16 Burst results for "Donor Foundation"

"donor foundation" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:32 min | 2 months ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Neighborhood He pleaded guilty to sexually abusing 5 children while he was a priest at saint Agatha's parish despite the fact that a judge in 2017 rolled McCormack a sexually violent person he was released He has registered as a sex offender in Illinois The Oak Park woman convicted of helping to kill her mother in Bali and then stuffed the body in a suitcase was arrested this morning upon her arrival at O'Hare after being released from an Indonesian prison where she served time Gil sofa is a legal analyst at ABC 7 The early release was the decision made by the Indonesian authorities and their stated reason was that it was related to Independence Day when they apparently routinely will provide early release And that she was well behaved as a prisoner Mack who gave birth in prison arrived with her 6 year old daughter she and her former boyfriend Tommy schaeffer who is still in prison now face federal charges of conspiracy to commit murder and obstruction of justice or attorney argues she can't be charged again because of time served Illinois Chicago public health officials say there are plenty of doses of the COVID-19 vaccine for young children ages 5 to 11 to go around Many places are already set up for parents to take their kids to get the shots Northwestern children practices doctor Scott Goldstein says his office is ready Within the first week or two we're going to have a weekend Saturday and Sunday where people can come in walk in and we're going to have an evening time Well CVS and Walgreens are going to start giving those shots out this weekend The CDC gave the final approval yesterday for the Pfizer vaccine Moderna's is still in review The strike continues in moline after John Deere members of the united auto workers union rejected a tentative deal to end the strike nickel with more At issue pay and retirement bonuses The UAW announcing Tuesday night that members voted down the agreement 55% voting no to 45% voting yes The strike involves more than 10,000 production and maintenance workers at 12 deer sites in Illinois Iowa and Kansas The strike will continue as the union discusses next steps with the company Nick Gail 8 90 W LS news The car rittenhouse murder trial in Wisconsin continues today rittenhouse is accused of killing two people and wounding another during a protest in August of last year where marchers were demonstrating against the police Shooting of Jacob Blake Here's ABC News contributor Shauna Lloyd The defense is doing a good job in using him as almost foundational witness to kind of set the scene as to what was happening at that time He's doing a good job of in the sense of he's creating this idea that people were needed in the area because what it was doing was people who were protecting their businesses were decreasing the damage to their businesses The trial could take two to three weeks Steppenwolf theater unveils its new $54 million campus Here's Mallory war broker Mayor lightfoot and community leaders joined together to celebrate the new 50,000 ft² theater building in Lincoln park the expanded campus will include a wine bar a teen loft area and a 400 seat in the round theater Mayor lightfoot looks to the future We want steppenwolf to continue to be this access point to another generation of artists and audiences Governor pritzker also attended the event Steppenwolf continues to be one of our nation's premier ensemble theaters The new building is part of steppenwolf's multi phase $73 million expansion campaign which has raised 56 million today thanks to civil support from individual donors foundations corporations and government funding Mallory warburger 8 90 WL us news News time is.

saint Agatha Gil sofa Tommy schaeffer Illinois COVID Scott Goldstein united auto workers union McCormack Oak Park Nick Gail Bali Mack Moderna Jacob Blake Mayor lightfoot ABC Shauna Lloyd
"donor foundation" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

02:26 min | 3 months ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"They asked for her vaccination record but key to this entire conversation. They didn't turn her away because she wasn't vaccinated against covet mclaughlin said it's a personal preference there you have to sign away ver- and it says they recommend the vaccine for these reasons but if you choose not to get the vaccine that's your choice now to bonds foundation for its part is willing to help mclaughlin and other colorado scrambling to find another hospital in other states. If they're seeking transplant the cost of an out of state. Transplant is much more than most can afford to bond said we provide transportation and free apartments for families who need to travel to dallas. Fort worth area for an organ transplant list. We give them a place to live while they're going through that process adding. We can't solve all their problems but will give you a hand. We'll give you at the very least a free place to live. That's one less thing they'll have to worry about now. Apparently mclaughlin for her part she had started looking into a hospital in arizona before it's ban offered help and she says that they're help has been nothing short of a miracle adding you stay in that state for at least a month because when you get a transplant does work right away. You have to continue dialysis until the kidneys starts functioning. You have to be watched very closely your back and forth about three to four times a week just for testing and to make sure everything's good. She added they reached out to me and said not only. Are we going to take care of getting you there and bringing her husband out to be with you but we're also going to bring out your donor and we're going to give you a place to stay for a month. Rent free mclaughlin obviously already in the process of transferring her record saying i could have kidney as a christmas gift and how amazing that would be. The state of texas through a donor foundation is lending a hand to unvaccinated colorado in need.

mclaughlin Fort worth colorado dallas arizona texas
"donor foundation" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

02:28 min | 8 months ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"We're taking a break from our series of episode exploring judaism and the trans experience to interview the author of a new book. We're really excited to have this conversation. But before we jump into it. Since it's the beginning of june when we're releasing this episode and some of you might know that nonprofit organizations generally have fiscal year that ends. On june thirtieth. This isn't important time for us to put out an appeal for some financial support from our listeners. And i should note that when i say nonprofit organization i really mean it. Nobody in the judaism unbound jewish live. Enterprise is making a profit in fact. We're not really making very much at all and not that any of us expects to get rich doing this but we really would like to build a stable sustainable organization in which everybody who works in. This enterprise is paid a decent wage and where we're able to expand our offerings and do more and more so that we can connect you with a really exciting thinkers and doers out there in the jewish world. So that we can continue to develop new workshops and classes and all kinds of things that we dream of doing in the last year during the covid pandemic over one hundred thousand people access some of the material that we've created on audio or video through judaism unbound or jewish life. It's an incredible number. And i wanna share with you that in the same last year. Where one hundred thousand people accessed material we have had fewer than five hundred donors. We've talked on this show about the idea that it would be great if everybody only donated a small amount like a dollar for every hour of content. That you've consumed. We would love it if you're able to do that but if you're not able to do that or this isn't a great time the truth. Is that any amount that you could donate would be both appreciated and helpful because if we can show other donors foundations and other large donors that we have one hundred thousand people using our content and some meaningful percentage of that audience is so interested in what we're doing that they want to help it continue even if they can only afford a small amount that would indicate a level of engagement with what we're doing that would other donors really excited and that would translate into the larger amounts that we need to actually keep all of this running. I would love it if everybody. Who's listening to this right now. Might just pause the audio for a second go to. Www dot judaism unbound dot com slash donate and donate something even if it's one dollar or five dollars total. We're super appreciative. It would help..

one dollar five dollars last year june thirtieth one hundred thousand people judaism over one hundred thousand peop five hundred donors both june a dollar jewish beginning every hour dot com Www dot
"donor foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So my artists are leaving their switching careers. Andare patrons are in continual lockdown, so we have to. We have to have to meet the need. There's no choice and you're doing it in ways that are really quite innovative and imagine if I mean it's best you can and in terms of fundraising. I was reading where For a $5000 donation could have someone come to your driveway and doing Aria E Z imaginative but also I want to talk about the unique approach you're doing and creating actually a digital lab bond, quarantining artists and creating new content. But I hope your listeners appreciate is what our artists are willing to sacrifice to bring them new programming. Oper centered 8% is a doesn't enjoy a vast library of archival productions on We don't have an endowment, So our life blood is new work incubating tomorrow's artists. These artists do not make MBA salaries, but they were willing to sacrifice seeing their families seeing their friends. Joining together in a household in complete isolation, having their groceries delivered any number of sacrifices that are staggering so that we could produce a production during these times. Ah, production that feels relevant to exactly what's going on in this moment, and I'm very, very proud of them for pulling that together. And you're doing things well under the circumstances, which really? I wanted to highlight you got into movie making. Remember? In fact, years ago, I did have it was participant in a film with lofty Monsoor, who was then head of San Francisco Opera. Exactly. It's a really good and solid way of fundraising. But you're also doing a lot of multi lingual things. Reaching, for example, beyond into the Vietnamese community. That's right. So many of our non English in community members haven't felt comfortable in our opera houses for four decades, and now we have an opportunity to offer our programming in Vietnamese in Spanish and remove those barriers on. That's what's surprising about this pandemic. Julie mentioned the silver linings. They're actually all over the place. The costs can come down the the amount of work we can produce can go up. We can produce shorter programming. We can produce new or work. We don't have to rely on the same formula that's taken us this far. And I see a tremendous, tremendous creative renaissance coming on the heels of this and you know to be Frank. Everyone's missing live performance, perhaps in a way that they weren't aware of before, and perhaps they will stand with the arts in the months ahead as we speak recovery. Corey Duster with US general director of Opera San Jose and the future, We hope will hold more for opera. You have to do it without masks, which is certainly Ah, challenge in many ways, But you're gonna have shorter productions, probably and fewer people in the future. And yet I think it's really vital to get some protocols here for your group. And for so many groups that we're going to hear from over the course of this hour court. Thank you for joining us. Good to have you. Thank you, Michael. Thank you for the topic and congratulations on the retirement. Thank you for that. And let me go back to Juli Baker and Juli Baker again, his executive rector of California for the arts, they say In the course of this hour, we'll be talking to some other leaders from The arts community, But arts, culture and entertainment is an industry in California, which really still has a zoo said earlier with the Brookings Numbers. Ah, third of its Participants third of its employees out of work. I'm wondering Julie if we could sort of look at what's being done broadly in terms of the pandemic, creating and social media, for example, and what's being done. Visa VI this crisis because there's so much It's being done and offered online to people who are working at home with their Children. For example, in the like I mean it Z pretty remarkable. It is Michael. I mean, I think that you know it's obvious that artists are incredibly creative people and innovators and when the pandemic hit, and we had to change every way in which we do business, and we're used to doing business and his, Cory said, I think one of the silver linings is that the industry is learning. Some some new tools getting from new tools in our toolbox, and many people are actually reaching wider and larger audiences because of going online. The challenge, however, toe online is the monetary aspect of it. How do we earn revenue in the United States? You know, the source for revenue for nonprofit arts organizations is about 60% earned income. 31% is contributed from individual donors, foundations and corporations and the remaining 29 comes. I'm sorry. That's not that's not the right map. The remaining 9% comes from public funding, so We have, you know, lost a lot of opportunity in terms of revenue, But I think what Corey was saying is really important, which, you know, we've been talking about the value of artists and these cultural and arts organizations at these trusted community partners as second responders in a crisis. And we've really seen this come to really uncredible light during the pandemic of where people looking for a sense of joy, a sense of hope, a sense of meaning during this time and the arts of providing that for us The trick is to make sure that we also value it in terms of investment and funding. And, you know, I think we can all say that we know that we are systemically undercapitalized as an industry. I mean, we are a massive industry to California. We are actually 8.2% of the state's gross domestic product, a larger share of the state's economy that construction or transportation, Joyce, You know you're the economic engine. In many ways, they're one of the major economic engines. I'm coming up on a break, and I want to give out the phone number because Another many people who have questions and comments and again we're really talking about the status of the arts and the pandemic. You can call us now and we welcome your calls. 8667336786 is the number to call again. That's All 38667336786.

California Corey Duster Julie United States Michael Juli Baker San Francisco Monsoor San Jose Frank Cory Joyce general director executive
"donor foundation" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"Slash newsletter, and just subscribe to the show notes right there. The show notes a newsletter it's the same thing. Here. This article is a must read. American greatness. Truly Kelly. The billionaire back the insurrection. The, mostly behind the scenes attempts between election day and inauguration day to prevent trump from taking office. For the first time, we'll go public in two thousand twenty. WHO's paying for this effort? To foment confusion about who won the election number one, and secondly for all these organizers, they hit the streets and cause violence and chaos to confuse you and scare you who's paying for all this because it costs money. Well, that's interesting, and in this piece, she has quite a few suspects. Let's go into one of them I've addressed before. Let's go to screen shot number one in the interest of time. Let's hit this one because I've already mentioned a woman named Rosa Brooks. Is Behind the transition integrity project. A project of left-wing. Never trumpers committed to causing a streetfight after the election if trump wins. So they say Julia says quote one of the CO founders of the transition integrity project the chaos brigade really is Rosa Brooks. She's Georgetown. Law Professor and Obama Administration Alumni. Wow Weird. WHO's a former council and board member for the Open Society? Foundation created in one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three by George Soros I got bad there I'm sure that's what the left is going to say despite the fact that this irrefutable evidence of the foundation is a massive donor. Foundation to hundreds of left wing causes around the world and in July you open societies foundation announced five year one, hundred, fifty, million dollar investment a quote racial justice groups including black lives matter. Wow strange black lives matters supposed to be about black lives mattering. Bright that's the name of the group black lives matter matter black lives black life should matter what are they doing partnering up and taking money for some of the same groups same groups talking about fomenting an insurgency during an election what does that? During a post-election transition period, what does that have to do with black lives is nothing black lives matter has nothing to do with black lives. It never did. It's a Marxist group just listened to the founders own Moore's I've only played that cut of Patrice, Patricia Colors Twenty Times on the show. One of the founders of black lives matter saying she's a Marxist organizer, our words not mine, and that's why the liberal media is not covering my show ignoring all this. So George Soros is group is funding a transition project designed to cause chaos in the transition and send people into the streets if trump wins. Some of the same people funding black lives matter this had to do with black lives what? I write my again, my next book, follow the money where I cover George. Soros you'll see George Soros rarely has anything to do with what he says he has day they call projects like we love democracy and black lives matter the names of these groups have nothing to do with what they're actually doing. The Open Society Foundation source who is nothing to do with open societies. It has everything to do with chaos societies. So, now we know Rosa Brooks is involved in this a Soros Obama affiliate let's say. Well. What are they planning on again, these groups let's go to screen shot number two from Julia. Kelly's wonderful piece spread this thing around a lot trying to get this up on report DOT COM to. Well in a recent Washington Post op Ed Rosa Brooks, put the country on notice unless Joe Biden wins in a landslide, we will be sorry she said quote with the exception of the Big Biden wind scenario each of their exercises reached the brink of catastrophe with massive disinformation campaigns violence in the streets her words not mine and a constitutional impasse she warned she warned is that awaken an odd joe? Quote that reaction will occur according to the simulation even if trump wins the electoral college but loses the popular vote, do you see where we're going year isn't as weird? Too Weird Dude. that. Joe You. There has since when I recorded yesterday's show, just checking it, I need you to be a legitimate facts like around the show has been a constitutional amendment throwing out the electoral. College just checking since yesterday yesterday. No. Thank you thank you Massachusetts yesterday where we haven't heard maybe some effort behind this season, we have not heard since yesterday of the Constitution being modified that this is now the president is elected via popular, but we haven't heard that. So just to be clear. Rosa Parks is group is warning about quote street violence, their words not not my words again this is why the left won't cover my show 'cause they don't want you to go look this up in her own op ed their warning about street violence and they're indicating even if trump wins legitimately the electoral college jogesh how I check that's how you become president right the electoral again. amendment. Thank just we're good. Okay. Tell me double checking on you gotta get to do. So just checking, they're calling for violence in the streets even if trump wins legitimately. The group run by. The lady. WHO's getting paid by Soros Foundation that's also involved with all kinds of groups like black lives matter and elsewhere. Yeah. Tell me again how we shouldn't worry about any of this calling for violence in the streets and everyone just wants you to. Whistle plastic graveyard. There's graduates to walk home from Saint Pancras School in Glendale and Mount Carmel Cemetery used to be on my left. That's why I was never scared of cemeteries I worked in one. I, used to clean mausoleums, but they're whistling past the graveyard right now. I'm a terrible whistler Joe's fantastic. He could play our Monica Whistle whatever you want about me. But for the purposes of this segment that horrible whistling we'll do. We're all supposed to ignore this. A soros-funded group that transition integrity project is openly talking about violence in the streets even if trump wins. And we're all supposed to pretend. This is an EPI. Thank you Tucker for covering this on your show last night with Mr Darren. Beatty. WHO talks not going to be a military insurgencies way our military do that. This is going to be a color revolution insurgency. You know yeah the type we use overseas because chaos in foreign countries we're doing that here is an APP. Weird Now again, what are the two rules of the insurgency and the conspiracy one don't talk about the conspiracy because I want to get busted? And number two. If you are busted, make sure you blame it on your opponent, they're doing it. More of that in a minute here. Let me go to the screen shot number three here from this Julie. Kelley article here's another group you need to keep.

George Soros Rosa Brooks trump Soros Foundation Kelly Julia joe Open Society Foundation Joe Biden Rosa Parks Joe You Open Society Obama Washington Post Obama Administration Alumni president Georgetown Beatty
"donor foundation" Discussed on The Morning Ritual with Garret Lewis

The Morning Ritual with Garret Lewis

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on The Morning Ritual with Garret Lewis

"Conservative Pr Firm. God Bob Robbins on the liberal news networks and these professors that don't understand marketing at a journalism professor in English professor teaching professor. They now are experts in marketing. But it all comes down to politics and race. They just hate the fact that it's a firm. Pr From that has ties to Mitch McConnell and to conservatives again the fact that this Bustamante Lady said the universities a Hispanic serving institution optics aren't good when you have a you have a working. In whatever form with a hyper partisan organization called cavalry again? What would ever happen if they actually started You know espousing conservative views right. What would happen then this is. This is crazy. There's so much waste so much waste in this in this university system and now they just opened it up and listen Bob. Robbins said the view of a incurred losses of fifty eight million dollars in fiscal year. Twenty twenty projects ninety seven million in losses by June thirtieth due to decrease in enrollment drops in housing applications for the resignation or live there and more. So he's doing everything to get back some money and it's still not good enough because it's a conservative group and again these are the people that are teaching And they want you. There's no indoctrination going on. This is crazy no no. I don't think so. It's exactly what we said. It was the Farid took the English professor said the anxiety by many of us. Is that the the donor foundation is going to at some point. Expect a reciprocal change in policy. That would reflect the priorities of conservative. Think tanks legislators might there be an expectation of deepening relationship between this donor or foundation. So this happens now. You know we got you on the business now. Change the way you do things. If he's going to change the way you liberal nuts at teach on the campus are going to actually work okay. You're refused to change after you literally disrespected border patrol and chased them off the campus. GimMe a break these. There's such wimps so I'm glad they are actually exposing themselves. I'll put pictures of this on my facebook page article in Lincoln up at facebook dot com slash Garrett Lewis Radio and on twitter at Gear Lewis. More coming up. Don't go anywhere it's Kennedy going now. I am not as going.

Bob Robbins professor facebook Mitch McConnell Bob Bustamante Lady Gear Lewis Farid Kennedy Garrett Lewis Radio Lincoln twitter
"donor foundation" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Hi Carol is with you N. S. T. a am seven ninety two sons of most stimulating talk so the conservative PR firm got Bob Robbins on the liberal news networks and these professors that don't understand marketing got a journalism professor in English professor bad teaching professor they now are experts in marketing but it all comes down to politics and race they just hate the fact that it's a can and a firm appear from that has ties to Mitch McConnell into conservatives again the fact that this Bustamante lady said the university's a Hispanic serving institution optics aren't good whenever you have a working in whatever form with a hyper partisan organization called cavalry again and got what what would ever happen if they actually started you know espousing conservative views right what would happen then this is this is crazy there's so much waste so much waste in this in this university system and now they just opened it up and listen Bob Robbins said the view of a incurred losses of fifty eight million dollars in fiscal year twenty twenty projects ninety seven million in losses by June thirtieth due to decreases in enrollment drops in housing applications for the resident or live there and more so he's doing everything to get back some money and it's still not good enough because it's a conservative group and again these are the people that are teaching her and they wanna you got there's no indoctrination going on this is crazy no no I don't think so it's exactly what we said it was now the Friedman took the English professor so the anxiety by many of us is that the dot the donor foundation is going to to at some point expect a reciprocal change in policy that would reflect the priorities of conservative think tanks are legislators might there be an expectation of a deepening relationship between this donor or foundation so this happens again you know we got Johnny did the business not change the way you do things he's gonna magically change the way you liberal not to teach on the campus are going to actually work okay your guys refused to change after you literally disrespected border patrol and chased him off the campus give me a break at Easter there such wimps so I'm glad they they are actually exposing themselves I'll put pictures of this on my Facebook page article and link it up and Facebook dot com slash Gary Lewis radio and on Twitter at Gary Lewis more coming up don't go anywhere it's canister news on million.

Carol Bob Robbins professor Mitch McConnell Friedman Johnny Facebook Twitter Gary Lewis Bustamante
"donor foundation" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

13:02 min | 1 year ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"One hundred ten kids over small town Talent yeah it's pretty small. Yeah I mean it's these mountain towns Colorado a little different because it was like huge like area wise but like there's not many people because everybody has lands and stuff so it's Kinda hard to describe people don't know kind of what the mountains look like but yeah like five hundred kids maybe four hundred kids total in high school Pretty Small High School Close my family Parents did get divorced. You know when I was what was I. Sixteen fifteen sixteen. That was hard. Obviously specially in a small town. I think it makes it a lot harder and then from there. I went to college in Nebraska also another small college in the Midwest And then from them about Colorado after graduating there and lived in Denver now for about six years. Did your parents divorce have any affect on how you looked at relationships in love? Did you still want to get married at that? Point absolutely had effect on me because my parents definitely had they were married. Very Young They were together casualness. Eighteen years something like that. Eighteen years longtime like it wasn't like a Krino which inherited enemy and they were. You know definitely together for the kids for a long time and so it was almost when it finally they decided you know to kind of heart ways it hurts but saints. Who is best for everybody? And they're both very happy now literally in the next relationship they were into a been together since so For both of them so my mom remarried my dad now but dating you know same woman for ten years maybe maybe longer so So yeah it was. It was one of those weird things where it didn't make me not leaving love and not Li marriage because they gave you the best shot that lasts as long as possible. They raised me. My sister and stay together for US loved us. I was always in a very loving home. And then when they split up they still found remarried and found love again so definitely didn't affects. You Know My love life or anything like that. Tell tell us a little bit. More about what? It's like one of the things that I don't think we've ever discussed on an in-depth podcast though is As somebody's in highschool or late high school you know you had some traumatic experiences. I know it was public. That you were At School You're a senior when there was a school shooting At your high school In addition that obviously we just talked about the the separation of your parents For anybody out there listening. That's just like hey these feel like Heavy topics And not everybody's been through a school shooting That is a unique experience but a lot of people have been through divorce. How do you process this? And has it changed your perception of kind of life in how you see the world yeah Yeah my at the time when you're going through that you don't really realize that it's much different than everybody else. I mean. Obviously a school shooting very unique. But when you're going through it you know you don't really think much when you look back on it it's like man my high school those four three or four years really transformed to. I am today in the man. I am still you know and parents divorce. Yes was very hard you know and especially in a small town no But it's at the same time it brought Mr Ferri very close and so that that is something that always be thankful for me Mr close now. She's for years younger than me We're always kind of close But that's we're going through the divorce. Ron Us very very close together and then yeah. I mean it was not much longer after us. Kinda during actually I was senior in high school and a complete stranger walked into my high school. Didn't have any ties. The high school in took took Some female students hostage and it was very skilled obviously for everybody in the community and the state really came together but for me it was Kinda strange because or you know hard because my sister was a freshman at the time in my mom actually worked in high school too so I had basically my whole family in that high school at the time. So it hit me a little differently Because you know so much could have been taken from me that day and you know. I'll never forget. My mom was actually the one got on the intercom and said like coat white and I could hear it in my mom's voice that something was wrong. You know and the teacher remember the teacher looking at me and me looking at teacher and I could tell something often never forget stacking deaths in front of doors antiquing windows and things like that and it's it was very hard to process at the time. I remember prying but I couldn't figure out why I remember that a lot And but one of the cool things that came from it is the community. The state and the country really rallied around us And I remember we were getting. I was getting calls from people that I would never have probably talked to and they were calling in support. Never remember was a ton of money donated to my school and I remember. We had a whole classroom full. It's heady bears things like that. So it was cool to see the outpouring of love when things like that happen and how people can kind of come together and amy. I mean sometimes you can lose faith in humanity A lot actually And that was just a reminder that there are really good people out there that was. That was kind of a cool thing with everybody. Okay we did lose one female. Yeah and Yeah it was. It was really hard You know she was small school. So you kind of know everybody and was it was also very cutting credible to see. Was Her parents rally and be so strong and she they they actually. There's a emily. Keyes Foundation names than Wiki. Was Emily Keystone Dacian now and anytime you actually just did etc. Renew my license. It was kind of a weird moment where I was going through the To give new drivers license and in it it says. Would you like to donate to the emily? Keyes donor foundation Because she donated all your organs and everything and I was like. Oh my God. That's crazy that out of that. You know how many lives have been saved like heck. Yeah it was like donate donate donate so it was interesting and it was. It was just a strength that her parents showed and her family showed was also It was very inspiring. Do you do you feel like I mean how much of that there's always. I'm I'm I'm in therapy right now. And my counselor talks about there. Is this moment in every person. No matter if you're male or female or how unifies life where you see you see like there's you see the world differently become an adult innocence? You lose your night. Not Naive nece you. The I guess the the Lens of the world looks if it was this that moment for you and if not Yeah I remember. There was a moment during haven't talked about a while you get choked up. I'll never forget so when we were evacuated from the high school By SWAT teams Room by room I remember going into the. They huddled us into the gymnasium which was in a different building and held on us in gymnasium. And I remember seeing my mom and sister for the first time you know and we like ran to the middle of the Gymnasium. And it's a big group hug and it was just like in that moment it was like gosh things. Can you just ribs from ripped ripped from you so quickly and stuff asked And it's strange maybe to learn that and ice school knows at sixteen seventeen But it was definitely a moment that I will always remember like being so thankful that they weren't Ripa me and there was and then also at the same time the feeling the pain of Emily's family and how she was tremend- you know it was. It was a lot to take in. You know a sixteen seventeen is still stuff. I'm process long way and it took a while but to be so thankful that for what I have but then at the same time somebody who lost their child you know that was. That was a hard thing to deal with. You know not sixty. I'm John Member just. I remember watching CNN. And they were like you know his helicopter with my school. I remember seeing certain things happening and I remember just losing and crying and I was like crying. It was just so much process. It's are do you think Have have you ever been that scared again now? I guess that's a good point. I mean I've never really. I've never really thankfully that I've never really experienced anything like that in the there's a feeling of helplessness. Like I'll never forget that. I'll never forget the feeling of helplessness and US running from classroom classroom to try and like lock doors and fire doors have locks and you'd hear knock on the door and we'd pant you'd be like. Oh my God what's happening is we had no information So I mean it was complete Tara but also for myself but most importantly like I knew. My sister was in bat at a height that the school as well. And my mom and friends like your whole life sixteen life is in that school and so it was not only worried about yourself worried about the zoo and that was. I was really hard. Did you feel like you had like long-term effects by it like going back to school yet? I mean of course obviously like that's a life changing moment obviously Something that while enforce too many people go through to be honest now But it's I remember going back to school a couple of weeks later they can open up the school and I remember they They changed the door shuts on other room at Everything took place in and it was really eerie but also said it was. All of our students came together and the teachers and the community and everybody just as outpouring of love that I. I've never felt before or since to be honest and so it was pretty incredible. Yes it changed me and changed our community but also like a gave me hope again. You know you lose all that hope some stranger who just for no reason given to our high school but at the same time you lose hoping and same time you see all of these incredible people doing these incredible things you hope again. And that's why it's so important for people to reach out in times of need because it does make a difference coming from somebody. Who's been in it? It does make a difference the donations the teddy bears the food. Everything makes huge difference. They you're just sitting here and I'm listening to everything you're saying you know. Obviously as a kid who went to high school you experienced this and there was huge life changing effects from it. The family that lost somebody had massive life changing effects As you said like this is unfortunately not uncommon in some in the world. We live in And it also makes me think that That we all we all have a story that we all have something in our lives that marks that point in time where we realize that we're out of control we don't have control of this. We are in control of what happens next and it makes me relate and a lot of waste like what's happening now like you know a couple of weeks ago. People had job there. Couple months ago people had jobs. People were hearing rumors of a virus that was across the world Things were operating as usual as normal We were able to be with family. You know Easter is coming up and as a Christian like that's a big weekend for me. That's one of my favorite weekends. It's where I get to see my grandmother who is in her eighties that I don't get to see very often and I get to give her a hug and sit with her and just share members with her. I could see my GRANDPA. Who's in his mid nineties right now and like those eastern. These holidays are times I would make special to come back home into sit with him and I say all of this not to feel sorry for me. All all of us have a story You know all of us have a story and right now. A lot of people. Their story is being changed. Their story is being enhanced. Their story is getting more complex. Their sadness involved. There's weird ways of like new ways of looking at the world and kind of celebrating through this blake as we end this segment about your upbringing and who you are as a man leading you into One of the biggest things in your life which is crazy enough going on a reality television show for anybody out there listening once again. That's going my story. Feel so hard to understand right now like this is so scary. My world is being rocked. My world view is changing. What would you say to them? If you had your platform you had everybody. That just feels lonely and scared right. Now what would you speak into their life? Well first of all I I don't be you should be afraid. You should be scared Kind of embrace that in a way because if you fight it you know the more and more you fight It's okay to feel afraid. I have more friends who have been laid off and friends who have not right now and it's it's terrifying time In the virus itself is scary and I think like I have some friends who I recently talked to and they were like. We're.

Emily Keystone Dacian Pretty Small High School US Colorado Midwest Nebraska Denver Point CNN Ron Us Mr Ferri Li Keyes Foundation amy blake Ripa Tara John Member
"donor foundation" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"Graduated with one hundred ten kids over small town It's a really talented. Yeah, it's pretty small. Yeah I, mean it's these mountain towns Colorado a little different, because it was like huge like area wise, but like there's not many people because everybody has lands and stuff, so it's Kinda. Hard to describe people don't know kind of what the. The mountains look like, but yeah like five hundred kids. Maybe four hundred kids total in the high school. pretty small. High School close my family. parents did get divorced. You know when I was. What was I sixteen fifteen sixteen? That was hard, obviously specially in a small town I, think it makes it a lot harder and then from there I went to college in Nebraska also another small college. In the Midwest and then from them about Colorado after graduating there and lived in Denver now for about six years. Did your parents divorce have any affect on how you looked at relationships in love? Did you still want to get married at that point? Absolutely. Had a weird effect on me because. My parents definitely had they were married very young they were together gas. WanNa say. Something like that eighteen years longtime like it wasn't like a Christian heritage any and. They, were you know definitely together for the kids for a long time? And so it was almost when it finally they decided. You know to kind of heart ways. It hurts but saints who is best for everybody, and they're both very happy now. Literally in the next relationship, they were into a been together since so for both of them, so my mom remarried my dad now, but dating you know the same woman for ten years. Maybe eighty longer so so yeah, it was. It was one of those things where it didn't make. Make me not leaving love and not leave marriage because they gave you the best shot that lasts as long as possible. They raise me my sister and stay together for US loved us I, was always in a very loving home, and then when they split up, they still found remarried found love again, so definitely didn't affects you. Know My love, life or anything like that? Tell, tell us a little bit more about what it's like. One of the things that I don't think we've ever discussed on an in-depth podcast, though is as somebody in highschool or late high school. You know you had some traumatic experiences I know. It was public that you were at school You're a senior. When there was a school shooting at your high school in addition that obviously we just talked about the the separation of your parents for anybody out there listening. That's just like hey, these feel like heavy topics, and not everybody's been through a school shooting that is a unique experience, but a lot of people have been through divorce. How do you process this? and has it changed your perception of life in? How you see the world. Yeah Yeah My. At the time. When you're going through that, you don't really realize that it's much different than everybody else I mean obviously a school shooting very unique, but when you're going through it, you know you don't really think much when you look back on it. It's like man, my high school, those four three or four years really transformed to I. Am today in the Man I am? Still. You know and. Parents divorce. Yes was very hard. You know and especially in a small town, no But it's at the same time. It brought Mr Ferry very close and so that that is something that always be thankful for me Mr close now. She's three years younger than me We're always kind of close but that's. We're going through the divorce. Ron Us very very close together and. Then, yeah, I mean it was not much longer after us kind of during actually I was senior in high school and complete stranger walked into. My high school didn't have any ties. The high school in took. Took some female students. Hostage, and it was very skilled, obviously for everybody in the community, and the state really came together, but for me it was Kinda strange because or you know hard, because my sister was a freshman at the time in my mom actually worked in high school, too, so I had basically my whole family in that high school at the time, so it hit me a little differently. because you know so much could have been. been taken from me that day and you know I'll never forget. My mom was actually the one got on the intercom, and said like coat white, and I could hear it in my mom's voice. That something was wrong. You know and the teacher remember the teacher looking at me and me looking at teacher and I could tell something often never forget stacking deaths in front of doors and windows, and things like that and. It's, it was very hard to process at the time I. Remember prying, but I couldn't figure out why a member that a lot And but one of the cool things that came from it. Is The community, the state and the country. Rallied around us, and I remember we were getting. I was getting calls from people that I would never probably talked to, and they were calling in support. Never remember. was a ton of money donated to my school and I remember we had a whole classroom full. It's heady bears. Things like that, so it was cool to see. Outpouring of love. When things like that happen, and how people can kind of come together and amy? I mean sometimes you can lose faith in humanity a lot actually and that was just a reminder that there are really good people out there that was that was kind of a cool thing with everybody okay? We did lose one female. Yeah and Yeah, it was. It was really hard you know. She was small school. So you kind of know everybody and. Was it was also very. Cutting credible to see was her parents rally and be so strong, and she they they actually there's a emily keyes foundation names than Wiki was emily keystone. Dacian now. And Anytime you actually just did etc. Renew my license. It was kind of a weird moment where I was going through the. A new drivers license, and in it, it says. Would you like to donate to the Emily Keyes? Donor Foundation because she donated all you know her organs and everything and I was like Oh..

High School Colorado emily keyes foundation Emily Keyes US Midwest Nebraska Denver emily keystone Ron Us Donor Foundation Wan Wiki amy
"donor foundation" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You by now? I know why we forgot to tell Sonning to play one Seebeck clear from the twin cities jazz fest is joining us. And I cannot believe you've been doing this festival for twenty one. By the way, Greece. Oh, you do. I love I love the show in the movie a lot. All right. How in the heck do you put on a jazz fest for twenty one years in a row and not charge? Anybody? Not supported by the community civic free event where about education about bringing art people together. So we basically create support from our sponsors. Heart donors foundations, and just the people that community together to make this happen. Okay. That's good. I mean, it really is so much fun. It is. So all kicks off this Thursday night in lower tone, don't on Saint Paul in its on rudder say Friday and Saturday over three hundred different acts at so many different venues downtown Saint Paul. Tell us the big folks that you're really excited about, but we should be. Started. But we have Jose James coming in who is a Minnesota. And he's now pretty good things traveled around the world. Great singer. Right. People know. Yes. So I mean doing a tribute to Bill withers, which, which should be a lot of fun over jazz woman. Who's on the tonight show quite a young. She was. Teen years old, and she's twenty five who is that Grace Kelly. Okay. And he she plays the sax. Yes. Okay. Absolutely tremendous. And then we have music, all in the different clubs and all pointed the jazz, fascist to be walking event, Mears park your side, you, if the weather could be quite, whatever it is lots of clubs downtown. So you find something you really enjoy. And enjoy it. It is so much fun. Because it's there's so much energy and lower town. The park is beautiful. I mean that's just. Chairs and there's all the food trucks in restaurant around it in an I have loved, you know, 'cause sometimes it's rained, a little bit going sliding into a bar and catching a different act in the energy is different. It's just such a fun. Your beer wine. That's right. I forget that beer and wine are served. So we have our friends at summit. Our local friends at some of the district, seven's, we have some really amazing product up there. You know, folks like often highway credit unions, kind of people come to come forward and make this happen. What would what do you like? I mean, are you like the two weeks before the jazz fest just running? I mean do you get any sleep? And then you just go on a vacation as soon as it's over. Literally, we're already starting twenty twenty eight now we cycles. You just Don stop. You're planning it years. And did you get this idea because you love the jazz fest in New Orleans? Oh, gosh. Don't answer. No answer that, if you listen to our show, that's all lorries talked about this. So much fun at my very first New Orleans jazz has it was just like what a great. That was so much fun. I'm just curious, if that's where you got the idea. But you guys are gonna have to make up over here. Everyone has fake folks from New Orleans jazz. And clearly we go to court a fast. We learn a lot. We bring brought up many, many musicians from New Orleans. You mentioned that award. You win at Tom McDermott will be the trade series on HBO. Yes, we'll be here. So we so we ask. Yes, I've learned a lot from what they do. And we traveled to many different festivals, every everywhere, from anama Detroit. Whenever it just different how they approached a music around the world, and we learn different pieces. What, what could work for us? New Orleans is really, you know, where we pick up a lot of ideas. And so, yeah. Down there, well, just this past year as is rolling her eyes at me because it was just I've never gone. Take hearing about every guest on to talk about it before during, and after that's an example any Cuban. Do we have any Cuban jazz, this Thursday? We have Rivera's a singer, a plane with a local local up an trouble tropical who is an eighteen piece big band. Thursday night six and then we have horrid Pacheco a young pianist, right after that different sound, and it's a different approach so showing how eclectic and diverse Cuba, really is this music, Thursday night, that's going to be amazing, the wanted artists ever been to Minnesota, and just enjoying it tremendously. So it's really great folks. No your. That's it's exciting. Because everyone gets excited about it. And in how to get access to the complete listing of all the musicians, and if you wanna buy VIP tickets. Oh, yeah. You go to Twinsies. Jazz festival dot com. Backslash. VM. Gua. Is also a nice way to see it because you're guaranteed to see to beverages vote for you. That's a lovely way to see it. Absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. What else are you excited about Steve? Are you? I mean, you know, first of all, just the fact that we've been able to stain disa- twenty one years. Yeah, I know. Here's a question I thank you. I I love when you guys call. Great hush Welby of twenty one years ago. I knew most of the jazz, musicians out there and even a lot of the crowd fast forward twenty one years and it's amazing. I don't know. Young people are picked up the jazz just absolutely picked it up. And just been tremendous. Watching me watching the number of jazz, people here in the city picking up, you know, young people I can't keep up with how many young people picked it up. I know. Great musicians. Yeah. You know who you know who would be so happy to hear you talking like this. And maybe he's to show up at the at the jazz fest did prince, because that was always his big thing about people need to be playing instruments, and he was so passionate about getting those in the hands of kids, and he was great. A lot of people don't know that how wonderful. Right. It's tremendous. But every every year, just seeing more and more young people coming, right? Emailing me. Hey, wanna play kids listening to them? How did you mind? This. It's, it's just hardened that young people picked up, picking up music coach, every parent, my parents, let me thank drums, and piano, when I was a kid, and I'm how did they put up with me. Caledonia ever you a stage don't have a stage where you've got the kid some of the, you know, like high school and other, you know, younger people playing at the union people. We have a stage run for the Dakota. It's all year. Okay. It's at Dakota union. And that works fighting it Saturday. And it just give a huge say. Other places over at the Brock dog. Covers young fourteen year old kid who just I think she's the next emerging artists. So many young emerging artists this city and you asked me gets keeps me going. Why wanna do it just watching that such a motivator for me personally? Yeah, I was Steve where you win a band. Were you. This. Jazz fest. The wilty aren't coming in that big time your music. I'm a happy guy. To be able to put this on over three hundred different acts this weekend, downtown Saint the low in the lower town for the VIP tickets for sale jazz festival dot org. It is free. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy the food and beverages and all the great music Steve. Thank you, so much, really prefigured. We have continued to. Yeah. We'll see. Thank you. Listen. When we come back, what are we talking about who knows?.

New Orleans Steve Minnesota Saint Paul Sonning Bill withers Greece Grace Kelly Jose James Tom McDermott HBO Mears park Chairs Don Dakota union Rivera Cuba Detroit Twinsies Pacheco
"donor foundation" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

11:46 min | 3 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Thanksgiving. That was last Thursday Valentine's Day, she wished everybody a happy thanksgiving. But she's all there, especially happy thanksgiving to President Bush. The Daily Mail is is now reporting new developments in the Jesse jussie smollet case, apparently he was Instagram ING with the brothers. He was he was at a an audition for a play about a in New York and the play he was he was trying out for the role of a guy who who's a professional athlete, and he comes out. And so he's he's attacked by people, and they call them the N word and the f word which is what he claimed they accused him of doing. So then he was going to fly back from LaGuardia to Chicago that night, but there were delays on the plane. On the plane taking off that apparently the Daily Mail is reporting the cop, the the brothers told the cops that's why it was so late which he'd been another interest. You know, a mysterious point. How's he going to pull it off that it happened at two o'clock? These these muggers just happen to be roaming around in a below zero sub-freezing coldest night in decades in Chicago. After mitt long after midnight. He might have to pull a Daniel Day-Lewis urine say, you know, this was all in preparation. He was he was a method actor, well, he meanwhile, the brothers also allegedly told the cops that they that they were Hearst the whole thing that they were ready to go. And apparently he had a he he wanted. He had a camera that he was interested in doing it in front of. But then then it turned out that the camera was pointed around the wrong way. So that's you know, that's so so his directing credits are shot as well. You always say in in America, these days, you always get a second chance f Scott FitzGerald once famously said there are no second acts in American life there. There are innumerable second acts now in American life. But this may be one of those things like like, Monica Lewinsky type deal or a, you know, Jason Blair the the pipe artists for the New York Times. Sometimes you can't come back. And this may be one of those cases, I'm not I think his I think his career is pretty much over that would be my guess eight four four five hundred forty two forty two Linda, you're next with Howie Carr. Go ahead, Linda. Doing good. Yes. Good. Listen, Andrew, McCabe story is a bunch of the as hard my fronts, but this I've been following this from the very beginning. I gotta tell you. It just doesn't make any sense. This is a cover up of a cover up, right? Stories they're lying back and forth. And you're just trying to throw everybody up nine opinion. This all goes back to uranium one. You know, everyone of these people were involved in uranium one and they needed Hillary Clinton in now. One uranium one is the deal for people who don't know because I don't think most people still know what uranium one is uranium one deal where a a Russian connected company was allowed to buy twenty percent of the US uranium supply. And they needed a sign off from various government entities, including the secretary of state, which is what Hillary Clinton was at the time. And after the Russians got control of uranium one Bill got to make a speech for a half a million dollars at a Russian Bank, which was you know, had ties to the oligarchy. And also the Clinton foundation got more than one hundred million dollars from the various principles of uranium one. According. That went to the Clinton initiative, which is an arm of the Clinton foundation, which goes directly into her pocket. It doesn't even donors foundation. They get to keep that money. Right. I I've long said Linda, the Clinton foundation was the biggest protection racket in human history is just not question about it. I mean, it was just it was a pain a play scheme. You know, they sent Chicago alderman the prison for taking ten thousand bucks for a liquor license or a a curb cut or something like that. These people were stealing hundred stealing. They were they were getting contributions of hundreds of millions of dollars from from various entities. You know, and they they talk about trumping friendly with dictators. They were taking money from some of these really really bad Arab nations. Where in some cases, the women aren't allowed to drive where homosexuals are executed for you know, for for sodomy. It's it's just amazing. What the Clintons have gotten away with your you're right? And and I don't think I don't think most people understand the whole thing and for him. I mean, the most exasperatingly part of all of it was that he that. He's just walking around like he's like he's some kind of aggrieved party mean he was fired for cause. He lied under oath. I've said this repeatedly because nobody else seems to pick up on it. But the day he was appointed FBI director he'd been lying about this leak of a Wall Street Journal story, so they finally put him under oath. He's just been sworn in as the acting director of the FBI. They put him under oath. Any proceeds Polizei under oath. Lacked candor, that's what they said so-called lying under oath. So the day. He's appointed. He's he's lying under oath. He's committing crimes felonies. And is he ever going to be prosecuted? No, of course, not he's on TV. No. And they they, you know, Scott Pelley. Doesn't doesn't wanna ask him? But. Embarrass him theft answer that question, whether he lied under oath. That was a good impression Howie. I think for people who missed the McCabe interview. This is also an unbelievable cut of him talking about Rosenstein, suggesting he would wear a wire and go in and this rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general who denies this up and down. He's just a career career swamp creature went to Harvard Law School, he claims he was kidding. Deputy attorney general offered to wear a wire into the White House. He said, I never get searched. When I go into the White House. I can easily wear a recording device. They wouldn't know is there. Now, he was not joking. He was absolutely serious. And in fact, he brought it up in the next meeting. We had I never actually considered taking him up on the offer. I did discuss it with my general counsel, and my leadership team back at the FBI after he fronted up the first time the point of Rosenstein, wearing the wire into a meeting with the president was what what did he hope to obtain? I can't characterize what rod was thinking. Or what he was hoping at that moment. But the reason you would have someone where a concealed recording device would be to collect evidence. In this case, what was the true nature of the president's motivation and calling for the firing of Jim. Komi the general counsel, the FBI leadership team, focus. At this at that point. Do not interrupt them and say, Mr. McCabe did not James call me past the fi under oath to congress that he hold the president of the United States three times that he was not under investigation. Other words, he was neither a subject nor Pargat of a federal criminal probe into the Russia investigation. Right. Is that now? Right. So why what would possibly be the reason for Rosenstein to wear a wire is that isn't that a legitimate follow up question Halley? I'm also confused, and I've heard people explain this better. But I'm gonna oppose it out there because I think you'll understand my question. You can't just wear a wire and start collecting information that you hope will then translate into a crime. You have to have a starting point of a reason, and they don't really have that. So he's always going to wear a wire to try to get them to say, something bad. But you can't just. But yeah, you're right. I don't you have to get a warrant to what you have to get a warrant to get a wiretap. I would assume the same thing would apply for a for a. A bug because they doesn't everything just become fruit of the intrigue. If you say, oh, we got all this information. We'll why why do you put a wire on because we want you back when J Edgar Hoover was bugging all the the mafia places, you know, here in Boston Chicago everywhere else in in the sixties. They just throw up the they would just throw up the wires the call them gypsy wires, but they couldn't use it. They couldn't use any information. I mean, they they used it, you know, for for their own edification and get leads. But none of the information that actually came off the wiretap could go in and what? Yeah. So what are they what does it? What are they hoping to get here said what about this idea? I think the general counsel had a heart attack. We ain't got off the floor. He said, I that's a bridge. Too far. We're not there yet. That it wasn't necessary at that point in the investigation to escalate it to that level. That's correct. What investigation. What were they investigating? By strucks own words. There is no big. They're there. We're now to two years further down the road. And there is still no there there. So what what were they looking for this is the insurance policy? Did they I couldn't watch the thing last night? I just I I saw bits and pieces of it. Did they ask him about the insurance policy? I'm sure they did. Right. Because this is struck and page the love birds, th they weren't discussing that they had they needed an insurance policy and the insurance policy in other words to stop Trump from becoming president that was discussed in quote, unquote, Andy's office. I mean, there's another interesting query, what was the insurance policy that that struck and page were texting about a say, oh that was another joke that was another. Everything's a joke. You know, they get they get the bus, and all we were just kidding around. We were just goofing around. How did he bring up the idea of the twenty fifth amendment to you? Honestly, I don't remember. Just another kind of topic that he jumped to in the midst of a of a wide ranging conversation seriously. Just topic. Honestly, this is a guy again, we have it on the record from the inspector general of the Justice department, he'll allied at least four times under oath. Now. He's saying honestly. How many times it call me? Forget it say, I don't recall what it was two hundred and thirty five times during when he was being questioned by the house committee. I don't recall I was to queasy during the testimony to remember or as Billy balls. You're used to say at his appearances before the house con- the house government reform committee. To the best of my recollection. I do not recall. We'll be right back. I'm Howie Carr. This half hour of the how we are show is powered by the cargo purchasing a free owned car can be tricky. But.

uranium one FBI Howie Carr rod Rosenstein president general counsel Mr. McCabe Linda Clinton foundation Hillary Clinton President Bush Chicago Daniel Day-Lewis White House New York United States Jesse jussie mitt
"donor foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR news. I'm Scott Simon three million people granted access to clean water four million children, given food charities publicize their work. They tend to focus on successes, but today story about a charity. That's proud to announce that it's failing NPR's Eisenman explains in business. If you're trying to sell a product that people don't have use for they won't buy it. You've run out of money. Okay. Right. I mean, you shut down. That's Karen Levy for the last twenty years. She's worked in the business of aid trying to help the world's poor where she says that rule does not apply. Historically, what got funded was good proposals not necessarily good impactful programs Levy who trained in social policy and planning at the London. School of economics says the trouble is the people being served by aid programs are not the ones paying the Bill. Goes to donors foundations governments that for years have largely had to base their decisions on whether a program sounded good. You can keep an ineffective program funded for years. If you're good at sunrays. But over the last decade, there's been a major push by economists to do rigorous research on poverty, basically run experiments to figure out which solutions actually work Levy works. For charity called evidence action whose mission is to look for the most promising experiments, then scale them up massively each the lives of millions or tens of millions of people. And at every stage it runs tests to see if it's programs are still working if we find that they're not having impact then will shut it down. Now that commitment is being put to the test with one of evidence actions. Most prominent ventures a program to help rural farmhands in Bangladesh during what's called the lean season a three month period. Every winter when the fields lie empty, and there's no work Oxman, Bushwick, Mubarak is a development economist at Yale. You see that up to forty forty five percent of people report that they regularly miss meals instead of three meals they'll cut down to two it's particularly hard on children. It can lead to stunting which leads to cognitive problems traditional aid food distribution food for work programmes is too expensive to reach all of these farmhands suit Mubarak had an idea instead of trying to bring jobs to where people in rural areas are encourage people to move go to various towns or cities. So that they could go find work for themselves. Offer them a tiny loan around twenty dollars to buy a bus ticket to the closest urban area where for the duration of the lean season. They can get a job like pulling a rickshaw Mubarak's early tests were so successful evidence action decided to take it up their first round of loans in two thousand fourteen targeted thirty five. Hundred households. Here's Levi again, I happen to be in the DC office when the results came in. And we were you know, a bunch of geeks jumping up and down in the conference room. Looking at the tables the loan roughly doubled the number of people who decided to try their luck in the city and those who went earned enough to give their families and additional meal each day in the world results like that. Yeah. That certainly doesn't come along every day soon. Evidence action was going big raising eleven million dollars to scale up to one hundred sixty thousand households in two thousand seventeen then this past fall the results from that 2017 round came in. It was very sad. I mean, I was I was very disappointed the loan offer had not induced anyone who wasn't already planning to go to the city to make the trip. Evidence action is doing one final round of loans to see if they can figure out what went wrong, but they've also announced that if they can't solve the problem. They will not. Not seek new funding. This is quite unusual Catherine Hollander is with give well in organization that researches charities to come up with an annual recommended shortlist for donors in the fall of thousand seventeen evidence actions programme made the list for twenty eighteen the charity said don't consider us Hollander says this was a smart move. It makes us trust them more. You know, the response that we've gotten from folks in our network who use our research has been positive evidence actions. Levy says she hopes their example will inspire other charities to own up to failure. It's sad. When something that you thought might actually solve a problem turns out not to but it's much sadder to waste resources narrate Eisenman NPR news tomorrow and weakened tradition. Sunday this week with Layla fato antiquities in Yemen are being plunder by criminals and extremists another tragedy in a country struggling with four and starvation. You can listen to borrow by asking your smart speaker to play in. NPR and your station by name. Now, a story about rescued wolves and the troubled children who walk with them other helping and healing each other Gloria Hillard reports from a wolf sanctuary in the high desert north of Los Angeles. In hoodies and well-worn sneakers. They city kids are making their way up the mountain leading them is a wolf named Marlow. For many of the teens. This youth empowerment program called wolf connection is their last chance kicked out of school in gangs in and out of foster homes when program later, Amanda, beer, asked them for one word that describes their strength. The tough kids struggle the wolves never themselves. They always have their own back. They also have each other's back. So let's hear this is who I am my a tall. Boy. His eyes fixed on the ground. Finally, speaks aggression. The wolves often.

Karen Levy NPR Mubarak Scott Simon Eisenman Catherine Hollander Eisenman NPR Levi School of economics Bangladesh Oxman Gloria Hillard London Los Angeles Yemen Bushwick Amanda DC
"donor foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon three million people granted access to clean water four million children given food charities publicize their work, they tend to focus on successes. But today a story about a charity. That's proud to announce that it's failing NPR's Eisenman explains in business. If you're trying to sell a product that people don't have use for they won't buy it. You've run out of money. Okay. Right. I mean, you shutdown. That's Karen Levy for the last twenty years she's worked in the business of aid trying to help the world's poor where she says that rule does not apply. Historically, what guy son did was good proposals not necessarily good impactful programs Levy who trained in social policy and planning at the London. School of economics says the trouble is the people being served by aid programs are not the ones paying the Bill. Goes to donors foundations governments that for years have largely had to base their decisions on whether a program sounded good. You can keep an ineffective program funded for years. If you're good at sun raising. But over the last decade, there's been a major push by economists to do rigorous research on poverty, basically, run experiments to figure out which solutions actually work Levy, works for charity called evidence action whose mission is to look for the most promising experiments, then scale them up massively each the lives of millions or tens of millions of people. And at every stage it runs tests to see if it's programs are still working if we find that they're not having impact then will shut it down. Now that commitment is being put to the test with one of evidence actions. Most prominent ventures a program to help rural farmhands in Bangladesh during what's called the lean season a three month period. Every winter when the fields lie empty, and there's no work Oxman, Bushwick, Mubarak is a development economist at Yale. You see that up to forty forty five percent of people report that they regularly miss meals instead of three meals they'll cut down to two it's particularly hard on children. It can lead to stunting which leads to cognitive problems traditional aid food distribution food for work programmes is too expensive to reach all of these farmhands suit Mubarak had an idea instead of trying to bring jobs to where people in rural areas are encourage people to move go to various towns or cities. So that they could go find work for themselves. Offer them a tiny loan around twenty dollars to buy a bus ticket to the closest urban area where for the duration of the lean season. They can get a job like pulling a rickshaw Mubarak's early tests were so successful evidence action decided to take it up their first round of loans in two thousand fourteen targeted thirty five. Hundred households. Here's Levi again, I happen to be in the DC office when the results came in. And we were you know, a bunch of geeks jumping up and down in the conference room. Looking at the tables the loan roughly doubled the number of people who decided to try their luck in the city and those who went earned enough to give their families and additional meal each day in the world results like that. Yeah. That certainly doesn't come along every day soon. Evidence action was going big raising eleven million dollars to scale up to one hundred and sixty thousand households in twenty seventeen then this past fall the results from that 2017 round came in. It was very sad. I mean, I was I was very disappointed the loan offer had not induced anyone who wasn't already planning to go to the city to make the trip. Evidence action is doing one final round of loans to see if they can figure out what went wrong, but they've also announced that if they can't solve the problem. They will not. Not seek new funding. This is quite unusual Catherine Hollander is with give well in organization that researches charities to come up with an annual recommended shortlist for donors in the fall of two thousand seventeen evidence actions programme made the list for twenty eighteen the charity said don't consider us Hollander says this was a smart move. It makes us trust them more. You know, the response that we've gotten from folks in our network who use our research has been positive evidence actions. Levy says she hopes their example will inspire other charities to own up to failure. It's sad. When something that you thought might actually solve a problem turns out not to but it's much sadder to waste resources Narita Eisenman NPR news tomorrow and wicked addition Sunday this week with Layla fatal antiquities in Yemen are being plundered by criminals and extremists another tragedy in a country struggling with war and starvation. You can listen to borrow by asking your smart speaker to play. NPR and your station by name. Now,.

Karen Levy Mubarak NPR Eisenman Narita Eisenman NPR Scott Simon Catherine Hollander Levi School of economics Oxman Bangladesh London Yemen Bushwick DC Yale forty forty five percent eleven million dollars twenty dollars
"donor foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Four million children given food twenty five billion families given bed. Nets to protect against malarial mosquitoes. Charity's publicize their work. They tend to focus on successes, but today story about a charity. That's proud to announce that it's failing NPR's Eisenman explains in business. If you're trying to sell a product that people don't have use for they won't buy it. You've run out of money. Right. I mean, you shut down. That's Karen Levy for the last twenty years. She's worked in the business of aid trying to help the world's poor where she says that rule does not apply. Historically, what our son did was good proposals not necessarily good impactful programs Levy who trained in social policy and planning at the London. School of economics says the trouble is the people being served by aid programs are not the ones paying the Bill goes to donors foundations governments that for years have largely had to base their decisions on whether a program sounded good. You can keep an ineffective program. Son did three years if you're good at sun racing. But over the last decade, there's been a major push by economists to do rigorous research on poverty, basically, run experiments to figure out which solutions actually work Levy works for a charity called evidence action whose mission is to look for the most promising. Experiments then scale them up massively reach the lives of millions or tens of millions of people. And at every stage it runs tests to see if it's programs are still working if we find that they're not having an impact then will shut it down. Now that commitment is being put to the test with one of evidence actions. Most prominent ventures a program to help rural farmhands in Bangladesh during what's called the lean season a three month period. Every winter when the fields lie empty, and there's no work Oxman, Bushwick, Mubarak is a development economist at Yale. You see that up to forty forty five percent of people report that they regularly miss meals instead of three meals they'll cut down to two it's particularly hard on children. It can lead to stunting which leads to cognitive problems traditional aid food distribution food for work programmes is too expensive to reach all of these farmhands suit Mubarak. Had an idea instead of trying to bring jobs to where people in rural areas are encourage people to move go to various towns or cities. So that they could go find worked for themselves offer them tiny loan around twenty dollars to buy a bus ticket to the closest urban area where for the duration of the lean season. They can get a job like pulling a rickshaw Mubarak's early tests were so successful evidence action decided to take it up their first round of loans in two thousand fourteen targeted thirty five hundred households. Here's Levi again, I happen to be in the DC office when the results came in. And we were you know, a bunch of geeks jumping up and down in the conference room. Looking at the tables the loan roughly doubled the number of people who decided to try their luck in the city and those who went earned enough to give their families and additional meal each day in the world results like that. Yeah. That certainly doesn't come along every day soon. Evidence action was going big race. Using eleven million dollars to scale up to one hundred sixty thousand households in 2017, then this past fall the results from that 2017 round came in. It was very sad. I mean, I was I was very disappointed the loan offer had not induced anyone who wasn't already planning to go to the city to make the trip. Evidence action is doing one final round of loans to see if they can figure out what went wrong, but they've also announced that if they can't solve the problem. They will not seek new funding. This is quite unusual Catherine Hollander is with give well in organization that researches charities to come up with an annual recommended shortlist for donors in the fall of two thousand seventeen evidence actions programme made the list for twenty eighteen the charity said don't consider us Hollander says this was a smart move. It makes us trust them more. You know, the response that we've gotten from folks in our network who use our research has been. Positive evidence actions Levy says she hopes their example will inspire other charities to own up to failure. It's sad. When something that you thought might actually solve a problem turns out not to but it's much sadder to waste resources narrate Eisenman NPR news tomorrow, and we condition Sunday this week with Layla bottle. Antiquities in Yemen are being plundered by criminals and extremists another tragedy in a country struggling with four and starvation. You can listen to borrow by asking your smart speaker to play NPR and your station by name. Our story about rescued wolves and the troubled children who walk with them how they're helping and healing each other Gloria Hillard reports from a wolf sanctuary in the high desert north of Los Angeles. Hoodies and well-worn sneakers. They city kids are making their way up the mount leading them is a wolf named mom. For many of the teens. This youth empowerment program called wolf connection is their last chance kicked out of school in gangs in and out of foster homes when program later, Amanda, beer, asked them for one word that describes their strength. The tough kids struggle, the wolves never doubt themselves. They always have their own bag. They also have each other's back. So let's hear this is who I am. This was my a tall. Boy. His eyes fixed on the ground. Finally, speaks aggression. The wolves often respond this.

Karen Levy Mubarak NPR Eisenman Catherine Hollander Eisenman NPR Levi Son School of economics Bangladesh DC Oxman Gloria Hillard London Los Angeles Yemen Bushwick Amanda
"donor foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:03 min | 3 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Four million children given food twenty five million families given bed nets to protect against malarial mosquitoes. Charity's publicize their work. They tend to focus on successes, but today story about a charity. That's proud to announce that it's failing NPR's Eisenman explains in business. If you're trying to sell a product that people don't have use for they won't buy it run out of money. Right. I mean, you shut down. That's Karen Levy for the last twenty years. She's worked in the business of aid trying to help the world's poor where she says that rule does not apply. Historically, what guy son did was good proposals not necessarily good impactful programs Levy who trained in social policy and planning at the London. School of economics says the trouble is the people being served by aid programs are not the ones paying the Bill goes to donors foundations governments that for years have largely had to base their decisions on whether a program sounded good. You can keep an ineffective program funded for years. If you're good at sunrise. But over the last decade, there's been a major push by economists to do rigorous research on poverty, basically, run experiments to figure out which solutions actually work Levy, works for charity called evidence action whose mission is to look for the most promising. Experiments then scale them up massively each the lives of millions or tens of millions of people. And at every stage it runs tests to see if it's programs are still working if we find that they're not having impact then will shut it down. Now that commitment is being put to the test with one of evidence actions. Most prominent ventures a program to help rural farmhands in Bangladesh during what's called the lean season a three month period. Every winter when the fields lie empty, and there's no work Oxman, Bushwick, Mubarak is development economist at Yale. You see that up to forty forty five percent of people report that they regularly miss meals instead of three meals, they'll cut down to its particularly hard on children. It can lead to stunting which leads to cognitive problems traditional aid food distribution food for work programmes is too expensive to reach all of these farmhands suit Mubarak. Had an idea instead of trying to bring jobs to where people in rural areas are encourage people to move go to various towns or cities. So that they could go find work for themselves. Offer them tiny loan around twenty dollars to buy a bus ticket to the closest urban area where for the duration of the lean season. They can get a job like pulling a rickshaw Mubarak's early tests were so successful evidence action decided to take it up their first round of loans in two thousand fourteen targeted thirty five hundred households. Here's Levi again, I happened to be in the DC office when the results came in. And we were you know, a bunch of geeks jumping up and down in the conference room. Looking at the tables the loan roughly doubled the number of people who decided to try their luck in the city and those who went earned enough to give their families and additional meal each day in the world results like that. Yeah. That certainly doesn't come along every day soon. Evidence action was going big. Raising eleven million dollars to scale up to one hundred sixty thousand households in two thousand seventeen then this past fall the results from that 2017 round came in. It was very sad. I mean, I was I was very disappointed the loan offer had not induced anyone who wasn't already planning to go to the city to make the trip. Evidence action is doing one final round of loans to see if they can figure out what went wrong, but they've also announced that if they can't solve the problem. They will not seek new funding. This is quite unusual Catherine Hollander is with give well in organization that researches charities to come up with an annual recommended shortlist for donors in the fall of two thousand seventeen evidence actions programme made the list for twenty eighteen the charity said don't consider us Hollander says this was a smart move. It makes us trust them more. You know, the response that we've gotten from folks in our network who use our research has. Been positive evidence actions. Levy says she hopes their example will inspire other charities to own up to failure. It's sad. When something that you thought might actually solve a problem turns out not to but it's much sadder to waste resources Narita Eisenman NPR news tomorrow and weakened edition Sunday this week with Layla fossil antiquities and Yemen are being plunder by criminals and extremists another tragedy in a country struggling with war and starvation. You can listen to borrow by asking your smart speaker to play NPR and your station by name. Now, a story about rescued wolves and the troubled children who walk with them how they're helping and healing each other Gloria Hillard reports from a wolf sanctuary in the high desert north of Los Angeles. Then hoodies and well-worn sneakers they city kids are making their way up the mountain leading them is a wolf named Marlow. For many of the teens. This youth empowerment program called wolf connection is their last chance kicked out of school in gangs in and out of foster homes when program later, Amanda, beer, asked them for one word that describes their strength. The tough kids struggle the wolves never themselves. They always have their own back. They also have each other's back. Let's hear. This is who I am. This is my Tallboy his eyes fixed on the ground. Finally, speaks aggression. The.

Karen Levy Mubarak NPR Eisenman Catherine Hollander Narita Eisenman NPR Levi School of economics Bangladesh DC Oxman Gloria Hillard London Los Angeles Bushwick Amanda Yale Yemen
"donor foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"donor foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon three million people granted access to clean water. Four million children given food twenty five million families given bed nets to protect against malarial mosquitoes charities publicize their work, they tend to focus on successes. But today a story about a charity. That's proud to announce that it's failing NPR's Eisenman explains in business. If you're trying to sell a product that people don't have used for they won't buy it. You've run out of money. Right. I mean, you shutdown. That's Karen Levy for the last twenty years. She's worked in the business of aid trying to help the world's poor where she says that rule does not apply. Historically funded was good proposals not necessarily good impactful programs Levy who trained in social policy and planning at the London. School of economics says the trouble is the people being served by aid programs are not the ones paying the Bill goes to donors foundations governments that for years have largely had to base their decisions on whether a program sounded good. You can keep an ineffective program. Son did for years if you're good at sun raising. But over the last decade, there's been a major push by economists to do rigorous research on poverty, basically, run experiments to figure out which solutions actually work Levy, works for charity called evidence action whose mission is to look for the most promising. Experiments then scale them up massively each the lives of millions or tens of millions of people. And at every stage it runs tests to see if it's programs are still working if we find that they're not having impact then will shut it down. Now that commitment is being put to the test with one of evidence actions. Most prominent ventures a program to help rural farmhands in Bangladesh during what's called the lean season a three month period. Every winter when the fields lie empty, and there's no work Oxman, Bushwick, Mubarak is a development economist at Yale. You see that up to forty forty five percent of people report that they regularly miss meals instead of three meals they'll cut down to two it's particularly hard on children. It can lead to stunting which leads to cognitive problems traditional aid food distribution food for work programmes is too expensive to reach all of these farmhands suit Mubarak. Had an idea instead of trying to bring jobs to where people in rural areas are encourage people to move go to various towns or cities. So that they could go find work for themselves. Offer them a tiny loan around twenty dollars to buy a bus ticket to the closest urban area where for the duration of the lean season. They can get a job like pulling a rickshaw Mubarak's early tests were so successful evidence action decided to take it up their first round of loans in two thousand fourteen targeted thirty five hundred households. Here's Levi again, I happened to be in the DC office when the results came in. And we were a bunch of geeks jumping up and down in the conference room. Looking at the tables the loan roughly doubled the number of people who decided to try their luck in the city and those who went earned enough to give their families and additional meal each day in the world results like that. Yeah. That's certainly doesn't come along every day soon. Evidence action was going big race. Using eleven million dollars to scale up to one hundred and sixty thousand households in twenty seventeen then this past fall the results from that 2017 round came in. It was very sad. I mean, I was I was very disappointed the loan offer had not induced anyone who wasn't already planning to go to the city to make the trip. Evidence action is doing one final round of loans to see if they can figure out what went wrong, but they've also announced that if they can't solve the problem. They will not seek new funding. This is quite unusual Catherine Hollander is with give well in organization that researches charities to come up with an annual recommended shortlist donors in the fall of two thousand seventeen evidence actions programme made the list for twenty eighteen the charity said don't consider us Hollander says this was a smart move. It makes us trust them more. You know, the response that we've gotten from folks in our network who use our research has been. Causative evidence actions Levy says she hopes their example will inspire other charities to own up to failure. It's sad. When something that you thought might actually solve a problem turns out not to but it's much sadder to waste resources Narita Eisenman NPR news tomorrow, and we can tradition. Sunday this week with Layla fatal. Antiquities in Yemen are being plundered like criminals and extremists another tragedy in a country struggling with four and starvation. You can listen to borrow by asking your smart speaker to play NPR and your station by name..

Karen Levy Mubarak NPR Eisenman Narita Eisenman NPR Scott Simon Catherine Hollander Levi School of economics Oxman Bangladesh Yemen DC London Bushwick Yale forty forty five percent eleven million dollars twenty dollars