18 Burst results for "Doris Kearns Goodwin"

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

07:59 min | Last month

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"You optimism that you can bring the country back at the same time. Humility has been shown besides the resilience and ambition that's bigger than not for self for something for greater good. And Trust in my word that was over and over again, the way people could promise. So that's one thing that maybe these qualities that allowed him to help fix a broken family might fix a broken country but also because he's seventy seven because he's been in power for such a long time, he was there when the congress was able to make compromises to do things and get things done on A. Bipartisan basis that may seem like old nostalgia but if these outside protest groups are going to be able to do what the civil rights movement did in the sixties, you need the outside power pushing always every change comes from the ground up but you need levers of power inside that can translate those desires into policy, and that's what we saw. So brilliantly with the relationship between Martin Luther King, and LBJ that. Pressure especially at Selma which we saw John Lewis in these last months and celebrated. But inside that southerner in the White House who knew the Congress knew how to pressure at knew how to get it done and that's the promise may be that a seventy seven year old who lived in a very different time when congress was a different animal before it became this polarized thing might be used his skills to get that economic recovery. Actor to run that. Recovery. Act And I. think that's what we saw. Last night was the fact that maybe the very thing this has seemed his problem, his age and having been there for a long time at this point in history the experience and the commitment and the ability to get other people to get together that unifying spirit that optimism may be the right thing to connect to all that energy that's on the outside right now. It's really interesting because he talks of himself also as a bridge. Also, the word transition has has been bandied around, but but you're you're talking about bridging these two powers from the street and and in terms of executive and legislative power I think that's really interesting. So I WANNA ask you this a lot of people not just president trump and his party, but Democrats were very concerned about not being able to campaign. As usual you know being being sort of a front porch campaign. Do you think that it's actually weirdly worked for him and put that in context because. You know the previous candidates who did just that, right? Go Oh correct the expectations for what president should do during a campaign have shifted hugely over time I mean in Lincoln's time they were never supposed to be anymore on the campaign trail that's supposed to be at home. He stayed in Springfield and surrogate would be out there campaigning for him. Then finally, Garfield and then most celebratory ways McKinley had a front porch campaign seven, hundred and fifty thousand people came from. All over the country and trains and they would come to his lawn he would come on the front porch. He'd say something, and then they'd go away taking blades of grass and his Portuguese for him but it worked, and then after a while expectations changed again, as I said, FDR comes to his first convention and he begins to campaign more out in the open and then now they're changed again because of covid. The question will be do we expect the president to go into crowds and to potentially endanger the safety of the people or we're going to expect him to find settings where he can talk more like conversationally to people he's GonNa have to talk a lot. He's going to go different places but do there need be crowds that will depend on whether he can persuade people that the safety and whether people feel it of of keeping themselves safe during the virus will have this campaign be more virtual campaign. What made it work at the Convention? Is that it did seem like one long conversation like they were in the living rooms and that's what FDR did people said you felt he was talking to you when you were in your kitchen or your radio and you could hear his voice everywhere and that's what we became accustomed to with the new innovation of Radio. So now we've got this virus, we have to technologically adapt to it and so far it's worked but we'll see what happens in the campaign, but the expectations have already changed so that that's that's a lucky thing for him. I want to ask you in that case about. The historic nature of the technology that creates these changes. So FDR, mastered radio in the way you've described the way now we we know and we remember but so too in very very bad ways did Stalin and Hitler. They. Mastered Rate. Radio, that was their big skill in reaching the Matt the masses. You're saying that a Joe Biden essentially mastered the intimacy of the so-called Zoom? Convention. What about President? Trump. Who Has mastered today's dominant technology, which is well TV. Social. Media. These mediums can work. Every which way. You know you think about it. You're right FDR mastered radio, and then you could argue that JFK and Reagan Master Television and then there was cable television and a polarized media and the social media developed and it is true that President Trump has mastered that the problem with the instantaneous nature of tweets though is that there's not time to think and things can be said that have to be unsaid things that were true or. Not. True have to be changed around. You Know Lincoln was a great extemporaneous speaker. When he was in those debates with Douglas, he could speak right away. He could have done. This is easily could have done the tweets. One point somebody yells at him Lincoln to faced and its immediate response was if I two faces do think I'd be wearing this face but once he became president, he never wanted to speak extemporaneously even when the. Unions would win battle and they come to serenade him at the white. House he would just thank the soldiers and he would sing songs and say he would speak when he was prepared. He said the words of president matter they have to be prepared and FDR, would spend three or four days preparing those fireside chats go over ten or twelve drafts because the words matter words last, you have to trust the bond in your. Word and the whole world of instant talking today and tweeting is completely the opposite of that and it makes it much harder to get a national message to get your bond on your trust in your word and so it's it's it is the modern media but I, think it's gotten a lot of people in difficulty and it makes it much harder to be a presidential leadership with a fixed plan and a trust in his word. Much harder to get the public square, which is necessary. To Save God Democracy I. Guess. Can I ask you a question about you've talked about presidents what about? First Ladies. Michelle Obama by all accounts and all the reviews essentially. Most the metaphor kicked it out of the park. Out of the park. She didn't credit. But but quite. But It's unusual isn't it for first ladies to be that? Direct. and. Consequential politically culturally socially in this speech is. Well, it certainly is in recent modern times but think about Eleanor Roosevelt in nineteen forty. She becomes the first first lady to ever go before a convention in a very consequential time. What happened is Hitler had already conquered most of Europe and England. is standing alone an FDR is facing the decision of whether I with third terminate an unprecedented thing to have a third term and he was gonNA stand. For third term, but he didn't really want to be there at the convention because he wanted it to seem like he was being drafted so that the third term would not seem as if he was seeking it. So he didn't go to the convention and then he had vice presidential choice and Henry Wallace at the convention didn't like and so people are booing and the things got out of control. He.

president FDR President Trump Lincoln front porch congress Martin Luther King Selma Hitler White House John Lewis Eleanor Roosevelt Joe Biden LBJ Michelle Obama executive Springfield Europe Henry Wallace
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:30 min | 4 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"Oh I am often been very disappointed when I see voter turnout. Mock elections primaries twenty percent thirty percent. I I happen to think that voting is a privilege. I think it's your responsibility and citizenship. Now they're not to postpone the elections and I'd like to think that now is the time for people to understand if he can't get to the polls it's very easy to select among leadership choices by simply requesting an absentee ballot. And if nothing else. I'd like to think to November election primarily that people were still reluctant to go to the polls all fifty governors in all these states in local local much rose encouraged people register register and vote absentee so while overdue love to see eighty or ninety percent participation and winning I what an irony it would be because Kobina and damage. The people finally understood. I can vote absentee and I need to G. L. happens before we let you go. I'M GONNA ask you to quit. Your Department of Homeland Security had Back on its never taken off What should be happening now? What are some things that you think should be taking place now to try to address this ongoing pandemic and frankly prepare for the next one because all of our intelligence experts are saying? This is not the last. I figured to wonderful question because well. We've always focused for the past decade or two on the goal of transportation possession of Finance. And what was the communication? This tragically becomes executives with the globalization of disease. And what we need to understand. How is it? This certainly won't be the first time in. This may not be the worst epidemic confronted with. So you know about six years ago. I started working with my good friend. Senator Joe Lieberman panel unbowed percents and we saw back there. Gaps in vulnerabilities. Just in the way. The federal government is structured. We could anticipate it would not be able to confront this. We made a series of recommendations. Now What we said then as we work our way through this. You're going to go back to that and say okay. What do we need new together? Republicans and Democrats in a way to make sure that we reduce the risk. Is You never get along in verse? And you're never going to eliminate these but how do we reduce the risk of the impact? The social economic and were tragically the personal impact substantially reduced. Now we know that disease is what will like everything else. There's a way ahead once we do this but for the time being it's self sacrifice with men and women in uniform this country than doing for a long long time looking out for each and we look at American history. When we're together or resigned in resilient we succeed normally once gone to crisis become a better astronomer country. That's what we do here. But it's about so secretaries. Governor Ranch The former governor missile being that First Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Governor Mister Secretary. Thank you so much for speaking with the Jewish sites with you so interesting better stronger and hopefully more human when we all emerge from this crisis and finally we wanted to talk about this effect of this krona virus on children so many of them are out of school feeling lonely and feeling anxious scared so elmo cookie monster and other muppets have come to help their teaming up in a new family special called friends time on sesame street Arabic show Alan Simpson. It means. Welcome sesame it's filmed remotely from the puppeteers homes and premieres this weekend on M. B. C. Three and other local TV channels in the Middle East. The muppets are trying to guide. Families were stuck at home through activities designed to help children make sense of what's happening all around them including managing stress and how to cope with big feelings. Take a listen.

Democrats Department of Homeland Securit Senator Joe Lieberman Alan Simpson Kobina Secretary federal government Middle East G. L. M. B.
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"And I'm going to treat this as if it were a war. And he couldn't wait. He said in February to become president in March so he could have that really easy and I remember hearing the Churchill felt the same way when he finally became prime minister. That means that you're able to know that you're GonNa make mistakes and you're going to be judged and you have to take that responsibility and you'll acknowledge them and you'll learn from your mistakes show growth who it all he said. I know I won't battle thousands but I'm GONNA try and bat three hundred for the team and then if I see what I've done wrong hopefully I can change it but right now that's the responsibility. You want our president here. In America to take for testing you want the responsibility for him to give guidance to the states about when they should reopen and not the CDC guidelines are no longer there anymore because they're almost seems like a desire to move that responsibility onto the states. And then you have a lack of coordinated response so I think that is empathy and the responsibility and the willingness to take that humility and acknowledging eras and being able to communicate through trust. These are the qualities we have to look for in our leaders in both countries now and in the future. Just look back on either get examples. Yes yes you do and actually I think well anyway. I'm not going to go back but I want to ask you about Lincoln because you've talk also about the gift of language and and basically giving the facts and Lincoln's famous quote attributed to Him Anyway. Let the people know the facts and the country will be safe. I mean I want both of you should give me quick answers on that because there's so much misinformation and confusing information not just on social media but from the from the from the mouths of the elected leaders presidents and prime ministers so Doris. It's a fine line between giving people the brutal facts of what's happening and absolutely giving them the facts and then being able to give them a vision of what's possible if they come together and they work under a coordinated strategy that's the challenge of leadership and we're not having that met right now neither the facts nor the Vision Max. Very very briefly. There was facts. There was vision back in World War. Two it just doesn't seem to be the case right now. The duty of a leader is to provide hope. Andrew unto generate trust and. It's the loss of trust the fact of the confidence in our leaders and our institutions. We have to restore respect on faith and we have a huge problem but we can do it then. They're wonderful opportunities to come out of this crisis but at the moment it's depressing to see so divided around the oil might hastings thank you so much. Doris Kearns Goodwin. Thank you very much indeed for your wonderful perspective. Us Bank you for going to work and for staying home for treating patients and having patience for being on the front lines while having our backs thanks for working together and playing podcasts. You love us. Bank can't thank you enough but we can do our part. That's why we have donated millions to help our customers employees and communities in need equal housing lender member. Fdic in two thousand nineteen venture. Capitalists had another blockbuster year they invested more than one hundred thirty six billion dollars in US based companies but now there's a corona virus pandemic and it has brought on economic calamity. So what's GonNa Happen to all of that money? Invest it and all of those businesses. I'm poppy harlow and this week on boss fouls I talked. Venture Capitalist Arlan. Hamilton and backstage capital. Arlen has had a remarkable journey from being homeless at times sleeping on the floor of the San Francisco airport to running a multi-million dollar venture fund clearly. She knows a thing or two about resilience her story and the latest episode of boss files. Wherever you get your podcasts work as we know it has changed and as you've probably figured out when your home is also your office. All sorts of lines become blurred. The you ask your boss for more flexibility. You can look after your kids. How long should you let that slack? Message go on answer before following up. And how do we even begin to talk about work life balance? We're here for you. We've created a newsletter called work transformed. Tell US figure this all out together. Sign up to get work transformed into your inbox twice a week at CNN dot com slash work transformed that CNN dot com slash work transformed to mark momentous day the British Opera Star and Soprano Katherine Jenkins is taking the stage at the Royal Albert. Here in London. It's her forty six appearance there that I conduct venue but she singing to a completely empty auditorium as the concert hall is closed Jacobean. It's goes for the first time in. It's one hundred fifty year history but people around the world can stream the full half hour performance of wartime favorites and here is a snippet.

US prime minister Doris Kearns Goodwin Lincoln president Katherine Jenkins CNN poppy harlow Fdic Royal Albert America Andrew CDC London San Francisco Arlen Hamilton
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:11 min | 4 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"And that was the beginning stage of the Civil Rights Revolution. So my hope now and this is just always wanted to be optimistic. The disproportionate number of African Americans Latinos. Being will make us know that are conditions that are unfair that equal access to healthcare is not there that will see the fact that that lots of people have been living paycheck to paycheck before the corona virus. Now many more in the same situation and maybe that will produce empathy and social re representatives and the desire to understand what we talked about abstractly during the election that election campaign. That seems so long ago. That's now become visceral for a lot of people so you got to have a vision of the future and I'm just hoping that if something comes out of that that will be this before I turned to a match holders one second because I'm doors African Americans. I didn't think got to participate in the in the GI bill. No that's true. I've just mean that they had greater opportunities in the military and then that became the desire to continue even the unfinished revolution that had begun during the war. And then you have Truman undoing discrimination in the military and then you have the civil rights movement. These things are in steps. I think and I think that was one of the steps. Not Enough of a step but it was there to really put maximum. Ask You because you also talk about how it affected not just culture but the youth and you. Everybody is very concerned about what this does to the young people and their hope. This corona virus down the road which a massive fourteen point seven percent unemployment rate in the United States. Right now and it's very similar in many other parts of the country and inferno you you you talked about One of the one of the letters that you read comes from George biddle. He's an American combat artist. And he wrote. I wish the people at home instead of thinking of their boys in terms of football stars with think of them in terms of miners trapped underground or suffocating to death in a tent story fire. Cold Wet hungry homesick and frightened. These were the young boys at that time because it was boys who went off to war what did they come back to the United States and the British experience. We're very different. Because United States came out and said we're welding the dominant and the well with Hof wells total GDP Whereas brickman came out completely bankrupts while thing in all the celebrations today and all the pictures we see if everybody cheering and dancing getting in the streets in ninety five that I've read so many dollars in unless is from People of all souls who actually wanted doing that they were fearful for the future because the young man who had fought they'd spent most of their adult lives simply learning how to kill each other. They have no skills lived always under orders on the discipline. They've been denied personal choice. That did with rationing the blackout restaurant. Suddenly likes what you're used to and suddenly they were told that we're going to have a completely different life. And they were pretty apprehensive about what sort of life it was going to be now in the United States palm or opportunities where opened up because of America came out to the wall so politically dominant so economic too dominant. Breslin resume a frightening place in nine hundred forty five but was also absolute determination to do things different. They abouts an awful lot of people have been very unhappy with Britain classroom Society which to be PA Was a pretty terrible experience on the British people were determined to do things differently and I do think it. It's very early to say about this crisis but I think this crisis is going to be so severe economically it's GonNa have social and political and economic impact for yes. I do think that an awful lot of people are going to say we've got to find better ways of doing things so although we're going to have a very very tough time in the head I do think as Dr said. I totally agree with us that this may be an engine for change. We brought to try and make sure positive change. I want to ask you because one of the great things that did come out of world. War Two was these all the mechanisms of alliances and multilateral organizations that the United States helped lead what they call the liberal world order which liberal-leaning free for heaven's sake and that seems to have been systematically denigrated surf knee under president trump and also off the brexit and all the rise of nationalism always seeing corona virus and the strains it's putting and the lack of global leadership. We're we're seeing kind of what this denigration of multilateral organizations is meaning right now right well maybe seeing again the disaster that the lack of alliances has brought will create. Create that same engine for change that Max was talking about to realize how important it is to reestablish them it was really interesting I moderated a conversation between presidents Clinton and Bush like the last day in February. Shortly before you know this whole thing broke out and we were shut down and both of them talked about the worry that alliances had been undone. The audience cheered every time they said something about it which was an echo of what was happening under president trump and brexit. Even though they didn't mention the names there's an urgent desire to restore that sense of connection to the world so that we can work together and maybe again I mean maybe just have to be optimistic because the story in because you look back and you see World War. Two ended the right way we were able to defeat. Hitler and Fascism. The Great Depression finally came to an end. That we've gotta feel that something's GonNa come out of this and maybe that's yet another that will come out in a require different leaders but if those leaders reestablish those relationships those alliances the people want them so it's not like we have to change a whole peoples. Except for the nationalist experience that they are but you can inspire a change in that as well I hope. So that's really interesting and Max I mean look the facts that Churchill was able to bring FDR into the into the war. I mean it was a whole complicated dance to try to get the United States to join and help out. You know what it did what it did to rescue the situation for the free world now. We're seeing that the trump administration. I mean it's a self-declared thing this is this is what they don't want to do global leadership they've shirked that responsibility. I think you know Doris calls it enthusiastic leadership. This is the opposite of enthusiastic leadership. How much weaker is these? The free world without strong American leadership shockingly weaker. It's my hero among historians professors. Michael Hart died. Lost Ninety six close friend of mine. A Michael often used to say to me and he's lazy as you said the great lesson in my lifetime is old difficult. Problems must be addressed partners with allies on Churchill wanting of drives me mad about Johnson he bangs on about trying to Churchill but he seems to think the something glorious about isolation but Churchill never thought was anything on the stood churchill was willing to embrace the Russians who most of the of the leading British people didn't have anything to do with the Russians the Bolsheviks the the the revolutionist but Churchill knew that we have to work with these people and goodness knows we to work with the United States and sometimes it was driven mad by the humiliations that the United States so that started to flex its power in nine hundred forty four forty And Churchill at times go pretty fed up with FDR because if the pain the United States was going to the but my gosh we all had so much to be grateful in the way that the United States has led through our lifetimes. We're all solving quite frankly today. The fact the United States the longest on and Doris to that point as I said you speak about enthusiastic leadership that FDR embrace this really difficult role whether it was you know what happened to him during the depression all the way through to World War to talk about that kind of characteristic where the buck really does stop on the desk of the leader and they wanted. They're not trying to shirk the responsibility. No it's really interesting. I think that willingness to assume responsibility is one of the most important characteristics of a true leader even during the early days of his inauguration. Right after the presidency in nineteen thirty three. He said in his inauguration that I've been given the gift of leadership and I'm going to exercise it. I'm going to take action.

United States Churchill FDR Doris George biddle football trump president Truman Breslin Michael Hart Britain classroom Society brickman
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:12 min | 4 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour working from home in London. Today we celebrate the seventy fifth anniversary of the end of World War Two in Europe a flypast over London by the Royal Airforce Mark the occasion as the French President Emmanuel macron lit the flame at the two of the unknown soldier on an Empty Sean Cillizza in Paris. Indeed there were no crowds in the streets. No Big Parades. No pomp pageantry as the whole world fights a new enemy this time invisible and this battle is taking its toll in dramatic ways. The virus keeps claiming lives and inflicting deep economic pain and hardship. The unemployment rate rose to fourteen point seven percent in April in the United States is the highest since records began in nineteen forty eight as people self isolate and the economy comes to a halt and it's the same in so other countries presidents and prime ministers have been quick to call themselves wartime leaders. So how are they measuring up to this challenge to discuss the importance of the day? And the lessons for today. War Historian and Sunday Times columnist. Max Hastings. He joins us from the village of Hungerford in sub south limp and he is the author of inferno and intimate look the Second World War from the perspective of those who experienced it and from Boston on the east coast of the United States presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize. Winning author. Doris Kerns Goodwin. Welcome both of you and your last book of course leadership. In turbulent times exploring what does it mean to be a great leader? So let me just ask you both. I just quickly to to reflect on where we are today on this anniversary and the fact that it cannot be marked perhaps as it was intended doors all the way over there from the United States. I know it wasn't the end of the war for the US. But what does it mean for the US? I think what it still means is the remembrance of a time when we had two leaders FDR and Churchill together who were able to end that war on this day at that time seventy five years ago at least in Europe. What makes me sad about as thinking that FDR and Churchill had planned to be together for this moment and of course FDR die just weeks before there was going to be a huge celebration and parade? He was going to the king and queen made it seem like FDR was happier than he'd been in Mons because his health was already undone. So I keep thinking about the two of them on this day. What remarkable leaders they were and the countries in both Britain and the United States who responded magnificently into the challenge. It makes you sad because she wish we had that today. Well at least meet you Max. Of course the country's did respond so amazingly well and rose to this challenge and even though the whole war wouldn't end until the victory over Japan much later. This was a big big deal. What do you make of the muted celebrations? The Queen speaks and virtual sort of joining in various celebrations. But is it doesn't matter that that the World Europe has not been able to mark this on a big big scale. Of course it matters because we all facing what. He's probably the most serious crisis. A strike societies is since nineteen forty five. We must keep a sense of proportion but this is not the Second World War. If you look at the numbers of people who've died on thank goodness still voss smaller than they were saying. Well we'll do remember rush of twenty seven million people in the second well. The war went on for six years but Millions of young men and women were conscripted into the obvious. Is that people's lives wrenched out of kilter now. Whatever happens with this current crisis. I don't think thank goodness. We're headed for a terrible economic ordeal more serious than anything we've seen but this is not still a well wall judge will churchill by nineteen forty five He was in many ways. A very unhappy mound that He was very acutely awhile that the Russians were taking over eastern Europe. When often fighting wall to liberate Eastern Europe from Nazi subjection? That suddenly you find that stalled in his taking over this empire and it's a very little known fact That in May nineteen forty five. Churchill instructed the British chiefs of staff the repair plan which they code named operation unthinkable for forty seven British and American divisions. Aided if you please by up the remains of Hitler's Valmont to drive the Russians out in Poland. But of course neither say the United States I wouldn't have entities. Do this crazy idea. An reflected judge really having slightly lost the plot in these rage. Russian behavior but He wasn't a child in nineteen. Forty five you did have a sense that the election might not be going to be awarded walkover the election in which he he indeed lost the premiership's so yes there was terrific celebration in nineteen forty five but judge or was in some ways on the unhappiest men in the course of that celebration. That is really interesting and doors. You said you said that reminds everybody of the phenomenal leadership that rose to the occasion from both sides of the Atlantic at that time. And I mean I guess comparing it to what's happening now I mean there were. There was a real alliance to tell me because everybody wants to know you know these leaders who we have today with rich president trump prime minister Johnson they portray themselves as wartime leaders. Just put that into perspective. Well it seems to me that the definition of a wartime leader is a leader. Who can coordinate? A national strategy can inspire the people to discipline and sacrifice that are needed to follow that can develop trust in their words that that rhetoric of a wartime leader certainly doesn't fit president trump. I mean think about the trust that people felt and Churchill and Roosevelt style of speaking even though they were very different. Churchill's believed so much in the British past and the British tradition. It's almost like he projected his courage onto the British people and Roosevelt. Had this conversational style. Speaking in his fireside chats but people believed he was talking to them individually. There's a great story of a construction worker running home one night and this part where you going. He said WELL IT president's coming to speak to me in my living room it's only right. I be there to greet to him when he comes. So the fact that they were both able to speak to the people in a national way with the National Strategy and we feel here at least in the United States that every state is now left on its own to make these hugely emotionally difficult decisions of how to balance opening up the economy and keeping the public health's of course show important from both. Go ahead Max. I agree entirely with Dr to me. One absolutely critical measure of elite is a willingness to tell people things they don't want to hear and at this stage nobody is in a position to produce solutions. Either about the disease. The Corona virus or about the terrible economic tomorrow lies ahead of us but if our leaders were leading they will be starting to try to educate people to some of the difficulties and challenges that lie ahead unto explain some of the dilemmas. And I don't see on either side of the Atlantic that anybody's really doing this with the possible exception of Chancellor Merkel in Germany. Can I ask because I think what's another thing? That's so important about World War. Two and what happened afterwards was that it did lead to massive social political economic change both on both sides of the Atlantic Doris spoken a lot about the GI bill. Here in Britain it was the welfare state. Can I just ask you about the opportunities that came out of this crisis if you could just sort of tell us about that and whether you think the same might be true after Corona virus doors? Well my great hope is that when a country has been through something so damaging so destructive so changing everyday habits together that they're willing to think about the changes that should have been made even before this I mean what the Gi Bill of rights as you suggested brought an entire generation of American particularly working class people who would not have had the chance of a privilege of college. It gave I home loans for these people so that they became middle class. We had a progressive tax structure. Tax cuts tax tax increases on the wealthy. So that the change of the country's middle-class was able to not be a pyramidal structure. Women came to work in the factories and after that women's lives were never the same and it was a sense of civil rights during during World War Two. We saw the importance of blacks in the military..

United States Churchill Europe FDR Atlantic president Max Christiane Amanpour Britain Max Hastings Sunday Times Roosevelt London Doris Kerns Goodwin Atlantic Doris World Europe Eastern Europe
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

10:47 min | 6 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"I don't know whether we had this a decade ago but somehow the awareness of the difference in the way people feel about the other in this society has been brought out more in these last years that people in the cities don't understand the people in the rural areas that people in the rural areas. Look with you know some sort of trepidation about the people in the cities and when you read Sociological Studies that more and more people are living with like minded people around the shopping and the same store. This is why so many people were stunned when Donald Trump one accident. I suspect that they'll be there. Were you know I I? I read twitter traffic and so on. I confess that I do from time to time and I think there were a lot of people who would have been Shocked who are supporting trump if he hadn't of won because they weren't talking to each right right and I think you know Teddy. Roosevelt said that the most important Aspect of democracy is for people to have an especially leaders fellow feeling for the other and by that he meant empathy essentially and he said that when he was young having come from a privileged background at the first time he went into the tenements. We went into these cigar making plants that were houses that it was somewhat conscious that he was going into a place that he'd never been to before but he said as a leader you have to go there and then after a while. It's not going to become conscious if you start as a police commissioner. He saw tenements at the night that he never would have seen. Before as a cowboy out in the badlands. He sought ranch trying to make a living. He had a wonderful set of meandering experiences that brought him to the presidency that allowed him to see people as they lived trekking around with people in Maine woodsmen. And that's what's missing today. Is that an I keep wondering would national service make a difference? Would more people having had a military background helped US perhaps after World War Two period questionably? That was because there you have a common mission and you have people working together over class lines over religious lines over racial lines and they're just working to do something to accomplish something and once that's in your spirit. Then you know that the other is not the other and somehow because of the media world today because of where people are living because of the absence of a lot of people being in the military because of some nothing like a national service program that that people don't have that experience of knowing other people and then they become alien and that is the hardest thing in a nation like ours which is a nation of other nations in the nation of all manner of people and the need to somehow reach out and understand their lives. I I was. That's why I was so optimistic. When gay marriage happened because it seemed to me that that was a symbol of the opposite situation that because and maybe media had helped because people had known people in their own lives who who were gay or had children were gay with their friends but also seen programs on television that made it all seem Something familiar to them that they were able to seemingly overcome some of those prejudices and not everybody exactly. But you know I I I. I'm haunted by the fact that I was looking at erroneous polling data and yet I would drive out to a place. I have in rural Michigan and everyone at trump signs on their lawns. Not their yards actually not lawns and it they would And and I And these are good people. You know hardworking. People decent people great neighbors but they feel like they've been displaced in this economy And and they've been kind of screwed and Trump spoke to that it makes me think about your book bully. Pulpit which really is centered during the gilded age and the Industrial Revolution And we're all searching for historical kind of lessons to help explain the early. We're in. How similar are these eras the industrial revolution which completely changed the nature of the economy created great wealth at the top and lots of consternation and and alienated among workers? Who Felt exploited And dislocations in our politics I think they're very similar I think if you have to look at another period that is an echo for what people were feeling. Today it would be a lot of Americans during the eighteen nineties because what they felt was not just that people are moving from farms to cities that there was a huge gap between the rich and the poor before that the richest person in the farmland might have been a doctor living at the top of a hill but now suddenly you have people living in tenements side by side with these vast millionaire palaces and the pace of life was being sped up at that time in a way that worried people the Telegraph. The telephone you know all these new inventions were coming in today. Technology has brought so much of a speeding up of life. There was lots of immigration coming in from abroad. I just read. I haven't read it in a long time a speech by Henry Cabot Lodge in eighteen ninety six on the Senate floor where he talked about the new kind of immigrants that were coming in. Were no longer the western Europeans. They had dignity. They were hard workers. They were classy. These new immigrants coming in from Italy and Germany and all these other places now And and Poland. They were people who were low-life they were. Swindlers they were thieves. I thought Oh my God. This kind of a speech was given but all of that meant that people felt anxiety. In fact there was a A study done at the turn of the twentieth century. That people were more anxious and depressed than they've been in a long time because they were nervous about an America. That was changing. And that's what's happening now that you see Uc high rates of suicide among men in their fifties who you know a lot of whom have been displaced and Now I see the more they feel the moorings of what was a traditional life have been taken away and America. Great again right exactly but when you think about it. What are people feeling anxious about to some extent? It's jobs that technology has taken away. And hopefully somebody can do something about that. But it's hard to know what can be done about that. Especially as technology turns faster and faster the more you can automate work. The the higher the Prophet so this is a fundamental challenge to capitalist fundamental challenge that goes beyond the globalization argument on America. You see all the advanced economies Europe is facing these same right wing populist movements and the other thing is that changed obviously as the parents of the generation. That's now out there. Probably were not divorced so whether or not happy. In their marriage there was a stability to those families and now with the large numbers of people that get divorced and kids that are trumpeted from one place to another that creates instability and and sensory overload from all of this media. And that's what happened in the eighteen. Ninety two they were writing about the fact that suddenly you had newspapers that are telling you horrible things that are happening all over the world these mass market you know tabloid newspapers. So you're worrying about things that are happening that you never even thought about now. That's the same thing too so I think what happened in the eighteen ninety S. Is it's instructive for us today. At the beginning there were demagogues. I mean there were people running around talking about wall. Street is the enemy we have to do something about Wall Street There were people who were talking about immigration. As Senator Senator Henry Cabot Lodge was and you had William Jennings Bryan who ran for president in eighteen ninety six as a protest somewhat candidate who then became the Democratic Major League candidate in some ways. Trump was a protest candidate within the Husk of the Republican Party. And in those times of anxiety. Protest candidates have a lot of sway? But then luckily I think for the Republican Party and for the country Teddy Roosevelt when he came in was able to channel that anxiety toward positive accomplishments so that the people felt that things were being done for them. Factory exploitation was lessened women and children were given certain rights He did something about railroad copies antitrust conservation so that people felt that government was handling some of their problems and then the anxiety got translated into legislation. And that's what you need from a leader at this time of anxiety. Your magnificent book bully pulpit also focuses on the role. The muckrakers played journalist who exposed Some of the The darkest recesses of of American life and the inequities in the economy Can you imagine a platform like that today? In this media environment you know and this really goes back to what we were talking about at the beginning. What the muckrakers did were to tell stories. It's not like they put out a bunch of facts about how bad things were in the oil industry with J. D. Rockefeller or what was going on in the coal mining industries. They were given the the wherewithal by the magazines particularly McClure's magazine to study subject for two years on salary before they had to write a single word and that meant that when they put out these pieces. Teddy Roosevelt could not have mobilized people. He didn't think on antitrust. Without some of these stories having really let people know what it meant when a monopoly occurs you know that not only. Is it swallowing up these small businesses and he would make those businesses? Come alive. The muckrakers would so you care about these people but it also meant that prices were not lowered in fact in many times they were hired so that you understood to the story what the economy was doing and what needed to be done to preserve it and that's what we still need. That's that's the role of journalism. Then and we. We've got to figure out after this election I'm sure journalists and you and you yourself are having thoughts about how. How could it have been done differently and one has to be done now? I mean I think there's an even larger question which is what about technology because the technological revolution that we're experiencing isn't just about the economy it is about communications in every aspect of our life. And it's churning so quickly that we don't have the capacity it seems to get our arms around all the implications of it I've said this many times here And it's not original Farid. Zakaria was the one who surfaced it in one of our conversations But we've got driverless cars coming online and by the end of this decade They'll be well in circulation and we have three million people who make a living driving trucks buses cabs And and what happens to these folks in the economy and I think that what's desperately needed is a strategy to to make sure that there's a meaningful work available for people because that's how we define ourselves right. I mean work. You know. That's the problem when people say the economy stupid it's economy means whether you have a job that you'll fulfilled in whether you go to work during the day and you feel like you're making enough money for your.

Donald Trump Teddy Roosevelt America Republican Party Sociological Studies Henry Cabot Lodge US Senator Senator Henry Cabot Lo Europe Maine Michigan Zakaria Poland William Jennings Bryan J. D. Rockefeller
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

13:20 min | 6 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"The dance the article came out and the title was how to remove Lyndon Johnson from power. So I was certain I'd be kicked out of the program and instead since that time I've talked to Tom Johnson and people who are in the White House and there was real discussion what to do about her and I think the people around Johnson would have not had me come absolutely because he they'd be scared of his reaction but he's the one who said to them. Oh let her come down here for a year. And if I can't win her over no one can which says something about him because he he believed that there was no one he couldn't win overs. Isn't that true? I think that's absolutely right. And in a Lotta ways. He did win me over. He never changed my mind the war in Vietnam but that's not really only what he was after he just made me feel such empathy and affection and respect for him that I think it made me become an historian at presidential historian I'd written my PhD thesis at Harvard on the Supreme Court. So I would have been studying those guys in women in their robes and. I'm so glad that it happened this way. So that first book on Him I think it taught me to look at a president from the inside out rather than judging them from the outside in and I feel so privileged from having had those hours and hours with Lyndon Johnson. I think he was lonely when he talked to me. If I had known you were with him after he left the way correct. I mean while it was in the White House in he would often call me into his office late at night just to talk and sometimes when I've gone back to the White House and seeing that little room where we sat it's just brings back such a flood of memories off of the Oval Office. Yes yes and then then I went down to his ranch to help him on his memoirs the last year of his life and I just went back to the ranch for the first time in thirty five years when I was involved as a consultant to all the way the HBO movie that Bryan Cranston is brilliant. He was great and so they had their premiere in Austin and I went to the ranch the next day and again it was just overwhelming to see the bedroom where I used to stay and where his bedroom was. And where Lady Bird was in the closets where his clothes were and this chair that. I used to sit in whenever he took a nap. He wanted me to be right outside the room just in case he needed something the kitchen where we ate it was an extraordinary experience that I value even more now at my age than I did then. I probably took it for granted so here I am with the President Day by day and it was great. You said You'd never changed your view of the Vietnam War. Did he change his? I don't think so I mean I think the saddest thing for him was that at the beginning when you hear the tapes particularly. It's clear that he has no desire and willingness even to get into the war. So what are we doing over there? But then I think once he got in and the deeper he got in and the more he lost and the more lives that were lost. There was no way he could easily say he'd made a mistake. How can you acknowledge that fully when fifty thousand lives have been lost so I mean he would argue with me about you think it was just a war of Mama and Papa? I know that it was more complicated than that. And I know about the domino's and things that you didn't know and so it wasn't angry argument at the time it was sadder argument but I'm so happy that at least now fifty years later he's getting his righteous do for civil rights for Medicare and for aid education. Nobody dealt with Congress as Lyndon Johnson did and it's because of what you said earlier. He could charm anybody when he's in their presence. Not Just charm them but motivate them to do something you know. He could call up those congressman at six. In the morning he'd call them at two. Am in the afternoon. Call them at two PM and just never let go and they couldn't give up on him because he wanted this so much. I think the domestic stuff was in his his his lexicon more than almost anything else that he wanted to do. That's what made it so sad. There hadn't been the war and this is the big historic question. He would have been one of the great presidents and even now he's one of the really good precedents you know David Maraniss A great storyteller and historian in his own right Was here some time ago. After we published this wonderful book he just wrote about Detroit during the sixties and he talked about the war on poverty speech that President Johnson made the University of Michigan And the sense of that speech was that there was no problem that couldn't yield to The efforts and the attention of particularly American people acting with through their government And it me in reading that. That this generation come through a depression a world war and there was this sense that Any problem could be overcome with enough effort and commitment. You know John. F. Kennedy we're GonNa land on the Moon Lyndon Johnson saying That we're going to radically poverty There was a confidence that we don't feel today. and Was that misplaced Where we were we the victims of our own ambitions. I don't think so. I mean I think that mood of the sixties which really did characterize the sixties until the war deepened until Martin. Luther King was killed until Bobby Kennedy was killed and turn dark and shadowed. But before that you have to believe in America that men create problems or man creates problems and men can overcome them not necessarily male female but just human and that speech at the Great Society speech at the University of Michigan which my husband worked on. Actually my husband Richard Goodwin Young speech writer for JFK restorick figure in his own without question and he worked for L. FOR LBJ and that speech meant a lot because it was it was outlining not simply Poverty. It was outlining what to do about. Education was outlining what to do about the countryside and the environment what to do about this cities and civil rights and so everything that eventually happened. In the Great Society Medicare aid education student loans. Three civil rights bills even public broadcasting immigration reform. All of that was part of that idea that he had that. I've got power and I want to use it. I never thought I'd have it and here I am and from that moment. On from that speech on he set up a whole bunch of task forces and the legislation that came out in the next eighteen months has never been equalled one hundred days and FDR OBVIOUSLY. The problems of today are different. And we've we've got fifty years of history including a determined effort to undermine a lot of government gut the image of government and the functions of government but It seems to me now more than ever given the complexity of the problems. We have that. It's going to take a determine organized effort with government at least as a catalyst To deal with some of these I mean without question. I mean when you think about government. We've made it seem like a foreign entity when government is the collective action of the people to deal with problems that people face. And that's what we've lost our faith in. I think you said that early on that. That loss of faith in institutions in the nineteen sixties. People believe government would do right most of the time and now that figure is so low and it's to the detriment of us all because if it means we can't work together to solve the things that are are ailing us than this very little chance that it's going to get done so until some leader or until some movement is able to restore that faith in collective action. That's what was so exciting about being young in the sixties in our private lives were cut across public lives. People were part of the civil rights movement. The women's movement the environmental moment. You really felt that what you were doing would make a difference in other people's lives and you felt larger as a result you weren't leading only your own life you'll leading this larger life and that's why people go into and if we don't get that group of people continuing to feel that going into public life if we denigrate our politicians and put them at the bottom of the ladder of political careers In a democracy I don't know what that's GonNa mean but it's a troubling thing well and it's not just politicians but all our institutions are under assault now. There are lots of reasons. We'll get into that a little bit later. I got to take a short break here. And we'll be back with doors Kerns Goodwin. You also wrote a book about The Kennedy family. But you've obviously you're obviously a student of John F. Kennedy as well I just talking about the family for a second and the relationship between fathers and sons in politics which is a a kind of fascination of mine Top about the dynamic in the Kennedy family and how that helped formulate who he was and who he was as a president. What interested me in the years that I spent studying the Kennedy family was how much all the living members of the family cared about their father. Joe Kennedy. I mean he's the one that when you look at him as a public figure has a much more complicated reputation. Obviously than Rose Kennedy. You think of what he did. As an ambassador to the Court of Saint James you think of some anti Semitism seemingly surrounding him but as a father this man according to his children over and over again all they asked me. When I was writing the book was what do you think about Daddy? Interestingly not what do you think about our mother? 'cause she'd been lionised sanctified But somehow he gave them confidence. He gave them especially after his public. Life was over during World War. Two he gave them all the energy the vitality and the money they needed to go forward as we all know. Joe Junior was the one that everybody thought including the oldest son would be carrying the banner of being the first Irish politician to possibly reach the presidency but he was killed in World War Two and then John Kennedy took up that mantle somewhat awkwardly at first but then obviously grew into it but even so the family remained a huge part of the image of Kennedy. So it wasn't just this man running. He was running with his whole family around him. And I think that was part of our interest in him and continuing interest in the family. When you think about Bobby Kennedy and then Teddy Kennedy and then the next generation I think was Lord beaverbrook in nineteen forty six when John Kennedy one said something to the father about your family may go down in history like the addams family. There was so little he could have known then. Because here's this one kid doing this and yet it turns out that they will have been one of the more important families in our history. You point out that Jackson. It started off awkwardly. What was there? Do you think ambivalence about the role. He was an interesting guy because he was Incredibly charming and inspiring. Especially as as you say as he matured as a politician but also He was a little removed. A little loof And you get the sense. Of maybe just a touch of ambivalence that he was carrying out his birthright or his responsibility but that he had other other things other interests that perhaps he might have pursued. I think that's right. I think he had a writer sensibility. He could look at himself from the outside in and probably might have become a journalist or a rider. Had He not gone into politics? I remember just given the Fathers Influence one of the times when he made a bad speech and he thought it was not so great and the father told him it was good and so he said you know if I went up on the stage and I fell before I gave my speech. My father would say you fell more extraordinarily than anybody. I've ever known so I think the father's desire and the and just sort of the family hope for the future rested him but then obviously once he got out on the campaign trail once he became a congressman and a senator. William James says there's always a certain point when that voice inside speaks to you and says this is what I was meant to do and I think after a while. He certainly felt comfortable. And they're all you know your point about the Ryder. Sensibility reminds me of my friend. The president absolutely President Obama who I think people ask me. What president do you think he most reminds you of and I I always say JFK because he he brought that same sense of inspiration impossibility The same sort of elegance to the to the role of president but he also has that sense of irony sense of humor about about it. He has the ability to step back and act and witnessed the scenes in which he's actually he's also participating and the characters involved because he has a storytellers Instinct as well and I think neither JFK nor President Obama had that intense need to be loved by the public. I mean that's the that's what the writer sensibility means. Very glad to win these elections. They're incredibly charming when you meet with them and they WanNa win you over as a person but it's not like a Clinton or even an FDR who for some reason. Especially I think Bill Clinton you could feel almost that that H- his LBJ. Johnson was a hole in them that had to be filled by the People's approbation. And I don't think either. Jfk or president. Obama had that whole you know in your wonderful interview with him in Vanity Fair. You guys talked about that..

president President Johnson Bobby Kennedy John F. Kennedy Lyndon Johnson writer White House President Obama FDR Tom Johnson Rose Kennedy Kennedy University of Michigan congressman Joe Kennedy William James Vietnam
California monitoring 8,400 people for possible coronavirus and actively testing 33 people

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

02:48 min | 7 months ago

California monitoring 8,400 people for possible coronavirus and actively testing 33 people

"United States none of not doing so bad not doing so badly the United States has a we have about fifty cases and the fifteen of them are just an inexplicable but about about thirty five of those cases are people coming back from the Yokohama cruise and one of one in California they don't even know how they got that one person you don't know who I just I just saw on television the one L. thirty three cases in California no one will know thirty three people being quarantined and tested they don't know is that right about thirty three cases okay all right no but the point is this that do you remember of course you remember back when the CNN put out that tweet when the when the president had this a panel of experts doctors medical staff and CNN puts out a tweet a picture of that and says another example of the trump administration's a lack of diversity is what they were concerned with back then and this guy did the other night that his name is what a hot elite from The New York Times the other night when the president had his little event press conference bigger than it was and a great one to authorities very presidential and he was like take it easy everybody take it easy and we we should work together so much over and punk in a pantsuit net Nancy Pelosi stop sniping Abby let's work together anyway yeah this guy Wajahat Ali from New York times he says that the the the presentation was only one woman on stage surrounded by nine white men this is only see that these people are sick and I had a really really a second ed and then you had Jon Meacham but remember I told you I tried to watch Doris Kearns Goodwin's yes Washington you Washington special on the history channel and I saw John Avalon from CNN and then Jon Meacham I I got to meet him and then I turn that thing off I couldn't watch anymore because I know he's a raving that TDS afflicted lunatic John legion and I used to know the guy back in the M. S. N. B. C. day's gonna follow them all the time zone I miss all the time anyway this is not what this idiot said about the coronavirus yesterday on MSNBC migraines anxiety aside from the the impact of the virus itself is we're living in an age of xenophobia and it is not impossible to imagine a scenario where blame is cast in a short article in some country or group of people if this becomes worse you have this what is horribly normal what is this what they're worried about that that Americans might die or whatever they'll blame the pecans in here the woman there and I was making mmhm mmhm it Dave stick absolutely nuts out of their minds they hate this place the blame might be kids we should find out how this virus got started just it's it's it's it's just for knowledge sake it if it the blame falls on the Chinese it falls on the

United States
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

14:36 min | 8 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Kickass News

"Which is intended to salute all of our forty five presidents. Now I ask you does. Abraham Lincoln deserved to be lumped in with James Buchanan who all but paved the way for the civil war. Is it right to give equal honor to both George Washington and the wildly corrupt and incompetent Warren g harding of course not George Washington deserves his own holiday? And you know who agrees with me? Pulitzer Prize winning. Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. She's doing her part to reclaim presidents day for the father of the nation as executive producer of Washington. A three night television event airing on the history channel over President's Day weekend Washington will explore the full arc of his journey. And we've together dramatic live sequences experts from Washington's letters and insights from a roster of notable experts historians and scholars to tell a very personal story about the evolution of one of history's most iconic leaders and today Doris Kearns Goodwin returns to the podcast to discuss why she wanted to go beyond the highlights of Washington's life. To explore. The real man foibles. And all Doris shed some light on the long held personal grudge that led Washington to join the American revolution. The intense ambition that drove him to succeed in how owning and exploiting slaves became essential to that success. Doris talks about going. From being chained to a as biographer to the more collaborative process of filmmaking. She shares some observations from watching Steven Spielberg on the set of Lincoln. And she debunks and confirms some common legends about our founding father. Coming up with Doris Kerns Goodwin in just a moment. Doris Kearns Goodwin is the Pulitzer Prize. Winning author of Lyndon Johnson and the American dream no ordinary time team of rivals the bully pulpit and leadership in Turbulent Times this beloved historian has spent her life illuminating some of the greatest man who ever sat in the White House from Abraham Lincoln to Teddy Roosevelt. And now she's bring our first president to the screen as executive producer of Washington. A three part miniseries event that begins. Sunday February Sixteenth at eight PM Eastern and Pacific on the history channel. Doris Kearns Goodwin. Welcome back to the show Hi Ben I'm so glad to be with you again. It was so much fun the last time yes and I remember when we last spoke you told me that you had just started your own production company to get into movies and TV and now here. You are with your first project. What made you want to jump into a whole new medium at this point year career. Yeah it's pretty exciting. I mean I think what happened is I'd had such a good experience. Being able to be part of the Lincoln movie. Steven Spielberg was so generous. To have that and Daniel Day Lewis became my friend and then I got involved as a consultant in all the way about LBJ with Bryan Cranston. So a good friend of mine who we've been working together for eighteen years decided to form a movie company called Pastimes Production. Beth lasky and I and we were approached by history to get involved as executive producers on this George Washington miniseries so it was the first big project that we did and it was turned out to just be a joy of working with the producers with the history people with the interviewees and and just to be able to be involved from every step along the way from the writers table to the rough cuts to the interviews to going over the scripts for the filming. The final cuts the locked guts. I now know all this stuff that I didn't know before. And it's a wonderful medium. I think the ministry's documentaries are sounds like you were very hands on with this project. So you're on the set and making script changes casting decisions and the whole deal Now we weren't. I wish we'd gone to to mania that. That's the one piece that when we do the next thing I think for sure. We'll make sure to go for the actual filming of it. But we we know. We worked on the scripts before that and saw the changes after so they really included us at every step along the way which was great for us. We learned so much and like you said you were a consultant on Steven Spielberg's Lincoln and I want to say that. I think I heard that you have another project development with Spielberg and you also worked with another guest to the show Jay Roach on the film all the way. Have you gotten any advice from these directors or anything that you've observed that you've been able to apply as a producer now? Well you know I think the most important thing is is what makes a good leader is what makes a good director or producer. It's emotional intelligence. You know just the way that I watched you know Stephen handle the actors and the costume designers and the all the you know thousands of people involved in the making of Lincoln you know keeping calm and giving them credit and taking responsibility of something went wrong. All the things you want in a leader are true and similarly. That's the way we hope that we've been able to deal with teams of people on this. I mean there's Rail Splitter Company that was the production company and then there's you know dozens of people from the history channel and then there were all the people that some of whom we were able to recruit who would be interviewed for this and making sure that they had whatever they needed for the interview. So and then watching the process developed so I think it is that emotional intelligence. Just enjoying the collaboration and being able to have humility about what you don't know and surrounding yourself with people who know a lot more than you do and boy was that true. They knew sell much more about George but I feel like I could stand on their shoulders and I now know George even call him George Now. It must be very different experience for you because when you're writing I have to imagine that's a pretty solitary process. Have you enjoyed the collaboration of producing Washington? And that's the real reason why this has been such a pleasure to go into films right now. I mean I'm sure I'll find another book to ride. And my husband was writing a book about the value of public service and Kind of an idealistic call young people when he died a year and a half ago. And I'm hoping to finish that. But in the meantime there's something about being able to be part of a team every day because at least when my husband was there the two of us together would be their writing so it wasn't lonely but now to work every day with with these people who have an equal intense feeling of what what they want this to be and to go through. All the you know the strains and the triumphs of it It's a really large experience that anybody who works in an organization knows but it's been so long since I've done one that I've really enjoyed that as much as anything and makes me want to do more. We've got a chance for a movie about I'd Itar Bell one of the characters in bully pulpit To be made by Amazon actually and We've at the stage where there's a couple of scripts that have been done which we think are really good and hopefully that might happen so we feel like we're just getting started. I just wish I were twenty instead of my age because I'm really joined this a lot. Maybe they'll just make me younger than I am to keep doing. It will tell us about some of the talent that you've learned to your miniseries. You've got the Great Jeff Daniels narrating and people will of course recognize the man playing George Washington on screen from net flicks the crown. Well what was what was fun about getting. Jeff Daniels was that I had met him in the course of talking to him about a possible project on Franklin Roosevelt. He'd be a perfect Franklin Roosevelt and then went and then went to. He invited us to To Kill mockingbird and then when we asked him about being narrator he said yes it wants and it's got a wonderful voice for this so that was pretty grade and then we were able to get some of my fellow historians and many of them are ready had been gotten by the history people but to add to the list and President Clinton and General Powell so when I call General Powell. It was it turned out to be such a wonderful addition because he could talk about what it was like for. George Washington to have to discipline the troops as hard as it is to have to sometimes hang deserters to make an example for the team and how difficult that is for a war leader he was able to talk about how it changed George Washington in one of those early battles with Braddock. When he saw a thousand people die out of fifteen hundred and never again would be an adventure. This is the worst. This was the worst is what palace Powell said and then President Clinton offering the insight even just from his personal experience of what it was like to lose a father when he was young and have to be more independent as he was because he had to. This was a strain with his single mother having to keep up the farm and he didn't have time to putter around and then understanding that he had certain strains said he was worried. Always about not having had a lot of formal schooling. Like you know Adams gone to Harvard and Jefferson and gone to William and Mary and he was not even able to go to London for schooling as his half brothers were because his father had died when he was eleven and yet he then put these kind of people around him as as advisers and when he chose to motivate the troops at the crossing of Delaware instead of making his own motivational speech. He used the words of Thomas Paine. Knowing the Thomas Paine was a better writer and order than he was. So all of that came from Clinton's understanding So it was great and he understood what it was like to be president and the exile of the presidency. Sell it rounded out. I think the show and a lot of ways that I was very glad to be part of. No you've written a number of books about us. Presidents would appeal to you about telling the story through mini series rather than doing another presidential biography. Well I you know I think part of it is as I was saying that. There's the combination of film and in interviews that I think allow you to bring a person to live and especially in Washington's case we have so few pictures of him and the pictures don't really suggest a lot of movement in his face partly because he was always conscious of his teeth he had had that tooth disease and had a lot of other teeth in his mouth. That not. Where would they were not. Wouldn't they were actual teeth from animals or from other people but conscious of that? He didn't smile a lot. So it's hard to see inside of a living person and then you see him on Mount Rushmore. So the chance to have Nicholas playing him As Young George Washington and bringing to life expressions on his face and anxiety and pleasure and meeting Martha and dancing. And as Joe Ellis said and he was a Stud. You know you see him as a study among taller and bigger than most people his age. I think that was part of it but I think what I was saying before was it was just such a great. It was eighteen months of collaboration. Really intense. Collaboration out takes it. Took me like ten years to write The civil war and eleanor. So but this intensity almost almost made it the same length of time but I just felt I was learning at every step along the way from all these other people who knew so much more about making documentaries or about George Washington then I did so I felt like I was back in school and it was a great experience. We know from history class. The bullet points of his life. The highlights a crossing the Delaware winning the revolution his presidency. Maybe his farewell address but the average American knows almost nothing about his personal life. For instance. What. You just mentioned that. He was raised by a single mother. Or his failures is insecurities the grudges that he held all of these things. That really made him a human being now. I think that's absolutely right. And and what what? I think the film smartly does it starts with his first mission for the British for the King Which is the British and the French are fighting of course during that period of time before the formal outbreak of the French and Indian war..

George Washington Doris Kearns Goodwin Washington Steven Spielberg executive producer President Pulitzer Prize Abraham Lincoln President Clinton General Powell producer Delaware consultant Franklin Roosevelt Jeff Daniels Thomas Paine Warren g harding
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:09 min | 10 months ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"Coming up the difference between then and now how is not the difference between the Nixon and trump. It's the difference between that Congress and this one America gathers for Thanksgiving As Divided Nation Award winning author Doris. Kerns Goodwin tells me how history will judge these dramatic public hearings. and Are you accusing accusing him of murder. Hollywood takes on the government inquiry that expose torture in America Annette. Benning on being Senator Dianne Feinstein in the report. Then in general I think we need to all listen better and respect expertise in defense of elitism. A new book uses comedy to examine how one social class fueled a populous backlash are willing to Isaac's and sits down with writer Joel Stein. Welcome to the program. Everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour..

America Senator Dianne Feinstein Kerns Goodwin Christiane Amanpour Joel Stein Nixon Benning Congress Isaac murder Hollywood
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

"He actually wanted them to live in the white house to be ready for the cocktail hour. So the second floor of the white house becomes the most exclusive residential hotel. You can possibly imagine all the cocktail guys living there living there during world war two so it was pretty cool. I got to go back and stay in the room. Where winston churchill had lived during world war two. When hillary clinton was there she heard me talking about how i wished i knew where everyone hid live during world war two so she invited my husband and me to a sleepover in the white house and i figured out that yes chelsea clinton was sleeping. Were harry hopkins his foreign policy house advisor f._d._r.'s was the f._d._r.'s people were not his people f._d._r. Was sleeping in the room that clinton's latest leptin and we were in winston churchill's bedroom so i was sure he was in the corner. I wanna drinking his brand and smoking. A cigar. Churchill enjoyed a stiff drink. I'm sure was great f._d._r. His drink of choice. I'm gonna guess sloe region phys well. He had his own sort of weird concoction of the martini that he would make oh he was a mixologist of of sort of a special mixture and he is lame hipsters who go themselves. It was always a visionary always fees and you might do it someday. Sorry we're getting off track. Keep going doors. You're also considered a sports journalist of your a brooklyn dodgers fan growing up. I heard heard why baseball what's interesting about it. Just the good looking guys now. It's not really just i mean. They're not so hunky many of them no. It's got much much deeper roots. My father loved baseball. I was the third girl in the family. You taught me when i was i was he taught me how to keep score. You're so that he would come home from work in brooklyn during the day and i could record for him. The history of that afternoon's brooklyn dodger games so when your father listens to you for the play by play inning by inning he thinks any makes you think he's telling you a fat. I'm telling him a fabulous story. It makes you think something's magic about history. It's where my love of history came from. In fact i'm convinced i learned how to tell a story from those nightly sessions father because at first i'd be so excited i would blurt out the dodgers. The dodgers lost which took much of the drama of this as long telling away so i learned yet to tell the story from beginning to middle to end and then of course the dodgers abandoned us and went to just going to say when they left were were you able to to still you know pulled for them or did it did it. All now. Now bro. I knew more is to send letters to walter o'malley the owner we used to lease to have petitions against him when i was a little girl then finally i went to harvard and i went to fenway park and a park so reminiscent of ebbets field became an equally rational red sox fan and we've had had season tickets for more than thirty five years so baseball's huge part of my life. I wake up thinking about them in the morning when they lose. I don't even want to read the newspapers. It's it's unhealthy but it's a happy happy unhealthiness. I would've been way pork. One time i bought it was so excited to go. There and i sat behind a poll. The guy sold me a ticket that was behind a poll. I i mean that's the problem when you go to an old stadium but it's got charm right charm and i really studied the layers of paint on that in the rush that i bet you didn't you in grave something on it. That ron was there. I don't know how i'm gonna say this. I carved a little heart or be a plus d k g. I listen to it now. Finally i'm going to have to go through. It's in the right field woman. Cha cha rykiel. You've got this so doors are you. How are you feeling about the current..

winston churchill dodgers baseball brooklyn hillary clinton walter o'malley ebbets field fenway park advisor harry harvard ron f._d._r. thirty five years
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Ron Burgundy Podcast

"It's not ruth bader ginsburg. You tried her right right carolyn against her business. Manager said this is where it she said. You two had a falling out. I was so i was confused. She said you too were no longer on speaking terms. You heard that right for two whole years if you if you came to saddle creek diner on a monday morning you'd see me <unk> baby ruth in a corner eating breakfast talking-shop. You're talking shop. You wouldn't understand it carolina okay. It's loss stuff right. I did you understand not really but i let her talk and boy. Can she talk. She can talk you through the saddle creek's lumberjack special four sausage links and to pancake piles later. She's still going on and i'm sorry to ask you. Why did you guys stop hanging out. I would say scheduling conflicts well. Well i mean after we had a huge fight. She said that she couldn't see me anymore. So that was our scheduling conflict. Oh got it so if i saw today ah i feel like bygones. Be bygones so exactly. How did you guys leave it word for word yeah well. If memory serves she said something like if view start a food fight in this diner. I will never speak to you again and you start a food fight in the diner. Yes we we did or i did who can remember the specifics anymore. It's hard to have a food fight when you're the only one throwing food yeah feels like you're the cool in that situation cher but to get people to join. You have to just throw more food. I mean omelettes jello a couple of is i mean nothing was getting this crowd going. How old also do you think most of how old were the most of the people in the dino. I mean everyone was in their early to late seventies except for one grandkid yes. That's probably not the best participants participants for our food fight us knows that i'm here if she ever wants to rekindle our friendship and available for breakfast literally every morning well actually assuming record.

ruth bader ginsburg saddle creek carolyn carolina
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Amanpour

"I think it's unrealistic to say that now that the chairmanships have gone into different directions that some of the investigations will keep going on certainly the Muller investigation is still going to come back, despite the fact that people say more people are disapproving it now than before. It's partly because it just hasn't been in the news when they're indictments when things are happening. Then people think highly of the investigation there hasn't been anything because it's been quiet. So I can't we can't imagine that that's all going to go away in the next few months. But it's possible that on some of these smaller issues, which aren't so small to the people for whom it counts, pre existing conditions or prescription drugs. They can move in both both fashions at the same time unless the president decides as he said if you do that, then I pay you back and nothing we'll get done. I. Now delve back into history because both of you, I as I said have written biographies of great leaders and presidents and secretaries of state, and and all the rest of it. So let me ask you first Walter since have you sitting here you've written about Benjamin Franklin who was at the constitutional convention helped, right? The constitution and the end urging his fellow frame is to put their divisions behind them. Here's a quote of his from seventeen eighty seven. I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the convention who may still have objections to the draft constitution would with me on this occasion doubt, a little more of his own infallibility and to make manifest unanimity put his name to this instrument. What does that teach us today? We know Ben Franklin said that he was old. He was actually hitting eighty which back then was considered old beliefs. And he was he was twice as old as the average age of the other members. And he said the older, I get strange happens to me. Realize have been wrong at times and other people will right? He says it's going to happen to you. So put your divisions aside. And then he gives that line. I think that's what America was built on which is somewhat of a respect for listening to other people the big question a country faces now is after this period of rabid into village, rabid demonization, and so much just bashing on weather. We can grow up unstudied who I also wrote about who also was not president of the United States. Who was a very smart person? When the McCarthy hearings were happening he wakes with sunset I've seen this before. I saw it in Nazi Germany. I saw it in the communism. But then is in how're Edward r. Murrow in the mainstream but not Joseph McCarthy off the stage. Einstein says American democracy. It hasn't gyroscope. It's amazing. Just when you think it's going to fall over it can ride it out. I believe. That we gotta do that now, and it's very important to mention the mainstream press, and what a fundamental and strong pillar of a healthy democracy. It is I'm Doris Kearns Goodwin. Let me let me turn to you forbid of history. You obviously worked for a Lyndon Johnson. You also have written about him. He had huge democratic majorities in congressman. He was doing civil rights and the others. Abraham LINCOLN who you've obviously also profile big Republican majorities, but the country was at war, then, but you know, what what is the the president. Let me just quote, this this this from Benjamin from ABRAHAM LINCOLN. If I can find it here. It is. Inaugural address in eighteen sixty one though passion may have strained. It must not break. Our bones of affection, the mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hot stone all over this broad land. Will yet swell the chorus of the union when again touched shortly. They will be by the better angels of our nature again. It sounds so great an almost two quaint for today. Can we find out to angels? What will it take? Well, I think we have to. I mean when I think back to the eighteen fifties before he gets into office..

Ben Franklin president Abraham LINCOLN Doris Kearns Goodwin Benjamin Franklin Lyndon Johnson Joseph McCarthy Muller Germany Walter America Murrow Edward r United States Einstein congressman
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"But that's how amazing figure ABRAHAM LINCOLN ones that and of course, that procedure was about the civil war and slavery. But I mean, I think what happened in the movie is they they used a smaller plot to get the third year pass and to show that politics in bargaining all sorts of things. Yeah. This is the time when we compromise was bad. But most importantly, Daniel Day-Lewis was just unbelievable. I mean when he first finally agreed to be Lincoln. It's feel-good hoped. He would be Lincoln for months and years actually, showing him various scripts, and he said, no when he farm and says, yes to Tony Kushner's scripts Stephen me, taken to Springfield to show him the scenes, but he was the birth that in the where he's where he married live the state house his office. But he didn't want anybody to know that he was already becoming Lincoln because he wanted to hold year to become Lincoln. He inhabits the character. So he was coming. We're supposed to eat under an assumed name. But at the last minute, he says, oh, no, let's go to a bar until he went to a bar in Springfield immediately. Somebody bought us drinks. And I thought oh my God. It's already over. But they didn't recognize him. They recognize me. It was a huge joke. So anyways of why would they not? He just becomes the character is a book like the person. So many premier happened back in New York. And he said, okay, I'm taking you to my favorite bar. Will remember that night in Springfield? So we had these old Cuban drinks. And you know, I had to he had maybe more than me everything was bombed. And then he got the first of his series of awards in Spielberg came to deliver to me sold told how he had be Jackie these roles these beautiful rejection letters until finally he said, yes. So you've got up there unaccountably because there's a Wall Street Journal report in the room. He said, I don't reject everything when Doris Kearns Goodwin asked me to go binge drinking with I accepted. So So I was. I was. That's fantastic. I always wanted to know. The things that I've read them Lincoln. It almost seemed like. I don't know how popular he was as president, of course, during the civil war and all of those things, but it seemed like he was wildly popular. Once he was a sassy. I know it sounds like an odd thing. But it almost seemed like a bottled up feeling for him was was able to be released because of that assassination. Something right about that. I mean, what what happened was of course, he's assassinated when the war has already come to so union had one slavery had been undone by the emancipation, proclamation and. And the war ended one. So he was already having an extraordinary triumph, and he was already tried to reconcile the south and the north together in that second inaugural when he talks about the state of slavery was shared by both sides both read the same bible broker pages. Saying God's neither prayers. We're fully answered. Then, of course, the words remember what malice toward none in charity for all. Let us find up the nation's wounds. So people realize by then between the Gettysburg address the second inaugural that he'd give given a meaning to the war with this beautiful language, and that the war had been one. And that he was the major figure with long with the union army and giving direction to the cabinet in the union army. But then when he died in when you really were hoping he would keep going and keep that chance of reconciling north and south together. I think you're right. It released these feelings that have been growing as I'm went by..

Daniel Day-Lewis ABRAHAM LINCOLN Springfield union army Wall Street Journal Doris Kearns Goodwin Tony Kushner New York Spielberg Jackie president
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"True. Let's all go, man. I'm telling you. Let's do it two thousand nineteen are you there? I am New Mexico. Welcome back. This will Mark. I am black on the air has gone out there. You get doing feeling pretty gate because the sports in LA doing. Brad. Now, we've got the dodgers in the World Series as I record this World Series has not yet started. So you hearing the couple of days after there have been some results. I have no idea. See I can't get to snotty right now and start bragging 'cause you guys little what'll happen if the dodgers have lost like three in a road. You hear this like what's wrong with Larry? So I remember from dodgers hope they win. But of course, my Lakers LeBron in the Lakers. It's gonna be rough. You guys Gumby rough. But I got you. We got this. Let's stay in there and ski playing tough. The Lakers looked pretty interesting. Now this post the Rondo spit fate with the CPI three. I know I'll because not into sports. I apologize. Always. You have no idea what I'm talking about. We find CPA threes. Nine of Star Wars character. His a player in the action Pasco cessation one of the Lakers claims he didn't spit on him. But he's been at them caused the bait. And Rondo would he would fight with an image of himself. That's how hard he is to get along with Rondo Faye with anybody. So he's the Laker player. They did a couple of acres out. Like, I haven't a little rough go as of this recording. They have not yet one. But hopefully, they will have on by the time this airs but in terms of the season, I have some patients here. I think we're gonna do. Okay. How some ever guys there are some other things that are going on that are much more than right now. Oh, by the way, until they show I talked to Doris Kerns Goodwin. A little while ago. And we're going to be playing that live conversation that we did out in riverside to very nice audience and talked about her book covering out of the four presidents like the burlingham four covering the four presidents. That's all these minutes for president Lincoln theatre Roosevelt. Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. Chip coursework to Johnson ministration and is good conversation. Really good stuff. A lot of that history. Stuff that I like, but. But you know, she's amazing Doris Kearns Goodwin. She has so much knowledge of the personal foibles and things that happen. You know, she puts the flesh and blood on these sometimes mythic figures, and it always relates to today all of it. So open enjoyed that conversation kind of saliva conversation that we did before. But so before we get to that. I just wanna say this one word guys boat boat boat boat boat boat, vote vote vote vote as violence said don't boo vote now is the time. Okay. The time for talking shit all you know, protests in snarky nece speaking up. All this voice voice voice. Fine now voice needs to turn into vote vote boat boat. There are a lot of races around the country right now that are up for grabs in some of them can really make some differences at this time. I mean, it doesn't look like much. It's going to have in the Senate. But you never know. But in the house, they're really looks like a good chance. We may have Florida's first black governor that would be amazing Georgia may have its first female black governor, which would be unbelievable. There's a lot of there's some LGBT q. I always forget all the letters..

Lakers Doris Kearns Goodwin dodgers Rondo Faye New Mexico Franklin Roosevelt Lyndon Johnson LA Lincoln theatre Roosevelt Brad Rondo Larry Florida Senate president Georgia
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Glenn show on the vox media podcast network. I'm your host as reclined we are a couple of weeks out of an election. We a heart crazy political era crazy, and so it's nice from moment to step out of this exact moment and think about America other times of stress look at times when we have come through. I I would say trials quite a bit deeper than the ones we're going through now with a lot more grace than at the moment. It seems we are capable of. But hopefully that is gonna prove wrong. I had the opportunity recently to interview Doris Kerns Goodwin. The pulsar prize winning presidential story in at the six synagogue when my favorite venues in Washington DC, you're gonna hear my interview with her here. And also a great Cuna after she's just written a remarkable new book called leadership in turbulent times, it traces, the growth and the dark nights of the soul, and then the eventual elevation the great works of four different presidents FDR. Teddy Roosevelt Abraham. Lincoln and Lyndon Johnson. Also, Doris Kearns Goodwin. If you have a chance to Dr you'll hear it here. Just a great person to talk to I one day aspire to have as many wonderful stories for any one thing. You might ask me as Goodwin has for literally anything you can ask her. It was an incredible joy to get to have this conversation with her. And I hope you enjoy it too before we get to the show I've a request. I have been thinking about how to think about the community of people who listen to the show. I get wonderful emails from you. I meet some if you on the street, a means a lot to me. But also, your great, you're smart, and your thoughtful, and you engage with us in a in a way that I find really moving, and I want to think of a way to build something out of this. Whether it's just a more normal form of communication a newsletter. Forum. I don't know. But I figured that rather than try to figure it out myself. I would ask you is there is there something that you wish we had some way that you wish you had to connect to other people who watch your show to discuss the episodes to communicate with me something. I could give you right like a newsletter after the show that talks through it a little bit more a little bit differently. I've been trying to think about this. I don't feel like I have a brilliant idea on it. But I'm hoping some of you do my Email is kind show at vox dot com. Again, as we're con- show at box dot com. And I appreciate any thoughts. You might have so here without further ado is Doris Kerns Goodwin..

Doris Kerns Goodwin Doris Kearns Goodwin vox media Teddy Roosevelt Abraham FDR Glenn America Washington Lyndon Johnson Lincoln one day
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Times America's historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. What a great pleasure means to you. Thank you for coming on. It's great to see you. I won't burden you with all the supreme court. Talk on this show tonight, but I just want to ask because we often hear from historians that, oh, we've seen this before with congress, people have acted lousy and presidents to supreme court. I feel was always kind of on a pedestal. Is this allow or were they acting like it's before? I don't know. I think it is a low in my lifetime, which is not short. I mean the partisanship that we saw two alternate realities during the cavenaugh hearings run and the other that had nothing to do with each other. But I can go back as an historian because I've lived with guys in the past. There were lower moments. Just imagine this in the eighteen fifties. There was a congressman from South Carolina, and he came into the Senate floor and he hit the Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner over the head with a cane falls into unconsciousness. But the most important thing is in the south, he's made a hero Justice Kavanagh's been made a hero. Now they all had canes. They gave him a golden Kane, but in. The north, here's the positive thing. It mobilized the anti slavery sentiment in the north. They got stronger the Republican party, the party of Lincoln then produces ABRAHAM LINCOLN. So if we can awaken from this new low and the citizens can get active again, we can make something from this moment. I believe. Glad you out with John. It's not place. There's no choice, but to be optimistic, what's the other thing too? Just wallow in it. We can't know. We can't wallow. We. I mean. You'll get toilet paper stock the near. I don't know about that man. I've ever seen Iran HBO let it fly. Okay. Well, you know, when you said he was a hero in the south, the reminded me of the guy who heckled Obama and said, you lie, and then he was a hero in the south. Maybe this is the problem. Well. Maybe we should've let them go. Oh, no, no, no, no fact. At this point. And in this I played the south all when you're in the cities is just like anywhere else. It's really it's not a state thing. It's a city versus country thing in. That's what happened at the turn of the twentieth century, had a very similar situation to now the cities were growing. The people in the rural alleys felt cut off from the right had a lot of new inventions. The pace of life was speeding up the gilded age gap between the rich and the poor. But luckily than a leader came along, it was a lot of popular spirit. A lot of anti elitism and teddy Roosevelt came along and he was able to channel all that emotion into something he called the square deal between the rich and the poor. I mean, he was like Trump. He came in from a privileged background, but he learned empathy through politics. He learned to go to the slums and see what it was like these other people to live. So he's not like Trump? No, he's certain. No empathy is the most important characteristic and a leader, and it's it's what's missing in the current president. Somebody who could monitor a whole menu. I know. Historians and you're certainly preeminent among them. I would consider you premiss into Parry's of all love to be that you are. Thank you first among equals for you non Latin speakers. Like Zeus was free missing. Okay. So all right. So is the question, but you all seem to say, I guess you're all optimists that you know we've seen worse before, have we did we ever have a traitor president because I really do think we have a trader as a president, someone who plainly and out in the out, an open sides with them, not us attacks. Our Justice department are FBI. RCA says he agrees with Putin. I could go on with the list of things that I consider traitorous somehow his agenda and Putin's are exactly the same all the time coincidence, possibly. Did we ever have that? I'll tell you, I don't know that we need to go to that direction right now. The Muller investigation will show us whatever is going to come forth on that right now..

president supreme court Doris Kearns Goodwin Senator Charles Sumner Putin Justice Kavanagh Obama Trump America Republican party South Carolina congress teddy Roosevelt FBI ABRAHAM LINCOLN Iran congressman Muller RCA John
"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"Basically. But I got interested in in politics because I went away from my hometown, and I could see that place from a different lands. And I saw in the bay area of California, a place that had higher education logistical to Stanford higher income levels. It was more entrepreneurial more ready for the future. And my interest in politics was. That I felt very, very blessed by the opportunity that I had in life, but I wanted to see what could be done so that other folks who had grown up like me could get to the same kind of places. I can't imagine you ever. Being the in your face sky, and I think you rasta version of this question are Dettori board, which is you you. You seem like you're temperament is the Barack Obama temperament. If you were going to compare you to temperament, not the Mike Levin. ATI, temperament, I think was the straight. How do you channel the? How do you channel the rage that's out there. Instill stay. You. Number one, you have to be yourself more than anything else more than people wanting. You know, this sort of democratic warrior or somebody to take the fight to Trump in Trump is a good example of this. People thought that he was being himself. That's number one, no one. You pointed this out in in our editorial board. You know, he is. He does what he says. Now we may not like it, but it's, it's him. So you have to be yourself. But I also think that. That I can that I can point out what's wrong with Donald Trump and his administration in a way that resonates with folks, but not do it in a way that is so divisive. And so such a bad role model for the young people of America and people that are coming up and I, this guy is a unique character in American political history, of course, and I don't think that the answer should be for every single leader that we have to try to emulate that whether they're running against him or not. Unfortunately, we have folks like the guy running down in Florida to Santa's that are trying to be Donald Trump light. That's not an answer for Republicans or Democrats what. You've been speeding presidential biographies. No, you know, over the years I've read a few. We've got one that's your favorite favorite president, but like we know Doris Kearns Goodwin's book about Lyndon Johnson the. Yeah, it was good, Texan. You felt like I have to confess that I have not written. I have not read all of Caros material. Read some of it already fixed. You know, he still hasn't gotten to be. We're still waiting for help from Mr.. Carol Murray. Your point earlier about what Biden said, you know, I think that in that road to Camelot book recently made clear that oftentimes that the action is out there in the country, it's not in Washington DC, and so you who ever becomes the democratic nominee in twenty twenty. It's going to be. It's going to be somebody who gets out into the country and can capture what people are feeling in what they're Spiring to and not get so caught up in the date. A day back and forth with Trump. What do you think is going to be in? We have these with all the small short, the stuff that you're going to be campaigning, moron..

Donald Trump Trump Mike Levin Barack Obama California Doris Kearns Goodwin ATI editorial board Biden Washington Carol Murray America Lyndon Johnson president Florida Santa