9 Burst results for "Donald Davies"

"donald davies" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

06:14 min | 2 months ago

"donald davies" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"To using the brain as a model for computing. Right now my guest is paul ceruzzi. He's curator emeritus at the smithsonian national air and space museum and the author of the classic a history of modern computing. We've been talking about the evolution of computers since the second world war and so in the context of the space race. You sometimes hear people say this thing. That a single iphone is more powerful than the mainframe computer that was used for calculations at nasa at that time is is that true. It's fifty times more powerful hundred times linked. Yes and there's this common phrase. Moore's law named after. Gordon moore said the chips would double in capacity every originally said every year. It's than gustloff down about every eighteen months or two years sorta come to an end recently but if you look at the doubling you see that the number of of circuits on a in an iphone or just unbelievably in the billions or something like that. The circuits had took astronauts to the moon. Had a few hundred. You know that was it so of course moore's law has come to an end so now things are getting kind of interesting but if i'm a historian i don't have to worry about. So as we move into the nineteen seventies. we have the emergence of the internet as broad network. You talked a bit about arpanet. Can you talk a little bit more about the origins of the internet. Well the research projects agency was founded by the united states defense department in the aftermath of sputnik when the russians orbiting satellite and fifty seven. It was a real shock and there was a sense that we can't let this happen again. We can't let us nick moment happen again. So they created this agency said blue sky. Think what can you do so i mentioned. Jc are lick lighter. Who had access to some of this money and he'd funded and research project. There were a number of other people One of the key developments that they came out with was the way of transmitting the data. It actually was simultaneously invented the uk by a research their named donald davies and it's called packet switching and the idea is that in the traditional communications and there were computers. We're liked company. Like general motors would their computers but the traditional way of communicating was that you open up a circuit between new york and drama or something and you keep it open and you talk and when you're done you hang up and the circuit has in the impact packet switching completely different idea. They divide i message into small chunks. They call packets that came from the uk the term and then they would put on the front and the back of this chunk. They put some information to say. Who sent it. Where's it going. How long has it and now. Now you're done at the end and it's very similar to mailing a letter when you mail a letter. You have the return address in the upper left hand corner. You have the stamp in the right hand corner. You have the address in the middle with postal code and that is all standard regardless of. What's in the letter Can be a photograph. It can be a beautiful piece of poetry or to be dribble now but the point is the envelope has to be a certain way. The paul won't take it if it doesn't arpaio came up with this these protocols that said okay. Here's how you divide it up. And they had this other question would be what. The message gets scrambled on the way to its destination. They have checking. They would check him a dozen check right senate again and things like that. They came out with protocol which was moderately successful and as a network started to grow. They realized it was not working quite as well as they wanted it to. So they they came up with second protocol transmission control protocol slash internet protocol. They came actually to which they combine as usually regard tcp slash and. It's a two way. Say of standardizing. I'll you send these packets and this was done in the mid seventies or so and we still use today and that's the crazy thing because you know when you look at how how big the internet is today and how much our lives depend on it. Our economy depends on everything. Depends on is still uses this set of protocols. That's a testimony to how good they were done. It's also kind of frightening in a way because we probably shouldn't be it'd be like you don't drive a model t anymore. You know you right and there have been proposals to upgrade it. But it's never going to happen because everything is so entrenched and of course. When did the idea of this local personal computer about well. That's another good store. You know When moore gordon moore published about the moore's law this incredible the doubling every year in the original paper nineteen sixty five or so basically as cliche. Every electrical engineer has a piece a semi log graph paper in his desk drawer. That is to say time on the x axis and as a logger them computer density on the wyatt's and by simply plotting that line. It was very clear that by the nineteen seventies are so the number of transistors that could be contained on a single circuit would equal the number of vacuum tubes over in the univac. The first commercial american computer okay. At every engineer saw that they all knew that they could it was just staring at them in the face. But like how do you do that. Well that was the hard part and it turned out that a group of people working at intel which was also in mountain view california by eventually that area journalists call it silicon valley. They came up with a way of translating that notion into reality..

paul ceruzzi new york Gordon moore fifty times two years california iphone mid seventies today uk billions first hundred times second world war nineteen seventies a dozen second protocol two way intel every eighteen months
"donald davies" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"donald davies" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right <hes>. So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays <hes>. And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain <hes>. He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here <hes>. So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay <noise> so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway <hes>. He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in <hes>. that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

mike explorer steve lauren julia wilson library Julia microsoft syracuse liverpool gene white house Steve vint cerf
The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
"donald davies" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"donald davies" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"And millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas.

wells christopher stray cheesy newman inc paul baran oxford university Donald davies national physical laboratory unesco mit derek paris baron davies charlie Defense department darpa Uk mike Pto arpaio
"donald davies" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

10:12 min | 1 year ago

"donald davies" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"Matt's now were assumed that brother and sister so it's declines and Murdoch and that's it's climbing Murdoch Attorneys at law and Pennyworth is their lead. Who was a former Marine sergeant or army sergeant? Now he's Office. He's very uptight and that's that's the. That's his gag for comedy relief because they were whatever planning spin off the newest series. I kinda Oh yeah yeah. It was very much going to be a series. That was the idea. And don't but for and it's really sad because there is so much in there that is kind of almost they've really they've really built it out to be a series built all these characters and it does mirror the previous. Kung-fu COP story. That they did in the seventies of the apprentice where it was going to be. You know this cop who Lawrence Kung Fu and then fights bad guys and so they have they integrate the hulk into the storyline very nicely. And in fact it's nice in this one because they could've this whole thing about met seeing this green blur coming. This green green light was the last thing he saw though. Yeah you know and of course Matt says you know Oh you. Doctors think you understand radiation and Ben is like yeah I trust me. I know bit about radiation like we were saying all fly. The first live action appeared the first cameo by Stanley live actors. Yes the first Stanley Cameo. He's in the jury box and they actually shown like several times. Because it's the first time in people didn't know what Stanley looked like. Obviously so they ran like four four scenes where you see him. He's the foreman of the jury who finds the Hulkah- guilty in a dream sequence. Spoilers and that. Yeah that was Stanley's very first cameo yes and once you got that acting bug he just wasn't GonNa let it go bit by the acting bug. Well that was his dream to be earl slim. Well that was his first live action. I know he always did at the beginning of spider man and his amazing friends than any. Maybe yeah but that was more reading off a script metro. This is first time a moated yes? Stanley has shown up in the comic money. Time Stanley actually has his first cameo and I think the first sentence aquarium annual the wedding of Reading Sue. Wasn't there like a scene before that in initial fantastic four was like him and Jack argued in the office or something. I thought there was an issue like that. I'm not sure I'm not sure I thought the first time was him and Jack. Not being able to get into the wedding which way they duplicate that in the movie desert for where's Stanley which is the other time Stanley. Place himself in a movie. Oh Martin played himself. I mean in a marvel movie yes more plays and then arguably he plays himself in captain. Marvel oh yeah axes soccer up. The system was going to say you could say maybe Ironman one you say. Tony Stark mistook him for someone else. Now he was he was being after that trust me. Stanley doesn't usually have three three beautiful blonde hair off of them. You know he's not George Burns. He was very happily married for many years. Yes I knew it here. We go fantastic. Four number ten okay Lee and Jack. Kirby appears themselves in fantastic four numbers ten January nineteen sixty three. The first of several appearances within the fictional marvel universe's depict similar to the real world counterparts creating comic books based on the real adventures of the fantastic floor. I stand corrected. You Stanley corrected I stanley correct. Yes yeah so so that's interesting Also what I thought is the most what is to me. The most interesting thing about it is that it is also the first live action only is it the first live. Action Live action daredevil. Not only is the first live action. Kingpin is also the first live action. Turk Oh yeah which blew my mind when I saw because I did not realize Turk was so central to date will mythos that someone said. Okay look we we we we can. We can skip a lot of this. You don't need a bullseye donated. Karen page foggy Nelson. Who's he we deter which hit? Even this rule could be literally played any random start. We need a guy whose name is the Turkey to be interrogated by daredevil. To give him information it's important which is why. I think they actually really thought this was going to be something to grow on because I think there was this feeling that you know. Maybe if you made these more like a comic books people would like them a bit more on them like that. But that's what I understand. Yeah if he like you said if they can do kingpin and Turk why couldn't they do? Fogging Karen was it with something with the rights. Or would you have to pay marvel's extra or something or why wouldn't they? I mean there's always that theoretical possibility but usually as I always understood it. I mean maybe it's one of those things where they never really got all the rights at the at the start so technically every marvel character you use you have to pay for and but then again that's sort a why why the Turk tash strikes me as weird because it is to me. It's a weird character. Maybe at the pay for Palestinian Karen but Turkey through in for free. Yeah well you know maybe having. Maybe maybe they're like okay. Look we give you. We'll give you the hero their main villain and one henchman and like that's maybe that was marvel. Senator deal at the time you get eager to hear a villain and a henchman shoes wisely. But that's that means you don't get a second maybe you can either pick a side kick or a henchman and maybe they just thought you know what foggy and Karen just weren't that important story while show? They were not essential a home. I you know I think now we can say we disagree but again much like having a Turk really if it's a different lawyer and a different character so for example if we are going to look at Christie Klein as the foggy Nelson Pastiche so we're GONNA DO GENDER SWAPAN foggy color Chris decline and that she met went to law school with and became best friends with and now it's sort of this will they won't they. I mean trust and I'm sure there's a lot of Matt Murdock Foggy Nelson Stories out. There will hard-drive yes. No no no. There's actually once year by MoD interested in your house. I don't know into bears and fog inside even really a bear or as as has been he's a polar bear which you know he's a bear without for which isn't really a polar bear. But you know the region with these rob that because I'm a fan of Broken Lizard speaking can proudly incredible. Hulk showed up daredevil. One sixty three and that much differently. They're double goes to them. There was hospitalized by the end of the issue. Let's just say because the hallway is. He's fighting the hulk with hawks. Like rampaging through New York will I? He shows up in there and Matt. Murdock is able to talk down you know. He changes back in the banner in now. He spent the night at Matt's place and then the next morning I got to get out of New York. So the dummy takes the subway. What's GonNa what's GONNA trigger the change being on the New York subway? Please even referencing the movies exactly so then like yeah so then like you know. Sit in their to stop a rampaging hulk again. He doesn't realize it's his friend Matt Murdock. Smacks him into a couple of buildings and you know once he realizes the hawks like all you know. It's all sad and leaps away. I'm not sure I I Yet hoke Murdoch never fight in this. No it's not like sore when when when you have the original curly. Incredible Hulk fights store which is a great film as well really doesn't make an appearance at the Internet movie of which one trolley incredible hulk. No He's there. He's he encounters there at the end of the movie of not the hall. Well Ben is always into this show because that's where he goes out but he helps the hope like the final showdown kingpin. He doesn't change yes he does does me no remember the last time he changes is actually chooses to be. Your good will actually changes. Is that seen before you know? Oh you doctors. Don't know much about radio. Is I think it was? Yeah Yeah but Edgar. I thought was a very interesting case because in many ways is are pro. Wesley yes especially as says you know. Oh you know. Let her go. But don't worry he'll forgive me he. I'm the only one that they can never forgets. Dot Com slash fiction now kids talk about Donald Davies and Edgar. Like you talk about your bears but Lois you wanNA throw anything out. I think reading.

Stanley Cameo Matt Murdock Marvel Karen hoke Murdoch Turk Jack Lawrence Kung Fu hawks Ben Turkey New York Hulk George Burns Pennyworth foreman Tony Stark Donald Davies Kirby Martin
"donald davies" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

13:01 min | 1 year ago

"donald davies" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"Thanks for thanks for having me on. Let's see what I knew you do. I know you edit. I know you dark. I know you're right. No Dad I know you brew. How do you make all these things were basically? I don't sleep it's no. It's I mean it's balanced right so it's Bruin is squeezing when I can. I have joint custody of my kids week on week off so the weeks that I don't have her I just try to know. How did you get into field? I hadn't a film. I mean I was always a moving toward I worked at. My first job was working on a blockbuster worked in retail for probably ten years ten more years to blockbuster worked video difference here in Halifax For a few years and then In that time after I moved back to Halifax I signed where I'm from originally from pick the county some from skeleton and I was there the Sohbi's please rate. Yeah the Soviet from there the wealthiest family from from victim. But yeah. I WANNA come back here so I moved with my partner. At the time and we she was going to jail. I went to see for the screen arts program so I did that from two thousand six to two thousand eight and then What lucked out is Doing that program get an internship. So I picked up A project with the local filmmaker and then about a year after that it was Donald Davies. She's done punch. Yeah superstar she is if you think. I'm busy Dutta under lockdown. But she if you can get her. She's amazing yeah. I did an internship with her. 'cause they knew in the horror horror films so. I did an internship on a project about women horror and did that for a month and then a year or so year and a half after that she had a documentary about Camby effects out of La and so she hired me on as a BA production. Assistant and supposed to be three months. And I worked on that for about a year and a half and that got me into assistant editing and working in post production and then just GonNa once you're into that contract and you contract. It's like well it just got to keep doing this. I kept rolling with Moving from project to project worked with a few more times and just wherever? What do you like about Edison? I'm a story guy I love storytelling. And that's why I kind of the writing directing editing. I've always kind of been my trove interests but that it's like your funnel rewrite so you get you get a lot of get a love involvement in storytelling earn. Ideally you do. How do you prefer working with dark? So it's like you do on them. Well what would your ideal approach when it comes made this film? How would you like to go? It can vary from project to project circumstances us. What would you like I mean if we're talking narrative like a fiction type person. I'd like some notes. Some you know that kind of circle takes you know indicating stuff to really focus on like some time to go through it with the script and just put what I think works together And then kind of get some feedback from the director and then eventually we worked together. But I mean I'm so used to working at this point on my own that I think one of the last things I did with Michael Muskie was a music video and he is a director around. Who's been doing twenty some years? A child remain. Yeah yeah that was his but he did a music video in the winter for Adam Baldwin. Look musician he started out with Matt. Mays and then was branching out on his own so they did a big music brought me on and it was the first time for. Michael in twenty years that he didn't sit down with the editor. He sent me notes very specific notes and takes and I put it together and I think I think we cut it in like two and a half weeks or something like that. Yeah it was a pretty tight. 'cause it had it had a lot of visual effects and had a deadline. You Walk on me Fox. You know went. It went to like it went to a proper. It was a lot of Driving means a lot of composite and stuff and they were Adam was playing two characters there a lot of like positive them into the same shot twice we shot it in December and I got the footage like end December and we were delivering it at the end of January and had to go through the visual effects and color correction in there as well so it was a very short but now it is. I can send you a link. It's on it's on Youtube it's call The song's called salvation. Oh the fun. It's kind of dark. Take on like The taxi driver concept like that movie where he's like it's about having kind of split personality type things but like there's an evil version. Yeah it's good though and it updates. It was like Dubar affects gaming. Would do ask but no? It turned out really well. It's pretty bad it considering. I was also working fulltime and doing so Muslim recording at night weekends. Yeah pretty much anytime. I could sit down at the computer and bang out some stuff but then during what I feel you mean for yourself first film out of film school. Yeah I did one really bad one. That will never sent anybody else. Gold is called Livingstone place. Originally originally it was written for one of those like forty hour eight hour film contests on I was the idea was like we the or they gave you some components to put into the film. And you have to do it so I signed up for that and planned on shooting it and then at the time my dad was ill and there was a lot of personal family stuff so we didn't shoot for the contest but then. I liked the idea now. Set like a couple months later we we went and did it but it was just like a home. Invasion creepy creepy slasher short with a lot of blood and tax But Yeah I don't really when two people it was probably my F- sorry you know I was. I was GONNA say probably my. I like short that you knows super proud of was one called presence that I had Glenn Matthews as local actor at the time. He was in hoboken shock on the corridor. Tons of great. Great Films We develop that with Donna Davies actually I don Davies Company for like a obligation with the CBC. They had a funding program for short. So we applied for that and didn't didn't get it but I came out of it and I finished my contract with Donna. Had the script. It was two characters in like two interior locations. And I was like I could do this like I don't need yes. I did. A bunch of hundreds and stuff. I raised about three thousand almost three thousand dollars on my own and then we went up. It was like two weekends in January. We shot we shot at a studio studios up on the road and then shot at friend's place on hydrogen for the other day. And it's about a guy who's it's all connected hearing I've sent you the link to it before but also your link because it's all about the idea of a musician inches hearing and then he taps into other creatures from another dimension and it's very like psychological but what why like almost actually. I don't oilfields. I've been horror thriller but why is that Genre? Your political goes back to being a kid. What am I? E earliest movie memories was probably in six or seven and sitting down with my family watching robocup which a seven year old should much remember being fascinated by the special effects and my parents really great about like explain it so I had as a kid. I had a healthy understanding of like these. Are that fed into my love of Halloween. And I was obsessed with Michael Jackson's thriller. I used to get my family. Rent may the Vhs which was the video and then making of Oh. God you know. I I. I don't know I was talking about ball but recently I was actually talking about that we saw. I said watching that things will meet me wants to make music videos. Actually because it was crazy absolutely no it was like to have that kind of I like behind the scenes. Look back and see the process. I actually kind of funny. Wraparound is my daughter's obsessed Michael Jackson thriller and so then found the making of on Youtube so we sat down and watch the video and the making of and it was just this moment where you know. I was like I was taken back full circle by there was that and then seen like Georgia Mirror movies like the living dead time all that stuff. It just it fed into my good. I was reading an article by him. And he's I one occur remote. The first one was actually based on a on a book and it was someone else's big like a well known author got bored. He didn't have permission to do that. So he kind of talk to the person and the passengers say it was okay because it wasn't going to make money on vast. I Wreck Board. But the problem is he dindo. You can make money like all these other ones all the time. Yeah it was actually the I am legend in your story. It's it's such a good book but yeah it That was a movie that was fastened. Because it would be on you like. I remember going grandfather's place around Halloween and it would just be on any random channel odd to me. It was like I was young. Enough is like this thriller like zombies breaking down doors like it was took me the Michael Jackson Video. Scientists head kind of combined themselves obsess. Yay zombies are still my favorite. So you've known me before though. I make us ambience. None that I'm proud was really funny actress through film school kind of going into it. I didn't expect it to make anything. That was creepy gruesome murder Zombie related. I end up making like three short projects that we're all like horror. Zombie related on the chat. I've been itching actually to do a proper Zombie. What did you think of a show? The walking dead. I've fallen off the bandwagon The last few seasons I was a huge fan of the comics Robert Kirkman had a really healthy appreciation of Georgia marrow. You know the modern Zombie. He's he's guy kind of birth that John Russo. Kirkman always had that appreciation and kind of approach is huge in the comics early on. And I'm on the show came around I was really into it because it was. You know well made and fairly faithful but still surprising but then yeah it around. It was funny actually around the same point in the comics like story wise that I lost interest in the comics. Same time that I lost interest in Michelle was some of the big communities getting. I don't know it Kinda was getting a little repetitive. Oh by people now we have to find you know. Is that vibe people. It's It it did good things but it was like how about Dawn of the dead the remake dollars in the mall. Yes actually really like outfield. I did do a little people's lose little good boy. I think department really socked me was ending like the credits right when you thought they were like devoutly escaped in the boats and then a decree to see like no no right right. No I am a van. That was a hard one going in though because the original is one of my favorite my favorite Romero's and it's just one of my top favorite films so going into remake. I knew I'd approach it knowing that they're not gonNA take Romeros stance that Like if you're think of when when it was made and how much of a commentary it is on like capitalism and you know this need to like consumed by and the fact is made in the seventies long before that was really a social thought right like malls weren't even a big thing that time and here's guy likes talking about how you know. It's not a great mindset to have and also for that ending of like you know you think they're alive from great the original the way it ends its so on the surface. It feels so happy when you think about it. You're like no this. Is there if you haven't seen it?.

Michael Jackson Youtube Robert Kirkman Halifax Donna Davies Romero director Donald Davies Bruin Adam Baldwin partner Adam Michelle Michael Muskie Dutta La Camby Michael Edison
"donald davies" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"donald davies" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"It's big matters. When it counts only one station in south, Florida. Is there for you? Every step of the way, news talk, fifty W F T L. Stay connected. Guess there are a lot of Mets bonds. Then their strikes wellness using the straps. Buying power. Strokes wellness offers the same injectables and wriggle reducers only at a fraction of the price. Talks a twenty unit syringe purlee to forty nine the sport for one thousand nine syringe rest radius or versa for only four forty nine or two syringes for three ninety nine each these prices. Can't be beat straps wellness. Also offers Bella to reduce that below the neck normally nineteen ninety nine for four files. Now, twelve ninety nine fractional and a blade of lasers tattoo removal. G shots. Non-surgical vaginal rejuvenation all at low cost with no downtime with expert injectors. There's no reason to ever go to a meta other than strikes wellness. Call nine hundred four sixty four thirty three thirty three or go to Instagram at flawless faces by an to see samples of great work. Each county high school sports desk. County boys lacrosse action Oxbridge academy with a thirteen to four winner. Benjamin. Donald Davies with three goals ended assist. Jack Killian also scored three goals for the thunder walls proved a fifteen into ever Natalie had three goals from the buccaneers to fall the seven and five in girls lacrosse king's academy with a fifteen to eight win over the pine school any van wart led the way with six goals. Molly Ernest added three goals to the lions who proved to eleven and four. This report is sponsored by Mako. You might not be able to get a new car.

Molly Ernest Donald Davies Mets Jack Killian van wart Oxbridge pine school Florida Bella Instagram buccaneers Benjamin Natalie fifty W
"donald davies" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

08:41 min | 2 years ago

"donald davies" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Joe, beningo Evan Roberts. Eight seven seven three seven sixty six sixty six. The phone number. We hit the one o'clock CNBC comes your way. Don't Kramer, Ernie Acosta on the other side of the glass a football Friday PD kings, go to join us. We also got the guy that used to be an agent. We've got a fuller agent named David Sloan with alone. That's right. Former MLB agent baseball player's agent. And of course, and how could I forget that? We are brought to you by your dog sesame every day is black bear towards every black. The said, and we are coming to you live from the black bear studio. Delicious black the deli meats cheeses only at ShopRite. So I'll aggravated today. Did you eat Steve Serbia to post? No. Steve. And I know Steve Hello time. Steve I like you lot. Why would you write these articles just aggravate jet fans? Have we been tortured enough? Are you still aggravated at that Richard Todd three into the locker room, you know, twenty seven years ago thirty? Thirty seven years. Are you still aggravate the problem because he writes this thought about you gotta wait till next year and all this money next year. I understand. But you know, he's basically saying it's okay to lose this year. And here's the thing that bothers me. Can I ask this question? I was thinking about this. Tell me if I'm maybe I'm lost. And I understand that we're a better team. But why does it seem like it's different Donald Davies better than Sanchez? Why does it seem like when Sanchez was a rookie quarterback? Okay. It wasn't about the development of Mark Sanchez because they had a better much better team. They did. But even so you know what I mean? I don't I don't get that. Well, what do you mean? Like, they should have been more patient with more. No, no, no. It's too much. No. Because he wasn't as good, right? Donald who's better. I think Donald I don't think there's any doubt about it. Right. It just it just it just it just seems like there's a different criteria than it was you know, what ten years ago when I did the biggest difference. If you talk about the way guys are. Rex Ryan and Todd Bowles. Right. Well, Rex Ryan in his first two years the coach of this team got the jets to back tobacco AFC titled. And while it was all downhill after that within I'd say five weeks of that two thousand eleven season. Everybody wanted to Rex Ryan fire. He's terrible. Of course, I think Todd Bowles who's done. Nothing. Nothing. Todd. He has gotten away with a lot more than just simply because Rex Reid wasn't like live. That's it. The truth is this it is about wings. Of course wins matter. So I'm with you on that point. And when you look at these game against the dolphins one thing that's really worrying me about this game with the dolphins. Is that you boomer, gene ATI record. Everybody's picking picking next week. Well. Lost to the Bill one week at a time. I understand there is a lot of confidence that the jets way down to south Florida. And then just gonna run all over the dolphins. Because remember the dolphins can't stop the run unless facing the jets. Where'd you confident that there was in the Bronco game? Was I comfortable about coffee and what about beating Denver? Okay. That's. What does that mean about one game? Was it me you being confident not getting a? It seems like it's a conclude to the chance to win this game. People picked him. Of course. Yeah. I don't think the dolphins beat Brock Osweiler. They're starting quarterback Cameron quarterback last year. But he went to Denver after David was eight Neroni chewed up. And that was another week after just one against Kansas City, and they were patting themselves on the back about how great they are. And then didn't bother to even get off the plane in Denver. So we say now, I just don't know why there would be that much confidence that the jets are going to go down to south Florida just blow the dolphins because it's everybody's picking up. I'll tell you what here's why. It's very jet. Like that's why and look at look at all the similarities from this year to last year last year, they were had the same record. They had now that week not a week nine. They played a bills Thursday night. Yeah. They beat buffalo up all day four and five we giddy, dancing and doing the electric slide on a on a on a field. All you know, the, you know, Jamal acting like he's Michael Jackson. And they're all pumped up. Oh, they got all next week. That'd be five and five the play the Tampa Bay box. It's a layup. He was actually we're going into the bye bye. Forget it. It's gonna kill him. And what happened they lose the Tampa? So this is this is this is this is set up. Exactly. Like, listen, if the I mean, that's that's why you mean Monday at ten AM if the jets beat the dolphins, I'll be with you that it makes sense that they'd have a letdown in a game they should win against the bills. But they have to get there. They have to go to Miami and beat a team that they lost two week to earlier this season and a team they lost four to five games. But that's one of the reasons why I think they're gonna win this game. And also I looking at it from this viewpoint. The jets will do it the most painful way possible for you. Okay. They will tease you. Okay. We buy watch this. They will tease you get you pumped up. They'll make you believe. They win this scandal. But you'll talk and tough guy law with palm. We're ready now we're ready to make that wrong. It's not the same old Jetson yada, yada doodoo and two plays into the bills game. They'll be three four start penalties which is impossible. But the jets would find a way let me ask you have three full start penalties on only two points. Now, I agree that after they beat the lions and put up forty eight poetry Bank one. We're all pumped letdown. I was at the game and the game. And we're all everybody's heard about that game for the reasons, you're right. So that that was a painful suck you in and agree after beating Denver and beating Indianapolis at home seventy six points into a game against the Vikings was an opportunity to prove. Hey, this season could go somewhere. Right. And that was let down number two. I think if they beat Miami. I am not going to go into the buffalo game beating my chest. I think they have to win these next to more. So to beat out. Hey to believe that they are a different football team that you're right. They have to win these next two. And here's where it starts against this dolphin team. It starts with the fact that they have to run the football. And if you look at the Sunday, right? Well, they haven't activated him. But they probably right. Well, probably going to see him wire crow Allen. I'm assuming cannon will play. Yeah. This jet run game is essential to not only helping out Sam darnold but essential to beating the dolphin team who all season long recites, wait till against the jets have not been able to stop the run. The jets rush for like forty eight yards. And what did he give up one forty three? A pop the dolphins. Forty three yards a game. Right. Here's all you need to know about the Miami Dolphins this season. I'll give you the numbers. The kind of hilarious when you think about what the jets were unable to do. And there we to game they've given up one sixteen on the ground one. Oh, nine one seventy five one zero three one sixty four to forty eight and one eighty eight and then the jets forty two. Blue. I really think about it. It's unbelievable. Twenty ninth in the league in rush defense. If you take the jets away, they thirty eighth out of thirty. Tovia, right. So it starts there. It starts there. And you look at the style. Frontier. D eight out of thirty two. That's right. That's how bad the dolphin. Well said well, it's kind of like. Boundary playwright three three penalties to place possible. But it's the k-, right? And I think the dolphins are a mediocre to bad football team. Right. And if the jets are going to have any semblance of a season when does have to down to the game, and they got time L. Let's be let's put it. I'm gonna what's put it right here. Obviously, you know, my feeling on bowls. If Todd Bowles wants to continue coaching his team, the time is now, I don't wanna hear anymore about how great, you know. All we we played hard Lila Richie Kotite line that he gave us after the game last week against the bears. Okay. Kotite alec. We played hard while we saw together in the locker room, you know, Leonard overrated Williams is telling you how you know. This is where we're not the same old Jay round with three and five. We're not the same old jets different feeling locker room will go out there now and win these next two games. And maybe I'll start to believe that there's a different feeling electoral. All right, Todd Bowles needs to show. Have you want to continue coaching his team many guys that we know he's a terrible coach. But if. He wants to continue coaching his team then go out there. And when these next two games, I was reading this article today in a post on Jeremy Bates, Jeremy Bates is he says it right? He's as their wits about what are you going to question.

jets dolphins Todd Bowles Denver football Richard Todd Donald Davies Steve Serbia Rex Ryan Miami Dolphins David Sloan Miami MLB Mark Sanchez CNBC ShopRite Tampa Bay Rex Reid Joe Jeremy Bates
"donald davies" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"donald davies" Discussed on WGN Radio

"See a lot of great funny funny things from the mind of anti college i love you so much thank you so much it's such a pleasure to be on travel this cargo by any chance i so frustrated that i have not set foot in chicago proper i've been to the airport all these always clamoring to to to to explore and i've never gotten around to it chances i'll come to you before you come to me is what you're saying i gotta do this before before i shuffle off this mortal coil i mean chicago is such a cool town and i wanna see that experienced that firsthand are you doing a tour with your book because i think that you can tell your agents hey i gotta go to chicago and do wgn radio people by i wish i wish i was creative enough to create a an agent who would facts right up i smell tax write off oh that's right off to make note of that yes please would you say comics writers and and all of our ilk are not great when it comes to the the ledger and the business side of what we're doing i think that's so true and i think i think agents and the the business people may smell that so we have to tough it up yes i agree we'll toughened up everybody but laugh while you're doing it pick up banging my head against the wall comedy comedy writers guide to seeing stars it has been pleasure my friend likewise thank you so much i look forward to talking to you again i'm gonna i'm gonna email you gonna i'm about some ideas i had to do you have any extra gags sent you know don't don't be shy scott scott says way oh we'll send me about information to because i love i love pitching that was such a fun world to pitch speaking the opposite i use that in many examples in the cartoon like the the wife is saying to her husband yes i cheated on you with your twin but i thought i was cheating on him with lots of examples of the opposite in comedy i leave you with a timely one should we spend the girlfriend telling her less than amused boyfriend should we spend the fourth of july together or independence day apart limit on that we say a do and good night and we will see you again and talk to you again that's andy cowan pick up his book on amazon banging my head against the wall comedy writers guide to seeing stars come to chicago chicago yeah i will i slices on me more after this at seven twenty wgn steve thanks one button has it's too many buttons can't even do that bill and wendy one button willie i liked that's my name cole is here say something i did stand up comedy for ten years and stand up comics tend to look a certain way you do not look that way you look like a model stand up comic model okay i'll come back all right that was me to come back this is a return home for you right you were born here yeah man cargo born and raised chicago southside nice socks fan then white sox yeah the socks yes i said yeah they'll be good don't get me wrong but yeah you don't have to love both of them bill i do i do cousin ralph avenue man and that always always had tradition yes exactly what it is you still have family here my family so when you come back dion is working at the improv this week do they do they load up the show to they come out and drill family and friends everybody come out you know yeah absolutely is it different knowing that your family do you do anything different because families watching i get everybody together one day and we all do something and then i'm good oh i had to go out individually here is that i go to myself and then i'm good yeah down your time you start doing santa fe in chicago you did start at all jokes aside down on the wabash and the lifestyle was go up north to the lincoln law yeah this place on shared in chef is called the q club don't they form up there and so i'm guessing you dave hughes donald davies always do shows up north him in aaron and he's talking to do shows with the.

ten years one day