20 Burst results for "Dorie"

"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:03 min | 4 months ago

"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"They charge X. amount per hour or whatever it is, but for often kind of higher level, professional services or bigger ticket things. There's often a hesitancy for people to talk about it and. And so if you, if you have any friends or connections that can introduce you to people where you can ask them legitimate open questions or joining typically an online professional community that can be very very valuable and getting that intelligence now if you need money quickly, this probably isn't an option, but if you have a little bit of an economic benway. Do you recommend a coach? Is that something people need or can people do that themselves? So I. Asterisk idea executive coaching so I find value in it, I for sure. But I will I will say that In the early days of my business I was not in a position to afford coaching myself I. Do eat my own dog food I have worked with executive coaches myself. In addition to to coaching others on different things right, we all have different areas where we are very proficient, and can teach others, and we have different areas where we need to grow and get better, but in the early days of my business when I really didn't have A. A lot of cash margin what I did was I kicked it. Old School Jesse I became the best library patron in the history of the universe, and for about two years two to three years I was checking out between two and three books per week, and I was just literally reading hundreds of business books so that I could acquaint myself with Canon of. Of Business Literature and Best Practices because I didn't know anything about this when I when I got started I had good subject matter expertise, which a lot of people do when they start a business I knew a lot about marketing communications, but I didn't know a lot about running a business doing marketing and communications, and so I really embarked upon a program. Program to try to educate myself in that area. You know as I'm listening to you. I'm hearing this three line that comes up for a lot of our guests, and that's if there's thing that they need to know to execute the project. Run the business. Start the company. They just believe that they can go and learn. It and I'm curious story. Where does that confidence to believe that? If you read enough books from the library, Shirley, you can figure it out come from. Can we fake it if you have been able to hold down a decent job at a good company, if you have become a college graduate, or what have you if you have managed to do? Those things I'm not sure why you couldn't. Nobody knows calculus before they take a calculus class. Nobody knows how to. Perform lab experiments before someone shows them, but I didn't know how to do calculus after I took the calculus class. We don't all have dispositions for anything we pick up. Even spark people. I think that entrepreneurship is something that is a constellation of different skills, and it is a lot more about. About a willingness to to learn and to try then about any kind of natural disposition. I mean it's sort of the classic. Do you have the fixed mindset or the growth mindset right? If you're a smart person, you can figure things out, and there are some things that I continue to not be amazing at but I'm good enough, and then there are some. Some things where I think I really excel and like anything else you just you try to lean into those as much as you can, but I think I did always have the belief that yeah I intelligence enough and I was I. was GonNa Learn this because I committed to learning it? There's one more thing I want to talk to you about. The other thing that this window of time gives us is time for some of us a lot of it. Those of us with small kids lots of it. And that time sometimes allows us the space to rethink what we're doing, and some of us are figuring out. We actually don't want to be doing it at all. And I know you know a lot about reinvention. Where do even begin if you've discovered that the thing that you're doing day to day is not bringing you enough joy. Yes such an important point, Jesse and You're you're right of course I I spent a lot of time thinking about reinvention. My first book was reinventing you and in my twenty s I had a zillion jobs. After my ill-fated journalism career I worked in politics is a political campaign spokesperson ran a nonprofit, did a lot of things before settling into having my own consulting and executive coaching business, and so if someone is starting to feel the stirrings of discontent in some way Harkening back to our first point, actually I would see the the most important thing that you can do is to really leverage and make use of your runway as much as possible. The truth is you can reinvent yourself into literally almost anything as long as you're. Runway is long enough the problem that a lot of people have. Is it the assume that things have to be an all or nothing proposition? They assume that. I've decided. I'm not happy in my current career, so obviously I'm going to quit my job and then suddenly find another job well first of all we, we all know especially in a down economy, it often takes a while to find another job, and it often can be very very hard especially if you've built up a certain level of seniority to find another job right away at that same income level that can be really really challenging and so what we need. Need to do as we think about reinventing ourselves, number one is to take to take the time that we need to really get clear on where we WANNA reinvent ourselves. What? What is the direction we want to go? What is the ideal job and so that involves little experiments I mean everything from the kind of classic informational interview to maybe volunteering on a board. Let's say like a charity board so that you can explore some of those skills or Even even doing job shadowing for a day or a half day with a friend that's that's something that not a lot of people do, but is a very legitimate way to find out what things are like, so it's first that getting that clarity, and then beginning to try to build up as much experience and network on the side on your own time as you can, so that when it becomes time for you to really make a shift for real, you're in a far stronger. Stronger position to do it when thing I've been thinking a lot about lately as networking looks like now that we don't have physical proximity, and I was a person who did a lot of it. In my younger years, I got my first media job by essentially cold, calling people toward the beginning of their career in magazines in New York and asking them for coffee, and after twenty coffee, somebody finally gave me a job well done well. It feels a little harder to cold zoom. It's awkward anyways, so what works right now? Cold Calls Sir are always a challenge They're never the optimal.

executive Jesse professional services Canon Shirley New York
"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:03 min | 4 months ago

"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"They charge X. amount per hour or whatever it is, but for often kind of higher level, professional services or bigger ticket things. There's often a hesitancy for people to talk about it and. And so if you, if you have any friends or connections that can introduce you to people where you can ask them legitimate open questions or joining typically an online professional community that can be very very valuable and getting that intelligence now if you need money quickly, this probably isn't an option, but if you have a little bit of an economic benway. Do you recommend a coach? Is that something people need or can people do that themselves? So I. Asterisk idea executive coaching so I find value in it, I for sure. But I will I will say that In the early days of my business I was not in a position to afford coaching myself I. Do eat my own dog food I have worked with executive coaches myself. In addition to to coaching others on different things right, we all have different areas where we are very proficient, and can teach others, and we have different areas where we need to grow and get better, but in the early days of my business when I really didn't have A. A lot of cash margin what I did was I kicked it. Old School Jesse I became the best library patron in the history of the universe, and for about two years two to three years I was checking out between two and three books per week, and I was just literally reading hundreds of business books so that I could acquaint myself with Canon of. Of Business Literature and Best Practices because I didn't know anything about this when I when I got started I had good subject matter expertise, which a lot of people do when they start a business I knew a lot about marketing communications, but I didn't know a lot about running a business doing marketing and communications, and so I really embarked upon a program. Program to try to educate myself in that area. You know as I'm listening to you. I'm hearing this three line that comes up for a lot of our guests, and that's if there's thing that they need to know to execute the project. Run the business. Start the company. They just believe that they can go and learn. It and I'm curious story. Where does that confidence to believe that? If you read enough books from the library, Shirley, you can figure it out come from. Can we fake it if you have been able to hold down a decent job at a good company, if you have become a college graduate, or what have you if you have managed to do? Those things I'm not sure why you couldn't. Nobody knows calculus before they take a calculus class. Nobody knows how to. Perform lab experiments before someone shows them, but I didn't know how to do calculus after I took the calculus class. We don't all have dispositions for anything we pick up. Even spark people. I think that entrepreneurship is something that is a constellation of different skills, and it is a lot more about. About a willingness to to learn and to try then about any kind of natural disposition. I mean it's sort of the classic. Do you have the fixed mindset or the growth mindset right? If you're a smart person, you can figure things out, and there are some things that I continue to not be amazing at but I'm good enough, and then there are some. Some things where I think I really excel and like anything else you just you try to lean into those as much as you can, but I think I did always have the belief that yeah I intelligence enough and I was I. was GonNa Learn this because I committed to learning it? There's one more thing I want to talk to you about. The other thing that this window of time gives us is time for some of us a lot of it. Those of us with small kids lots of it. And that time sometimes allows us the space to rethink what we're doing, and some of us are figuring out. We actually don't want to be doing it at all. And I know you know a lot about reinvention. Where do even begin if you've discovered that the thing that you're doing day to day is not bringing you enough joy. Yes such an important point, Jesse and You're you're right of course I I spent a lot of time thinking about reinvention. My first book was reinventing you and in my twenty s I had a zillion jobs. After my ill-fated journalism career I worked in politics is a political campaign spokesperson ran a nonprofit, did a lot of things before settling into having my own consulting and executive coaching business, and so if someone is starting to feel the stirrings of discontent in some way Harkening back to our first point, actually I would see the the most important thing that you can do is to really leverage and make use of your runway as much as possible. The truth is you can reinvent yourself into literally almost anything as long as you're. Runway is long enough the problem that a lot of people have. Is it the assume that things have to be an all or nothing proposition? They assume that. I've decided. I'm not happy in my current career, so obviously I'm going to quit my job and then suddenly find another job well first of all we, we all know especially in a down economy, it often takes a while to find another job, and it often can be very very hard especially if you've built up a certain level of seniority to find another job right away at that same income level that can be really really challenging and so what we need. Need to do as we think about reinventing ourselves, number one is to take to take the time that we need to really get clear on where we WANNA reinvent ourselves. What? What is the direction we want to go? What is the ideal job and so that involves little experiments I mean everything from the kind of classic informational interview to maybe volunteering on a board. Let's say like a charity board so that you can explore some of those skills or Even even doing job shadowing for a day or a half day with a friend that's that's something that not a lot of people do, but is a very legitimate way to find out what things are like, so it's first that getting that clarity, and then beginning to try to build up as much experience and network on the side on your own time as you can, so that when it becomes time for you to really make a shift for real, you're in a far stronger. Stronger position to do it when thing I've been thinking a lot about lately as networking looks like now that we don't have physical proximity, and I was a person who did a lot of it. In my younger years, I got my first media job by essentially cold, calling people toward the beginning of their career in magazines in New York and asking them for coffee, and after twenty coffee, somebody finally gave me a job well done well. It feels a little harder to cold zoom. It's awkward anyways, so what works right now? Cold Calls Sir are always a challenge They're never the optimal.

executive Jesse professional services Canon Shirley New York
"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:31 min | 4 months ago

"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"It's for you know something on a platform like medium where anyone can contribute. They odds are they may well say yes, and it's a great way to help. Shine a light on someone that you admire and also begin to create content under your name, and to hone your own thinking about professional development in your field I'm so glad that you you bring up the interview strategy because I. Find Time and time again that people and I'll tell you in particular women over men will say to me. I'm not really confident enough in my idea, feel like anybody would want to share it or read it, and if you've been in this business long enough, you realize that nobody needs confidence. You just get out there and you you know. Throw in the pool. You will learn how to swim. But thinking about how to ease into, it is really important. I love that idea that you have another thing that I see. People do a lot is share other people's work because that is its own way of telling the world about who you are and what you're interested in right. That's exactly right pretty much. Any robot can just hit. CLICK CLICK RE tweet, but if you share things in a thoughtful and curated manner, and actually take the time to explain why you like it or why you think. Think. It's relevant. That is very powerful because it again which you're trying to do is give people a lens into your thinking, and how you see the world and when you do that, they get a better sense of your personality and what you might be like to work with if we want your in its use some lingo here if we want your brands to scale, you know if we if we want people to know you outside of the human beings who literally already know you in person. You need to give them a way to be able to do that. And if you're using social media or the Internet as a way of conveying your ideas, so that other people can see it and feel like Oh yeah i. know what she's like. She seems cool. That's a fantastic way to to really get known which translates into much better professional results because people already have a favorable opinion of you is folks don't have the capacity to be everywhere all at once and they need a front door. Is it a newsletter? A twitter feed a profile on a social media site. So what I advise people to do is they're thinking about their their brand building is. I'm not sucking up here I do think that that linked in is. non-negotiable for for most professionals today it ranks very highly in a search search engine algorithms. It is usually one of the first things that people will find about you, and so and also it is amazing, because it is one of the very few places on the web where you can make it exactly what you want if you had the opportunity to have one. One place on the Internet where you can literally just save your piece, say what you want to say about who you are as a human being in what you have accomplished unfiltered by other people and their interpretations in their agendas. Why would you not do that and yet? So many people have these like Barron profiles. They haven't updated in years. It looks like. A ghost town. I think that having a robust and and you know well-tended linked in profile is really important and really essential for most people. If you have your own business, if you're an entrepreneur, then I think additionally it's important to have a a website that conveys more about you and your products and services I do think for every professional whether you work for yourself or not, you need to buy. Buy the URL of your name. Immediately that some squatter does not and then they'll hold you hostage twenty years from now. When you finally decide, it's time for you to own it the way we got here in the first place as we're talking about the things that you can begin to do to get ready to formulate a plan B even as you're living out the good and the bad play. So. What else have you got up your sleeve in my book? Entrepreneurial you what I really specifically focus on is how can professionals people? You know white collar knowledge workers earn additional revenue and create multiple revenue streams for themselves, and so if we look at where is the low hanging fruit? What is the thing that you can do it? As rapidly as possible? It is typically performing some kind of professional service. It could be coaching could be consulting. It could be a service that you happen to be good at Lake, photography or Organizing closets whatever it is, it could be tied to what your regular job is or was is. The asterisk on that is of course it depends on what kind of contracts you've signed with your employer in terms of non competes, but it also could be something that is outside the realm of what you do professionally in the reason that that is usually the best and quickest thing to turn to is number one. There's no startup costs if I want to say hey, I'm a consultant. You don't have to get an office. You don't have to pay for anything. You really just need to start reaching out to people reaching out to people who might potentially by your services and say hey. I'm doing this thing. suits very inexpensive. Some of the things that people come up with a go I'm GonNa Resell things on Amazon or I'M GOING TO START A. I mean those those things have a huge cash outlay, so you WanNa go quick and dirty and cheap and also. If. You have built up a good reputation amongst your friends amongst your network you often when you raise, your hand can actually get clients relatively rapidly once you start saying hey I'm doing this thing. Let me know if you're interested or let me know of someone you know is interested. How do you figure out tactical pieces of that? Let's take the. The example of closet organizing great. Maybe you have people who are interested in that. How do you figure out how much money to charge them? Yeah, so there's there's a few pieces here. The first thing actually is that you will discover that pretty much. No one wants to be the Guinea pig, or no one wants to be the first person literally. Literally in history that you've ever done something for so a great thing to do is to pick a small number this. You know you don't want us to go on forever, but pick maybe three people who you can get to agree to be your volunteer clients, and you do it totally pro Bono and you do it because you wanNA. Get testimonial and. And you WANNA get referrals and that way you're able to to actually approach future clients with a lot more confidence because you can say. Oh well, your your closet. Situation is just like a a person that I worked with a while ago. She had XYZ problem and I think we can solve. Your is the exact same way that client is reassured because. Because aw, she's seen this before. Okay, I know she can help me. Maybe you have some nice before and after pictures and it's it's convincing, so that's number one is it gives you the confidence, and it gives you the ability to charge more because you can prove to people that you actually have gotten results in. It's not just theoretical in terms of. Of how much charge there are a lot of professional communities on the web these days there's sort of like online masterminds. facebook groups things like that for people given professions and I actually run one in the Consulting and executive coaching space, and those are the kind of intimate communities where people can trade information about pricing and things that might be a. A little bit sensitive to disclose. If something is a BBC transaction business to consumer, oftentimes, you can literally just find out on people's websites. Okay, there are closet organizer..

facebook Barron BBC Amazon consultant executive
"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Bother you. You know you might have a contrarian opinion you might say. No location based interfaces are not the future of XYZ. While okay. Tell us why share your opinion. put it out there if you don't feel ready to start. Putting your own opinions out there. Something that I tell people is a fantastic way to get started with training wheels is to interview. Other people reach out to colleagues or senior leaders or even somebody potentially who has a book out I can guarantee that that for many people. If you're not talking about you, know world renowned level. Almost anyone with a book wants to promote that book, and if you say hey, can I, can I interview you? Can I talk to you and write something about it even if it's for your linked in page, or if it's for you know something on a platform like medium where anyone can contribute. They odds are they may well say yes, and it's a great way to help. Shine a light on someone that you admire and also begin to create content under your name, and to hone your own thinking about professional development in your field I'm so glad that you you bring up the interview strategy because I. Find Time and time again that people and I'll tell you in particular women over men will say to me. I'm not really confident enough in my idea, feel like anybody would want to share it or read it, and if you've been in this business long enough, you realize that nobody needs confidence. You just get out there and you you know. Throw in the pool. You will learn how to swim. But thinking about how to ease into, it is really important. I love that idea that you have another thing that I see. People do a lot is share other people's work because that is its own way of telling the world about who you are and what you're interested in right. That's exactly right pretty much. Any robot can just hit. CLICK CLICK RE tweet, but if you share things in a thoughtful and curated manner, and actually take the time to explain why you like it or why you think. Think. It's relevant. That is very powerful because it again which you're trying to do is give people a lens into your thinking, and how you see the world and when you do that, they get a better sense of your personality and what you might be like to work with if we want your in its use some lingo here if we want your brands to scale, you know if we if we want people to know you outside of the human beings who literally already know you in person. You need to give them a way to be able to do that. And if you're using social media or the Internet as a way of conveying your ideas, so that other people can see it and feel like Oh yeah i. know what she's like. She seems cool. That's a fantastic way to to really get known which translates into much better professional results because people already have a favorable opinion of you is folks don't have the capacity to be everywhere all at once and they need a front door. Is it a newsletter? A twitter feed a profile on a social media site. So what I advise people to do is they're thinking about their their brand building is. I'm not sucking up here I do think that that linked in is. non-negotiable for for most professionals today it ranks very highly in a search search engine algorithms. It is usually one of the first things that people will find about you, and so and also it is amazing, because it is one of the very few places on the web where you can make it exactly what you want if you had the opportunity to have one. One place on the Internet where you can literally just save your piece, say what you want to say about who you are as a human being in what you have accomplished unfiltered by other people and their interpretations in their agendas. Why would you not do that and yet? So many people have these like Barron profiles. They haven't updated in years. It looks like. A ghost town. I think that having a robust and and you know well-tended linked in profile is really important and really essential for most people. If you have your own business, if you're an entrepreneur, then I think additionally it's important to have a a website that conveys more about you and your products and services I do think for every professional whether you work for yourself or not, you need to buy. Buy the URL of your name. Immediately that some squatter does not and then they'll hold you hostage twenty years from now. When you finally decide, it's time for you to own it the way we got here in the first place as we're talking about the things that you can begin to do to get ready to formulate a plan B even as you're living out the good and the bad play. So. What else have you got up your sleeve in my book? Entrepreneurial you what I really specifically focus on is how can professionals people? You know white collar knowledge workers earn additional revenue and create multiple revenue streams for themselves, and so if we look at where is the low hanging fruit? What is the thing that you can do it? As rapidly as possible? It is typically performing some kind of professional service. It could be coaching could be consulting. It could be a service that you happen to be good at Lake, photography or Organizing closets whatever it is, it could be tied to what your regular job is or was is. The asterisk on that is of course it depends on what kind of contracts you've signed with your employer in terms of non competes, but it also could be something that is outside the realm of what you do professionally in the reason that that is usually the best and quickest thing to turn to is number one. There's no startup costs if I want to say hey, I'm a consultant. You don't have to get an office. You don't have to pay for anything. You really just need to start reaching out to people reaching out to people who might potentially by your services and say hey. I'm doing this thing. suits very inexpensive. Some of the things that people come up with a go I'm GonNa Resell things on Amazon or I'M GOING TO START A. I mean those those things have a huge cash outlay, so you WanNa go quick and dirty and cheap and also. If. You have built up a good reputation amongst your friends amongst your network you often when you raise, your hand can actually get clients relatively rapidly once you start saying hey I'm doing this thing. Let me know if you're interested or let me know of someone you know is interested. How do you figure out tactical pieces of that? Let's take the. The example of closet organizing great. Maybe you have people who are interested in that. How do you figure out how much money to charge them? Yeah, so there's there's a few pieces here. The first thing actually is that you will discover that pretty much. No one wants to be the Guinea pig, or no one wants to be the first person literally. Literally in history that you've ever done something for so a great thing to do is to pick a small number this. You know you don't want us to go on forever, but pick maybe three people who you can get to agree to be your volunteer clients, and you do it totally pro Bono and you do it because you wanNA. Get testimonial and. And you WANNA get referrals and that way you're able to to actually approach future clients with a lot more confidence because you can say. Oh well, your your closet. Situation is just like a a person that I worked with a while ago. She had XYZ problem and I think we can solve. Your is the exact same way that client is reassured because. Because aw, she's seen this before. Okay, I know she can help me. Maybe you have some nice before and after pictures and it's it's convincing, so that's number one is it gives you the confidence, and it gives you the ability to charge more because you can prove to people that you actually have gotten results in. It's not just theoretical in terms of. Of how much charge there are a lot of professional communities on the web these days there's sort of like online masterminds. facebook groups things like that for people given professions and I actually run one in the Consulting and executive coaching space, and those are the kind of intimate communities where people can trade information about pricing and things that might be a. A little bit sensitive to disclose. If something is a BBC transaction business to consumer, oftentimes, you can literally just find out on people's websites. Okay, there are closet organizer..

facebook Barron BBC Amazon consultant executive
"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:39 min | 4 months ago

"dorie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Lincoln I'm Jessi Hempel, and this is hello Monday, our show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing us. Okay so quick question. Don't over, think it. What's your plan? B? What are you GonNa? Do if your job goes away in your industry plotlines? because. This is definitely part of what's going on this year. Media companies I spend most of my career working for them. And I've been really crushed to watch so many of my friends and former colleagues. Really talented people get laid off. And it's got me thinking. As we prepare for the next big shift. Maybe we just shouldn't be looking for a job like the one we have. Maybe it's time to look for something else. So how do you begin to do that? If, anyone has a good answer to that question. It's my story Clark. Stories a master every invention. She's written a book on. It called reinventing you. She's written a couple of books and she's a coach and she teaches. She's talked recently. The Business School at Columbia and Duke. which is to say that she's qualified on paper but I'm here to tell you. She's also qualified in person a couple years ago. I called her up for a drink when I needed advice on my own side hustle. Why Dory, well! She's all action tips ideas and she's always in your corner. Fat and she speaks from Experience Doi lost her job after nine eleven. It Really Shuker. Here's story. It's something that has been on my mind for a long time. Honestly, because during one of the last greet national calamities in nine eleven, I lost my job as a newspaper reporter and was unemployed, and was given four days of severance-pay, and suddenly had to support myself, so I really dove headfirst into the question of how do you deal with being laid off and losing your job in the midst of a truly terrible and frightening economic situation so I definitely have a lot of thoughts and ideas to share well so. As a journalist I will say that every year that I have been in this profession I have seen layoffs at the institutions I've worked for and. That is not targeting one institution. It's every institution. It is an industry that is deeply troubled. But nine eleven. That's going back nearly twenty years. What was your life like? Then? What did he think you would do before that happened? Well I think that Somewhat analogous to our current situation. Right now if you are a journalist, let's say it's not really a huge supplies when people get laid off because that's a thing that happens to journalist, but in two thousand one, it was a stunning and shocking thing. A journalists would be laid off because we forget it now, but the year two thousand was literally the best year all time in history for the print journalism industry it was it was dripping in prophets. It was so lucrative and then. I totally remember that not to stop you. But I shortly after that period, but within a decade after that I went to work for Fortune magazine, and they always talked about that trip to Hawaii for the entire editorial staff in the year two thousand. was like this is the life that I want. And that's what I thought I was signing up for Jessie I thought it would be all trips to Hawaii and yet no, so I was I was really in in the first wave of people that was laid off and I. It had literally just never occurred to me that this could happen. I mean first of all. It was my first job out of Grad School, so I didn't know what it was. What but I just never thought the journalism wouldn't be a secure industry and I think for a lot of people who are experiencing a layoff now or who might feel that they are threatened with such a thing down the line. ME. No one for saw a pandemic like this, and so it's not like people have necessarily had a long time to think. Oh, Gosh, I! See All I all my friends around me. Being laid off, I should probably be cooking up a plan. B For many people who are experiencing it today, it is coming like a bolt of the blue, and suddenly they have to deal with this very rapidly in very quickly. If you are in a place where you're needing to come up with something new or you. You suspect that you may in the future. How how do you even start to think about what that means for you? There's a couple of ways to think about it, so the first is about the urgency level essentially because if you are in a position where you don't necessarily need to earn money tomorrow, but you think Oh okay. This is a wakeup call. I need to start planning for it. then. Whenever there's a longer time horizon, you can be a little bit more thoughtful a little bit more. And you can start taking what I will call longer term steps that will position you better down the road and so there's activities that you can do in that situation. Maybe it is starting a blogger, a podcast or starting to write and create content on linked in something that can establish your expertise in your field whether you want to continue in your current one, or maybe you want to plan a longer term, pivot and transition to another one, and those recreate ways to get started lay the groundwork. I WANNA jump in there and really hammer that home a second because this really is your superpower door. You are personally very very good at it. One thing that I think is new about the time that we live in right now is that it used to be that if you were a journalist as you began, I am. Made sense free to be writing on these platforms branding yourself as it were, but today kind of anything that you WANNA. Do Professionally. You'RE GONNA better. Position Yourself for the future if you brand yourself through content. And I think this really overwhelming for a lot of people and a lot of people ask me, and so I would ask you like. Where do I begin? How do I know what is useless? Spinning my wheels, and what matters I? Will second what you're saying. I think it really is important because ultimately when you're creating content, we putting something out into the world. That is the way that people who do not already know. You personally can get a better sense of who you are as a person and what's powerful about that, is it? It eliminates a large part of the risk that's involved in hiring you and whenever you can do that. It is way better for your career if you can make it less risky for people to pick you rather than someone else. That is a great thing, so one of the best ways that you can get started is literally to just make note of all of the questions that people ask you all the time. You're at a cocktail party. You're hanging out with people and they have questions about your field your industry they want to know. Maybe, there's myths or misconceptions that bother you. You know you might have a contrarian opinion you might say. No location based interfaces are not the future of XYZ. While okay. Tell us why share your opinion. put it out there if you don't feel ready to start. Putting your own opinions out there. Something that I tell people is a fantastic way to get started with training wheels is to interview. Other people reach out to colleagues or senior leaders or even somebody potentially who has a book out I can guarantee that that for many people. If you're not talking about you, know world renowned level. Almost anyone with a book wants to promote that book, and if you say hey, can I, can I interview you? Can I talk to you and write something about it even if it's for your linked in page, or if.

Hawaii Fortune magazine Jessie I Experience Doi Lincoln Jessi Hempel reporter Dory Clark Grad School Business School Duke.
Going All In on Sleep Hygiene

Forever35

09:05 min | 5 months ago

Going All In on Sleep Hygiene

"I love what you wrote here you do in our in our little prep document. He said okay. Gone all in on my sleep hygiene. Those words are music to my ears. Well you know I wrote this document before I went to bed last night and then last night was just in party with Mehan insomnia just a sexy dance between the two of us but it was okay. I figured it out I worked through it. I would say insomnia is probably not the maybe it is the right term but just I had a really hard time falling asleep. I could not do it last night. I did all my little things that I try but then finally I've mentioned this on a recent episode of here for you but I got mentioned again. A listener recommended something called good day. Chocolate sleep supplement candy coated pieces with one milligram of Melatonin per piece. Now got some in a grocery order. I should tell you Dorie yes I ordered it. I had done like a whole foods pickup order. Okay and I put this on my list thinking it'd be like a big bottle of vitamins. It is eight pieces of. Oh my gosh. It's so tiny. It's literally like the size of an a little cardboard box the size of an eraser that you get an elementary school. It's a very small. Wow or eight pieces of chocolate and I've already had two of them last night. So like you now loops and I just dropped. What on my desk so just FYI. I I don't know I need to do a little more research on if I can acquire more but they are basically giant chocolate eminem like candies that have Melatonin in them and at one thirty last night I took to them and that did help me transition into sleeping. Okay do you know. Do you know why you weren't able to fall asleep last night. Okay as I confessed to. You already pre recording. I was doing the thing where a looked at my phone late. Yeah and I regret it. I deeply regret it. So let me let me. May I fill listeners? In on kind of just what? I'm Lee the steps. I am taking s please. I would like nothing. So our we've talked about sleep hygiene a lot on forever thirty five and I have always found it to be a struggle and I've had sleep issues in the past and they go hand in hand with my anxiety so i. It's pretty clear to me that this is pandemic related. Yes omnia and stress like I know what it is and I do feel very fortunate that like while I do have to wake up and work and take care of my family. It's not like I have to wake up and be at an office eight o'clock so because when I used to get this kind of sleep. Insomniac used to be at work at eight and it would be this kind of like all night panic about it So so that is. That is very lucky for me. I feel like right now. That is that does help. But I'm trying to figure out ways in which to not Trigger this kind of bedtime sleeping Zayed's so the one thing I need to do that I think really helps get off my phone about an hour before I plan on falling asleep. Okay and that is hard for me because like when I go to wash my face a bring my phone okay. Do you do this studio the no? I put my phone away before I start my whole bedtime routine brain. It's like I want be looking at facebook while I'm washing my face. That's what I do. Here's what I do and like you. Can you're welcome to do or not do this? I don't care if I'm if I'm doing something in the living room like say watching TV. I will finish watching TV. I'll take one last look at my phone. And then I'll plug my phone in the kitchen and then like I'm done with the phone for the night. Ooh And I go into my bedroom. I change into my pajamas or maybe. I'm already in my pajamas. I do my whole you know. Wash my face put on my serums my lotions. I brush my teeth floss etc. Do Yoga Toes. I write in my journal I'll usually read kindle for a little bit Last night I was on my ipad looking for something but I will talk about in a little bit but I try and I try to stay off my ipad because then I get then. It's tempting to look at news websites and I don't want to be doing that and then I usually get so tired. I often fall asleep while reading. Yeah that's amazing like lights on kindle in hand and then I like jerk. Oh Okay and then. I'll put the kindle away turn up late and like really go to sleep. I feel like that's how you know that you hit Middle Age because I do that too and I feel like I would watch my parents do that and be like they are so weird though kick in their bedroom and they both leap with the lights on with books on their totally but like now we're there and it feels good and like you get why you just Kinda like close your eyes mid book. Yes I I've had that experience in my better sleep days and I and I I really admire that. You are so consistent with that that and not the just that it works but that like you. So much of it is forming the habit. And you've done that and you've done that as long as this podcast has been in existence even before you know well. Yeah I mean as discussed on this podcast. I have had to be consistent because of my sleep disorder and even though I still get night terrors. Having a consistent sleep routine does help. So did you talk to anyone. Like did someone guide you through figuring out asleep routine in terms of dealing with your sleep disorder or is this something. There's a lot of articles about it that I consulted. It's also partly why and Matt Matt and I are at odds about this. I like to have my bedroom be cave like I like it pitch dark preferably like blackout curtains. No late getting in quiet as to WHO and he likes to like. He likes to wake up with Natural Light. Which means that there's late seepage. All the time and I so yeah so so that's been that's often been a source of conflict but lake ultimately. I think the person with a sleep disorder wins out a man But yeah like some of the like I've talked about this before but like going to sleep at a consistent time every night is also very important. Yeah Yeah having that wind down period is important earplugs. I mask like do earplugs at night. I do okay okay. Do you have a certain brand of that? You like or is it just kind of like a generic drug store earplug. It's a generic drugstore earplug. I believe the one I have right now are from walgreens great shoutout to Walgreens shout to Walgreens I so I don't know I like a very loud white noise eight. Yes yes and I love the variety of white noise. Machines have cranking up all over my house. I have been finding Melatonin to be very useful and as well as reading and journaling at night. That does really kind of helped me wind down. It's the transition from phone to non phone that has been really hard and maybe I need to move my phone out of the bedroom completely. I've been leaving it on my desk. Which is in my bedroom and as you mentioned you like when we were talking about this previously I think work needs to be kept out of the bedroom but right now. My workspace is literally twenty four inches from my bed. That's very hard right now. I'm sitting at my desk and I can reach behind me and touch my bed. So that is. That is a little tricky. Like I will look at my computer and I'll think of something I haven't done for the podcast and I'll be like oh just do this one flip it. Oh men and do it. So so. That's that's hard for me to. I need to kind of start figuring that out but I will say I have been wearing an eye mask a lot more in not only is it helpful and filtering the light. There's something about the pressure of it. That is comforting. You do you experience that like the jazz header. Caress of an eye pillow against my face. I'm finding very soothing. That's very

Melatonin Insomnia Walgreens Facebook Dorie Insomniac Matt Matt Zayed LEE
Am I Glowing?

Forever35

04:52 min | 8 months ago

Am I Glowing?

"Do you think my skin looks good right now. Yeah I do. Do you think looks like better than normal or the same not to put you on the spot judge my skin but do I have glow you but I think you always have a glow. I recently Tried a new product that we've mentioned listeners. Had written about and I like. Oh Yeah have to try that. I'll give it a go and then we'll try to things I did. I mask okay on Saturday night. Watching my new obsession love is blind same and that mask tightened and made me glow doesn't normally happen and I was like what was your mass. Okay hold on brought it here. It's five Yuna Divine. All seasons bio cellulose mass. Wow where did you purchase this? I didn't purchase it. My friend gave it to me so I didn't buy it okay and I was just like well. I'll give this a go. Sure why not and then it was like I looked in the mirror. It was also like nine o'clock at night and I was in pajamas watching. Tv On my phone. It seemed like a good mask like going out because my skin looked height Like just like in a good way. Yes but then Dorie I use this yesterday. This tart. Knockout tingling treat then which many listeners wrote into us about as a duke for P. Fifty. Oh yes and I was like mom it just gives us a go and then I woke up and my yesterday after I did it. My skin looked so rate and smooth that I was almost like am I. Am I playing mind games with myself and I used it again today. Which probably isn't the best idea. Because it's because it's chemical so oh whoops it's ten. It's ten percent acid complex a blend of salicylic and lactic acids. Oh Yeah and then I lathered my doctor al-Qaeda's oil on after so I'm just giving it like. I don't know when you use new skin care and you're like am I glowing or is this just my brain wanting my face to glory so wear. My Skin looks sneer. Scare does look really good of and I don't know if it's the stuff. Yeah I don't know anyway just. Fyi How often are you really supposed to use that? Well I normally only use like my Pixie Glow. Contact me as a chemical expedient once a week right right right the recommendation of Courtney Chissano yes facialists to the stars stars being us so I would imagine it's a once a week thing and I grabbed just because I was like taking around my little like been of skincare stuff. The other two products so a lot of people recommended this as a dupe for illogic. Reshare P fifteen. Which have you started using again? I have not. Are you over it. I'm not over okay. I just I feel like I've been giving my skin a little bit of a break from chemical experience. Not for any like real reason. I still occasionally use this. Totta Harper resurfacing serum But I do like that. Actually kind of reminds me of good genes. Oh interesting honest. But I haven't been using a ton of them and yeah I mean I. There was a time when I was using using the P fifty. Like almost every when we started this. Podcast you're an everyday P fifty user. Yeah and that. That quickly proved excessive. It was to exfoliating. Yes but I don't know maybe I'll go back to it I did. I did really swear by it. Yeah like you were a die. Hard advocate and. I did not find that it really did much. And then I purchase this other stuff by Yuna Which is another kind of exfoliating. It's vinegar smelling. I think actually does have vinegar in it but I didn't have. I didn't actually really see any results with that. And that's why after using this tar knockout tinkling treatment. Stuff and I said yeah after one use. It is a little sticky going on out. Doesn't have all the ingredients on this. Probably just on the box live to give it a googles. Yeah I I was Kinda like well. Hello Hello you okay. So it has a lot of ages. Yes that's why like I should probably only be using it once a week. Especially CONSIDERING AMERICA. You are slathering on sunscreen right yes. I SLAPPED HER ON CENSORING EVERY ACT. Because when you say you've got two sons anyway so that so. I didn't mean to put you on the spot of like look at my face and judge it but I was genuinely curious if I'm just imagining things if something's happening. I think you're looking

Totta Harper P. Fifty Al-Qaeda Dorie Courtney Chissano America
"dorie" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

13:16 min | 10 months ago

"dorie" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"And standing out which was named number one leadership book in Two Thousand Fifteen by INC magazine. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman she teaches at Duke and writes frequently for the Harvard Business Review. I've been following Dory for years and I couldn't be more thrilled to welcome her today. So welcome dory to what's next. Hey tiffany great to be speaking with you. Well it's just fun to have you on because I've you know. Read your books and followed you for some time and I and I'm looking forward to this conversation but before we dig in then I always start with something I call bullish. Bearish which my listeners have come to really love. It's just three quick questions bullish. You're really four it Bayrischer against it and it's just a way to kind of get the guests ready for the conversation. You're ready for this. Yes are right not painful. And although you were a presidential campaign spokeswoman I didn't pick a political one I wanted to but I did not but maybe we'll get into that ask. I was totally totally wanted to all right. So bullish bearish. I won A. I will be able to replicate a grammy winning jazz album album bullish. Oh not what I expected you to say. I think I will be able to do pretty much everything. Wow so there's a little back story that you've actually been involved with multiple grammy winning jazz album. Hence why pick that. But I'd be like what why I don't understand but that's why so. I may want to ask you more about that. All right the next one is a little fun. Sales is a harder job. The Marketing Mu. I think yes. I'll say bullish on bullish on that. Oh also not what I expected acted Dory you are two for two on me. I thought Recipro- As a marketer that Oh man I'm way off today clearly are i. Can I can explicatives more of these. He's of these things right now. If you'd like or or we can or we can do it later. Tiffany up to you told that because that's a good one 'cause not what I expected. All right in the next one is people can be brands and create brands just like companies sure bullish. Three four three three three four three. I didn't get bearish out of you all right. So I'm GONNA DIG in. I guess and start with a sales marketing one because I often often have this career debate. It's been twenty five years where I can call myself a recovering seller bleed sales blood and I had to learn how to be a marketer and and customer service etc and whenever you know you get sales marketing in the room depending on what industry and what size company etc.. It's always this love. Love hate relationship kind of you know water and oil. But I'm I'm really curious as someone who watches an advises this is for marketing. And brand that you would agree. That sales is harder and I know that harder is in air quotes because I mean all kinds of things but talk me through why you answered that bullish Polish. Yeah so I advise a lot of people in my executive coaching and you know in the in the books that I write like entrepreneurial you who are starting their own businesses and consulting or or coaching or things like that and it's it's interesting because of course there's yes This sort of microcosm where you have to begin from the ground up and create a going concern and certainly at the macro level this is what companies have to do as well no we built. We know that both marketing and sales are critically important. You have to have both of them but sales is something As I they have kind of created a a formula around how to how to advise the people that I coach around it what I tell them this in the early days of your business you have to over over index on sales because it is about the hand to hand combat of getting a revenue stream and having enough cash flow to keep your business going and it's only then once the wheels are turning and you have validated that you have something in the marketplace that you can begin to lift your head up and have more of a long term orientation which fundamentally is what marketing is about marketing is about. How do you make the sale a year from now? Not How do you make the sale tomorrow and you know sales is much more Focused on the here and now and so at different stages in your business you have to have both but what I I have. Would I have often seen Holding many people back especially people who are highly talented educated successful professionals who want to to start their own businesses and this is often a demographic that I that I work with people who are Either high level executives looking to become consultants wouldn't or People who may already doing it but just want to up level at the challenge is oftentimes that sales involves uh a level of putting yourself out there and risking director rejection in a way that many smart people just cannot countenance and I think it is emotionally harder for people. Marketing is a hard discipline and it involves A lot of strategy involves really really being good at at what you do but if you are rejected quote unquote it's usually a lot less direct. It's it's if somebody didn't take your article or maybe nobody retweeted your article or something like that. As compared to a person face to face saying no and I think that the emotional fortitude fortitude that is required for sales is something that is that is probably much harder than what is necessary marketing. Well I I liked what you said about Marketing being more of a long term view. Because I feel like that's actually shifted a little bit right. I think it's true that marketing absolutely has to have the long term. I'm but with all the digital marketing advancements we've had in mar tech in the last. Let's say five years right. which is it used to be two hundred products or one hundred fifty products now? It's eight thousand products for tackling that MAR tech stack in trying to improve marketing. That I feel like marketing now actually has to balance both short and long-term where salespeople those people it yes. It's more short term if you're selling kind of a commodity I'm over simplifying right but a commodity product but you may have very long term big relationship sales go over time. There's always the outliers in the comments. Both you and I are making but do think marketing now has more of this challenge between this kind of short term you know. Lead generation integration can even be driving sales through through ECOMMERCE online All of that which feels a lot more sales right short term right. Yeah I mean certainly. You're right that the the lines are blurring and especially when you're dealing with Some of the the more The technical aspects you know online Online marketing efforts there linked in much more tightly to sales But but yeah in in sort of a a a you know a a template you could say the sort of archetypal thing When I when I am envisioning marketing it is kind of the slow burn? Like a lot of the activities that I talk about with my clients Around the concepts of how do you become a recognized expert in your field. You know that was the topic of my book. bookstand out and it's that's never something that that happens overnight If you are establishing an expert reputation as an individual L. or a strategy of preeminence in your industry as a as a company certainly there's there's lots of great things that you can do to make an immediate mark mark but but it is generally a strategy to please itself out over a period of time Thus I think that the fundamentally only longer term orientation of marketing but is technology changing it. Lake everything absolutely right right. Well you know another part sort of marketing is really around this whole brand which is one of the other sort of bullish embarrassed. Questions I had on people can be brands just like companies and I know that you spend and a lot of time helping people understand You know they say people could be you know entire teams or individuals and and these are my words but almost becoming more self aware of what their unique strengths are in order to double down on those begin to think about how do I create More of a personal brand internally like people go oh we need to be done oh she or he is exactly that person right because because your brand starts to associate with that kind of insider understanding and so where would you advise individuals to start on this journey. Ernie of you know what I actually want to build my brand up internally for being known for something or even external and becoming more of a thought leader. What's what started that journey? You would advise vise people to go on. Yeah it's a it's an important question. Fundamentally of of done as you indicated a lot of research into this question you know how wow do you really get known for your expertise Either inside your company inside your industry and what I discovered and I wrote about this in standout written about it for the Harvard Business Review. Is that fundamentally. There are three key elements of Becoming a recognized expert and they are content creation creation social proof and your network. And I'll explain that really briefly But the three really work together in a powerful way I'm I'm content. Creation is is basically just as the name implies you have to somehow in some format be sharing your ideas now. It could be something as low key as being the person who speak up in meetings or doing a lunch and learn for your colleagues or it could be something You know slightly. More elaborate like speaking in presenting was ending conference or writing an article for an industry newsletter or your company Your your company intranet or something like that but the the bottom line is if you don't share your ideas no one will know that you have ideas much less that they're good ideas see have to get that out there. Number two is social proof oof which basically is is just a shorthand in term used by psychologists for your credibility. Why is it that you're credible inuit? Why should people listen to you and so there's a lot lot of levers that you can move to try to help with whether it's Becoming the head of a professional association in your town maybe it's volunteering to be the chair of a certain committee. Eighty may be it is Working on you know working with a key client or you know having having some other thing maybe your team Got The you know by far the best results of any team in the company you know whatever it is but it gives you the credibility so people say oh I should I should be listening to her and then finally it's your network because of course if you're doing these other pieces that's great but if you're doing them in isolation it doesn't really do a lot of good. You need a network of people who you know so that you can tap into the best ideas but also that they know you and can become an ambassador to start spreading the word about what you're doing if you have those three the pieces in place. That's really what enables you to to get known and get recognized yet and I'd say this there's a couple of questions I get fairly frequently and this is one of them how to use sort of balance a brand when you work in a big company so you know your own brand of what you want to be known for not just internally but external like how do you balance that. That's one big question. I get another one is the sort of thought leadership title or thought leader title. And and I'm sure you know Sally Hogshead and it was this whole like. What are your strengths like? So you could learn sort of what you were going to pivot into and and One of the pieces of advice she gave was listened to what people say about you and that sort of shapes like where you have the strengths that you may not be aware of and so when people started saying. Hey I think she's really a thought leader or she's coming up with unique content than I felt like I had that social proof right that okay you know I if I just call myself that that's a little bit different but if people are starting to say that in agree with it then I feel a lot more comfortable having people say in so. That's this one question I get often is. I WANNA become viewed more as a thought leader or I wanted to be known for these certain things and what would you advise someone to say. What should I be known for? How do I even identify what I'm going to use those those three things like? What am I going to create content about and what network would I reach out to like?.

Dory Harvard Business Review marketing and sales INC magazine grammy Recipro Sally Hogshead executive director
"dorie" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Someone who really encouraged me right and who was a good editor and I I never saw well at the separation between developing recipes and writing to me writing the recipe instructions was a form form of creative writing. It was a way of imagining somebody in the kitchen imagining talking to them. It was a conversation for me Suet. Do it always felt like like writing. It always felt like like I was talking to the person who would be falling my recipes so that was I don't I hadn't odd experience of friend of mine. Akali friend was was going to award nomination and a book of mine. What was the baking with? Julia Book was just been published in and she said to me and I hope you don't get nominated and when I could catch my breath I said what are you saying being and she said well all you did was write the book and I've thought about that's twenty some odd years ago and I've thought I always think about that because I think what is it about is a cookbook. Just the recipes zippy's is a cookbook. A cookbook is something you right. Do we think about the importance of writing. When it's instructional optional I think it is a whole peace and it never occurred to me that being just the writer with anything less than being so it's I think about this a lot? I think that I would love to seek cookbooks thought about as books yeah well as cookbook pieces of writing. There is so much personality that goes into the even just the instructional part of a cookbook. It's unique due to its writer. Yeah I mean you have a very particular way of raiding your recipes of. It's it's it's our voice. It's in Yeah it's instruction and pep talk and like walking people back from the cliff with baking yeah. Thank you very much which we'll be right back with Dorie Greenspan and joy the baker after this quick break. If you're serious foodie unique to know about traeger wood fired.

Julia Book Dorie Greenspan writer editor
"dorie" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"And now Christina. I'm so excited. Everyone came up to hear me talk. So my name's Christina I have two main interests cookies and cats and I do both for a living. I've two bakeries called macaroni parlor then there's meow Parlor New York's first cat cafe on UNAI throw the cat equivalent of this jubilee every year call Jackson galaxies cat camp. I'm a lucky person. I have a wonderful family. I have amazing easing friends. I have great employees and I've helped over five hundred cats find homes. However things weren't always this way? The loneliest period of my life was about ten years ago. I'm not sure what I was looking for when I moved to New York but I knew I was afraid to to stay in the suburbs and afraid that I would just settle as a teenager. I didn't know what settling was. I didn't know if it meant fulfilling the dreams of my immigrant parents by becoming a lawyer or if it was choosing a path because it seemed easy I don't know what are y but I had felt uneasy for very long time. So I just kept busy busy. I graduated college in three and a half years then went back to school to get an associate's and then back to school to learn how to sew instead of pursuing higher education as just signing up for school for the sake of filling my time I took internships and eventually jobs my dream companies only to look around one day Eh and wonder why didn't fit in. I'm an introvert who felt so uncomfortable in a city of eight million people that I was thinking into into myself. It was my mom who encouraged me to sign up for my first speaking class at that point. She knew I would never be a doctor or a lawyer and she a new unhappiness look like she told me that. When I was in preschool we had a weekly Bacon class and it was my favorite thing in the world? She knew I was lonely than to partly because I didn't speak a lot partly because I didn't understand what people were saying and partly because they constantly felt like other but food has no language barriers and it was my favorite part of the school week so as an adult I start to take baking classes over time late nights of anxiously waiting in for the night to end and the next workday to begin turned into our spend on the floor with my feet propped up against the oven watching breads rise cookies caramelized caramelized and magic happen. Finally something felt right. I'd spent so long chasing shadow. They never stop to look at what was in front of me that in a city with thousands of restaurants fast casual joints and cafes though the thing that made me happiest could be a career I went all in I use recession as an excuse to shrug and say the desk job wasn't going anywhere anyway. Within a year I was in pastry school met my now husband who's over there and we started macaroni parlor but anyone who has opened a business knows the first few years are still lonely. You don't have time to socialize because you're understaffed. You're afraid to step out because replaced my burn down in fifteen minutes. You're gone and you go to sleep so late that you wake up tired but that kind of loneliness didn't hurt I had a purpose and it was tangible and things felt right during this period. I didn't have many friends ends but I had the Internet I used to write about my life about owning a business and the things I was learning. I didn't write for an audience. I wrote because for the first time in a long time I'd a lot to say and so I wrote into the abyss of the Internet much to my surprise it spoke back. If you love a New York has a cat cafe it only exists because my business partner sent me a letter five years ago and I was so touched that I hired her her to work in my kitchen so one who works for me now read my blog when she was in pastry school last month someone from Australia message me to say that she thought me recently because you starting her own business. I haven't written for many years now because I'm not lonely but there are still people out there looking. It made me realize that we're all looking looking for some connection. It's what makes us alive Dory understood this years ago before we had twitter and instagram that will food is a necessity city. It's so much more than that. It's about people it's about connecting with others about memories and experiences her cookbooks were the first I had ever read included stories about a recipe thirteen cookbooks in Dory's invited people all over the world in some of the greatest kitchens and more recently into her own own kitchen. I I found through her world peace cookies name because they are good enough to bring world peace then there was Tuesdays with Dory where people connected connected with each other from their own homes by blogging recipes entire communities sprung out of doors writing and everyone who participated how their own story to tell she helped people create memories. Today we have so many more tools at our grass to allow us to stay in touch to meet new people to double tap or Swipe right right we can invite people to peek into our kitchens with photos taken on a phone or quite literally like joy invite people to cook besides us in our actual kitchen joys joys one of those people who figured out a way to combine storytelling food and the desire to connect both on and offscreen using these new tools she gets it. I wouldn't be surprised if that's helping out someone who is lonely today. Food has stories to tell people to feed look forward to listening to these women talk about their careers. Here's the human element of food and how social media has impacted the landscape from their first cookbook. Dori was one of the first people I met in the food industry three men T in a mentorship program and for years. She sent me words of encouragement. Every few months got an email from her about something she saw that she wanted to share or deceive. I was practicing self care or just to send some love. Doria was one of my first friends as an adult and she claimed she had nothing thing to teach me. She may not know this. The much of what I've learned from her has shaped entirety of my career so without off my chest. I'm so happy for everyone here to listen to the Magic to come because I know it's going to be so beautiful. The I'm going to start off my conversation with Dory today by telling her a story so I was saying in two thousand and six I was working as a baker in two bakeries. I wasn't joy the baker so it was funny that I was Baker into bakeries because I was an enthusiastic home Baker and I had finagled my way into to baking jobs because I realized that if you like to bake and you will get to work at three thirty in the morning you're hired you know so I would get to work at two thirty in the morning and start baking because a lot of times I would mess things up and have to throw them away so then at three thirty ready when real bakers came in I'd be like hey guys just starting fresh just here ready that happened a lot career and so much chocolate Mousse okay. I'll get to it training you in the speaker like coming prepared with extra black bags to throw yes yes and after I get off of work I would go home on the way home. There was a bookstore and in the bookstore was your baking from my home to yours book and I couldn't afford to buy it but I would sit in the aisle and copy down your few recipes word word for word it's no problem and then I would take the notebook to the bakery at two thirty in the morning and try some of your recipes and what was that wasn't the one that didn't work was it that you know they always and what was so wonderful to me about that book. Is that your your technique was so helpful but it was written from the perspective and from the heart of a home Baker and so I take it to this new job in in a place where I was making friends with my fear and I got so much comfort and skill from it and I bought the book I eventually could afford it. I had to save up but but the mother in me is thinking. If only I had known this I would've since you the book story they don't do that. People need to buy books so yeah so I wanted to tell you that story and then ask you you think you ask you how your kitchen journey started and what were the books that maybe you held close to your chest as you were embarking on your journey from Home Baker to professional personal home Baker to Home Baker. No I am a home home big can I just I worked with Julie. This has not answering your question but I will call okay so I had the amazing the amazing good fortune to work with Julia Child in the nineties. I wrote baking with Julia which was the book that accompanied her TV series and we shoot every day and one day Julius said I want to play Hooky. We play with me and so I had I still have a little MIATA which is like a car the size of Jelly Bean holdaway. You have Miata a red one a red one yet yeah and it's it's a convertible but Julia you couldn't you couldn't take the top down because your hair right and Julia had sized is twelve or thirteen feet and so I kind of had to plead her to get her into the carpet. This isn't this isn't the story. I want to tell you so. Julia said let's play Hooky. I Origami her into the car. Her idea of Hooky is going to the supermarket and so we're we're shopping around. She's helping people choose a good melon and at some point she turned to me and she put her arm around me. She's six tall and she said you know we make such a good team and I was really touched and she said we make a good team because his were just a couple of home bakers and even after all the Julia had done and all the Chia taught all of us. She really thought of herself as a home Baker and I have never stopped thinking of myself that I burnt my parents kitchen down when I was twelve I wasn't. I'm GonNa do this very quickly. I wasn't allowed to bay. I got married when I was nineteen. I'm still married to Michael Greenspan and I learned to cook and Bake because I I learned to cook because I had to and I learned to bake because I really wanted to and I my book the book that is tattered and has spots. I thought they were chocolate. I have no idea what they are. All over. The place is me to heater she. He was my does it. Does anybody know maybe heater so she was my hero zero. Everything I made from her books worked. Her directions. Were so precise. When I started writing about food I had made it in my my minehead she was she taught me to Bait? What is your favorite thing of hers to Bake? Do you have a favorite. She had a lemon cake in her the first book that I made for I made it every year for our son's teachers for their Christmas gift. I made it for potlucks. I made it for everything everything and when her the paperback version came out that recipe wasn't there and one book later she wrote and she said here's my revised version..

Baker Julia Child Home Baker Dory New York Christina Bake Jackson twitter Doria Dori partner Australia Julie Michael Greenspan Julius
"dorie" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"And food pantries to eat especially during the summer months when school is out the folks over at Food Bank for New York City want you to know that unlike school hunger doesn't take a break help them. I'm an child hunger by providing meals to families and children in need during this challenging summer months visit foodbank. NYC DOT ORG to learn how you can volunteer spread the word and and more hi bomb squad your listening adding to Radio Cherry bomb the number one female focused food podcast in the universe. I'm your host Kerry diamond. Let's thank today sponsors Lu Cordon Bleu Lou culinary schools and traeger wood fired grills. You folks are the bomb. Thank you so much to everyone who came to our food for thought event in Asheville North Carolina this this past weekend you can probably hear my voice that I lost my voice a little at least longtime listeners you probably can too much excitement. It was wonderful meeting so many of you and hearing from amazing guests like chefs Katie Button Chidi Kumar and Ashley Shanty. We'll be airing that episode very soon so stay tuned and thank you to the folks at carry gold the maker of beautiful Irish cheese and butter for supporting our tour and Asheville by the way is a very fun place to visit great restaurants so many cool makers and you're surrounded by the most beautiful mountains and scenery. You should plan a visit our next big event is jubilee Seattle. We've got a great lineup planned for you. Including Chefs Rene Ericsson mckinney Howell and Rachel Yang talk about supergroup Alison Roman is flying in all all the way from New York City and we'll have lots of local luminaries there including Linda Eder Shang an Errand Goyo Alga. We'll have lots of food and drink and great panels and talks. We cannot wait to celebrate the Pacific northwest bomb. Squad tickets are on sale now at Cherry Bomb Dot Com and event will be taking place Saturday November second at at Block forty-one speaking of Jubilee for today's show were airing a conversation from jubilee two thousand nineteen in New York City. It's a chat between Dorie Worry Greenspan and Joy Wilson who many of you know and love as joy the baker these powerhouse home bakers have so much wisdom to share when it comes to baked goods careers. There's cookbooks and more introducing them is Christina hough the CO owner and Co founder of macaroni Parlor and meow Parlor right here in New York City Dory just happens to be Christina's mentor. Christina shares her story of how baking changed her life and we couldn't be happier to share it.

New York City Christina hough Asheville Lu Cordon Bleu Lou Katie Button Chidi Kumar Rene Ericsson mckinney Howell Seattle macaroni Parlor Linda Eder Shang Kerry North Carolina Dorie meow Parlor Co founder Joy Wilson Ashley Shanty CO Greenspan Alison Roman
Sheet Masks Are Overrated

Forever35

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Sheet Masks Are Overrated

"Let's get into it with a really important email. I will say i receive. I'll read this email since it's directed to you. Okay just let me narrated narrated alway. The subject is in all caps sheet. Masks are overrated. Here's the email thank you dorie for speaking your truth smiley face. Thank you dear listener. Breath it short and to the point. That's it agreeing with me yet. Perfect perfect email dream dory's dream sustain ct on her side. I love it. I love to and you know we've had had so many different reactions to your sheet mask declaration of festa da and i have found honestly since he declared yourself not a sheet mask fan <music>. I'm using the more interest not james bell against you aren't youth a little secret contrarian low scared of confrontations. The privately honestly just reminded me that of sheet masks and so i've been doing them more. I don't know oh. I don't know what it is. I did a bunch when we traveled a few weeks ago to florida. I brought one but didn't do it. Oh look at you. I was like how will the sheet masks. I might as well get rid of with them. I don't wanna waste them. That would be so wasteful. I mean we could do a giveaway of dory's rejected sheep past. How a lawrence. I'll take them off your hand or you know you can put them. Give them to my by nothing group

Dory James Bell Lawrence Florida
"dorie" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Evening this is Dorie masses and and I wanna overcome your problems I have a different way I want to share with you I just want to say before I continue my program our sunbathing yesterday and I fell on my head as a big bump and so I couldn't do it last night Burch I'm all right now and if I have a little problem you'll excuse me we have a program set up just in case I have a little problem so what I'd like to do is to sure you from every known disease about ninety five percent of them based in a motion no I want to give you an example since I'm always getting new people to listen to our program so I want to show you something very very simple and I will continue with this very very simple in many different ways yes could enable you know that is obvious the those wanting and straining to find the purpose of life and the others are just looking for pleasure pleasure pleasure and feeling good about money and girlfriends and everything loving power we are divided between these two there's a a mark in the middle as separates us sorry I went to spend my life in seeking the secret of life the purpose of it our are we just want to know to let my listeners understand the arm of the Jewish heritage I love this Jesus our in he is different are no he created who is able to cure people just by touch and the look I wanted to find that it took a long time but I had a beginning and that's enabled me to go forward to find the purpose of my life now having said that what I want to do is the cure you but I cannot cure you as a human being I have to have let.

Burch Dorie ninety five percent
"dorie" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Committee says hey, you wanna get in the restaurant business with me up? Yeah. Boy's dream all those women booze. You know, I'm all for young and going, so I I wouldn't business where them and I saw my business with them. This guy. This guy was a jerk. No business. Business skills whatsoever. Just you know, he's been in the restaurant business in peds something going forward. He no people skills. You know, that's not a college and on our service motivation properly. Good business. I wouldn't worry about making prophet worried about getting giving people something they really wanted to know get sales and not to make money out of it. Anyway, we can push to run the shelving. He hit. You're gonna buy me are gonna buy him. Our? So I didn't have any money. And that's probably not gonna be able to buy them out. Maybe by me out. And I'll just go on my way to my father comes up to me and he's a hardworking middle class manager. He says I'll get the money for you. Being italian. I was wondering where he's going to get the money. A de don't worry about it. I'll take care Dorie get the money for you. We got the money. Would you get it is a mobile home? Myself. Wow. To this day. I say it's not the sweet smell of success to make sure work hard to fear of failure fear of failure motivation. But you don't want that to fail. So you work your butt off to make that thing work being scared. Paralyzed. And that's what I've done. I to fear failure just keeps be going even anything. I do today. Feel this one may just gonna hurt my reputation. Maybe. That makes you makes you motivation makes you do things beyond and above. What is your? I mean, obviously you've.

Dorie
"dorie" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Dorie Greenspan wants mitt chip ice cream lobster and then and ice cream sundae with hot fudge and toasted nuts for her last meal, but for years and years and years, she ate a much more modest meal every single day for lunch rice with sunflower seeds, and raisins, so interesting doesn't come from. I don't know where it came from. I used to wake up in the morning and make a pot of rice. And I would have the rice hot for breakfast. And then for lunch. I would have it at room temperature with little olive oil over at salt pepper nuts, and raisins, and then whatever was left over. I would you know put away we he'd or fry. I just hit this thing for race years. It lasted years. Are you a creature of habit in general just with the rice guess things that I do all the time? But in Fant I am somebody who just follows her wims on one of the things I do. The kitchen all the time is not do what I say I'm gonna do. So I can plan a menu, and my husband will come into the kitchen and say, oh, I thought you were making chicken, I think I had another idea or, you know, I'm the kind who goes to the market with a list and comes home with nothing from the. So I'm not really a creature of habit. But lunch. Yeah. Yeah. With launch makes it easier. I mean, you're probably coming up with recipes all the time. And so it's like one less thing. You have to think about is your lunch. I also liked it. Was just good. I am fascinated with people who can eat the same thing every day because I am. So not like that. I've tried to be one of those meal planning people that you read about in women's magazines where you're supposed to make a big pot of something on Sunday night and eat it throughout the week and by Wednesday. I hate this dish, I can't eat it anymore. I literally don't eat it ever again. Sometimes because I'm so sick of it. But Donald Gorski takes the cake in the creature of habit department, even though he never eats cake because the only it's big Macs. Let's start at the beginning. When did you have your first Big Mac? I Big Mac on me seventeenth nineteen seventy two. And it was the day. I got my first car. And when I got my first car I wanted to go with McDonald's. And then I went to McDonald's, and I bought three big Macs. And I my three big Macs. The cartons in the backseat. I ended up coming coming back. A couple more times that day for three times eight nine big Macs on may seventeenth nineteen seventy two. And then I started in big Macs. Every. Ever since in. What prompted that? Why did you start eating them everyday? And why were you eating so many like so many I probably 'cause compared to like eating chocolate for the first time or something you can't get enough of it at first. And then after a while you just can't eat as much chocolate as you want anymore. I quite a few big Macs for about a month. And then I started coming down into a phase where it was like three a day or down to a day. But it wasn't never doing nine. Again. What gummy started on? It is just that Big Mac or my favorite food, and there's nothing better in the world. And so I just wanted to leave my favorite food every day. So what's your first ever big neck on may seventeenth or had you had them before? No. That was my first one ever was may seventeenth nineteen seventy two in. So were you still living with your family when when you got your car in nineteen seventy-two? Yes, I was my mom later on made me promise each one a day for a while. They're in a little bit worried. Just eat those all the time. So there's..

Donald Gorski Dorie Greenspan McDonald
"dorie" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"dorie" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Expert brandy Malloy, and I'm bringing back one of my favorite guests from a past episode. I IRA vedic counselor. Jody Boone says if you're somebody who loves sweets, then you're going to desert anyway. So eat it first. So that you don't end up over eating. Do you eat the save lunch? Every day. Do you always have a hard boiled egg for breakfast? We're gonna talk about being a creature of habit with the most intensely habitual creature that I've ever encountered Donald Gorski from Fonda lack Wisconsin is in the Guinness Book of world records for eating more big Macs than anyone else on the planet. How many are you up to at this point eating at least two a day since nineteen seventy two. Number thirty thousand four hundred ninety three intrigued good. There's a lot more coming up from Donald and act three of the show. But I right now my interview with Dorie Greenspan. I want to know about your history because I learned a new word today. I saw that you were going to school for gerontology die pronounce. All right. Yeah. You take you did a good job. And then you quit that job and got into cookie baking. But first of all what is gerontology? What were you studying? How did you transition to cookies so join tala jeez. The study of aging so I got married when I was nineteen years old junior college never cooked before. And all I wanted to do was learn to cook. And so I cooked baked in cooked baked in I got a job, and I went to graduate school and got this degree in gerontology. And when actually I'm all, but dissertation couldn't be finishing. I didn't want to do this. I couldn't face going back to work. And my husband said, why don't you get a job baking you love baking? I had no skill. No training. No talent. But but I did get a job baking got fired a month later, but that's a whole. Other story. So the transition really was from following a very sit traditional course to saying. Hey, this isn't what I wanna do. Yeah. And starting to bake the reason that you didn't cook. Until you got married stemmed from something kind of traumatic that happened in your childhood. Well, it was. It's yes. My poor mother. I burn the kitchen down like completely burning around. No, kind of the cabinets above the oven. Okay. Trash the C E N. It'd just been renovated. I tried to make frozen. I'd never cooked anything. I wanted to make frozen French fries for my friends in. So it said fried, and I thought you need all and I put a big pot of boy of oil up to boil tongue twister put a lid on it. And when I took the little out came these they were mazing flames. They were blue. They were yellow they were orange and we call the fire. So you got the marshmallows out and you made s'mores instead. So I hadn't cooked before I wasn't allowed to cook. After how old were you? When that happened. I was seventh grade. So what was I twelve twelve? Yeah. You on a James beard award for your last book, which was all about cookies. Yes, I know out of a huge book in a lifetime of baking. You can't pick one cookie. But what is your go-to cookie? What is your favorite or your most requested so morally, I would say I can't pick a favorite. But there is a cookie that really special to me, and it's the world. Peace cookie the world peace cookie. So it's the cookie this on the cover of Dory's cookies, but it's also a cookie that I've been making, you know, it's now almost about twenty years. So I the recipe came to me originally from peer air me, and it was called the Korovou cookie. And he hit created. He's a Parisian pastry. Chef he created for restaurant in Paris. And I published it in my book, para sweets, and I thought finished that's it. And then what was coming? The Ovid or New York apartment and neighbor said, you know, those cookies I love them. I don't know what you call them. We call them world peace cookies, and I thought with the name like that they're going into my next book. If you Google world peace cookies there are now over a million..

Donald Gorski Dorie Greenspan brandy Malloy Jody Boone James beard award Google Wisconsin Paris New York Fonda nineteen years twenty years
"dorie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"dorie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Essay for the rest of tonight here in our area. This guy should remain. Partly cloudy will have a low of about twenty seven tonight partly sunny tomorrow, high near thirty eight with wind chills between twenty five and thirty five degrees. And be sure to join us in the Greenspace as Dorie Greenspan and Melissa Clark. Hold a holiday cookie masterclass Wednesday night at seven you can find tickets online at WNYC dot org slash Greenspace. It's eight PM. This is WNYC FM HD and AM New York. Saturday.

Dorie Greenspan Melissa Clark New York thirty five degrees
"dorie" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"dorie" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Know the patriots as every NFL team. Is there banged up weekly? Yes. And for the patriots a big name Sony. Michelle, rob gronkowski. They've had offense of line problems. And they just keep grinding away. Yeah. They sure do. I mean, it just seems like they find players around the league or better on their reserve list. They come right in and stars. Second down and six Brady fakes the hand off looking throwing left side and his receiver fell down. Josh, gordon. Lost his footing at the twenty two yard line and a ball sailed over his head. He was open and it was good pass. He just slipped and fell that's two first downs. Now, the Josh Gordon either didn't catch or was not in the position to catch the ball. That's what stopped strives third and six, and you just get the sense that so far today the New England Patriots offense has been just a shade off. Third and six from the thirteen Brady and the gun five man rushed on right side line for Gordon. Incomplete completed the thirty five yard line well covered by Dorie Jackson. And the patriots go three and out. Gray one of his last five pass it. Yeah. You know, really, you know, Dorie Jackson was in great position that time, but he was facing up the receiver and I've seen that call in terms of even defensive pass interference. But he.

patriots Josh Gordon Dorie Jackson Brady NFL rob gronkowski Michelle Sony Gray thirty five yard twenty two yard
"dorie" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"dorie" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"Gypsy I, if you really look at the defense, I think the problem is two-fold. Now you say we should move on from Peters. He's gone. There's nothing we can do about it. Let's focus on the guys that are here. All right. I'm willing to do that with Peter's. I do think that Peter's absent is part of why the defense is poor way that it looks certainly part of the story, but let's see what they do at the second round draft pick. Let's see how the season of I'm willing to move on from the Marcus Peters conversation for the sake of this discussion. But part of the problem with the chiefs defense is you have not drafted a developed really well. The guys that are currently here, like I remember being sold from John Dorsey and Brett VH tunnel pass. Joe was a project by year two. He was gonna hit the ground running that last year. Very similar to Patrick. Mahomes was a redshirt year and a year or two. He was gonna hit the ground running. He was going to be a part of the team. I look this up. He is played in twelve percent of of the defensive snaps. He can't even get on the field in year two after learning your defensive scheme. All of last season after another off CD learning. This defense he's already been passed by Bruin speaks. I remember you a really high on Dory know Daniel man. He hybrid guy played at Clemson. He was the guy that played a high level could at least give you something Dorie. No. Daniel has been on the field for one snap the entire time. The chiefs played one hundred sixty four defensive snaps dorey. No, Daniel was on there for one. It was like he just wanted on the field for the one I accidentally. He just magically delivered on the field. Man, that's part of the problem. The chiefs have been unable to develop defensive players. You can instantly plug into the defense and can play from day one. Think about over the last, what five years. It's only been two players, Marcus Peters. Chris Jones. I've been the only guy that you felt that you could plug in from day one and could really help your team that part of the problem with the defenses, man, where's the help come and where's the reinforcements coming tunnel passing? It was supposed to be a guy that can help you with the password. He can't get on the field at this point. I think I think the deal with Paseo and I'll give him somewhat of a pass. And the reason I say that is because he is a project, he did come out of Villanova. They liked what he had, but they knew they were going to have to work with him. And one of the things that we've been talking about with with the chiefs at the Russian three guys, which means that you're dropping deformed, you're dropping Justin Houston you're up and all those guys back into pass coverage. I don't think that's necessarily tunnel passengers thing, you know, and and if you're going to go after the after the quarterback, then you have four on one side, you're going to have Justin Houston on the other. So I don't know if there's really a place to put him right now. But at some point though, don't you create a space like if you were a guy that wreaked havoc, if you were a guy that was a dominant run stop yet or guy that we're going to get to the owner again, like win that battle in practice, even have that opportunity, you know? And he has done. And I don't wanna make it seem like tunnel pass and you. I know he played at Villanova. I don't wanna make it seem like he was some seventh round draft pick. You're rolling the dice with just went the top sixty pick on Tano passing you by at least year to you should be getting some kind of fruits where I can see something with him, and he's a guy your second round draft and I'm not giving you a pass in the NFL when you were picked in the second round. If you were a six round draft pick. All right. I'm willing to have a different kind of leeway with you. I mean, look around the NFL guys that are drafted in similar position. Tano Paseo can contribute to your.

chiefs Marcus Peters Mahomes Daniel Paseo Justin Houston Tano Paseo Villanova NFL Peter Tano Joe Dorie Dory John Dorsey Clemson Chris Jones Brett VH Bruin
"dorie" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"dorie" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"And by hard i mean literally or figuratively so ring into tell me the hard thing i'm singing about and if you correct you're gonna earn a bonus point by telling me the name of the song or even just the artist that i'm parodying ready yes here we go ticks let's chew romaine with some crossing pour your iq knew that guy jamal the skull a skull is correct bonus point can you name the original song or artist i'm drawing a complete blank right now and everyone and collective side everyone everyone's very disappointed in jamal purple haze jimi hendrix oh i'm to big gonna make some brownies and banana bread these things that crunch shaw ride then the gods show flack clin walnuts walnuts is the answer want to say there's a note in the script says do not accept pecans they have smooth shells i do not think p cons look like klingons head they don't know look for the bonus point can you name the artist the white stripes seven army the threat okay then to mount dorie tv dressed in black minna b.

jimi hendrix jamal mount dorie minna b