I do so I think getting through loss and all of us have losses in our lives. And the question is can you process? It can you get perspective. Can you find wisdom in it? I mean Lincoln had a near suicidal, depression, they took all knives, and razors and scissors from his room, and his best friend comes to aside and said, you must rally you'll die, and he said, I know that and I just assumed. Hi now. But I've not yet accomplished anything to make any human being remembered that I have lived. He had that desire from the time. He was young. But I think there's no question if teddy Roosevelt had not lost his wife in childbirth and his mother on the same day who'd come to take care of the wife. He then went to the badlands to escape to get through the depression. And he becomes the man of the west he becomes the cowboy becomes the rough rider. And there's no question that FDR became much more warm hearted much more able to understand other people to him fate at delta and unkind hand and then Linden Johnson's heart attack. No, I think getting through a crucible and having perseverance and understanding loss allows you then to have perspective to go on. I think a leader has to project is strength confidence and optimism. I mean, I think those are other qualities I don't know what your your take would be on that. So no question. I mean, that's the key. That's the skill of communication that you're projecting. You know, what your strengths are? And all. Almost all of them had to have an optimistic about where they're taking the country. It's contagious. That optimism even Lincoln people said to him. Did you ever think the war would be lost? And he said, no, I never did. I couldn't not think that we would win this war. And obviously FDR that was the greatest strength. He had from that. I rely on you know, to make people feel you know, it's just fear that we have we can get through this and LBJ had optimism about civil rights and teddy was just a manic optimistic. I mean, they said about teddy that he had such a desire to be in the center of attention that he wanted to be the baby at the baptism and the bride at the wedding and the horse. I just can't picture. When you look at Lincoln, and you see, okay, the capacity to learn mistakes, etc. We've talked about Roosevelt's, what do you think was Lincoln's kinda crucible moment as a mistake that then drives them to greatness? And that effort, I think what happened to him. It was over and over again. I mean, even when he first ran for office, and he lost. He said ahead of time. You know, I may lose this race. But I'm gonna try five or six times if I lose until it's too humiliating. And then I'll never try again he lost to Senate races. But the most important thing about the second one that he lost a Stephen Douglas, all of his friends are so depressed..

Lincoln Senate teddy Roosevelt FDR Suns polio Texas Congress MVP Linden Johnson LBJ Stephen Douglas six months
"doris kearns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Amanpour

"Way too and veterans do now when when you think about it all the changes in our country have come from movements, you know? And then there's a leader there the channels that emotion, whether it's the anti slavery movement and Lincoln was they had the progressive moment for teddy Al Franklin, the civil rights movement with ABRAHAM LINCOLN with with civil rights men with LBJ. I get my guys. I think now there's a movement. There's a movement. That's a foot with women with veterans with new people coming in with all those people standing on line that they want to see change in the healing divisions of our country that to change our political structure. Let us hope there's no other choice. But to the the pessimism will not do us any good. There you go. I wish we had a lot more time for this optimistic segment of our program, both of you, Doris Kearns Goodwin. Walter isaacson. Thank you so much and now for the relationship between president and the press remember Thomas Jefferson's famous dictum, quote, where it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government. I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. Now that means a lot to our next guest. Of course, she's Barry Weiss, an op-ed staff editor and writer for the New York Times. She calls himself a political centuries. Sometimes inning left sometimes the inning. Right. She was born and raised. In squirrel hill. Pittsburgh eleven Jewish was worshippers with gunned down less than two weeks ago. Barry spoke to a Hari Sreenivasan about the election results. And how Tara came to her own backyard. What explains the outcome last night this country is I'm not the first to say this. We're in the midst of a kind of cold civil war and the outcome. Last night was you can sort of conceive of it as a battle that ended in a stalemate. You know, the lots of people predicted that the Democrats were going to take the house and they did. But we we really saw was sort of the the su- solidification of the Republican party as the party of Trumpism moderate Republicans loss last night, moderate Republicans who stood up to Donald Trump lost. And that is a very very troubling sign for the health of a of a country that sort of built on a two party system audience. Give us some context where do you identify yourself? A find yourself in a political spectrum. I think of myself as being in the center, some people see me as sort of a democrat in the mold of scoop Jackson or Daniel Patrick Moynihan, others see me as a liberal Republican. I don't spend much time. And thinking about what party I belong to. I've always been registered as an independent. I've always voted for people at both parties. I see myself as sort of classical liberal on. And frankly, I see myself in the space where I think a lot of other Americans do which is moderate taking taking things issue by issue not wanting to sort of just ascribe wholeheartedly to any political orthodoxy and right now frankly, politically homeless and unrepresented by both parties in this country powerful voices in the Would bin..

Barry Weiss Republican party ABRAHAM LINCOLN Doris Kearns Goodwin Walter isaacson teddy Al Franklin Hari Sreenivasan Thomas Jefferson scoop Jackson Pittsburgh squirrel hill New York Times Donald Trump Tara president Daniel Patrick Moynihan
"doris kearns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Amanpour

"I think it's unrealistic to say that now that the chairmanships have gone into different directions that some of the investigations will keep going on certainly the Muller investigation is still going to come back, despite the fact that people say more people are disapproving it now than before. It's partly because it just hasn't been in the news when they're indictments when things are happening. Then people think highly of the investigation there hasn't been anything because it's been quiet. So I can't we can't imagine that that's all going to go away in the next few months. But it's possible that on some of these smaller issues, which aren't so small to the people for whom it counts, pre existing conditions or prescription drugs. They can move in both both fashions at the same time unless the president decides as he said if you do that, then I pay you back and nothing we'll get done. I. Now delve back into history because both of you, I as I said have written biographies of great leaders and presidents and secretaries of state, and and all the rest of it. So let me ask you first Walter since have you sitting here you've written about Benjamin Franklin who was at the constitutional convention helped, right? The constitution and the end urging his fellow frame is to put their divisions behind them. Here's a quote of his from seventeen eighty seven. I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the convention who may still have objections to the draft constitution would with me on this occasion doubt, a little more of his own infallibility and to make manifest unanimity put his name to this instrument. What does that teach us today? We know Ben Franklin said that he was old. He was actually hitting eighty which back then was considered old beliefs. And he was he was twice as old as the average age of the other members. And he said the older, I get strange happens to me. Realize have been wrong at times and other people will right? He says it's going to happen to you. So put your divisions aside. And then he gives that line. I think that's what America was built on which is somewhat of a respect for listening to other people the big question a country faces now is after this period of rabid into village, rabid demonization, and so much just bashing on weather. We can grow up unstudied who I also wrote about who also was not president of the United States. Who was a very smart person? When the McCarthy hearings were happening he wakes with sunset I've seen this before. I saw it in Nazi Germany. I saw it in the communism. But then is in how're Edward r. Murrow in the mainstream but not Joseph McCarthy off the stage. Einstein says American democracy. It hasn't gyroscope. It's amazing. Just when you think it's going to fall over it can ride it out. I believe. That we gotta do that now, and it's very important to mention the mainstream press, and what a fundamental and strong pillar of a healthy democracy. It is I'm Doris Kearns Goodwin. Let me let me turn to you forbid of history. You obviously worked for a Lyndon Johnson. You also have written about him. He had huge democratic majorities in congressman. He was doing civil rights and the others. Abraham LINCOLN who you've obviously also profile big Republican majorities, but the country was at war, then, but you know, what what is the the president. Let me just quote, this this this from Benjamin from ABRAHAM LINCOLN. If I can find it here. It is. Inaugural address in eighteen sixty one though passion may have strained. It must not break. Our bones of affection, the mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hot stone all over this broad land. Will yet swell the chorus of the union when again touched shortly. They will be by the better angels of our nature again. It sounds so great an almost two quaint for today. Can we find out to angels? What will it take? Well, I think we have to. I mean when I think back to the eighteen fifties before he gets into office..

Ben Franklin president Abraham LINCOLN Doris Kearns Goodwin Benjamin Franklin Lyndon Johnson Joseph McCarthy Muller Germany Walter America Murrow Edward r United States Einstein congressman
"doris kearns" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"But that's how amazing figure ABRAHAM LINCOLN ones that and of course, that procedure was about the civil war and slavery. But I mean, I think what happened in the movie is they they used a smaller plot to get the third year pass and to show that politics in bargaining all sorts of things. Yeah. This is the time when we compromise was bad. But most importantly, Daniel Day-Lewis was just unbelievable. I mean when he first finally agreed to be Lincoln. It's feel-good hoped. He would be Lincoln for months and years actually, showing him various scripts, and he said, no when he farm and says, yes to Tony Kushner's scripts Stephen me, taken to Springfield to show him the scenes, but he was the birth that in the where he's where he married live the state house his office. But he didn't want anybody to know that he was already becoming Lincoln because he wanted to hold year to become Lincoln. He inhabits the character. So he was coming. We're supposed to eat under an assumed name. But at the last minute, he says, oh, no, let's go to a bar until he went to a bar in Springfield immediately. Somebody bought us drinks. And I thought oh my God. It's already over. But they didn't recognize him. They recognize me. It was a huge joke. So anyways of why would they not? He just becomes the character is a book like the person. So many premier happened back in New York. And he said, okay, I'm taking you to my favorite bar. Will remember that night in Springfield? So we had these old Cuban drinks. And you know, I had to he had maybe more than me everything was bombed. And then he got the first of his series of awards in Spielberg came to deliver to me sold told how he had be Jackie these roles these beautiful rejection letters until finally he said, yes. So you've got up there unaccountably because there's a Wall Street Journal report in the room. He said, I don't reject everything when Doris Kearns Goodwin asked me to go binge drinking with I accepted. So So I was. I was. That's fantastic. I always wanted to know. The things that I've read them Lincoln. It almost seemed like. I don't know how popular he was as president, of course, during the civil war and all of those things, but it seemed like he was wildly popular. Once he was a sassy. I know it sounds like an odd thing. But it almost seemed like a bottled up feeling for him was was able to be released because of that assassination. Something right about that. I mean, what what happened was of course, he's assassinated when the war has already come to so union had one slavery had been undone by the emancipation, proclamation and. And the war ended one. So he was already having an extraordinary triumph, and he was already tried to reconcile the south and the north together in that second inaugural when he talks about the state of slavery was shared by both sides both read the same bible broker pages. Saying God's neither prayers. We're fully answered. Then, of course, the words remember what malice toward none in charity for all. Let us find up the nation's wounds. So people realize by then between the Gettysburg address the second inaugural that he'd give given a meaning to the war with this beautiful language, and that the war had been one. And that he was the major figure with long with the union army and giving direction to the cabinet in the union army. But then when he died in when you really were hoping he would keep going and keep that chance of reconciling north and south together. I think you're right. It released these feelings that have been growing as I'm went by..

Daniel Day-Lewis ABRAHAM LINCOLN Springfield union army Wall Street Journal Doris Kearns Goodwin Tony Kushner New York Spielberg Jackie president
"doris kearns" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"True. Let's all go, man. I'm telling you. Let's do it two thousand nineteen are you there? I am New Mexico. Welcome back. This will Mark. I am black on the air has gone out there. You get doing feeling pretty gate because the sports in LA doing. Brad. Now, we've got the dodgers in the World Series as I record this World Series has not yet started. So you hearing the couple of days after there have been some results. I have no idea. See I can't get to snotty right now and start bragging 'cause you guys little what'll happen if the dodgers have lost like three in a road. You hear this like what's wrong with Larry? So I remember from dodgers hope they win. But of course, my Lakers LeBron in the Lakers. It's gonna be rough. You guys Gumby rough. But I got you. We got this. Let's stay in there and ski playing tough. The Lakers looked pretty interesting. Now this post the Rondo spit fate with the CPI three. I know I'll because not into sports. I apologize. Always. You have no idea what I'm talking about. We find CPA threes. Nine of Star Wars character. His a player in the action Pasco cessation one of the Lakers claims he didn't spit on him. But he's been at them caused the bait. And Rondo would he would fight with an image of himself. That's how hard he is to get along with Rondo Faye with anybody. So he's the Laker player. They did a couple of acres out. Like, I haven't a little rough go as of this recording. They have not yet one. But hopefully, they will have on by the time this airs but in terms of the season, I have some patients here. I think we're gonna do. Okay. How some ever guys there are some other things that are going on that are much more than right now. Oh, by the way, until they show I talked to Doris Kerns Goodwin. A little while ago. And we're going to be playing that live conversation that we did out in riverside to very nice audience and talked about her book covering out of the four presidents like the burlingham four covering the four presidents. That's all these minutes for president Lincoln theatre Roosevelt. Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. Chip coursework to Johnson ministration and is good conversation. Really good stuff. A lot of that history. Stuff that I like, but. But you know, she's amazing Doris Kearns Goodwin. She has so much knowledge of the personal foibles and things that happen. You know, she puts the flesh and blood on these sometimes mythic figures, and it always relates to today all of it. So open enjoyed that conversation kind of saliva conversation that we did before. But so before we get to that. I just wanna say this one word guys boat boat boat boat boat boat, vote vote vote vote as violence said don't boo vote now is the time. Okay. The time for talking shit all you know, protests in snarky nece speaking up. All this voice voice voice. Fine now voice needs to turn into vote vote boat boat. There are a lot of races around the country right now that are up for grabs in some of them can really make some differences at this time. I mean, it doesn't look like much. It's going to have in the Senate. But you never know. But in the house, they're really looks like a good chance. We may have Florida's first black governor that would be amazing Georgia may have its first female black governor, which would be unbelievable. There's a lot of there's some LGBT q. I always forget all the letters..

Lakers Doris Kearns Goodwin dodgers Rondo Faye New Mexico Franklin Roosevelt Lyndon Johnson LA Lincoln theatre Roosevelt Brad Rondo Larry Florida Senate president Georgia
"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

"And JFK had that perfect attitude for television when there's three networks and Donald Trump had he cut through that whole world with his tweets. The problem is that campaigning is not governing, and those instant comments have become troubling. I think for for not only him, but for a lot of people and Lincoln could have absolutely debated anybody when he was in the Stephen Douglas debates. He was so quick. He could mock people if he needed to when he was young and then decided he didn't want to do this anymore because it was not worth anything to hurt these people. But there are moments when like during the Lincoln Douglas debates, somebody yelled at him and said, Lincoln, you're two faced and he had an immediate response if I two faces do think I'd be wearing this face, but he decided once he became president not to use that. The capacity of his to react quickly. He hardly ever spoke extemporaneously. Even when the people would come to celebrate a union victory and they'd serenade him and they'd wanna speech, and he would simply thank the soldiers, thank them for coming and joining the songs because he wanted to make sure his words carried weight. When you're president is a dignity, this an importance to them, they need to inspire and not to inflame yon. He used the great trick of he would write angry letters in the never sent him just to get it out of system. I was telling on President, Obama did an exit interview for Vanity Fair with him. We were talking about Lincoln's hot letters and that, so we'd put them aside. You never even saw these letters until the twentieth century and underneath would be the notation never sent and never signed all sorts of angry thoughts in the letters. So I asked President Obama, do you ever do this? And he said, I'd do it all the time. So what did you do with the? He said, I crumple them up and put them in the wastebasket. How much fun to find those letters would be. Now, I thought you're supposed to preserve everything goes against. I didn't even think about that. Now you say that teddy Roosevelt would probably be the best suited to lead the country right now. Why is that? I think he could take on President Trump and Republican primary. I do think so only because we'll maybe that might might have to run as an independent actually if he's coming back. But he had that same fiery temperament, he could easily tweet. I mean, there's no question, although sayings speak softly and carry a big stick, you know, don't hit until you have to hit hard. He was a colorful figure. He was the center of attention. So in this entertainment world of ours, he was the probably the most entertaining president we had. But on the other hand, unlike the art of the deal, which says that you don't want both sides to win. You just wanna win. He said that the the, the important thing about a deal is when both sides win, and I think he could possibly knit together. That's what he was trying to do as president knit together. These various parts of the country. I mean, he took a train whistle, stop train for weeks in the spring and fall, and he was stopped in places where he. Lost as well as state posts that he won and always what he was preaching was common common interests, common duties, and he tried to introduce people from different parts of the country together so that there was a human understanding of what it meant to be an American rather than the class divisions which really were at the beginning of his presidency. I mean, he felt the rock of democracy would would be undone by these kind of divisions unless I got healed up. He could take criticism. Oh yeah. This story about the parade. Could you tell? Yeah. So when he was police Commissioner, he had to follow the law which he didn't agree with, which said that these the taverns could not be open on Sundays because the law was producing corruption. The police department and the business guys who on the taverns we're bribing each other to keep some of them open and not others, so they decided that people hated it. I mean, and understandably, the working class people, Sunday was the one day they had off from work, and they wanted to relax in the saloons..

president President Obama Donald Trump Stephen Douglas teddy Roosevelt Vanity Fair one day
"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

"Yeah. I mean, I think when I started out even before President Trump was elected, there was a lack of leadership in Washington. I mean, he'd been a long time since the two parties had gotten together, and people were talking about that. I also really wanted to study leadership because I've been interested in it from the time I was in graduate school, but then. The Trump administration came into power realized that I hoped what this book could do was to shine a light on what the leadership qualities are that we need that humility and an empathy and resilience, and the ability control negative emotions and the capacity to relax and replenish energies and courage of your convictions and to to speak in a way that people believe what you're saying and then it shows the absence of that leadership today, but not only just to make people upset about what's happening. I just feel right now that if you really look at these four guys, it wasn't just what they did as leaders, but it was what the citizens did. I mean, the anti slavery movement, Lincoln said, did it all more than just him? You have the progressive movement that was absolutely was created before teddy Roosevelt, the settlement house in the social gospel and the civil rights movement. Obviously underlie Lyndon Johnson. So if we are citizens, now if you read this and you're feeling well, why can't we have these leaders? That's one question. We should be looking for leaders with these qualities, but even more important. And we have to be active. We have to just not be spectators. We've just got to get out there and realize that it's every movement is what created change in our son. And we need a movement now to restore our political system to get people to vote to get people to to really become citizens. And there are record breaking numbers of women running this year, their signs of an awakening, the young people are interested now the test will be, do they carry out that? Do they go to the polls? Do they stay active? And then that's the, that's what we positivity can do rather than just simply look at what we don't have. Now, does Donald Trump exhibit in your mind, any of the traits of a great leader? Well, one must, you know, one must agree that what he did when he ran the election was that he made a group of people in the country, a large group Abass that became his base feel that he was on their side. I think that's an important part of what a leader does. He was able to use the technology of his time, the social media with his mastery of tweets to break through every polarized world. And in all of my guys, Lincoln had a gift for language at a time when printed word was king. So the fact that these words were so beautiful, they'd be read in pamphlets for days afterwards. Teddy had that punchy language that was perfect for the rise of the national press FDR had the voice for radio Reagan,.

President Trump teddy Roosevelt Lincoln Donald Trump Abass Lyndon Johnson Washington FDR Reagan
"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

"It's very hard for its to even conceptualize what that must have been like, just how dire was it. I mean, it was really the bottom of the recession that was taking place at that point that became the great depression in February and March. Before he was inaugurated, people had been trying to take their money out of the banks because the banks were collapsing and longlines things were getting violent, and then some of the banks had had to close and some were staying open and the system was chaotic, so hit the first day he gets into office. He decides he's going to call a Bank. Holiday how wise to call it a Bank holiday. I mean, it's really a terrible thing that all these banks are closing, but then he realizes, I'll have to get a law passed in the congress to figure out which banks are are week, which ones need government shoring up. And then a week later, they'd open them to the people. And the extraordinary thing he does that week is not only does he get the emergency banking law passed very quickly, both sides of the aisle supporting it. But he then realizes I have to explain to the public why these banks had run out of money and why it would be safe to put your money back in. So that's his first fireside chat, the ones that become his his signature in the presidency. He talks to the people as if he's really in their living room, explaining things to them. So he explains that when you put your money in the Bank, it just doesn't sit in a vault. They use it to give mortgages and loans to keep the economy running and that what happened in this instance, some of these banks used it to invest in the stock market, the stock market crash, so they didn't have the money on hand. The other. Thanks really was strong, but they may not have had the cash on hand. They had the acids because everything was being taken out. So he says, I sure you it's better for you to to bring it into the Bank rather than keep it under your mattress. So then the banks open on Monday morning and there's a fear. Maybe they'll take even more money out and they see long lines. They're bringing their money back. They're bringing satchels or money back in. So it seemed to save the system and then it created for him what would become as I say, his way of talking to the people, he had the most intimate relationship with the people. I think of any of these presidents, you know, when when he was giving one of his fireside chats on the radio and had the perfect voice for the radio, that conversational style, he would start my friends and Saul bellow said, you could walk down the street on a hot Chicago night. If he was giving one of these fireside chats and see hymns, see all the people sitting by their radios in their living room or kitchens and keep walking out here is voice and not miss a word of what he was saying. And then there was a construction worker who came home was leaving home. Early one night and the partner said, where are you going said? Well, my president's coming to speak to me in my living room. It's only right. I be there to hear him when he comes so that that was it. And that went even when he died. People said that they felt lonely because they had lost their friend and one person said, you know, one one person dies and one hundred thirty million feel lonely. It was an extraordinary relationship he developed. It's funny when you talk about how he explained what was going on with the banking system at almost Ryan's me of, you know, Jimmy Stewart as George Bailey and it's wonderful life. The money's not here the rise in Joe's house. Thought about that. That's exactly right. I have to go back and look at that, but I remember that now that you say it, we're gonna take a quick break, and then I'll be back with more with doors Kerns Goodwin when we come back in just a minute. Folks. I've been a small business owner for many years now and I've come to learn what every small business owner.

business owner Saul bellow Kerns Goodwin congress Ryan partner president Chicago Joe Jimmy Stewart George Bailey
"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

"And you spend probably I guess, as much time talking about their failures in their moments of doubt, as you do talking about their triumphs in this book, what do you think those moments reveal about these men? Well, I think the important thing that each one of them illustrates is that when they start out, sometimes they're going to go through failures. In fact, when I was talking about leadership lessons from the White House some years ago, a young student raised his status, but how can I ever become one of them? They're too far their remote. So I realized if I started when they first ran for office Lincoln's, Twenty-three Teddy's Twenty-three. FDR's Twenty-eight LBJ's roaming around from the time he's too. But anyway, they'll, they'll, they'll fail, they'll they'll make mistakes, they'll learn from them. They'll grow in office and these men had particularly harrowing experiences hopefully more than most of us might have. But there's something about going through adversity and finding wisdom at the other end and knowing that if you've got through that, you have the strength to get through something else. Lincoln fell into a depression. So deep that is friends took. Ol- knives and razors and scissors from his room when he's in his early thirties, and it was partly because the gap between his huge ambitions to want to change the world which he had from the time he was twenty three. And the reality of his circumstances was too big to bridge. And a friend went to him and said, you must rally or you will die. And he said, I would just as soon die now but have not yet accomplished anything to make any human being remembered that I've lived even at young age. That was his dream teddy Roosevelt was in the state legislature, and he got a telegram that his wife had just given birth and they celebrate with cigars. His mother who was only forty nine had come to take care of the of the wife. Then he gets a second telegram saying, you have to come home immediately. Your wife is dying on your mother's dying to his mother had contracted typhoid fever. She died just after teddy got home and then twelve hours later in the same house that same day his wife die. So he's circled into a depression, but it left him with the decision to leave the state legislature in New York and go to the badlands. And those two years he spent in the badlands being a cowboy being a rancher changed his view of the world made him a conservationist. It made him a westerner as well as an easterner. He said, he probably would never become president if he'd just been this eastern guy privileged. I now he was suddenly part of the growing west. And of course FDR's polio was what he went through. Johnson is more complicated. What happened to him as I do think he had empathy when he was young. He he taught for a year in between college because he couldn't afford to stay as a principal and a teacher in this community, whether we're Mexican American kids who were really poor, and there was prejudice being exhibited against them. So he became everything to the kids. You know, he gave them his salary to build sporting equipment and he taught them to eat said, I wanna fire ambition in them. And if I can do that, they'll be fine the rest of their lives. But then as he got into politics, it was more accumulating power and more power without that same sense of purpose he had when he was young until in in the middle of nineteen fifty five. He had a massive heart attack. He's majeur. Leader of the Senate, the most powerful one. And then he says to himself when he comes out of the depression. Well, if I die now, what would I be remembered for? And that gave a purpose to his power. He, he got the first civil rights Bill through the Senate. And then of course, when he's president, civil rights becomes the main thing that he cares about the remember the Theodore Roosevelt once lamented being a peacetime president, he said something along the lines, I think of if it hadn't been for the civil war, no one will remember, Abraham Lincoln's name. Do you think a president needs a crisis to qualify as a truly great leader?.

president Johnson Abraham Lincoln depression FDR teddy Roosevelt White House Senate typhoid Ol Theodore Roosevelt New York polio principal twelve hours two years
"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

"That story and with the drawings in. So FDR calls up the administrator. And he says, I know I've turned him down. They don't have enough people per mile. And so FDR says, well, I'll tell you what put it on my account. I think this should be done whatever his accounted. But more importantly, said, I know those people in hill country and they breed pretty fast. So they'll meet your requirements sooner LBJ walked out of there. The happiest man in the world. He's got a million dollars. He said it was one of the best moments of his life, and then he did bring electrobi- to his, I think of it was like to have lights for the first time. It's an extraordinary thing, and this was what the nineteen thirties exactly. I now so much of the country. Exactly. Exactly. Out. So many interesting leadership qualities come out with these four men, but to after beauts that come up consistently with these particular presidents are temperament and empathy. Those two aren't always the kind of things that people talk about when discussing great leadership qualities, and they certainly don't seem to be high on the list of the current president these days or why are empathy and temperament. So important? Well, temperament is really the whole way that you treat the people around you, job outlook on the world in a certain sense, I optimistic, I pass a mystic. Do you create a team where people can argue with you and question your assumptions and then bring them together for a central purpose FDR by adding Eleanor by his side, who could always question his assumptions like speaking truth to power. In fact, he said she was like a welcome thorn in his side always, but it meant that he was willing to listen to different points of view. An empathy I think is probably the most important quality for a leader mean what it means is. Being able to feel what other people are feeling to understand what they are thinking. It's what we are at trouble in today. I think in many ways, we've got different sections, different classes, different races who consider one another as the other rather than as fellow American citizens. And sometimes I think empathy is inborn. It certainly was for Lincoln even as a little kid. There's a time when his fellow friends are putting hot coals on turtles just to watch them regal and he knows that's wrong. I mean, it's just the wrong thing to hurt another person. In this case, wrong thing tired another animal, and he talks to them about it and in in Teddy's case, however, he admitted that coming from the privileged background. He did. He didn't really understand people who lived in slums or tenements that he hadn't any contact with. And he didn't feel that empathy or fellow feeling for their concerns. But then politics took him into those tenements. He saw child labor, he's police Commissioner, and he's rambling around the streets at ninety sees what it's like to live in those slums at night. And he said, maybe itself conscious at. I to identify with them, but after a while it becomes more natural. And so he becomes much more empathetic, and that's a huge part of his leadership program. When he does the square deal, it's for the rich and the poor, you know, the wage worker and the capitalist. I think for FDR he to coming from that insulated background, he had an intuitive understanding of people, even his mother and his father when he was little, but empathy for people outside of his group, he really wasn't exposed to all that much. But then what happens is once he gets the polio still in his thirties, and then he sets up this rehabilitation center in warm springs. He suddenly showing himself vulnerable to the fellow polio patients the, he realizes that he has to somehow teach them to get joy in life, not just physically recover. He becomes old dock. Roosevelt, you know, he's playing water tag and polo, and there have wheelchair dances and they have cocktail parties, and he emerged completely warmhearted with much more empathy for other people for whom fate had dealt and unkind hand..

FDR polio administrator Eleanor president Roosevelt electrobi Lincoln million dollars
"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Kickass News

"Dorris Kerns Goodwin began her career as a historian. And presidential biographer, when she assisted Lyndon Johnson with his memoir Lyndon Johnson in the American dream, she then followed it up with the Pulitzer prize winning no ordinary time, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, the home front in World War Two Goodwin earned the Lincoln prize for her runaway bestseller team of rivals. The basis for Steven Spielberg's Academy Award winning film Lincoln, and she received the Carnegie medal for the bully pulpit. The New York Times bestselling chronicle of the friendship between Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft. Now, she writes about the leadership qualities. She admires most about Lincoln Johnson in the two Roosevelt's in leadership in turbulent times, Doris, Kerns Goodwin welcome. I'm very glad to be here with you while I very much enjoyed the book. These are four people that you have chronicled in your biographies before, aside from. Just the fact that Franklin and Theodore Roosevelt were literally related. There seems to be something of a broader family tree of sorts among these four men talk about those connections a little. It's interesting. I don't think I realized it until the book was nearing its end. But as I looked back from Lyndon Johnson, his hero was Franklin Roosevelt. He called him his political daddy. He had met Roosevelt when he was a young congressman new deal congressman and and he wanted to insert in ways when he became president to be able to do domestically, what Franklin Roosevelt had done for his time of the sixties. And then Franklin Roosevelt's hero was teddy Roosevelt, and so they were distantly related as cousins. And of course, Eleanor, Franklin's wife was the niece of teddy Roosevelt, but much more importantly, he had watched teddy Roosevelt confront confront the problems of the industrial era with that fiery passion, he was such a colorful character and people really adored him. He'd be in a room and you couldn't be away from him. You know, it was said of teddy that he was so. Anxious to be the center of attention that he wanted to be the baby at the baptism, the bride at the wedding, and the corpse at the and that was his own daughter who said was his own dog who said that..

Theodore Roosevelt Dorris Kerns Goodwin Eleanor Roosevelt Lyndon Johnson Franklin Lincoln Johnson Pulitzer prize teddy Steven Spielberg William Howard Taft Academy Award congressman The New York Times Doris chronicle of
"doris kearns" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"We're, we're so tribal that because liberals want to say the environment that it's worth it to kill myself and died choking on bad air makes liberals cry. They're liberal tears, everything. Yeah. This other big story, it isn't. This is sort of voted this. Why we concentrate on one story and not the other to me. Giant story of the week was the New York Times printing. That's very very long article about Trump's origin story. He had always told us, I'm rich because my father gave me a small loan of a million dollars. That was always funny to me that he thought that was this mall, but he was off by four hundred and twelve million apparently. It was all daddy's money all along all through his life from the age of three years old. It was all daddy's money and it was fraud money. Fred Trump passed a billion dollars to his kids and should have paid five hundred fifty millions in inheritance taxes on it. That's the law paid fifty. So they cheated the government out of five hundred million dollars. Why isn't that resin that resonate with people? It was gone. Ago, and we. Surprises? Well, it in in the size of it is surprise. I don't take the Jeff's point. Listen, we've, we've always known this president as a con man, right? And so he engaged in tax planning, but he also engaged in tax fraud that was in the New York Times article delivered tax trod. I think the big takeaway from the New York Times story is what a terrible business person Donald Trump acts. Yes. The fact. What I mean by that this is a guy. This is a guy that we know was born on third base and the idiot, instead of stealing home stole second, right. This is an. How everything is father gave it to you. All right. This is an all BS obvious thing for them to us. Here he is Bill came, the working classes, screwing people. I'd right on these back owning two hundred grand a year at age three and the Democrats can't use. That's right activity. He loves the military looks incredible police. He loves the vets but not enough to pay one diamond tax. I know. Longer. They're put out of him for stealing from the government. That's where the Republican party. What are proud of him for stealing from the governments. Desisted he did. He'd beat the system. Just the way this tax cut that's running up the debt that's going to hurt them in the and we're now paying more to service the debt that we pay for Medicare. It's almost five hundred billion dollars a year. Just paying to banks who have lend us money when does when does that common man? The forgotten man that he said he was when does that guy see that this is the wizard of Oz, who's the TOTO who's going to pull back the curtain? But the media helped sell that story from the nineteen seventies. They re times themselves. He consistently were easily provable. Let's check. Does he only homes that he saying he owns? Let's see. Was he number one in his class of Warton which he was not. Let's let's actually fact check some of this and they never did they like to believe the story. I think it was Tina Brown when she ran an excerpt of her book. She's like, I knew it was bullshit, but I, I actually liked the writing. I thought it was a convincing story. And so when you do that, people then buy into the midst, don't be surprised when they they follow that species. Whole life has been constructed lie. It's a Potemkin life of something he wanted to be right, knows deep down. He doesn't have an hour to the ability to be, and he's managed to lay this incredible Pandora's scheme into the presidency of the United States. Yeah, he's still doing it right now. Whatever it is. It is an amazing spell. He's able to catch. It is a salesman of unbelievable skill. You're here and cunning and absolute ruthlessness, and I think we keep underestimating how dangerous this person is. And this phenomenon is this. This. Brings me to my final question because Mike Pence was out there today talking about China. I haven't seen Mike Pence in awhile. I don't know what. Playing though I people say this is the week Trump became president. I felt last week, whereas the week, Lindsey, Graham became vice-president edition for some, okay, but but Trump said it at the UN..

Donald Trump New York Times Oz fraud Mike Pence Democrats president Tina Brown Warton Desisted salesman Republican party Jeff Bill Pandora UN Lindsey Medicare China United States
"doris kearns" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Times America's historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. What a great pleasure means to you. Thank you for coming on. It's great to see you. I won't burden you with all the supreme court. Talk on this show tonight, but I just want to ask because we often hear from historians that, oh, we've seen this before with congress, people have acted lousy and presidents to supreme court. I feel was always kind of on a pedestal. Is this allow or were they acting like it's before? I don't know. I think it is a low in my lifetime, which is not short. I mean the partisanship that we saw two alternate realities during the cavenaugh hearings run and the other that had nothing to do with each other. But I can go back as an historian because I've lived with guys in the past. There were lower moments. Just imagine this in the eighteen fifties. There was a congressman from South Carolina, and he came into the Senate floor and he hit the Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner over the head with a cane falls into unconsciousness. But the most important thing is in the south, he's made a hero Justice Kavanagh's been made a hero. Now they all had canes. They gave him a golden Kane, but in. The north, here's the positive thing. It mobilized the anti slavery sentiment in the north. They got stronger the Republican party, the party of Lincoln then produces ABRAHAM LINCOLN. So if we can awaken from this new low and the citizens can get active again, we can make something from this moment. I believe. Glad you out with John. It's not place. There's no choice, but to be optimistic, what's the other thing too? Just wallow in it. We can't know. We can't wallow. We. I mean. You'll get toilet paper stock the near. I don't know about that man. I've ever seen Iran HBO let it fly. Okay. Well, you know, when you said he was a hero in the south, the reminded me of the guy who heckled Obama and said, you lie, and then he was a hero in the south. Maybe this is the problem. Well. Maybe we should've let them go. Oh, no, no, no, no fact. At this point. And in this I played the south all when you're in the cities is just like anywhere else. It's really it's not a state thing. It's a city versus country thing in. That's what happened at the turn of the twentieth century, had a very similar situation to now the cities were growing. The people in the rural alleys felt cut off from the right had a lot of new inventions. The pace of life was speeding up the gilded age gap between the rich and the poor. But luckily than a leader came along, it was a lot of popular spirit. A lot of anti elitism and teddy Roosevelt came along and he was able to channel all that emotion into something he called the square deal between the rich and the poor. I mean, he was like Trump. He came in from a privileged background, but he learned empathy through politics. He learned to go to the slums and see what it was like these other people to live. So he's not like Trump? No, he's certain. No empathy is the most important characteristic and a leader, and it's it's what's missing in the current president. Somebody who could monitor a whole menu. I know. Historians and you're certainly preeminent among them. I would consider you premiss into Parry's of all love to be that you are. Thank you first among equals for you non Latin speakers. Like Zeus was free missing. Okay. So all right. So is the question, but you all seem to say, I guess you're all optimists that you know we've seen worse before, have we did we ever have a traitor president because I really do think we have a trader as a president, someone who plainly and out in the out, an open sides with them, not us attacks. Our Justice department are FBI. RCA says he agrees with Putin. I could go on with the list of things that I consider traitorous somehow his agenda and Putin's are exactly the same all the time coincidence, possibly. Did we ever have that? I'll tell you, I don't know that we need to go to that direction right now. The Muller investigation will show us whatever is going to come forth on that right now..

president supreme court Doris Kearns Goodwin Senator Charles Sumner Putin Justice Kavanagh Obama Trump America Republican party South Carolina congress teddy Roosevelt FBI ABRAHAM LINCOLN Iran congressman Muller RCA John
"doris kearns" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"Basically. But I got interested in in politics because I went away from my hometown, and I could see that place from a different lands. And I saw in the bay area of California, a place that had higher education logistical to Stanford higher income levels. It was more entrepreneurial more ready for the future. And my interest in politics was. That I felt very, very blessed by the opportunity that I had in life, but I wanted to see what could be done so that other folks who had grown up like me could get to the same kind of places. I can't imagine you ever. Being the in your face sky, and I think you rasta version of this question are Dettori board, which is you you. You seem like you're temperament is the Barack Obama temperament. If you were going to compare you to temperament, not the Mike Levin. ATI, temperament, I think was the straight. How do you channel the? How do you channel the rage that's out there. Instill stay. You. Number one, you have to be yourself more than anything else more than people wanting. You know, this sort of democratic warrior or somebody to take the fight to Trump in Trump is a good example of this. People thought that he was being himself. That's number one, no one. You pointed this out in in our editorial board. You know, he is. He does what he says. Now we may not like it, but it's, it's him. So you have to be yourself. But I also think that. That I can that I can point out what's wrong with Donald Trump and his administration in a way that resonates with folks, but not do it in a way that is so divisive. And so such a bad role model for the young people of America and people that are coming up and I, this guy is a unique character in American political history, of course, and I don't think that the answer should be for every single leader that we have to try to emulate that whether they're running against him or not. Unfortunately, we have folks like the guy running down in Florida to Santa's that are trying to be Donald Trump light. That's not an answer for Republicans or Democrats what. You've been speeding presidential biographies. No, you know, over the years I've read a few. We've got one that's your favorite favorite president, but like we know Doris Kearns Goodwin's book about Lyndon Johnson the. Yeah, it was good, Texan. You felt like I have to confess that I have not written. I have not read all of Caros material. Read some of it already fixed. You know, he still hasn't gotten to be. We're still waiting for help from Mr.. Carol Murray. Your point earlier about what Biden said, you know, I think that in that road to Camelot book recently made clear that oftentimes that the action is out there in the country, it's not in Washington DC, and so you who ever becomes the democratic nominee in twenty twenty. It's going to be. It's going to be somebody who gets out into the country and can capture what people are feeling in what they're Spiring to and not get so caught up in the date. A day back and forth with Trump. What do you think is going to be in? We have these with all the small short, the stuff that you're going to be campaigning, moron..

Donald Trump Trump Mike Levin Barack Obama California Doris Kearns Goodwin ATI editorial board Biden Washington Carol Murray America Lyndon Johnson president Florida Santa