3 Burst results for "Doris Kearns Goodwin Pulitzer"

"doris kearns goodwin pulitzer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

13:53 min | 2 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin pulitzer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And mercifully they couldn't find an owner in Seattle all winter long I tried and in March of nineteen seventy the Seattle pilots came to Milwaukee on the night of March thirty first we opened up by the way seven days later and I've often said and and we've had they've had a great fifty years and great players playing as hard to believe that the number of hall of Famers and and the walking through almost three million people last year was it was merely a bacterial now if it was just a warm situation but fortunately this one could be rectified and so with all the things that have happened to me and all the things that going on I'll always be proudest of bringing a team back to Milwaukee I can well imagine yeah so just think you must've been at those games when the team won for the first time in a long time like the red Sox or Washington nationals it's just so rewarding I mean I the Washington nationals I was able to go to a game when Obama was there and and then you were able to the owners allowed me to have my picture taken when I was doing that book on teddy Roosevelt and Taft yeah with the two mascots because they used to have teddy in Taft as these big things would run around the corner there to somehow always lose this thing or teddy with those and so I felt such an emotional connection after the red Sox along out of it to the nationals this year and I happened to be at a bar in Texas at it giving a lecture that night and people were there's a sense all around the country somehow that when people know there is a team that hasn't won in a long time and deserves it that they feel it's that sense of the underdog it's that sense of wanting the pleasure of those kids and those parents when I saw the celebration afterwards and it was great and and Chicago Cubs having that happen in the red Sox having it I mean that's that's what you want for every team to have that sort of enormous joy the one thing that you see right from the start there's something in this is a sociological influences the game that's something that takes and binds the community together through thick and thin and you watch people in in the situation that you're talking about and there's really nothing like baseball it is just absolutely amazing and the joy it brings and the happiness it brings I I said to you often in distance nineteen fifty seven that we talked about watching the Braves win the pennant I I'll never forget the people in the upper deck crying and I started crying and it was it you're right it did bring something into that that is really just amazing from the Rancho Mirage writers festival but see for the good of the game in conversation with Pulitzer Prize winner Doris Kearns Goodwin I think I sort of had an unhealthy attitude until we find the one I would get so upset at when the red Sox would be losing that I didn't want to read the newspapers that day and there would be a bad feeling the whole rest of the day until finally once we won that first time I mean year after year before that the B. these playoff games and we lose to the Yankees and I'll never forget one time one old guy stood up and we also disconsolate and he just started yelling year after year after year and then everybody started laughing because we were in this commiserating together there's something bizarre about the fact that when you haven't won for a long time that develops an even greater sense of a bond so that when you when I used to think what if I were a Yankee fan would be as much fun to win year after year after year and I think probably not I mean it doesn't mean that I still haven't been happy that the red Sox have won since then several times more times than anyone else I guess on the twenty first century as we would say until the Yankee guys say me yeah but what about R. twenty Winston this entry before but there was something about just that feeling of connection to everybody and as you know the stories people would bring a red Sox hat to their grandfather's grave when they finally won and I'm sure they did that in Chicago and maybe in Washington and there's something about baseball that connects generations that I think is so special there's no question about it I remember when we won the pennant in eighty two and you just people wrote me letters and how it affected their family and how it affected their lives and and that's why when you when you're in baseball especially when you're a Christian you have to understand what it means to so many people and the obligation you have because of this very connection if you're talking about I remember there many things that I can tell you from there but I remember a woman who was a teacher in Madison wrote mean warm beautiful letter how it helped her family and how it'd help there and I they came in to see me and I when you realize the impact it's made in their lives you you're grateful no I know I think but knows the story that some of you know that in my first confession in the Catholic Church I have to confess that I had to sins relating to baseball the first occurred because the Dodger catcher Roy Campanella was coming to my home town of Rafah center to do a lecture I was so excited to be the first player I'd ever see outside of Ebbets field but it was announced that he was speaking in a Protestant church when you're brought up as a Catholic you think if you ever set foot in a Protestant church was struck dead at the threshold so I went to my father in tears I said what we gonna do so he said is there not to worry he's speaking in the parish hall he's talking about sportsmanship or sitting on folding chairs it is not a religious service it's not a cent so I went over the threshold at night fearing I had sold the life of my everlasting soul for this one night with Roy Campanella but anyway I came out and went to my first confession and I decided to tell the priest right away and he told me that it I told the whole story said nothing wrong with that not a sin but unfortunately said what else my child and then then I have to admit the other baseballs and that came in between talking too much in charge witching harm to others being mean to my sisters that to whom did you wish harm not to admit that I wished that New York Yankee players would break arms legs and ankles so that the Brooklyn Dodgers could win their first World Series and he said how often do you make these horrible wishes not to say every night when I say I don't have any said look I promise you some data when fairly and squarely on you don't need to wish harm on others to make it happen you understand the yes I said because I left the conventionally said say a prayer special prayer for our Brooklyn Dodgers how lucky my first confession was to a baseball loving treaties but that's what it does do you so tell tell everybody about what it must've been like waiting for the hall of fame news I mean you sort of knew you had a good chance to get in and they tell you that you'll be called at a certain time and blah blah blah well it was they tell you they're going to call at four forty five and so I'm there and family is there and everybody sorry first already don't have to worry well now it's four forty six and I say this to me I told her and of course at four forty seven she calls and any and all I guess so what do they say graduations but you've been elected to the hall and your heart is and with really when you think I often thought about their doors and I saw them that day the morning of the hall of fame ceremony got out and I started thinking about all those days our kids going to games and then the home the walkie situation and then the commissioners situation and the tough times of being the commissioner of lows all the good time but they're both I always say to rob Manfred no matter always remember this no matter what you do somebody's gonna be mad and that's true I mean that is a veteran absolute fair hence the thing then that term who could have ever imagined from those days are walking the streets in Milwaukee are flying all over the country trying to get a team I never thought anything about being in the hall of fame and so this was it was overwhelming I I didn't think it would be I thought a lot about it before that but I don't mind telling you it was really overwhelming and then I don't know where my piano every every day that they ask you to do that but I'm happy to do it and I wanted to do it locally because of but I've been able to go to a couple hall of fame games and at their most amazing it's it's like a throwback to another world because the old players come back and they sit on these chairs in that great hotel they tell the stories of when they were number you and and and it came to the hall of fame with with a friend and we sat at night this is when my book is rooms story we were Henry Aaron and his wife yeah and the four of us after on the veranda at to hotels I'm sorry go down and telling stories and she said to me you've got to write a book you can't read all the stories court I haven't really thought about it at that at the time but it it did it enters you there's something so H. when I say I love history and I when you walked the halls of the hall of fame and you see all that and you see all the people in it why they're in it and how they are and it if I said it's overwhelming and that's all I can say it's just really overwhelming so so tell me what you think about the future of baseball I mean there's talk about shortening the game this talk about having to make it more whatever move more prone to understanding in today's world kids aren't playing little baseball on the corners in the same way they are little leagues isn't happening the same way as it is I still believe it's always going to be you know a sport that ties us all together but I'd love to hear your thoughts about this well let me let me just say this right from the start because again histories report I've heard this for years about baseball in nineteen fifty eight if I can just run your story either as a sports editor Oliver he keep clear markings are one not one of the great human beings of all time but anyway he wrote this column that got national attention he said baseball is more about is dying this the new next generation hasn't accepted it and went on and on and on so now doors here we are sixty sixty one years later the game's gross revenue is up over thirteen million dollars in those days if a club to a million people they were successful today for club doesn't show anywhere close over two and a half million people are successful and so you look at all the things and work baseball is like everything else in life it goes through different periods it goes through different cycles and goes through different things but is it is it a game that will survive you better well yes talk about a time of the game and so on and so forth on the right note with great interest at the other sports are running really long too but we'll do things about that I think they have a ready I think they're very mindful of that I I know that Robbins and I think that there's no doubt in my mind that forty years from now fifty years from now baseball will have grown just tremendously and I by the way we have wonderful group of young players starting with Mike trout who's really spectacular and so I'm I'm very satisfied that will solve the problems ahead of us because obviously I'm partial but it's the best game in the world I agree totally what what was there ever a chance of having a team salary cap the way that football does or something like that could only knowing well that in the nineties when when I started new all the things we had to do and it was unfortunate that you talk about cycles we lost a World Series because that was all about a salary cap the owners wanted a salary cap and they were not wrong and they they wanted it to to protect themselves the NFL has with the NBA has but then players association to this state just won't go along with it but we've done a lot of other things that we passed around other things on the draft and really I think I've gotten meaningful use solutions out of it so no they're not going to accept a salary cap but look I said to you how competitive we are it's normal isn't it the competition is really good and yeah walking last year and opened you have a lot of small market clubs it really did remarkably well and that'll go on again too so I today I'm not sure that what we've done is better than a salary cap in putting it all together there's that bud Seelig baseball commissioner Doris Kearns Goodwin Pulitzer Prize winning historian the book for the good of the game and there's still that fact that when spring comes in you know the trucks are going to Florida and Arizona that somehow it's the beginning of winter being over and then the season begins and then the summer is there I think.

Seattle Milwaukee Famers
"doris kearns goodwin pulitzer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin pulitzer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"In. That's a big that's a big switch. Works out. Steppenwolf? That was a whole group park students in the basement out somebody's home. So he was gonna be great. He's up. I he's up first. And then we're going to have the folks from chief O'Neill's always have modern Saint Patrick's Day, but they're celebrating their twentieth anniversary, and they had their first ever Irish spirits festival. So Chris Duffy, who's the voice of WGN radio? Join us because he just he just wants Ireland. And even though these folks that we have on the show are Irish Chris has just a great of knowledge of the distilleries, and he that was his tour. I mean, he he visited Ireland, but he also. Checked out like Jameson? Those places. So he's going to join us his pictures on Facebook looked really beautiful ashes beautiful, and then Doris Kearns Goodwin Pulitzer prize winning author and historian is gonna join us because it's the president's day weekend. And kind of talk about her list of favourite presidents stories about the Kennedys and the Roosevelt's, and yes, so usually this could be like five six guests are five six subjects in a show. It's three tonight. But a lot of good long conversation. Settle. We'll keep you awake or at least per asleep. Whatever you wanna do. All right. Well, stick around having no knowledge. I'm stick around because Dave plyer is up next. All right, guys. The Steve Cochran show celebrates the most valuable person on the planet. Weekday mornings at seven twenty on seven twenty WGN. Chicago smart speaker users just say play WGN radio on tune into the news is sponsored by. Nope. I told him not to pay. No, I threatened them with. Recording. And you could do that. Yes. I can. But he then told me when I let them out. Oh, just what you expect. It's you a one. Here's Roger badesch, overcast and twenty four at O'Hare police say the fired worker who killed five people at a warehouse and Aurora on Friday was able to buy the gun because initial background. Check didn't catch that. He had a prior felony conviction and Mississippi roar police chief Christian seems a human issue lives.

WGN Chris Duffy Doris Kearns Goodwin Pulitzer Ireland Irish spirits festival Steve Cochran Jameson Mississippi Saint Patrick Kennedys Facebook O'Neill Dave plyer Roger badesch Chicago O'Hare president Aurora
"doris kearns goodwin pulitzer" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"doris kearns goodwin pulitzer" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Hope you had a great holiday season. So who's the guest? Well, if you were to come up with a list, maybe ten people that, you know, maybe you see on television. You read his or her book, I really love to have that. Person I'm willing to bet for eighty to ninety percent of my audience. This woman would be on that list who is it Doris Kearns Goodwin. Pulitzer prize winner bestselling author. Popular historian, learned historian, everything you would want an American person of letters to be doors currents good when it's great to have you on. So glad to be this is going to be fun. It's gonna be fine. Where are we? So we're at the Willard hotel, which has its own historic resonance in our nation's capital. We'll get to that. In a second. Cafe Duparc is the restaurant on the second full. Dr our waiter will be here momentarily. It's in the evening, and because of this particular medium's ability to shatter the space time continuum, you're hearing this and seeing it on January fourth twenty nine thousand nine we're not exactly recording it on January fourth twenty nine hundred nine. So one thing I want to say because you're hearing this and seeing as on January fourth twenty nineteen is happy birthday to you doors. Thank you. It happens to be very day. But we are going to be broadcast. Exactly what I think a lot of people my audience. So I know I know doors curtains Goodwin. But do you really know her I would love for you to tell my audience the story of how? This all got started as an intern in the Johnson administration because I didn't even know that story. And I thought I knew you pretty well, let's start there. So what happened is when I was twenty four years old. I was selected as a White House fallow. This fabulous program, Colin Powell was the White House fellow Wesley Clark you get to work for a year. Either. At a cabinet office are in the White House staff. I was a graduate student at Harvard when I was selected and we had a big dance at the White House. Then that we were selected president Johnson did dance with me. But not that peculiar there are only three women out of the sixteen White House fellows, but as he twirled around the floor in quite large fashion. He whispered that he wanted me to be assigned directly to him in the White House. But it was not to be that simple because in the months leading up to my selection, while I was at graduate school like so many young people, I was active in the anti Vietnam war movement, and a friend of mine, and I had this is nine hundred sixty seven okay for now. Everybody can figure out exactly how old I am in two thousand nine hundred at any rate. I sent an article with a friend. Into the new Republican. We hadn't heard anything and all of a sudden two days after the and the White House the article was against Lyndon Johnson. It came out with their title how to remove Lyndon Johnson from power. So I was certainly would kick me out of the program whole program the whole the whole program he was wanting to do things like that. Right. An incredibly he just told the people bring her down here for a year. And if I can't win over Nolan can giddy. So he did it win me over personally. He never changed my feeling about the war. But the most interesting formidable an incredible character. I mean, not only worked for him in the White House. But then accompanied him to his ranch to help him on his memoirs, and he was so sad. In those last year said he opened up to me in ways that he never would have had I known him at the height of his power. That's fascinating revelation. You just made tell me a little bit more about how can you be? So certain of that that's an amazing revelation that if he hadn't if he'd known you when he was so more so much more powerful. He wouldn't have been able to open up, and he wouldn't have had time. You know, he was on the ranch, and he was lonely, and he was trying to come to terms with the fact that his domestic legacy, which is extraordinarily and fifty years later. We're finally realizing what he did that he knew it had been cut into the war. And I happen to be there. And I'm not sure sometimes why he chose me to tell so much too. I think part of it was that. I was a good listener. And he was a great storyteller. I mean, fabulous colorful anecdotal stories. I later discovered that many of them weren't true. But it was no great colorful. It. Didn't mean they weren't colorful makes a good story. And he just chose me. Maybe he knew I was young historian. Maybe I was from Harvard, and they would those Harvard's that might write the history. But for whatever reason I spent a lot of time at the ranch. And I went back there not long ago, and it just.

White House Lyndon Johnson Doris Kearns Goodwin Nolan Harvard White House fellow Pulitzer prize Willard hotel Wesley Clark Cafe Duparc intern graduate student president Colin Powell twenty four years ninety percent fifty years two days