2 Burst results for "Doria Shafique"

"doria shafique" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:00 min | 2 years ago

"doria shafique" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm no well king last night. The Washington Post published what is believed to be Jamal kashogi as last column the Saudi journalist who was a regular contributor to the post was last seen walking into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul early this month. He's believed to be a casualty of the topic. He wrote about in that piece an unfree press in the Arab world kashogi wrote about Arab governments suppressing a free press without consequences. We're gonna read part of that column to you now, quote, these actions no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community. Instead, these actions may trigger condemnation quickly followed by silence as a result Arab governments have been given free. Rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate. He goes on. There was a time when journalists believe the internet would liberate information from the censorship and control associated with print media. But these governments whose very existence relies on the control of information have aggressively blocked the internet. They've also arrested local reporters and pressured advertisers to harm the revenue of specific publications now earlier, I spoke to kashogi editor at the Washington Post. Karen attiyah? Thank you so much for having me. So in a note to readers above the column, you wrote that kashogi. Jeez. Translator sent you. This piece a day after he was reported missing. When did you realize that that it was the time to publish it? For me personally, you know, earlier this week. I think with the news reports. And of course, you don't know sort of evidence of proof of life coming from either the Turkish or the Saudi side, we just decided that now is the week the time to do it. I think also has a story is moving to more geopolitical story story about US Saudi relations goal for locations. I think we just decided that it was good to bring the story back to who. Jamal was I'm in particular, this column about expression freedom for for journalists in the airborne. Does something not during our time together. He was extremely passionate about extremely energized about and away from severe politician. Just back to the humanity of it about his his thoughts his words and his ideas when you talk to him about what was happening back. Back home. What did he say? How was he struggling with that beyond just beyond writing about it? What other steps did he want to take? Very often. I mean, this last columnist fitting very often in his pieces that he wrote for the post he would politician to reformers and activists who are also being detained and jailed. So I think for him keeping awareness on on these these people, and these are just the people that we know about, you know, there are hundreds if not thousands of others who have been detained or or disappeared under under crunch Mohammed bin Salman. So I think he he definitely thought that this is something he he didn't agree with any. He always used to say Saudi Arabia was not always liked it. He would say that. It wasn't always this repressive. Did he ever talk? A you know, a man who spent most of his life in Saudi Arabia. Did he ever talk about having friends or colleagues who still supported the regime, and and how difficult that that must have been sure? And again, I mean Jamal himself even was not this this revolutionary, and none of those pieces that he call for overthrow or or anything. He was somebody who even in his his work in his long career believed and in a way working within the system. And so, you know, as far as our conversations about being pained at people who support that he he wasn't really. In our conversation. He wasn't really paying so much about that. He's just sort of in in in pain in general about the direction Saudi Arabia was taking and I think he really struggled to understand why people who even supported public supported crown prince Mohammad bin philmont's reformed. We're still finding themselves surveilled and intimidated and even detained what will you? Remember about your friendship with Tamaki Shuki. He was just a very very kind very humble, very generous person. I remember just being so energized about being able to write freely. I think it's just something in this country in America that we take for granted so much, but obviously looking back on it now realizing not he gave up so much everything. His his family has his being kicked out of jobs. I just I'm inspired by his his unwavering commitment to not only, you know, having freedom for himself, but trying to extend that his fellow Arab writers and voices and to he just wanted the world Arab world to be a better place. And I'll never forget. That guarantee is the Washington Post global opinions editor Karen, thank you so much. Thank you, so much know Jamal kashogi was well known among western journalists who've covered Saudi Arabia and the broader region among them NPR's. Deborah Amos, Deb has been reporting from Saudi Arabia for decades her first trip. There was back in nineteen ninety one and she joins us now. Thanks for being with us step. Thank you. What went through your mind? As you read this final column from Jamal kashogi in the Washington Post. You know, in a way for me it felt like an Obama for a man who was passionate about free media. You know, he spent so much of his life in newsrooms. And I remember his disappointment a few years ago when a TV station opened in Bahrain was closed in twenty four hours. He put a prominent dissident in his first newscast. And so the powers that be shut him down. You know, what turns out to be our last conversation. He wanted to build an Arabic version of public television for the region. And he said he had the money to do it for the. First time in his career, the Washington Post gave him this remarkable platform the post also translated his columns into aerobic which extended his reach. But it may have been the reason for his demise. We should also just remember that he he had been living in the US. Right. He'd been in Virginia. Yes. For a year. He had had come he'd been there before he'd been a spokesman at the embassy, but he was a Washington Post journalist, he was a resident of the United States. He had a profile in Washington often at sink tanks. I, you know, I'm beginning to think that he knew every journalist in town and most of the people who are covering this story knew him. So as we have heard Turkey. Turkish officials are pointing the finger not just the regime, but in in particular at the crown prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman, can you explain his rise to power what kind of leader he is proving to be. You know, he came on the scene when he first arrived. We didn't even know how old he was his older brothers have advanced degrees from the west. But the crown prince he stayed by his father's side in the kingdom when his father was the governor of Riyadh and back. Then his father actually wasn't enforcer within the family. He was in charge of the paychecks for the royals, and he knew know who owed money who is in trouble Mohammed bin Salman rice has been very quick. And his sort of his goal is to move the kingdom of conservative religious kingdom into the modern age. But he's done it with incredible brutality and a he has no tolerance for critics. He has arrested many in the kingdom he has also arrested royals in a crackdown on corruption. Right. He was holding them. Unlike the fancy hotel for weeks and weeks at a time. Yes. Indeed. And everybody had to pay. Up to get out. You know, I think that there was some discomfort about that in the business community in the west, but mostly it was like an odd Saudi thing to jail people in a five star hotel. He also jailed of Saudi women. These are activists who had been pushing for the end to a driving ban. Many of them are still in detention. No charges. We know nothing about what is happening with them. So, you know at the same time he was feted in the west. He was building this, you know, structure for stamping out dissent, but what does the west seen him? And in particular. What does President Trump seeing him? He is you know, there's this myth of the of the young reformer we sought a earlier in Syria. You know, we saw with the son of Moammar Kadhafi, you know, young men who are about to take over from their fathers. They have modern educations. And sometimes it turns out they are as brutal as as their. A father's in this case. I think Mohammed bin Salman sold himself in the west as a man who was going to change Saudi Arabia, who's going to move the economy, and in particular open up the social space for Saudis. What he never said was he was going to politically liberalize the kingdom and that for certain he has not. And I think that that is now donning on the west as as this story unfolds. What is in his future as far as you can discern? I mean, some in congress now what President Trump to reevaluate weapons deals with the Saudis. Same thing is happening in Europe is is there a chance King Solomon decides that Mohammed bin Salman is to volatile and replaces them, you know, I still think it's too early to to even answer that question, you know, on the one hand I'm talking to a lot of Middle East analysts who when this all started said, no, there's no chance. Now, they're beginning to say, the crown prince has toxic. The king is going to have to consider some replacement, but it's. It's also possible that the king, and certainly the White House sees that this relationship is too important to US national security to allow the death of one journalist to alter where Saudi Arabia is now I think we have to wait and see how the investigation goes is that tape released what happens in the White House to really see where the king will go on this. All right NPR's, Deborah Amos. She's been reporting on Saudi Arabia for years. Thank you so much. Thank you. It's morning edition from NPR news, and you are listening to KCRW. Support for KCRW comes from the craft and folk art museum dedicated to exploring the leading edge of contemporary craft art and design presenting Los Angeles, artists Charene gear gearboxes solo presentation of thorns and love which explores the neglected history of Egyptian feminist activist Doria Shafique through intricate paper Cup. Paintings sculpture end an interactive adobe installation. More at C, a f AM dot org. KCRW.

Saudi Arabia Washington Post Jamal kashogi Salman rice Mohammed Saudi consulate United States NPR Karen attiyah royals editor Rachel Martin President Trump Deborah Amos KCRW Rein Istanbul Washington Virginia
"doria shafique" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"doria shafique" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the luxury of six foot tall she was very hard to ignore and she was a natural leader and even the men they had a lot of time for her because of their hard work she'd put in in trying to improve the lot of the working class in dublin so she was a natural candidate for one of the constituencies in dublin city centre one of the poorer areas the feminist movement in the suffragette movement did backer to the hilt and she was easily voted in i i guess the story of constance market which is linked to irish nationalism is a good reminder that the were many different factors which played into the history of women's version writes and another factor which we've mentioned in passing was the impact of the first world war the argument being that it was this as much as anything else which led to women in the uk being given that vote there's a lot of debate about how much difference the publicity stunt sometimes violent suffrage jets actually made how much do you think they inspired other women around the world in some cases other women and other countries looked to the suffragettes and able to project themselves as being entirely different from the suffragettes they would say look we are ladylike we are not going to make noises we are not going to smash windows we're not going to do all these awful things that the english women do this is how we we can demonstrate our national guide however there were other women who took the message of the suffragettes a bit further people like doria shafique and her daughters of the nile movement in egypt where after abdul nasser's revolution in the in the nineteen fifties there was no place for women and so dear shafique the daughters of the now staged a hunger strike on.

dublin doria shafique abdul nasser uk egypt six foot