17 Burst results for "Dorian Warren"

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

06:02 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Melissa not thinking in pine aries on the one hand truth versus deception or costs versus benefits of passing or legal fiction or real lived experience and this deep dive on passing really taught me that it it opens up a range of questions which are binary way of thinking doesn't quite capture that there is fluidity and complexity and the notion of passing weather. It's race or gender. I know that for both of us. We hope is that everybody who is engaging with us. Who's listening who's talking. We'll continue this conversation that we've really just scratched the surface here and we hope that you'll keep asking questions for which there are not easy answers. It was a big show and yet it still feels like we only just begin. But i wanna thank all of our guests who contributed to today's deep dive for rebecca hall. Alison hobbs araya lester. Dean mantell carla holloway. Brit bennett lauren. Michelle jackson and bliss broyard and. That's it for days. Deep dive on passing dory and as always. Thank you for taking this dive with me. Explicit alarm you to join you on this deep dive and hey you had a lot of thoughts on this too. So now it's your turn. This is erica. I'm calling from raleigh north carolina. I use the my heritage. dna To find out my incest brie and not really. A lot of it was surprising. I'm sixty five percent nigerian. Thirteen percent era leonian ends twenty one point five percent other echinacea -ties and i knew that there would be some irish scottish welsh just based on my family's last night but it was very interesting and helpful to kinda know where we're from and looking forward to continuing the journey. This is diane off from tacoma washington. I was pleasantly surprised to be able to track down a great great grandmother in my dna analysis discovered that. I am to percents north african along with the scandinavian and italian heritage. But it did confirm my relationship with this woman from the late. Eighteen hundred. Seventy nine thousand nine hundred. This is before quality reese. I'm calling from las vegas nevada. I use a twenty three and me genetic test. It told me some interesting things. But it wasn't as specific as far as my exact ethnicity. As i would have liked so i think i'm going to try another company to see if i can get a little bit more information because an african americans are born in america so i have a lot of different pieces that make me up. Name is delia. smith. And i did the twenty three meet genetic tests some time ago and i found that i am fifty five percent european which was kind of what i knew because my mother's caucasian or white and my father's black or they were there all passed away. But i also found out that i do not have native american ancestry. Even though i i do. I have to be very miniscule amount because both sides of my family have claimed to be blackfoot indian descendants and also one side of my family. My father's side mentioned debbie also had cherokees. But that doesn't seem to be the case. But i am fifty five european and almost forty five percent african. And it's very informative. It was it was a very good experience. I even got the book that has everything print out all about my dna. My name is lonnie. I live in bend oregon. And i did do a twenty three and me cast and it was chock full of all kinds of surprises racially. We were always told that we were native american and turns out. No we definitely weren't. And also i found out who i thought. My father wasn't and Turns out i might. Biological great-grandmother was loma baldwin. The first female police detective in portland. Yeah crazy it was. It was just kind of nuts but it's all been good. Treadmill midland from watsonville california. I did an ancestry. Dna tests and was very surprised to find a one to two percent heritage from nigeria. My mother is from arkansas. Have i'm pretty sure that the nigerian heritage would be somewhere in her family tree because my father is from. Lithuanian truer heritage. I'd always thought because somebody in the end aa. She told me when. I was student protesting against discrimination. If you're from the south of you probably have black blood anti surprise. When i heard that sixty years ago birth to its truth my name is kara. Ruben dare and three and a half years ago. I didn't ancestry over the counter. Dna tests to find out where in africa my father was from. I could take my children on finding your roots to work. A result came back. And i was not half I had no african. dna is. I thought i would. I did have my price did show. I was half something but there was no african in it. I was Half a jewish oscar nause and this man only one thing. The man on my birth certificate couldn't be my biological father is sent me a bit of an identity crisis leaving forty four years as a biracial person to suddenly find out i was not bene- journey. Find myself my discovery.

Alison hobbs araya lester Dean mantell carla holloway Brit bennett lauren Michelle jackson bliss broyard rebecca hall Melissa erica bend oregon raleigh tacoma north carolina diane loma baldwin
"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

16:23 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Because he had a family secret to repeal so then my dad landed back in the hospital and had an emergency surgery and the doctors told us that there was a good chance he wouldn't survive it so during that surgery. My mother took us outside and she said look. Wanna tell you what. The secret is. Your father's part black and we laughed. We were like that's the big secret that's it you know. We thought it was something terrible in this actually seems you know back in one thousand nine hundred growing up as a white girl in connecticut kind of cool so we asked lists to say more about what she meant by kind of cool. I mean to me being a little bit. Blog was much cooler than being kind of a white girl who grew up in a waspy environment in connecticut where everybody just was trying to be kind of middle upper middle class. It felt very constricting so this seemed like much more interesting kind of history initially so of more than a little bit taken aback. When bliss described revelation is kind of cool and that she saw being a little bit black as a welcome addition to her identity. That we've been having all these conversations with historians and scholars and writers whose work reveals the agonizing losses endured by those who passed permanently. I mean these choices may to keep their new families and communities from knowing that they were in fact not white or at least not white by the air was definitions and to think of nella larsen's original novel passing. I mean it was shot through with tragedy prompted by the need to avoid ever being outed as black but here in one thousand nine hundred bliss and her brother received the news of their fathers racial identity. With a bit of shrug. i guess. It's a response professor ellison. Hobbs anticipated during the conversation that we had with her. We now live in a much more multiracial society. So it's very likely that if a child or grandchild in in particular found out about this story. It's very likely that they might find it fascinating. They might find it troubling But it might not necessarily change. Their idea of who they are or it's very likely that they might then feel that they are multiracial or they might feel that they are mixed race or they might sort of accept that identity without the same kind of difficulty that people in the nineteen twenties or thirties or forties would have felt yes but to be fair said the broyard reaction to the news became very complicated very quickly. It started to seem less cool and more troubling and confusing. And why did you have to keep this a secret and it started me on a journey that lasted quite a long time. Where i sought out my family members in most smart a lot of marin new orleans and Learn this history that i had never learned in school and began to claim this history and identity for myself to some degree and this was where bliss described this moment as a turning point in her understanding for self in her life. You know. I didn't grow up thinking. I was black. It's not necessarily with the world sees when they look at me but it isn't identity that i feel Attached to and. I feel proud of and i don't want to deny so as a shorthand. I've come to embrace. What i think is being used more and more this idea of being white passing which is different than passing for white but just recognizing that i have mixed raced heritage but i'm white passing so i don't necessarily have the same experience of blackness people who up his bacher perceived as black by the world. Do i had to sit with this for a while. Because i really did realize. My own possessive investment in blackness. Like i was kind of having this reaction that bliss could lay claim to black identity as a simple matter of this genetic familial discovery. That didn't come 'til her adulthood. Now let's just put the cards on the table. I've got white mom and a black father. I was raised in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy s. Virginia and for me as a kid in that space at that time having mixed parentage only meant black in fact the word mixed race or mixed wasn't even in my lexicon and i still kind of bristle when people refer to me that way but i have grown to understand. That's kind of silly. Because yes. I'm black but having a white parent who reared me also changes and shapes my experience of blackness in important ways. So there's this kind of push pull between the internal and the external definitions of the south yemeni. Listen it takes us back to the notion that professor holloway share with us the legal fiction of race. And and you just said you raise the nineteen seventies virginia but makes me think of the nineteen sixty seven supreme court case loving versus virginia. Right where that was the first time at national level. The court said interracial marriages are ligo. So you came of age right after it was frankly legal for someone like you to exist in the world and melissa. This all lands back on an interesting insight. I think bliss shared about her father that even though he may have been passing racially. That doesn't mean he was living ally in a way she. She believes that. The passing allow them to embody his truest self identity. It's tricky. Because i think he felt that he was being his most authentic self that really and he grew up a time where he surrounded by a lot of jewish immigrants who are awesome kind of casting off their legacy and their upbringing. 'cause they all moving to greenwich village you know he wrote in his own memoir like we always have sprung from our own browse and we were trying to discard our histories and our families. These kind of heavy legacies come into ourselves as we wanted to be so he was sort of doing what a lot of his peers. We're doing but i think for him. It required which didn't necessarily require as much. I say his his jewish contemporaries was a sort denial of his his family. The limits of categorization or binary his by constantly presenting this world male female black white gay straight comes into it. Too rich paul. She's she's constantly during attention. To how busy we are all trying to fend these containers and how invariably are messy humanity spills out and that place of nuance that such a gray area of human existence is always the thing that is turned me on as an art. This is rebecca hall whose new film passing is based on the nineteen twenty nine novel of the same name. Nella larsen and hall is clear. That larsson's novel speaks to issues of passing beyond racial categorization. Taking our cue larson. We want to wrap our deep dive today. By thinking about the ways passing also emerges around gender and sexuality there are many differences in how passing functions along racial lines versus say gendered ones. The concept of passing is a key issue within queer communities. And that's something we heard about firsthand from our next guest. My name is dean mancelle. I'm a biracial transplant. I'm a psychology student day in a freelance blog writer by night. When i came out. I was actually in college in the united states. I live in europe right now. So when i came out in the states i was at a very liberal pocket and everything and without any medical or legal transitioning just in my social transitioning of my name and pronouns i was completely accepted and that is even just by going to walgreens like. I didn't have to do anything even before i came out. It was already starting to be implied that i was being seen as a as a man. It's only when. I came back to switzerland after graduating that i realized that this may be a little more cultural because i came back here and i got my first abouts of being mis gendered and that started to make me think critically about. How do i pass in certain spaces. I took it very much for granted in the super early. Part of my transition completely made me reassess how even perceived myself my transitioning and passing because social transitioning wasn't sufficient definitely added a lot of pressure to meet to medically transition in a way. That just didn't have the pressure before i wanted to. But yeah this this. I don't know it pushed me in a way that i wasn't really expecting i had to really adapt and kind of made me feel like was what i lived in states like a fever. Dream like that really happened. Were people just like pretending 'cause that's how stark of a difference. It was so dean was able to pass one nation but not another and all that made him think about the power dynamics at play. When i came out to myself my declaration that i am a man that was in my full control. I was fully in control to believe it to live it to alter parts of my life in order to fulfil the declaration. And then you look at passing. And that's the next step when relating to other people right because at some point in order to relate to someone they have to perceive you so passing shifting that power onto the hands of someone else when someone is being mis gendered for bad passing quote unquote the control that you possess them. Defining yourself is being violated. It's being questioned suddenly. It's not onto you define yourself anymore and that control is completely lost so indefinitely in an ideal world. You're the one that can maintain the control around your self perception. All the way through the end today dina's undergone physical changes those changes more closely align his body to his sense of self and they reduce the chances. He'll be mis gendered by others. Now he can more easily passes assists mad but that ability to pass comes with meaningful loss. So now i've been on hormone replacement therapy since january by voice has gone down a great deal and that apparently was the light switch. My initial reaction is to just say that. I feel safer. I've been really baffled by how the world doesn't care about. I'm going to say me being a man. Although i am black i'm biracial and on the outside. I looked pretty ethnically ambiguous muslim american in europe. All of that has its own privilege. Is but i definitely feel that compared to how i felt as a butch lesbian before this i feel more invisible as opposed to being hyper vegetable the fact that i was a butch lesbian before it was almost like touted on my forehead. I couldn't go anywhere without that following me. It's one of the first things that people notice was my best and actually on a topic. That's really been my biggest struggle being perceived as not just to man but assist gender man in particular. It's really made me feel like sh you don't do. I really belong in the community. And i know that sounds ridiculous because the tea is literally in the acronym but when my clearness used to be so visible so implied it now becomes this invisible identity. Something that i've never had before but queens is really the lens. I learned to see the world through so losing. That is very much losing a part of myself. And i think that's that's a huge fear so we wanted to continue the conversation about passing across gender binary. Let someone who gave us a keen analysis. Mariah lester deputy director of the transgender strategy center passing in terms of gender is when someone is gender non-conforming or presenting a on characteristic identity that is different than what they were assigned at birth. Then passing is kind of a protection in conformity of passing assist gender or having as someone who's gender aligns with that which they were assigned at birth in so protecting oneself as far as like being a trans woman passing assist. Janet woman to where someone cannot recognized is that the person is transgender. Is passing as we asked a riot. Expand this idea and reflect come privileges and safeties associated with sis gender identity. I think is almost all ways because of safety you know passing is something that someone does for protection of one south viet that light skinned black person predominantly white space. That feels the need to pass in order to fit to be a bit more safe because your true identity is something that is both oppressed and attacked and so That's why we see. Black and brown people are hispanic tino even mexicans kind of have a whole on a conversation about you know white passing and so when you're looking at gender and especially transgender in. Look the violence. That's you now on constantly being on placed upon us on a yearly basis The many the adoption murders in tax and because of xenophobia and related kind of human expressions in a way that we react to certain things that are not what our perception of normal is Is the reason why a lot of transgender people do kind of fall into that. Passing or conforming to what society to standards of norm is in order to fill a bit more safe as they go about on a day to day. Lives so melissa. It seems that a critical difference between racial passing. This complex question of gender passing is about the presumption that racial passing is at its core deception but with transgender identity. It's not a question of deception. It's actually a matter of articulating ones. Truth is not about deception. Many times just about presenting a good assumption. You know So that the inference of people is that there's nothing about you that makes them want to question anything and so About tricking people. You know amp up. But but yeah act will is still about aligning to the gender binary system end so effort looking at going beyond the systems systems that were created for us to not thrive especially those of us who are not of white european descent and are not gender and don't fall in lines to what the founding fathers have said. Is you know your own standard american then. Then then that stats. We're when we're looking at were shifting to actually include others and make inclusion kind of organic with an all of our systems. Dan we have to kind of look. Pass passing you know in look past of how do we create a structure to where a person doesn't have to engage in trying to pass because there's a place for them to actually be there. Individuals cells gender is also a social construct on especially if we're looking at history seeing the multiplicity of genders in had a weekend now to just two and that being all that it is you know and so it's the same thing you know with race and ethnicity you know that was something that didn't exist at a certain time and all of a sudden in did know we see that it's not necessary for our human evolution for us generally as a species so gender race ethnicity.

bliss nella larsen broyard connecticut professor holloway dean mancelle virginia Hobbs ellison rebecca hall greenwich village melissa new orleans larsson larson supreme court europe Virginia Mariah lester transgender strategy center
"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

06:40 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Call it blackfish shake so. If if mellon larssen's claire is passing by tricking. Her husband into thinking she is white then. Social media. black fishing is about tricking others into thinking. You're black or at least that you have particular skills and styles associated with blackness. And because i don't need to come for me let's give credit where it is. Do freelance writer wanna thompson introduced the term black fishy in twenty eighteen article for paper magazine at their she described white women as caused playing black women online and she wrote the black woman are constantly bombarded with the promotion of european beauty standards in the media so when our likeness is embraced on women who have the privilege to fit traditional standards yet freely co-opt blackness to their liking it reaffirms the belief that people desire blackness just not on black women and melissa. What started with thompson's keen insight has expanded into popular culture to describe white artisan influencers who seemed to dip selectively into black culture of course when it's viable for their own advancement to kind of situational passing to draw the analogy johanna. Yogi the founder of the curl talk project said quote. It's about picking and choosing among black traits and characteristics for ones benefit while we continue to face discrimination on a day-to-day basis. Melissa if the wages of passing until whiteness are measurable in terms of access or income and wealth than the wages of black fishing are measured in accolades of say originality or creativity or street credibility in coolness you know that layers pretty nicely on top of contemporary observations about about our world about music about how culture fashion places where it is very easy to get lost in the crowd but if you can find something that sets you apart as a seemingly innovative as seemingly different rate. It's about difference. That is something that is a that is an artist in can really pull you ahead and it's here where just to play on lips. It's insight that the possessive investment in blackness becomes obvious because hell hath no fury like a black twitter chicken black fishing like when black twitter took jessie nelson from the british girl group. Little mix to task for black fishing in her new solo. Debut boys see in the music video nelson who identifies as white and british whereas girls on her teeth things about liking men who are so hood and in one scene she has her hair and brains and another shoe burn bandanna and then she's sporting a tan and his lit in ways that at moments make her appear non white during the week being when you win between the not this style. Mimicry that draws ire. The lack of critical reflection from the artists themselves here again is lauren. Michelle jackson i get the anger. Get the frustration. I think it's it's not something that's too hard to understand when you you think of something is as yours or something that you see being done. what such innovation in such beauty in coolness among the people you grew up with among the people who look like you Who you find kinship with and then you see it on. Tv by someone who's being paid a lot of money to be. They're performing their have career her. That's being thought of as as neat and popular Yup that is really frustrating. Ray i think you know one had it. can we can talk about it economically. we can speak about. It's compensated for the innovations of their work of their creative labors but i think also just from emotional standpoint. i think it's it's not hard to grasp. Why something like that would be So maddening sort of across a culture and a across Ah people an end so yes that would seem to contradict ray. The idea also a blackness and black culture as diverse in multitudinous enveloping and being capable of reaching into you know all these other kinds of artistic expression forms of artistic expression Like gwendolyn brooks sonnets. Like you can't tell me a sunday isn't what of and so in working myself into a ni- here but i think that's that's kind of the point right that that none of this none of this study or stable. It's the twentieth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of eleventh but danta burski isn't interested in that day. He wants to talk about what happened the next day and every day after that in his new podcast nine twelve dan tells the stories of a series of characters whose lives would never be the same after september eleventh and through them we begin to realize that their new lessons to be learned and that we just might have enough distance now from nine eleven to make sense of somethings. We couldn't understand before. Stick around to the end of this episode to hear preview of nine twelve. Wnyc studios is supported by forward. Did you know. Forty percent of deaths from leading causes are preventable. That's why forward is committed to helping you lower any health risks today by building. The world's first long term doctor focused on keeping you healthy. Not just treating you win. You're sick full. We're doctors use cutting edge technology to identify and address any underlying health issues. You might have before they become a problem. That's long term. Health is all about being early. Not late start living your healthiest life today at gopher were dot com slash. Wnyc that's go forward dot com slash wnyc. What's happening on npr podcasts more neighborhoods and more perspectives. The more of the world that you hear the more you hear the world as it really is. Npr podcasts. More voices all ears find. Npr.

mellon larssen wanna thompson curl talk project jessie nelson british girl group Michelle jackson claire johanna Yogi twitter melissa thompson Melissa danta burski nelson lauren gwendolyn brooks Wnyc studios Ray
"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:54 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Boys love boy is never risk it again. How went through how those nine months or fear march turn out to heart and you just heard actress. Ruth negga as claire in the new film. Passing clair's anxiety about having a to dark child it really. Lets us dive deeper into the question of what is race. Professor karla hallway described it as a biological fiction. That's been made into a social fact by law policy and practice. And i want to lean into that a bit more just to say that most of us who are raised in the us. We believe that we experience race as a as a highly visual marker. So when i'm teaching college students for example i'll ask them. How do they define race and particularly how do you define blackness and typically will respond with phenol types like darker skin broader features or thick curly. Or maybe even nappy hair But but melissa of course we know that. None of those markers constitute blackness. So let's take walter white an no. I'm not talking about the meth kingpin from breaking bad. But i'm of course talking about the journalists and civil rights activists who led the aa c. p. during the nineteen thirties and nineteen forties. Walter white was of mixed race parentage and he was so readily taken as white by most who saw him that he regularly passed in order to infiltrate southern kkk chapters. And then melissa. He returned to the north to report out his investigations of violence. Well he was also incredibly brave and also. Professor karla. holloway reminded us of the racial ambiguity legendary congressman representative. Adam clayton powell. Who represented harlem for nearly twenty five years. Adam clayton powell. Our revered late congressperson for the first two years of being. A college student passed as white until somebody called the question when he tried to join the white fraternity according to his biographers. So you might be onto something here. Melissa because congressman charlie rangel who spent nearly fifty years representing harlem and was known melissa as the lion of lennox avenue certainly didn't conform to narrow ideas about blackness. Looks like and. I don't care who you are if you conservative. Lifelong republican. you know that vote was stolen and yet no one. No one would question the racial authenticity of walter wide. Or adam clayton powell. Or charlie rangel their all black. Yep and so is governor. Doug wilder representative g k butterfield. North carolina an vice president kamala harris. Okay you're going there. I did. I had to go there because i just want us to be honest at least as almost as we can be about just how much we already experienced race. I mean we speak in these. Clean cut binary so. It's perfectly obvious. Any casual observer. Exactly which census box was checked. By every person we encounter but really dorian. We live with a lot of ambiguity and maybe passing a little bit less about jumping box to box and a little bit more about inhabiting the overlapping space in the racial diagram. Because we know. Melissa of course passing is not only about race. It's about color. My name is brett bennett. And i'm the author of the vanishing house now the vanishing half is set in a fictional town in louisiana. The community of light skinned black people who are obsessed with lightness to the point that they're essentially trying to genetically engineer their population toward light skin. So it's a very complicated marquette blackness Because they are not striving to be white necessarily but they also don't want to be associated with other darker skinned black people. What drew me into the idea of the story was to think of this community particularly when the book is set during the jim crow era which is of course a system of binary into this community positioning themselves against that binary which from one way of looking at it may seem sort of transgressive search but from this other way of looking at it. I think is deeply troubling to To see the way that this community is so deeply invested in the project of lightness and lightness for its own sake. Essentially you know light skinned does not really give them any tangible benefits in the world of the book This is still a roll community and working class community. They don't gain wealth or privilege and any real meaningful way. But they're interested in lightness for its own sake. Bennett's novel ask us to encounter in cope with issues of color and melissa. To the extent americans are uncomfortable. Discussing race were all so pretty resistant to exploring the meanings of color also wanted to think about passing from the standpoint. That identity is really fluid. So what does it mean even to pass. He think of these categories Themselves as being fluid and unstable and even to some extent unknowable. So to me. It felt like i wanted to build on this tax. That informed my understanding of racial passing wanted to push against The idea that there is something essential to race that there is Something that you can actively lie about Sort of push against that kind of reading. I think people sometimes have of stories about passing. I didn't want to even think about really lying in the sense because so much of this book is about characters trying to figure out what race is what do these categories even mean. What are they made of and the idea that they are some sort of a firm fixed thing that you can lineup. We're telling the truth about. That was an idea that also looking similarly made me feel uncomfortable and also motivated me to try my best to push against it. I have to say. I was thinking about george tips. It's foundational text. The possessive investment in whiteness. And just like david wrote eggers. Classic text the wages of whiteness lips shows us how whiteness has an actual economic value. And it happens in so many different ways so let's think about it. Unequivocal opportunities or unfair criminal justice practices. Or what has been repeatedly shown as the most consequential for the racial wealth gap housing segregation and discrimination and lending and the law. Real estate as you well know melissa is location. Location location but that often means race race race for real and lifted argues that those who possess whiteness are deeply invested in it because it has this cash value as he calls it but it is worth noting that those who possess blackness are also pretty darn invested in. I'm lauren shell jackson. I'm a assistant professor of english at northwestern university and a contributing writer for the new yorker. Now jackson is author of the book. White negroes when quarter rose were in vogue and other thoughts on cultural appropriation. You cannot be wait. In america with putting on a bit of menstrual see every now and then the way that american culture relies upon and really feeds off of what we call black culture or uniquely. Black let's go out again because we are diving down to another level melissa so up to this point we talked about passing from blackness to whiteness. But professor jackson is introduced this idea of white folk transgressing racial boundaries by adopting performance of blackness. This passing is more like cultural appropriation or in the digital age of online identities masked by avatars. Some.

Adam clayton powell charlie rangel melissa Ruth negga karla hallway Professor karla Doug wilder g k butterfield walter white brett bennett Walter white Melissa clair kamala harris claire holloway walter North carolina louisiana us
"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:09 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"For the modern age. Well plessey was engaged in a very refined experiment to make sure that the courts paid attention to the issue of. What are they using to determine who sits in what car so yes. It was deception If he understood himself to be a black man and fat intentionally. I gotta make that intention now at the clear again it wasn't. I just happened to be sitting here. Today it's a group of light skinned men plessey homer plessey was chosen. Who sat in the railway car and the question that was settled by the courts was separate but equal. The interesting thing about plessey was the other question in plsy is still used by skates and that question employee was can states demarcate rates. Can they use race. In situations like voting or in situations like that have what the law will call compelling interest so not only was separate but equal pluses exception of at the result of deception. But the unresolved question that plessey entered about whether or not we could have stakes could have a compelling interest in determining race and here we are in twenty twenty one and that factor from homer from plessey v. Ferguson is still a factor in state. Politics and i'll also say during this reminder about homer plessey it brings us to get another level in this question of passing because passing is not just about race. It's also about color. Breeze is not one simple coherent space but it's it itself is color coded and the codes of color. We have also been living alone side so there's only a very small segment of african american society that can even consider the the notion of passing intentionally But most folks are color coded and quickly identified which we have also found a legal problem. Some of us are in some of our always in that mix and some of us. Have the wherewithal which already gives it some sort of value to the outside or inside. This is why nella larsen could write this novel. And rebecca hall could make such a compelling movie and i could write a death in harlem because this question of color. Coding and i think that's a very important question to leave you the blank line. What is it that you want from passing. What.

plessey homer plessey african american society Ferguson nella larsen rebecca hall harlem
"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Of passing almost as like death sort of like a morning or feeling of grief that someone who passed as white had crossed over not only crossover the black white racial divide and the color line but had actually crossed over from a kind of sense of life to to a sense of death substan- after admit that during this conversation with allison i kept thinking about a long trajectory of american film and television occupied with this pain.

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:13 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The takeaway is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet. It works just the way it sounds. You tell progressive how much you want to pay for car insurance and they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive get your quote today at progressive dot com and see why four out of five new customers recommend progressive progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law. Wnyc studios is supported by forward. Did you know. Forty percent of deaths from leading causes are preventable forward. Doctors use cutting edge technology to identify and address any underlying health issues before they become a problem get started at go. Forward dot com slash. Wnyc that's go forward dot com slash. Wnyc aren't to lose. they seem you. Nobody could tell from looking at her.

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Completely <Speech_Music_Male> defenseless <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and taking them <Music> <Advertisement> out and killing them. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Melissa <Speech_Music_Male> reflection <Speech_Music_Male> from sister helen <Speech_Music_Male> and particularly <Speech_Music_Male> our story <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the warden <Speech_Music_Male> resisting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his role <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to execute <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> him beings <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> saying he'll be in therapy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the rest of his life. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You know it takes me back <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to very first <Speech_Music_Male> deep dive on political cruelty <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and the toll <Speech_Male> it takes <Speech_Male> on human <Speech_Male> beings who have <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Male> execute <Speech_Music_Male> other human beings <Speech_Male> who have to enact <Speech_Male> form of civic <Speech_Male> and political cruelty <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a lot to digest <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> here. I'm still <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as conflicted. I think <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as we were in the beginning. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i appreciate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> being <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> able to take this deep dive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with you because it's given <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> me <SpeakerChange> and i hope <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listeners. A lot to think about. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I feel <Speech_Male> the same way duran <Speech_Male> definitely <Speech_Female> given us <Speech_Female> to think about <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> and to feel <Speech_Female> during. Thank you so much <Speech_Male> for <SpeakerChange> joining <Speech_Male> me on this journey. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks so much. Melissa <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> today emotional <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> roller coaster for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the opportunity <SpeakerChange> to join <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and i want to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just say thank you on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> behalf of duran <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and myself to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> all of our <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> guests <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sam's tall <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sabrina butler <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> smith jennifer pinkney <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> lyndon <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> harrison sister. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Helen prejean <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and thank you to all <Speech_Female> of you. Who <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> have spent this <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hour deep <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> diving with <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> us. I'm <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> melissa harris perry <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> this is <Speech_Music_Female> the takeaway

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"That's exactly what it is. And his racially motivated. My case was racially motivated. And they know that and like a lot of other cases. It's not just mind. You know. And i just feel feel so bad. That united states is is doing this to his own peop-.

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:54 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"We want to turn to a troubling feature of the death penalty. And that's the issue of wrongful convictions. According to the death penalty information center since nineteen seventy-three. At least a hundred eighty six people who were wrongfully convicted and sentenced to death have been exonerated and in two thousand twenty. Even as the trump administration executed a record number of federal prisoners. There were six people across the country. Who are exonerated. And in each of the six cases prosecutorial misconduct contributed to the wrongful conviction on the takeaway. We've been following. The case of julius jones and jones was convicted and sentenced to death in nineteen ninety nine for the death of oklahoma businessman. Paul how attorneys and advocates reviewing jones's conviction have found multiple prosecutorial consistencies and inadequate defense counsel so in recent months a group of advocates have joined the jones family in leading a national campaign to pressure oklahoma decision-makers to vacate jones's conviction and send him home instead of to the death chamber. Now he was supposed to have a clemency hearing yesterday on tuesday but that has now been pushed to monday. So we'll continue to watch the case of julius jones. According to a pew research report from june twenty twenty one nearly eight and ten respondents say there are some risk that an innocent person will be put to death but many continue to support capital punishment. So once again. Let's dive deeper than the surface statistics and hear from someone who has lived through the trauma of being wrongfully convicted to die. My name is sabrina. Butler smith in one thousand nine hundred ninety when sabrina was only eighteen years old. She was wrongfully convicted of murdering her nine month. Old son walter. Dean butler after predominantly white mississippi. Jury convicted her. Sabrina became the only woman on death. Row in the state of mississippi at the time she served six years in prison including three years on death row. I've been on my office. I was fourteen Living in a small town called columbus mississippi. And i was basically trying to raise two boys being a kid myself. At the time my oldest son was not a home with me but my young son would that was the wild and i went in his room and noticed something was wrong right there and i panicked because i've never had that happen to me before i saw that. He wasn't bereavement. So i grabbed him in iran and started yelling and screaming trying to get somebody over there to help me. You know to get into the hospital. So i applied adult. Cpr to him all the way to us. But i was scared. I i didn't know what to do. I just did. What i thought was trying to help it and When they finally came out they told me that they did everything but they couldn't site and that's when it all started police officers and everybody ex me questions and i ended up having to go to the police station for questioning that's win. It all started even though. Sabrina was a miner and had no parent guardian or attorney present police aggressively questioned her at length and they kept getting in my face and they was yelling and screaming and i was scared. I mean you know a lot of people say why would you sign a confession if you didn't commit a crime but you have to be interrogated to understand what happens to you and especially if you're young and you've never been in this type of situation so i just did the first thing. I didn't know what that turned out to be. The worst thing that ever could have happened to me because they charged me with capital murder. They charged me with a challenged law. I you know. I didn't know anything. And they took advantage of that. Because i was young poor black girl and i didn't know anything and i had the all white jury and once i saw that jury a new demo life was i knew it i just when i saw them because nobody looked like me. Nobody eventually sabrina was moved to death. Row she did not know about her rights to an appeal process and fully expected to be put to death within a few weeks when i made it to death row. I was nineteen years old. And i don't wish that own inning hat was. That was an experience and that was one of the scariest days for me at at paced floors at for every sound every chain everything. I mean 'cause. I actually really thought that was the day that i was going to that. I think that being a degree my son and the end this being put on me at the same time which is too much and it was so hard for me to know that you or think that they were going to kill me and i couldn't get the truth out there and you know i just couldn't i. Couldn't i panicked you. I just listened for everything k. And i just cried. I i mean i didn't know what to do. What can you do when you're in a sale. No bigger than your bathroom. Six by nine cell. No beginning your bathroom. There's nowhere for you to go. July is just in the hands of somebody else. What can you do. There's there's nothing that you can do but hope and pray and cry in panic in all those feelings that that you have when you get. Some there was nothing that i could do but hope and pray and call out as god. Please don't let them kill me. Because i didn't kill my son. Nobody believed s. torture on a person as part of the appeals process. Sabrina was awarded a more experienced attorney. Who took her case to the state supreme court. My second attorneys argued through the state. Supreme court am sentence was overturned in ninety two so When my sense was overturned. I ended up going back to the county jail but i thought that you know i was going to get out. You know But it didn't work like that. I ended up sitting in the county jail another three years. Why went back on the second trial because the district attorney did not he just kept putting it off and they kept letting them do. I mean it. It was horrible. But i was more prepared when i went back the second time and they found out my attorneys found out which was already in his record. He had heart problems. He had kennedy disease and chronic bowel syndrome. It was nothing nothing that i did to 'cause not nothing for all this to happen to you. You know what i'm saying. And nobody believes that's one of the hardest thing on december seventeenth nineteen ninety-five. Sabrina was exonerated. After spending six and a half years in prison and two years and nine months on death. Row so i asked if she received therapy or assistance in all the years since her release. No i have not. And that's that's that's counter say because exonerates all over the world who get out and they go through. This type of trauma are not being reported. That because i guess we are the space dirty little secret. You know i'd say do this to me. This is something that will be in my life in my heart and my math and the rest of my life. There's no change in that. All i can do is speak until my story to try to Heal myself because i'm not getting our can't afford their and all that kind of stuff you know. This has made me strong. Because i refuse to just give up. I refuse to to know that we have a system in place that is using the definitely as a weapon..

jones julius jones sabrina mississippi Sabrina Butler smith Dean butler oklahoma walter columbus Paul iran kennedy disease chronic bowel syndrome supreme court Supreme court
"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:17 min | 10 months ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Pride at an explicitly teaching kids that they can make a difference in their families and their schools communities their country world..

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

"Welcome back to left right and center. I'm Josh Barrow, your center and business columnist in New York magazine. On the right is Megan McArdle colonised. The Washington Post on the left is Dorian Warren, president of the Center for Community Change. It is the third week of August, and this week, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris officially became the Democratic nominees for president and vice president. This was the first fully virtual political convention. The roll call of states, normally, a raucous process on the convention floor was conducted via satellite, with every state's delegation, voting from a scenic location or at least in most states if they have scenic locations. Rhode Island's Democratic Party chairman brought a huge plate of fried calamari to the beach. That's the state's official appetizer to talk about this convention and whether it was effective for the Democrats. Dorian Conventions always kind of funny right because they used to be for picking the candidate and they were really an internal meeting of the party where people get together and argue and decide who should be the presidential candidate. Now there's sort of a four day infomercial for the candidate, and now you have to have this completely new format for that this year. Did it work? Did this make a good case for Biden and Harris? I think it worked really, really well, considering the stress and anxiety of not being able to meet in person, and we know that a lot of politics is smoothing right of being in person and talking and having conversations in the hallways between speeches and events. Nonetheless, I think this really really worked well despite some of the technical glitches, But it came off as a very realistic portrayal of America and the vision and values that the Democrats wanted to project to the rest of the country. I was especially struck, I have to say by the number of ordinary people and voters. That had a chance to tell their stories versus the traditional elites, speeches that we usually get in these kind of convention, so I think it was very effective. And I think, frankly, with the keynotes each night in terms ofthe whether, as Michelle Obama are president Barack Obama, the vice presidential nominee, Kamala Harris, or frankly, Joe Biden on the final evening. I think it actually was very compelling. Watching making what did you make the convention? Well, I think it didn't work that. Well, I mean, I I sort of question whether Conventions air really that helpful tea parties at this point anyway. I mean, you see convention bumps in the bowls, and then they pretty much dissipate on leaving the candidates. Back where they were. I think this was particularly ineffective. You these weird formats where Joe Biden interviewed people from the party, which serves to illustrate why Joe Biden does not have a job as a TV anchor. Conventions were already kind of pointless and it's just highlighted just how pointless they are what they really served, as was a networking opportunity for people who are professional politicians or professional political campaign. Or professional abundance, right? That's who was actually going to these things. That was what was actually creating the buzz in when you took all of that away. What you had was a bunch of really nice, well, meaning people kind of staring like deer in the headlights into zoom cameras. Well, they faced a national audience, so I would be very surprised to see that this is going to generate like a huge campaign bump. That said. I think it was it made Joe Biden look like a perfectly likeable guy. I'm fine with voting for, But that's that's about all it did Dorian to Megan's point, saying that she thinks the messages out of this. We're a little bit muddled. What was the message out of this convention? In particular, I'm I've seen a lot of griping from people on the left and Democratic Party aboutthe lineup of speakers that it was heavily focused toward moderates and even some Republicans crossing over to say why they're voting for Joe Biden. Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez was limited to this role where she was nominating Bernie Sanders and didn't even get to really speak about what Joe Biden means to her. Why was she would be voting for him? What did you see? Is the message that this put out there? Ah, And And is that message getting through to the public? I do share a critique, by the way with my colleagues on the left around the missed opportunity, and I wantto specifically Raise up the issue of Latin next voters. There was a huge missed opportunity with both Chelsea and frankly, former HUD Secretary Julian Castro, who you might remember was also of presidential candidate along with Joe Biden was left off the speaking roles of the DNC. And this is points to a particular problem around enthusiasm with Latinos. We know from some recent poll from PBS NewsHour, NPR merest that shows Joe Biden, underperforming. Only 59% of Latinos right now are saying they'd vote for him over Trump compared to 66% voted for Hillary Clinton 2016 so huge, missed opportunity, not having rising stars in the party of Elsie and Castro. And I would have Stacey Abrams in a larger role. Frankly, that could have really, really Headed out the park. So to speak. What was the overall message? So I think was this theme of we, the people? It was a celebration across four days of what the current America looks like. And I dare anyone next week as they watch the Republican National Convention to see if they're similar kinds of images of a diverse, multiracial population with some values in a vision of what the future could look like. Versus Division. We're going to hear a lot of division. We're going to hear a lot of, you know, grating and this was much more positive projection of what the future could look like and should look like. I sort of think with the choice of the convention speakers in a lot of ways, it doesn't really matter what they actually said. Because most people are not going to be watching the convention gavel to gavel and to the extent that they do, they're probably strong Democratic partisans whose vote is already locked up. It's about what sort of coverage it generates on TV news and in newspapers and the purpose of having people like John Kasich speak at the convention. It doesn't even really matter what he said. It's that you get these headlines about Republicans crossing over for Joe Biden creating permission for swing voters to swing and the way Democrats one in 2018 in the midterms. Overwhelmingly, it was about voters changing their their positioning rather than about shifts and turn out. And so I think, you know, I think it's part of a broader strategy that Biden's had all the way through of trying to build. Ah brought a coalition as possible trying to rebuild some of the Obama coalition voters who had voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012 and then voted for Trump in 2016, while also retaining the suburban voters where Hillary Clinton had significant gains in certain areas in 2016. Those gains were then expanded on In 2018, So I think it's partly the you know why you would have less featuring of some of those progressive figures. I think it's a political calculation on the part of biting campaign that you want to do as little as possible. That might alienate people by making Biden something specific other than not Trump And the calculation is that those progressive voters are are so anti trump that that they're already in the bag. And I think that that's I understand why progressives don't like that calculation, but I think is as a matter of political strategy. It's pretty sound. Well, if there's two things that you could do with a convention, right, you can use it to pull the party together and bind the party together. Or you can use it to try to go out and get new votes. Now, on the one hand, I think that it's actually probably not going to generate that many new votes. But on the other hand, I think that it certainly could lose votes the way that you are going to keep the suburbs by convincing them that you're not actually gonna let Bernie Sanders and Alexander go Cassio, Cortez, come and Jack their taxes up sky high on, you know, ad infinitum all of the green new deal and so forth..

Joe Biden Democratic Party Kamala Harris Dorian Warren Obama Trump Megan McArdle president Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton Josh Barrow America Michelle Obama New York Washington Post Center for Community Change Rhode Island Ocasio Cortez
"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

"On the right is Megan McArdle, columnist of The Washington Post. On the Left is Dorian Warren, president of the Center for Community Change at the end of last week, with Republicans and Democrats unable to come to terms on a new Corona virus aid package, the president signed for executive orders that he characterized as an alternative way to support the economy without congressional action. At least one of these orders is likely to doom or less what is advertised, suspending payments and interest of Kroll's on many kinds of student loans through the end of the year. Another order purporting to extend a moratorium on evictions does little beyond telling federal agencies to explore what they might be able to do in this area. Then there are two orders that supposedly entail sweeping presidential action in tax and spending areas ordinarily reserved to Congress's power. The president says he's suspending the payroll tax for the last four months of the year, even though Congress expressed approximately zero interest in a payroll tax holiday. He also says he will take tens of billions of dollars of unused disaster relief funds to pay for a partial extension of enhanced unemployment benefits with a $300 weekly enhancement instead of $600 But there are major legal and practical barriers to these two policies actually happening to discuss those indeed, doctor Gupta joins us now Indias, co executive director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality High, and I'm delighted to be here. So let's start with the unemployment order. Administration officials have been saying that people on unemployment, whose benefits dropped sharply at the end of Well, I will be getting thes $300 weekly enhancements pretty soon is that true? Look, Thiss executive order is in many ways in it'll conceived it's grossly insufficient. It's targeted excluding some of the lowest aid workers and some of the least General states. Andi Thinkit's probably illegal. I think that you'll see some states try with all the challenges they're already facing. Getting out Unemployment benefits, pandemic unemployment assistance benefits. S o. I would expect some payments to some workers in some states. But if this is just a tiny, tiny fraction of what we could have gotten through a bipartisan agreement, But so I guess there's two key issues here. One is legality, and that issue may go unresolved because it's not clear who was going to sue whether somebody who has actually standing to to be heard in the courts to sue to block this, whether so it might We might not ever know if it was illegal. The administration may be able to just do it anyway. But there are also these thes administrative issues that you allude to that It's already been difficult for state unemployment agencies to process changes to unemployment benefits rules during a time when so many more people than normal are claiming unemployment benefits. A lot of states have been basically saying that they can't implement this or that they don't know if they'll be able to implement it. My understanding is this is different from the way the last one worked. It would sort of require states to set up a new programme. And so even if they try to do it, how quickly is that something that they can do? No, That's right, Josh. Look the administration has had Teo jumped through a lot of hoops and Sort of twist aspects of the Stafford Act, which essentially governs disaster benefits. And in doing so, it has put forward a programme that is absolutely unprecedented it when we talk about putting aside the question of whether it's legal or not. I think one of the striking aspects of the administration's executive order is that they quite clearly violate some aspects. Of the law, but then are trying to see if they can not quite violate other aspects of the law. But when they saw that states were unlikely to comply, for example, with the requirement of a 25% match from states, this administration started bending over backwards to find ways to get states to participate. But at the end of the day, the administration has made clear that states can't Essentially used their unemployment workers right now. So these are the folks already running pandemic unemployment assistance in the regular unemployment turns program unless they use them for overtime hours. So you can't have them just sort of work as they would otherwise, and also process claims for this new program. You'd either have to hire new workers. Engaged workers who aren't otherwise working on unemployment benefits or used these workers for overtime hours. So that alone is going to be challenging..

Kroll executive president Megan McArdle Dorian Warren Congress Center for Community Change Andi Thinkit Thiss The Washington Post executive director Teo doctor Gupta Josh Georgetown Center
"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

"That's the problem, so he tweeted quote. Mail in voting in 2020 would lead to the end of our great Republican Party. I don't know how much more clarity you need. For that He told Politico that lawsuits filed by his campaign Republican allies to block expanded access. That if they didn't win, it will be the biggest threats of his re election. He went on Fox business and said in an interview, and I quote. Now they need that money in orderto have the post office work so it can take all of these millions of millions of ballots. But if they don't get those items, that means you can't have universal mail in voting, because not equipped to have it like he's saying the quiet part out loud. And it's It's just mind blowing to me like there is no defense. There is no defence of this, and in fact, it's gonna backfire. When I talked to black voters in the south they are planning To stand in line for hours on Election Day because what the president has done has created such mistrust of mail in voting for lots of black voters who are really really motivated by his attacks on the post office by his attacks, a couple of hairs in particular they are motivated. So good luck with the strategy, like keep doubling down on de funding the post office and see what happens on Election Day. Let's take a break. I'll be back with Dorian Warren of the Center for Community Change, and Megan McArdle of The Washington Post to talk about the congressional stalemate over Corona virus aide and the president's executive orders that are supposed to get around it. This is left right and center. You're hearing from our left right and center, and we want to hear from you, too. Tweet us at our C C, R w and download the free Casey ar w apt to listen to left right and centre on demand..

Republican Party president The Washington Post Center for Community Change Megan McArdle Fox business Dorian Warren orderto Corona executive
"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

"We're now in a sense in a natural experiment about what's gonna happen. The ordinary people around him millions of ordinary people, and we're going to have a conversation soon about child care, which is a big part of this, too. But let me let me go back to the original question around. What is the path out of this and I think there's four ways I think first Trump or Senate Republicans could feel some pressure to act and Republicans come back to the table. We actually need some leadership here. We need the president to actually lead his party. Otherwise, we're going to continue to be mired in this mediocrity and incompetence. Frankly, second, the Democrats get cave and passed something very small. Frankly, that won't solve the scale of the problem like we did with the cares act. Third. We have forcing events with the September 30 of deadline around government funding so that could push both parties. Both the Republican Party get a line because in our lines and push them to the table with the Democrats to negotiate something on then fourth is maybe nothing happens until January 20th and that is that is a scenario that I don't want to imagine, but it's very possible and If we do nothing until then, the harm and pain in this country, and frankly, I think the protests around the inaction in Washington would grow grow much larger. It's funny, Megan. I've also been thinking about that September 30th date. That's also when the aide to the airlines run runs out, and there's been pushed with significant support on both sides of the aisle in Congress to do something to reauthorize that. But September 30 is eight weeks away. And, you know, I mean, Republicans used to talk a lot about the cost of uncertainty to the economy, making people wait eight more weeks, both individuals and businesses without knowing with policy's going to be. You would think that that would have Significant negative effects. In the meantime, o. I mean, this is madness. I think there's some madness on the Democratic side, Teo, you know it takes two people to have a deadlock there. Democrats could have accepted the Republican offer, and they haven't on the Republican offer is not that crazy. I mean, you know, $400 a week in unemployment benefit extra unemployment benefits instead of 600 is probably not going to buy itself crashed the economy. I would also say that the difference between those two things is not worth crashing the economy and I think that the you know the big risk. Has always been that we have this really weird recession is just not like any other recession we've ever had right on down and a lot of the old stuff that you hear people talking about. Oh, get no money in the worker's hands because they spend it well, you know, Yeah, but there's not a lot to spend it on right now. Which is why savings is going up. You know, we're we're in uncharted territory, but the risk is that we have a normal recession on top of the code contraction. And that's something that we're now flirting with. I think we've talked a lot about the short term effects of this crisis on the job market and on the economy, But a lot of what's happening in this crisis is likely to stick with us for a pretty long time. Children are missing school that may affect the kind of work they conduce when they grow up in their educational attainment. Parents lives have been turned upside down by the need for new childcare arrangements that affects their own work. Let's take a break, and then I want to come back and talk about those issues with Dorian Warren of the Central Community Change, Megan McArdle of the Washington Post.

Megan McArdle Republican Party Trump Senate president Washington Post Dorian Warren Teo Washington Congress Central Community Change
"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

"I mean, you do have a lot of households that have a lot more savings than they usually wood on. I don't know the extent to which Democrats concoct on the idea that cutting off the unemployment checks today is going to show up, you know, immediately and economic activity now. Obviously, people have excellent reasons to be nervous and to not spend money even if they have it. But I think that I think the broader economic picture has been a little bit better through this process. Then people would have expected just looking at those individual household stories. Yeah, I think we have to look at the date of the macro data and the stories of real people together. Josh on DH. That's That's partly what we count our political process to do. Rightist. That's Heather. Members of Congress to their district so they can actually hear from their constituents about what they're going through and offer some solutions on the table that would fix those problems right whether it's as we know the unemployment insurance, expanded unemployment insurance ended at the end of July fiction moratoriums in it in the July so we're now in a sense in a natural experiment about what's gonna happen. The ordinary people around him millions of ordinary people, and we're gonna go have a conversation soon about child care, which is a big part of this, too. But let me let me go back to the original question around. What is the path out of this? And I think there's four ways I think First Trump or Senate Republicans could feel some pressure to act and Republicans come back to the table. We actually need some leadership here. We need the president to actually lead his party. Otherwise, we're going to continue to have to be mired in this mediocrity and incompetence. Frankly, second, the Democrats get cave and pass something very small. Frankly, that won't solve the scale of the problem like we did with the cares Act third. We have Ah, forcing event with the September 30th deadline around government funding so that could push both parties. Both the Republican Party get a line because unaligned and pushed him to the table with the Democrats to negotiate something on then fourth is Maybe nothing happens until January 20th and that is that is a scenario that I don't want to imagine, but it's very possible and If we do nothing until then, the harm and pain in this country, and frankly, I think the protest around the inaction in Washington would grow grow much larger. It's funny, Megan. I've also been thinking about that September 30th date. That's also when the aide to the airlines run runs out, and there's been pushed with significant support on both sides of the aisle in Congress to do something to reauthorize that. But September 30 is eight weeks away. And, you know, I mean, Republicans used to talk a lot about the cost of uncertainty to the economy, making people wait eight more weeks, both individuals and businesses without knowing with policy's going to be. You would think that that would have Significant negative effects. In the meantime, o. I mean, this is madness. I think there's some madness on the Democratic side, Teo, you know it takes two people to have a deadlock there. Democrats could have accepted the Republican offer, and they haven't on the Republican offer is not that crazy. I mean, you know, $400 a week in unemployment benefit extra unemployment benefits instead of 600 is probably not going to buy itself crashed the economy. I would also say that the difference between those two things is not worth crashing the economy and I think that the you know the big risk. Has always been that we have this really weird recession is just not like any other recession we've ever had right on down and a lot of the old stuff that you hear people talking about. Oh, get no money in the worker's hands because they spend it well, you know, Yeah, but there's not a lot to spend it on right now. Which is why savings is going up. You know, we're we're in uncharted territory, but the risk is that we have a normal recession on top of the code contraction. And that's something that we're now flirting with. I think we've talked a lot about the short term effects of this crisis on the job market and on the economy, But a lot of what's happening in this crisis is likely to stick with us for a pretty long time. Children are missing school that may affect the kind of work they conduce when they grow up in their educational attainment. Parents lives have been turned upside down by the need for new childcare arrangements that affects their own work. Let's take a break, and then I want to come back and talk about those issues with Dorian Warren of the Center for Community Change, Megan McArdle of the Washington Post and Betsey.

Megan McArdle Congress Republican Party Josh Washington Post president Senate Dorian Warren Teo Center for Community Change Washington unaligned
"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"dorian warren" Discussed on KCRW

"Of the economy continues to function rather than locking up like it did in 2008. But beyond that, you know the parts of the real economy that have contracted. You can't fix that. As without fixing over. I'm not sure I buy this idea that you can't stimulate the economy right now. I mean, the economy shrank almost 10% in the second quarter. That means we still did 90% of the things that we normally do. You're seeing sort of a lot of shifting and consumer behavior. I mean, I I wrote this week about about coffee. Starbucks sales are down, but people are buying more coffee to brew at home. There are all sorts of these parts of the economy where there are things that people can do if you give them money, and we saw that there was a significant uptick in consumer spending in April, right after Easter right around when people started getting those stimulus checks, so I don't know. But before we move on from this story in What do you make of the idea that that we've heard from Megan and shy that basically, you know that you can't stimulate the economy that's in this position. The money is just to relieve people from insolvency. I think that's half of it. But the other half is stimulus like this is the hole over moment right for the Republican Party conservatives either We're going to stimulate the economy with spending and particularly targeting money, toe, low income households, which we know, spend it on things like I don't know. Food, shelter friends. Karp a beds just to give you a data point here during the second quarter. We know that compensation of workers drop 795 billion and the pandemic unemployment compensation program. That's the program that provides Theoden Channel $600 per week to unemployed individuals. Made up for that lost by 639 billion. Right, So we know and you combine that with the data points around spending by low income households, not higher middle income households. It actually helped keep the economy from an even steeper contraction. So yes, Spending by low income households especially does stimulate the economy. It helps it. I'm going off of a cliff. But I do agree that there can't be any recovery fundamentally, until we stand the spread of the virus. For all the reasons my colleagues have said whether it's about confidence, but it's also about people are spending money on basic necessities. When you look at the data, and Josh, just add. I mean, I don't disagree with anything, Dorian said. I think it really comes down to how you define stimulus. You know if you're talking about preventing us from going off of a cliff and propping up the economy, I think absolutely, That is what's happening with the relief that has been provided and what maybe provided. Additionally, what I meant is I don't think we can get to a place where we really getting anywhere near back to the economy that we had by just infusing more money into peoples. Consumer businesses hands unless we have a Under control over the virus. Yeah, I don't think that that's saying that. Spending money on basic obligations like rent and car payments and and and so forth, and food and utility bills is a contradiction of what I said. It is what I said. Well, I mean, we have seen a pickup in sales and some discretionary categories to after those checks went out. I mean apparel started improving and in April it at WalMart, For example, after people got those checks, but I I want to talk about One thing about what this means for individual households. Before we go to a break shy the There's been this proposal so far rebuffed to push out the unemployment benefits for one week as Congress continues to negotiate. Thea unemployment benefits or not administered by the federal government. They're administered by individual states that have to actually process thes checks. So what should households where people are receiving unemployment benefits? What should they expect in terms of timing? If and when Congress gets around to doing something? When is that actually going to mean money in their bank account? I mean, could Congress had passed a bill before it left this week, saying that unemployment benefits would be extended for one week. And would that have meant that the checks that go out this week actually would have included Thie extension of that of that enhance benefit. The bottom line. For most states, I think is know the deadline for not having any disruption in those benefits was probably some days ago, if not a week or two ago. What we're seeing over the port of course of the last several months is that state's unemployment insurance Programs are really in disrepair. I think Senator Kennedy from Louisiana had equipped the other day where you said something just got microwaves last week, and that might be a little bit of an exaggeration. But the fact that they can't implement anything more than a flat dollar across the board benefit increase and that has taken them months in some cases to get people the benefits that they're owed. Under this new additional federal supplement is really shameful and just shows how long have you neglected the system for? So I think But the reality is that the moment that even if Congress came back and miraculously reached a deal on Monday and passed something by the middle or end of next week, it would be at least roughly the middle of the month. In most states, if not the latter half of the month before, most people were able to get those benefits that was important to note that they could do it retroactively so people could perhaps collect the money from the weeks that were missed in between, but that would still leave them, obviously, with a difference between the amount that they're taking in, and then you need to spend over these power for many weeks that transpires. Let's take a break. I'll be Back with Dorian Warren of the Center for Community Change, Megan McArdle of the Washington Post and Shy a canvass of.

Congress Megan McArdle Dorian Warren Starbucks Center for Community Change Theoden Channel Republican Party Senator Kennedy Washington Post WalMart Josh Louisiana