23 Burst results for "Don Quixote"

"don quixote" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:13 min | Last month

"don quixote" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Can't even keep up with all the names from the listening audience. If you were on Miller's Twitter timeline at Jeff underscore Miller are great Sound man and one of our producers. Midway Jeff Miller. He tweeted a picture in Downers Grove. Nice Suburban Street. A couple of knuckleheads put up an 8 ft. Snow Penis, but they don't sell them short. Big Garment 12 footer, actually. Well, they were on the station earlier than they were on the station. They claim it was a 15 footer. How did they do that? And are the artists. Careful. I think any yet. No, but I mean, it is so hot Body. Egyptians build a pair Americo. It looks like the way it looks like something Michelangelo would sculpt. I mean, it is Gloria. It is very vast. Here's Here's the radar that much said so on Saturday, sculptors and artists. I think here's Here's the thing. They've gotten good at it. It's now an annual tradition. They started it in 2004. They've been going out for awhile. Years now there's been years, but in their 10,000 hours that's really mastered their craft. There have been years with a haven't had enough snow to really operate. We had a good snow. That's the medium. They were waiting for a nice heavy snow. They got it. And guess what? The neighbors can't be happy boy. In the past. I've been told that they had. They've poured water over. Over their sculptures. Yes, yes, even longer lasting these guys or something. I can't have this colder. It is this cold weather that's coming. If they do a slow trip on that shaft, I think, boy. This thing could stay for at least another 23 weeks. I can't. I can't even go through all the names some of them. We can't say A lot of people are making the nick Foles jokes, which is very good plan. They should plant a flag in the media. This all right? Stop it. What? Clinical term? I know it is. I can't read this one. I can't read that one when you can name is water wants to name it, Miller. Yeah, that was real Nice one. Model said. Name it, Miller. There have been a handful of sports people in the city of Chicago in the past that had they want that name. Oh, good old number six smoking old number six. They wanted to name it. That's right, White Night. Rising Snowpiercer was earlier Snowpiercer. I can't read that one time you've got to be able to read something. What is that's a good lad. You gotta get a good laugh. I'd like to give us some teas and a little bit Tomb of the unknown soldier. I thought that I like Pedro Count Pedro's awesome Is Pedro means, Peter. Right? As like, Pedro, Zoos count girth. Brooks is maybe one of the best ones. I've heard. Vote for Pedro. How about Colossus? Colossus is goods. Wonderful? Yes. Captain Frozen chef, The frosty phallus. Carm, I did. You can't keep doing this, but that is all. We've got listening. Why don't know the Willy tower there. Willie Towers. Very good. That wasn't you had a good entry. Classical literature. One, right? Somebody had said Don Quixote. Yes. Which I thought was pretty Dong Dong. Don't forget the G there. That's what it deserves. Yeah, so Go ahead, be childish with us and have a little help. We're having fun here, guys, That's what we're doing. We're having. That's what Well, I wanted to ask the our esteemed weather person from the morning at ABC seven. About said picture from earlier today and it was advised against it. Yeah, I told the guys I don't like being number four. I like being number one. So we gotta operate on the precipice of disaster. 1 ft. Over the line flirt with disasters, they said the song My God, So these guys, it's just up to the parents Don't get mad. Nobody comes, knocks it down like it's there, you could drive. This Is this like a tourist attraction from them might be Yeah. You know, it kind of is from them. The That's why they have a spotlight because people would stop and take pictures. Great fundraising idea. Hanging Christmas lights from it, And then everybody. It's $20 a guess on how many actual lights are on, said Fallon. Guess how many marvels are in the jar? Exactly? I think this could turn into a great community projects. You know where you could. You could have a contest every year. Yes, you know, when have yourself every yard you go, You know, just like you go through Christmas lights during the season, Different neighborhoods responsible for different parts of the body that works. I think that'd be absolutely fine. Mike Science a force that before I mean, it's not science. She blinded me with science is unbelievable. I could wear scientists start on. These guys were tweeting about it this morning. I couldn't go on like this for your Listen. The time of Kobe, you gotta find a way to last time. And to me That's comedy. What's comedy fart jokes and they could do That makes people that were very childish. I know. Of course I wait a minute. Jamison is in Darien. He's nearby. He could go over and see if he's in daring. He's right next to the L. Let's talk to him. Jamison, What's up, man? Take it Does you know a little bit about? Um The first thing is to some Watson. I think you the Bears pipe dream is gonna include two first round draft, but I think you're right. At least so you get you get three. What I mean, that's That's even not even a lot, Maybe four plus the to the you know the one they traded out for, and then Stravinsky. I mean, you got to include that, too. You have to include the two. It's just not gonna happen. I mean, it just will never happen. And also for your little sculpture. I think you should probably call it the great white hope. That's pretty good college. Let you guys going, Jerry Cooney, and it's not so little. We're gonna name it. Gerry Cooney, wasn't he The great white hope again today was he Who's the heavyweight? Who's that heavyweight boxer out of New Jersey? Gerry Cooney was his name and he was known as the Great White. Hold that right about the great White whale. Moby Dick. There you go. Perfect. Call me Ishmael. Yeah, who will be smells? It smells pretty good. Who wrote that? Herman Melville. That's the guy. Yes, Herman. You know, I've never read down old Herman. I never read that book. The movie. It's long. It's long, but I mean, I don't mind long books, but I mean, it's gotta be good isn't good. Everybody says yes. The book. Okay is it is good..

Jeff Miller Pedro Count Pedro Gerry Cooney Jamison Downers Grove Herman Melville Michelangelo Twitter nick Foles Dong Dong Don Quixote White Night Chicago Willy tower Snowpiercer Jerry Cooney New Jersey Moby Dick Willie Towers
"don quixote" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

04:45 min | Last month

"don quixote" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Pride of your ravishes lies prostrate on the ground through the strong arm of mine unless you should be pining to know the name of your deliverer. Now that i am cole. Don quixote of la mancha knight errant an adventurer and captive to the peerless and beautiful lady dulcinea delta bozo and in return for the service. You have received a me. I asked no more than that. You should return to el toboso and on my behalf. Present yourself before that lady and tell her what i've done to set you free one of the squires. In attendance upon the coach a biscay was listening. To all don quixote was saying and perceiving that he would not allow the coach to go on but with saying it must return at once to elta bozo he made at him in seizing his lance addressed him in bad castillian and worse biscay and after this fashion begun kobe. Gyro and ill go with the by the god that made me unless thou quits coach. Sleighs thou as art here. A biscay in don quixote understood him quite well in answered him very quietly if thou wert night as that were none. I should have already chastised thi- folly and rashness miserable creature to which the biscay and returned. I know gentlemen. I swear to god thou lions has i am christian. If ou- drop its lanson. Draw a sword soon. Shut thou see that were carrying water to the cat scan on land. He doggone at sea he dog at the double. And look if that's as otherwise. They'll last you will see presently set a grace replied don quixote in throwing his lance on the ground. He drew his sword braces buckler under his arm in attack. The biscayne bent upon taking his life. The biscay and when he saw him coming on though he wished to dismount from his mule in which being one of those sorry ones let out for hire he had. No confidence had no choice but to draw his sword. It was lucky for him however that he was near the coach from which he was able to snatch a cushion that served him for a shield and then they went at one another as if they had been to mortal enemies the other strove to make peace between them but could not for the biscuit and declared in his disjointed phrase that if they did not let him finish his battle he would kill his mistress and everyone that strove to prevent him lady in the coach amazed and terrified at what she saw ordered the coachman to draw aside a little and said herself to watch this severe struggle. In the course of which the biscay and smote don quixote a mighty stroke on the shoulder over the top of his buckler which given to one without armor would have left him to the waste..

dulcinea delta bozo elta bozo double one christian el toboso
"don quixote" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:21 min | 5 months ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"He drew a rich ring off his finger and placed it upon mine. He then took his departure and I was left. I know not whether sorrowful are happy. All I can say is I was left agitated and troubled in mind and almost bewildered by what had taken place and I had not the spirit or else it did not occur to me to chide my maid for the treachery. She had been guilty of concealing Don Fernando in my chamber for as yet I was unable to make up my mind whether what had befallen me was for good or evil. I told Don Fernando at parting that as I was now his he might see me on other nights in the same way until it should be his pleasure to let the matter become known but except the following night. He came no more nor for more than a month could I catch a glimpse of him in the street or in church while I worried myself am watching for one? Although I knew he was in the town and almost every day went on out hunting a past time. He was very fond of I remember well how sad and jury those days and hours were to me. I remember Well how I began to doubt as they went by and even to lose confidence in the faith of Don Fernando..

Don Fernando
"don quixote" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

02:38 min | 10 months ago

"don quixote" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

"Up And then the diary tariff that movie at that time he was already developing a giant movie and and he saw my portfolio ahead. Already some design working in and he was asking not interested in starting out some designs. I designs for his movie. It was based on their great adventures of Don Quixote Man. And I really learned kiosque. Don Quixote don't but the comet is a play on on the title it's actually donkey. Ot right story was split around and was from the donkey donkey. Essentially hunch right already and then I realized own that could be interesting because I could work for. Cgi production and but could still keep drawing. Yeah so that was really I geek in design Ever since I I want WanNa dig a little deeper on that and this and the Arctic side. Now take a break from the bio part but talk about their cystic side so 'cause I was going to ask you if you were an animator. I wondered if you had that training before we started this podcast. And so now we've heard yes you have training not only from school. But then animated on some some films What do you think is the big difference? Because there's now there's kind of two different character designers out there and establish this. Some that have animation trainings. They were animators are are animators into d and then either fell into character design or you know or pursued it but oftentimes fell into character design. And I'm kind of putting myself in that group Myself and then there's the other group that are not enemies have never animated and there they go specifically for design and that's kind of a newer breed. I would say I would say. The newer breed aren't not animators. Don't even necessarily have enemies from training. But they're strong character designers. Would you see as the difference between those two groups of character designers? I think the big difference is when you're coming from any nation if you have already worked as an animator for sample and then falling into that character design pov benefit.

Don Quixote
"don quixote" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

08:43 min | 11 months ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Are the folks that are responsible I believe for like the shark NATO movies or maybe it was like mega shark versus giant squid or stuff like that but total schlock meisters. That to me is is a relatively interesting form of plagiarism. He yes especially I can't be the only one who has seen so many of those on Netflix. You know what I mean. They're all over the place. Netflix is very much like the video streaming version of that meam where the parents says. We can't eat out. We have food at home and then you look over at the movie. That's food at home and it's like the revenge or spirits lavers spirits lepers. I love it but yeah survive. This you know He. He kind of felt a little burned by all of this and he was obviously a really smart witty fellow and he decided to unequivocally kill off his character I don't want to spoil it too much because again i. I haven't read this and I really wanted this sounds. I didn't realize how kind of trippy and Meta the whole thing is so. I'm super looking forward to digging into this For maybe quarantine reading But yeah he he made it. He left no room for there to be a sequel and completely closed the book on Don Quixote Close. The book totally stole that from a blog. Post by the way. Just don't accuse me of plagiarizing ny P. L. Dot org slash blog slash two thousand fifteen slash four slash twenty two slash case. Dash False Dash Quixote ridiculous. History folks come for the Historical headline but do please stay for our quarantine. Crowd work you know. There's one interesting theory I think I. I think this is a glade. Like speculative note maybe to end on for today. I don't know if you guys are heard this. But we still don't know and we probably never really will know who the author of the unauthorized sequel is. Some historians have argued that it may have been savant as himself. What yeah that. He may have been having this this weird PR stunt. I don't think that's super likely but if so it is even realized. Yeah Wow Kerr manufacturing a beef with yourself with a made up version of yourself and then writing it into. Oh my God. The more I think about I've been I've want to believe that that's true. I don't even care about the evidence. I'm just going to choose to believe that that's true because that is fantastic and disturbances right anything else or was he said he was kind of a one and done guy. He was so influential with that one work that he just kind of faded out He wrote a lot of Food reviews furniture reviews. Really no what to believe He he did. He's by far best known for Don Quixote but he wrote a number of other things as well Including Poems He was apparently not a super great poet. Kind of like Ernest Hemingway you know what I mean has gift was more for pro USB real kind of like ninety percent of quote unquote poets. So yeah I taught take their. You gotta be real good to make poetry work. I'm just putting that out there. Oh yeah yea I've often. I've often said the same thing. You're you're estimations actually more generous. The mind just be honest but when when you get to that. Ten percent poetry's amazing. It's just it just so happens. That survivor was not an amazing poet but he wrote he wrote farces. He wrote other stories. He wrote dialogues. He was prolific you know. He was prolific He was Super Petty. I think he and Oscar Wilde would have been great friends until the inevitably Fell OUT OVER. Probably over some kind of fun you know. Oh I'm sure I'm sure it was a punishing beef. No it's fine. No doubt that people can't see it but I was not in you. Were nodding and I know is not in your last quick as well then so. I just don't want anybody to think that we don't have to this backs here with our bad humor But yeah this is a great story man and the thing is that really leads me to believe that maybe it really was him that it was just like a elaborate publicity stunt not even known about this in history if it hadn't have been for him making such to do about it in writing it in to his own work and name dropping it you know every turn So really hats off to him for not only you know having the most clever way of responding to kind of be ripped off but for like kind of also big upping the rip and sort of like making him stand the test of time and and and have schmuck like talking about it. Yes that's a good point. It's kind of like a to go back to the mix example of one thing that a lot of celebrities in the world of hip hop do is is gained notoriety and attention by sort of manufacturing conflicts. You know and if you're an up and coming. Emc for a long time. The best path to success was to Was the insult an established rapper. And then have them mentioned you on their album. Because that's so much free publicity so I'm with you there. No I would also like to believe that survived as did this entire thing himself. I don't know if it's true but boy I wish it was. This brings our tail for today to a close. What what do you think folks let us know? Do you think savant as kind of ran a con on everybody in the literary world of the time or do you think that. He really was responding sincerely to a counterfeiting attempts. Yeah let us know what you think you can write to us that ridiculous at iheartradio Dot Com. You can check us out on facebook and please do join our facebook group the ridiculous historians where there is always a good memory and Chitchat to be had and Ben and I will occasionally lurk in their pop into the comments from time to time. So all you have to do to get in is named one of the three of us Or just say something humorous Let us know that you actually Listen to the show. At aren't Russian. Bought like Gabe Louisiana. I'm just can't establish real person. A big thanks to him. Our research associate extraordinaire. He will be appearing on the show very soon huge. Thanks to sue producer. Casey peg rim Alex Williams who composed are female. And as always thank you to another character you can see lurking around our facebook page ridiculous historians the One and only Jonathon Strickland Aka the twister Some you might show up but then again we may show up too. We also want to thank as always. Eve's Jeffco shout out to Sheryl Crowe glad we clever squash that the shoutout to survive himself. Shout Don Quixote and no thanks. Shout out to you. We'll see you next time folks for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hey Miles yes. It's Jack from work. Yes Hi did you know that. We hosted Daily News and culture. Podcast where people go to get caught. What is that saying are you? Yes are you confused about that? You're talking about the dailies. I shouldn't make sure you knew and that everybody knew that you could listen to us every day twice a day. Talk about what is happening. And they could learn everything without feeling. The life drained from their soul. Yeah I think at the daily Zeitgeist. We like to give people a balance of just enough news that they feel informed in just enough laughs that they're not overwhelmed. Have a decent day after listening to guys. Listen daily Zeitgeist on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever fine podcasts are given away for free? I'm Bob Ross. Host of the new podcast stay calm. Meditation Changed My Life College. I've spent the last fifty years teaching people about the benefits of meditation from celebrity clients to students in inner city schools. And now I'm sharing a lot of what I know. Straight to your ears in my new podcast. Join me every Monday. Through Friday morning all you need is a few minutes in an open mind. Listen and subscribe to stay calm on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

Don Quixote facebook apple Netflix Ernest Hemingway P. L. Dot Oscar Wilde Bob Ross Sheryl Crowe Daily News Emc Gabe Louisiana Alex Williams research associate producer Jonathon Strickland Jack Eve Ben
"don quixote" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

09:29 min | 11 months ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"They don't know about the the history behind this rival sequel you can imagine how confusing it gets because now all the sudden this is a story about a story and Don Quixote having these like more money more problems kind of situations. There's there's one scene in chapter seventy where a character named outisde aura recounts her journey. She's talking about traveling to Hell and she sees him devils playing tennis with books instead of balls and she notices one book in particular we got. We got there too. I think that's right It's says One of them was brand new. Well bound book. They gave such a stroke. They knocked the guts out of it and scattered the leaves about look what book that is said. One Devil to another and the other replied. It is second part of the history of Don. Quixote of La Mancha Yeah it's it's not by SID Hammett. Which was the like the. I guess the historian. That's referenced in the original Don Quixote. Yeah he's the scholar who is like. Hey I have more documents. That'll be coming in the second book. And then the other devil said out of this with an into the depths of hell with it out of my sight devils is it so bad and then you gotta do this for bed. Mrs Great so bad is it said the first devil that if I had set myself deliberately to make a worse I could not have done it. Wonderful Wonderful Really. Really Fun Really making me WanNa read all three of these just to see what what Oh Yeah and then and then you know like we were. I was getting at earlier. There really was no copyright law to speak of and we have a little bit more detail about that and how like at the time. Yes so is this the best way handle what is essentially fan fiction? I don't know maybe not. But it's like the coolest funniest way so I. I'm I'm I'm not the best judge here but Sirvan. Tease was still like about a century early to modern copyright law You know the thing called the statute of Anne get signed about one hundred years later in England not in Spain and so at this point in his life even if Cervantes had money to take someone to court somehow. He didn't have all the pieces that he needed. There wasn't a legal framework. He didn't know the real name of this cheeky author and even if he could find them you know how would he pay legal fees so instead? He went Uber. Petty and I approve because it made for some fantastic literature in a world where everyone is confined to their homes. Society begins its largest been watch to date in the Hallowed Library of Hulu or perhaps on a shelf of DVD's you haven't looked at in a decade is a show that perfectly encapsulates life in the early arts and launched a friendship that would inspire millions. Hi I'm Zach Braff. Donald Phasing in two thousand one we start in scrubs a Sitcom that revealed a glimpse of what it was like to survive medical internship as Turk and J D. We explored guy. Love nearly twenty years later a lot. It's changed we're not superman. But we're still best friends given a mandatory lockdown. There's no better time to relive the series that brought us together in the first place. And we're doing it with a podcast. That's right people we're going to bring friends and crew members and fellow cast members and writers. And guess what we're GonNa even invite some of you to call into the podcast and ask all the questions you want of the entire secret heart staff join us for fake doctors. Real friends on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. And wherever you get your podcasts. That's the thing about the printing press I mean. It was sort of a double edged sword. I get on the one hand if you were a rider with something to say and with ideas that that you know would benefit from abroad audience. You're able to do that for the first time. Ever as opposed to the oral tradition We're really so many of those stories had no Ownership attached to them and they were just passed down unchanged in there was never really been this idea of the author as celebrity right but on the other hand it made it a lot easier to make copies of copies and you know without any copyright protection and that the Statute of Anne. You're talking about there was really no protection for people's ideas and it would be so easy for someone I mean. I guess the technology was prohibitively expensive. So everyone couldn't own a printing press. Obviously that but that was really the only protection you had if some scrappy band of you know Bootleggers wanted to pitch in together. And get a printing presser. Make one or whatever They could and they could just copy other popular works sell them the way people sell bootleg banned t shirts outside of the Coliseum. You know Oh I got one book laggers so I love No. It's true and that's absolutely what happened. And so it made Sirvan tests much more tuned in to what the WHO. The real enemy was That it wasn't people copying the stories. It was the printers who just wanted to make money off of people's ideas and they didn't care about Robbing these folks who put their heart and soul into these creative works they just wanted to make a buck and again it would have been folks that had money that could afford to start printers that would have been benefiting from this so he began to actually call out kind of this culture. Call out print shop owners. Who were doing this kind of stuff? Yeah Yeah Well Don Quixote calls out the printers right. That's right. He goes to there's spoilers by the way. There's a scene in the second volume of Don Quixote where the main character goes into a print shop and is astounded. By how terrible printers are. He says they're cheating authors cheating translators. And in this story Don Quixote how. How like a being John Malkovich this in the story? Don Quixote Don Quixote finds in this print shop an unauthorized version of his actual life and it's been printed while he's standing there and he's like oh come on guys any leaves and this. This is weird because you know you think about it. Isn't it kind of against savant? Interest to take a swing publishers. When they're literally the way he's GonNa get paid. Yeah it's interesting and and if you want to read more about this and getting a little more into the Minutia. The side of the story Highly recommend this article from Smithsonian by Martin Poop ner called how a ripped off sequel of Don Quixote predicted piracy in the digital age It's it's it's outside the scope. I think of this episode but certainly a really interesting can of worms that was opened there and a double edged sword has all technology often is like we see with You know things like Napster and Electronic copies of software cracking things and being able to more or less steel. But it doesn't feel like stealing. You're not actually stealing it from a human. You know you're just stealing an idea. So it's a lot easier to justify right. I think that was really really predicted. That pretty intensely Yet so I I. It's funny because this extends to all media you know Anybo- I was watching some old like VHS rips earlier and I remembered with a tinge of nostalgia that FBI warning that POPs up. Like when I saw that as a kid I took that very seriously I did. You know by the time that That old at against piracy for movies came out the one that was like you wouldn't download a car. Would you buy the time that came out? I felt like I might download a car if I could those interesting part of that. Psa But yeah you're right. This is such an excellent relevant to today to the world where we're moving beyond physical media into Zeros and ones that you can send back and forth across the world so hats off to survive. I wish more people would handle piracy this way. I wouldn't that be like I don't know we don't. We don't have as much creative piracy. I want to say here in the US like there's not an unauthorized adventures coming out a revenge. -Ere's no actually. That's not entirely true. Ben There's this company called the What are they called the asylum? Who makes these movies called Mach Buster's street video straits video guys so But they really do genuinely capitalize Back in the days of video stores especially I guess. Now in terms of browsing thumbnails of people having brand confusion though instead of transformers. They've got trans more fers and instead of snakes on a plane. They've got snakes on a train and it's just different enough that someone might accidentally rent the wrong one And these.

Don Quixote Don Quixote Don Quixote outisde aura Zach Braff Statute of Anne apple US Sirvan La Mancha FBI John Malkovich Mrs Great Hulu SID Hammett Petty Napster Donald Phasing England Martin Poop
"don quixote" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

09:20 min | 11 months ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Bienvenidos ridiculous historians. Thank you so much as always for tuning in my name is Ben and I am over the moon today because we get a chance to talk about one of my favorite books growing up. Hey Ben I'm Nolan. I have the song return of the mack stuck in my head because I just ate macaroni and cheese on our episode pause For a quick five minute lunch my kid made some and I had a couple of bites and all of a sudden return of the Mack is stuck in my head. I'M NOT GONNA sing it for copyright infringement reasons but I hope it's an olive your heads to it's funny. I had never actually heard that song but I'll I'll look it up after after we record today and there's are I I see down here in our zoom call. A Blue Skies super-producer Casey peg room himself With you've got the disappearing Mike thing going on to man which I think is cool. Look yeah if I if I shift my My Body in a certain direction and blocked the light. The Mike appears to float in mid air without a stand and then if I moved you can kind of see the stand. Come in my background is the photo entitled. Bliss in it was the default wallpaper for Windows. Ninety eight I believe the much-maligned Windows Ninety eight was windows in windows. Ninety eight malign or that was windows two thousand. That was maligned. I think wasn't I want to say I think ninety. It was kind of Buggy. Emmy which I think was the one that everybody really. Yes Millennium Edition. Yeah and the diehards of US instead ended up getting windows two thousand or windows. Xp or something that's right. I remember X. P. is okay thousand was good too okay got it got it but it was. It was it was meant for like More like professional. Enterprise kind of stunning but it just sort of ended up that everybody used it because emmy was so buggy emmy was like the was like the new coke or the clear. Pepsi of Microsoft. Sav xactly exactly while the those are all twenty years old at this point. Oh Man people people listen to this or probably thinking what what what are you talking about? Get to the point. Ben Was said he was over the moon about something. What was tell us Ben. Why are you over the moon again? Oh man so glad you asked. Yeah this is a story that takes us to Don Quixote Don. Quixote is many of us will remember is the story of an eccentric man who believes that he is a night. This is a fictional story. But it has a lot in common with the true story of Emperor Norton of the United States which I believe we did an earlier episode on. Anyway Don Quixote the upon him as a star of the show in this novel goes on a ton of misadventures because he is head over heels in love with Dulcinea in the real world. Dulcinea is a peasant. And Don Quixote is not exactly a real world night this was written by a guy named Miguel days avantis and it's still a hugely popular book today. And today you can see the whole story published as like one thing but when it first came out in sixteen o five it was it was like the first half of the story and then the second half was published in Sixteen fifteen. An hour story takes place between those two volumes. And and this one's doozy. This is so cool. That's true and that's pretty big gap but it really speaks to. How much of a blockbuster this thing was. it's considered one of the first true great novels. You know not the first. I believe there was a Japanese One that was considering the very first example of a novel. We have to remember that you know. Movable type was a relatively new development in the Western World Yohannes Gutenberg took Some methods that were pioneered by the Chinese To create the printing press when he combined them with paper And you know. Obviously the Bible was the most popular early use of the printing press And a different kind of political tracts and treatises and stuff like that but the novel like a full length. Novel was a relatively new thing Don Quixote really benefited from this ability to mass produce printed works. Yeah and this made it less expensive to become literate to be able to read so now more people reading there's a bigger market for printed books and this the cycle luckily still It's still in play today. Don Quixote as a as a story as publication benefits from this and. It's funny because it's a little bit of a Meta narrative will explain what we mean by that in in a little while. But let's talk about. How much of a blockbuster this was. So as I printed in sixteen o five just ten years later there are more than thirteen thousand copies getting some of this information from an excellent article in Smithsonian Don Quixote course originally written in Spanish but it becomes popular as a foreign publication in other parts of the world in Brussels and Hamburg There's an English Translation Shakespeare. Yes that Shakespeare. Old Willy Shakes himself reads it and he likes it so much that he apparently writes a play based on one of the stories in the novel which is a neat fact that I did not know. Yeah and I think it was lost to right. He supposedly co wrote it with someone which is interesting because that was not really a thing He was you know there was some talk that Christopher Marlowe has potentially. Actually Shakespeare actually wrote some of Shakespeare's plays that are but you know. Think of Shakespeare is being someone who like buddies up with the CO author. He's kind of a one man band there but yeah he wrote a play called Cardino Which was based on one of those Kind of Meta Tales within Don Quixote Just to set it up really quickly. Ben. This is obviously a very important book for you and your life. I personally have not read the whole thing. I read the first several chapters as an assignment like in school. The one where he's talking about fighting the windmills and all of that. I think most people are familiar with but I do not know the other tales but There's a frame story where like historian is sort of talking about finding the lost You know texts that reference this this story within the story Where does it go from there? Bam This is interesting at at the very end of that. For what would be the first volume of Don Quixote in sixteen o five? There's this setup like you mentioned very clever setup where a scholar has colon own uncovered. These documents revealing the continued adventures of Don Quixote and the scholar. Says you know eventually I would love to publish them. Savant his final words in this book they translate to something like You know finish them or quote perhaps someone else will sing with a better plectrums. Plectrums is you know. It's a pick like you would use a pick on a guitar and so some people have kind of interpreted that message as an invitation from savant as himself to other authors to continue the story. Which is you know. It's a thing that could happen but that that goes to one of the big questions. Was He asking really asking some other author to pick up the pen and take us further into the life of Don Quixote. Or was he just you know kind of style and on at the end with a little mic? Drop either way. Somebody did take him up on what they saw as an invitation. It's true and and just just to backtrack ever so slightly just to give you a sense of what a massive hit. This was in the early days of a broad Printing Distribution In the first edition which I was trying to find like I just I saw this in the research and was thinking like I wonder if you can get a sixteen o five first edition of Dongyang. I'm sure it's probably one of the most valuable you know Rare books that you could you could own but I couldn't even find a price but I'm sure it's very very Very precious but yeah after that first edition in sixteen o five there were new editions printed across Castille and Aragon with created. This isn't a huge number. But at the time and considering the largely you know there was a manual parts of this printing situation it was movable because it was movable by hand there were thirteen thousand five hundred copies within the first ten years. And then it gained notoriety outside of its native land is in places like Brussels Milan and Hamburg in Germany. And then there was of course an English translation. And that's the one that Shakespeare got a hold of That inspired him to write that loss play. But you're.

Don Quixote Don Quixote Don Ben Was Shakespeare emmy Dulcinea Mike mack Hamburg Dongyang Emperor Norton Christopher Marlowe United States Willy Shakes Castille Miguel days avantis Pepsi
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:20 min | 11 months ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

"And so going back to think twice you were talking about about more about the writing. Yeah and it's something that I didn't know enough about until I was invited onto your program. But what are the things that interest me about? Shakespeare is the fact that you know. He wrote thirty six so plays that we know of and almost none of them may be. The tempest may be midsummer. Night's dream are his original story but for the most part Shakespeare was not interested in creating a new story. He looked around at the stories others had told whether they were Italian. Novellas or English plays or history's any thought I understand what's slightly off for not really fulfilled in this version older version and he did what architects call a gut renovation. He kept the frame and he just cleared out the inside and made it is. Oh so when Dylan writes. Don't think twice. He knows Paul Clayton Song. Who's going to buy you ribbons? When I'm gone? He worked with Klay knew who sadly killed himself in in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. Eight toward together collaborated a little bit and I'm sure that there is kind of cross pollination if you will between Clayton Song. And and don't think twice and dillon with a little techy from what. I've learned about that you know he said I steal the word a or the word so whether we're done you know Ed is a good question. Although he was a little defensive even steal those words but he is reaching into a tradition a tradition that goes further back than Clayton to. What I learned was an African American Song that circulated in Virginia. Who's GonNa Bring you chickens? So what we're talking about. Our traditions and Shakespeare comes out of traditions. Really in very similar ways. To how Dylan does and plagiarism is. A useless category the only useful category. Can you take something old and make it speak to the moment? In a way that makes people feel connected to that song ways. Nobody has ever felt connected to it in dealing did that for me. I think I'm right in saying and correct me. If I'm not the Sean Wilentz I think wrote a book called Bob Dylan and America. And he I believe explored this notion and said you know what it's Alchemy. What he's doing is he's taking base matters and is creating something new out of it that shines and I thought that was really damage. It is in trouble. Lens is A friend and a very smart guy and I think he wrote brilliantly about about Dylan. Christopher ricks did as well They're just a people recognize. That is work rises to the level of seriousness. And it is how chemical it is a transformation but for me. It's really the lack of thoughtfulness beyond the magic of the transformation and the thoughtfulness I suppose has to do with. I see what's not there. That's a hard thing to to grasp and Shakespeare was really good at it. Didn't create the story of Hamlet. He didn't create the story King. Lear those were all plays bouncing around in the stage. You probably acted in a spear holder when he was young. He's onstage they could. God I can write this great Soliloquy at this point or I could tweak it in this way. And maybe it's not occurring Bob Dylan in a cerebral way. But it's occurring to him in a way that lets them know. Yeah I. I know the folk he sang exists but that song is dead on arrival. Something has to be done to reanimated and I suppose it's as much Raising the data's alchemy. And where do you think Dylan? Shakespeare intersect particularly? I think oddly even though four hundred years or so separates their birth. They both products of a similar education system. You know it's it's remarkable if you listened to to Dylan's account of education in his Nobel lecture in two thousand Seventeen. He talks a lot of doubt grammar. School you know. He learned things in Grammar School. The devices techniques secret mysteries whatever. He's talking about. He talks about gullivers travel. Dickins Don Quixote all these stories and of course we know he had a great teacher in school. Who taught him the poetry John Donovan? The poetry plays of Shakespeare so shakespeare learn what he learned in Grammar School. I mean this is a Western tradition that span than in now and both of them sat there probably frustrated probably demise racing as they were exposed to this stuff and taking it all in and a decade later or or ten years later figuring out how to turn this into into gold if you will and I mean that both literally and figuratively because you have to make money as an artist or like pulled claim you can end up desperate and suicidal and both of them figured out how to do that. And if you think you know as a thought experiment Dylan or Shakespeare Been Born twenty years earlier or twenty years later whatever genius they had could not have been fully rely so yes. They were both remarkable artists but they had great luck in being born at what they recognize. Both of them were pivotal moments in in their culture in the arts in the possibilities that were now available to young

Bob Dylan Shakespeare Clayton Song Grammar School Christopher Ricks Sean Wilentz John Donovan Don Quixote ED Virginia Dillon Klay Lear America
"don quixote" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"don quixote" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tight in sixteen twenty two everybody including the New World by the way many copies of the first edition of Don Quixote was shipped to the colonies one so the book is a worldwide bestseller maybe the first of its kind and then ten years later ten years later serve on these rights the sequel which kicks up this narrative weirdness to a completely new level in part two part two don Quixote's of them he introduces a new character named Sampson Carrasco she actually visits gnocchi Hyundai inside sure to tell them that part one exists it's a best seller and so in the very early chapters apart to don't see how this would be like walking up the huckleberry Finn said oh by the way you living here in Hannibal Missouri you're now famous boy that's exactly what happened everybody he meets knows who he is because they've read part one and now it gets even stranger because in real life during that ten years it took serve on this to write his second book a person who goes by the pseudonym of Alonso Fernandes Davey in Asia published his own second part of don't be healthy before Cervantes could get his own second part out ways to this is this is an unofficial part two yeah today would recognize it as as as sort of fan fiction or or somebody attempting to steal George Lucas's idea and come up with their own Star Wars installment so there's this I'm authorized part two floating around Miguel Cervantes is very annoyed by and I'm assuming so in his official sequel to Don Quixote there is the scene where don't be healthy is that in in any over here's a character talking about his relationship with with this suppose a donkey hoping wait so this guy this guy that's Simonelli who sat in on the interview with me this guy existed in the fake Quixote number two is a character in that and is now appearing in the real number to surround days serenity steals him if you're still my character all still yours back right the now you got the real Don Quixote he's bumping into a character stolen from a fake book of them killed so so why don't you help and then decides to confront this person he marches right up to the guy and he says I am Don Quixote of La Mancha the same one who is on the lips of fame and not that unfortunate man who is wanted to usurp my name and bring honor to himself with my thoughts and so it and it's been the climax of that scene which is just wonderful is he he forces this other character who he's stolen from the another a sequel who's around this is stolen to admit that the don't be healthy he knows from the unauthorized sequel is not the real one and that the one he's currently talking to is the real one I am pro your grace for the sake of what you owe to your being a gentleman to please make a statement to the magistrate of this village and as a matter of fact if the forces him to sign an affidavit to that fact three busts him he busted in the novel in the now.

Don Quixote
"don quixote" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"don quixote" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Going on <music> salman rushdie shot this published by jonathan cape and we'll be back after a short break with a look at the wide expanses of the road trip novel <music> welcome back to the guardian books podcast earlier. We we heard salmon rushdie telling us about the road trip novels that inspired his book key shops. We thought we'd take a look at how novelists are offering fresh takes on the road trip novel in fact he shall isn't the only road trip novel on the book illness. Is that sean nice say. I'm larry lewis lost. Children archive is another n._f._l. As a family as they journey from new york down to the u._s. mexico okay border and there seems to be this particularly american thread of the road trip novel. I don't know why that is. We're talking before talking about this. Foundational shnell myths of of countries is big countries like america australia. How does seem to be lots of richard novels. Even if you look at the very first history of america america it's all about driving your wagons west coast culture founded on the road trip this myth that there's kind of extra space and you can leave your troubles behind hainan. Go and find something in the emptiness out there. Even though of course it wasn't really empty also the idea of the individual finding themselves through travel which is partly about staking out the territory geographical territory which is also staking out the territory of yourself as a grownup person in a new world yeah if you're doing like a beatnik coming of age stuff we're going to talk about roy says on the road by jack kerouac but let's not talk about on the road because it's rubbish brave statement the jazz yeah <hes> even that our debate anyway i. I was thinking that actually there's a funny threaded. Richard novels 'cause i. I was thinking about the great ones that i've loved and then thought actually really depressing than always sort of these great <hes> records of freedom and getting away from things to say things like as i lay dying by faulkner where they transporting co-ops across mississippi that also got me thinking about elliott rabuka's around the remainder which was up for the man booker international prize last year. I'm translated by sophie. He's <hes> it was about three chilean students driving a hearse in search of a loss corpse going back to an american book books like travels chali by john steinbeck which i love and some people don't love because it steinbeck writing nonfiction and you get to delve. You've full glaring steinbeck being grumpy and kind of hating his own country. <hes> is really good travel book that he basically packs up his poodle doodo charlie and they go driving across america and this is amazing journey was ten thousand miles that they drove in this camp event that he had built for him and it's supposed pulitzer so he's used just being recognized in these kind of annoyed about being famous <hes> an drives out of long island goes across the pacific northwest and then to california and texas and then through through the deep south backup to new york. That's one of the points about why it's so american isn't it. Is that such a massive country. How else can you come to any conclusions about what it is other the following the roads and seeing different parts of it yeah well. That's kind of why he did it. In a way was too i mean partly his son has said that he did it because he knew he was dying but it was also clearly this urge to get a better sense of the country that he'd been writing about so long and perhaps he'd lost touch with the pit because of his fame and these traveling around the world right and staff say this silly trip was kind of last hurrah for him but does nonfiction serves kind of cheating in a way isn't it and often subject to the road trip. Novel is often not so much the chip itself as the kind of jimmy. The couches are going on as they go along the rose. Is john steinbeck writing more about miracle or more by himself. I say more about america because he doesn't. He doesn't really appear appear very self reflective and he's a massive grumpy. Basically it doesn't get along with anyone on the trip except for charlie. Who's this lovely placid presence next to him but i think it's it's a lovely portrait of country. If we go into nonfiction then you could talk about safe bells rings a satin you know the whole psychic geographic eh claire full stop bill bryson impulse roo yeah lots of all blacks traveling basically by more modern books clear the things eh the novels indeed actually things that are made up that are that are part of vision well. I really enjoyed the wings versus the world which is the first novel by j chang. Who's am the chinese american and it was sort of around the time of the collapse of real estate and this busted millionaire collecting his kids who because he can no longer afford that boarding school fees so driving off across america. She wears very likely. It's like the opposite to valeria louis l. e. in valeria is very solemn and attentive intimate very solemn when j d sort of it's this riotous journey across america suit enough rushdie issue ray and they'll say like an american also but but not set in america jonathan safran follow and everything is illuminated which follows in the modern parts of the novel <hes> trip across ukraine again. That's quite zany alien way because of the tone of the narrator being this young ukrainian translate whose english isn't quite up to scratch it tons of countries. I mean we were having arguments. Uh-huh 'bout how much the size of the country counts and i made the heretical claiming that ukraine was no bigger than the u._k. And actually you proved to me on your phone just for the. I would think that it's something that is particularly valuable for big countries and australia and there's some very good australian road numbers on you. Oh you may both talking about pita carries a long way from home. Which was his most recent novel. We by kind of feel was terribly underrated. I am in really good novel and that's based on the reduction reliability trials in the nineteen fifties where it was a car manufacturers who started this road race around austrailia but then it becomes a meditation on what what is australian. What are australians but you also have this. This vision of the outback littered with carcasses says she's saying there are that that's such an extraordinary image which i will carry forward with me. Just as i carried forward peter carey's earlier image of the cathedral being wrote down the river in oscar and listen to this brilliant image making ability yeah i another example i recently read but is quite famous book in australia australia because it's now syllabus text is one of the air by tara june winch. Who's a young indigenous author again that that follows an indigenous dizziness tain who sets off to find a father and get a better sense of cultural heritage. That's also an element in the peak. Areas was this threat of indigenous history and also today's divide between rural communities and metropolitan communities and is like a shorthand the road trip novel for looking at those divides as ye sort of past three three towns into cities back into townsend and in the carry it ends with a with this cave painted with aboriginal roadmaps and what he's suggesting it's actually there are two totally different ways of mapping a country. You know he's just going on this journey. You could say it is a sort of parallel or ghost or shadow journey of journeys taken by people before but seeing a completely different landscape and that's that in the end this is i think is an elaboration on the road trip. It's something i've never read and i do think it belongs to. The genre extends the genre costa homer there. Any brits homeless crowded island well. It's so small and i do think that it's a quite <hes> sort of dwarfish england. I mean the obvious one that comes to mind is well. The most obvious one is new games good omens sean huge game and the actually the first example that came to me maybe because of the recent tv adaptation but you've got a hellish bentley that's driven around by an angel and a demon and they're trying to stop the apocalypse from happening so they get into this bentley and head too low a tad filled in oxfordshire to try and find the antichrist who was a young oh boy living in this oxfordshire village. It's just sort of all these elements of it was how as a young stallion teenager with no real awareness of english this geography learned about the twenty five or so and the four horsemen of the apocalypse a riding motorbikes. There's a lot of movement in this novel so i think is a good example is a new cool latter wrote likewise alex smith springhill where they get into an old coffee and head up for the battlefield of kloten and that becomes becomes sort of reflection on the relationship between england and scotland these in these very troubled times but i was struck by how often it sort of heads off into the supernatural a chinese palatis michelle favors under the skin in which an alien serial killer curb crawler does horrible things to male muscled hitchhikers cannot be me to perform dreamed of there's also supernatural all magical fiction aww superheroes if you want to have it in late hubbard's talented ripken sir novel where she sets off through some of florida's less glamorous locations on kind of family history with johny ripken's and his thirteen year old niece go dig up treasures try pale for that and another great regional but on on quite a small campus is all within florida seeing unburied sing has which has a fantastic element to it because it's this sort of threat of ghosts that pop up and parts of it but that's just in the state of mississippi and follows a family <music> as they leave the home to go pick up the father the patriarch of the family unit as he's released from prison and they clicked him. I quite like the idea we're talking about. Whether the road as well too obvious example copy we decided that the shopping trolley county shopping trolley charleena's father and son of fishing across america off to the puck is i think that counts so now with the theory that there is a little subpeona which is post apocalyptic take road. Nobody really roads any more of your calls with the road and with emily and john mandell station eleven richard. You're a fan of yes yes. She came in to talk to us a little while but when it was published and it's but it's actually strictly speaking it's post post apocalyptic novel. The kasese is about twenty years after the disaster. When things are kind of beginning to take off and actually she follows a troupe of actors and musicians who are trying to get beyond the day-to-day grinded living by touring shakespeare around the country and this discussion has has been slightly outrageous in that we've been borrowed and twisted the road journey to a to a pepsi's but hey that's what literary chat is all about and that's all for this week's podcast next week. We'll take a look at the memoir in the company of the writers lure coming and rick's him as always do contact us on twitter at guardian books or leave a comment on the podcast page.

america australia salman rushdie john steinbeck new york richard mississippi larry lewis ukraine jonathan cape jack kerouac long island sophie roy charlie twitter john mandell station jimmy jonathan safran oxfordshire
"don quixote" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

16:12 min | 1 year ago

"don quixote" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Who is a writer bad spy thriller saying they're all novels about a dinner party isn't it. You've got mrs dalloway. You've got ulysses but this is not a time for peduto dinner parties this time from he says this is is a time for mysteries. This is a time of blood yeah well. There's a bit of me that always wanted to be a second rate spiral of list and i think i've finally made it so you think this is the spine off of it well. There's a bit of it is because because he has been right expired levels and he you know one of the subplots he begins to fear that he's it kind of become the object of attention for people in the intelligence world that he's been writing about so this is in the outer carapace which is the novelist who imagines kesha shaw has his own life and he has a son as well. Who's a terrorist who's gone disappeared into it. A cell intelligent counter-terrorist kind of anonymous figure. It's on cyber terrorists. Who gets turned begins to work for. It depends what you call. The good guys really which which side are the good guys. It's difficult to to be sure about that but yeah i mean so you've got this story about the spy novelist trying to write a very different kind of book and through this different kind of book to face up to the issues of his own life like his strained <music> in relationship with his son like his his broken relationship with his sister and to write imaginatively versions of those stories working <music> out if you like the problems of his own life through his fiction and so that's how it is that the two stories mirror each other's yes they're at. I think those family relationships are really the heart of the book because i wanted to write about different kinds of love. You know that's to say romantic. Love in the novel is represented by key shots shots absurd infatuation obsession with ms salma are person whose name difference remind by one letter but these other loves the loves inside families fathers and sons brothers and sisters you know sometimes strained by distance because of the be as you've mentioned the diaspora it's pro because the way in which families could be spread across the world and and grow away from each other and sometimes strained by actual real or imagined wrongs done one to the other at how how those issues can be resolved if you have this is one of the ways in which the two storylines come together so there is a point at which he realizes that he has invented a scenario turkey shot which actually existed in his own life but he didn't know it existed but he did sort of nowhere somehow it was part tiv- his family intelligence in the breakdown of that family. I think it's one of the things that happened to riches that you sometimes invent things before they have that they happen and i. I don't know how that happens but it does happen so i wanted that to happen to him that he he invents a moment which he then realizes is the truth of his own life except he didn't know that ties in the idea of public mythologies of all these masses a popular culture in this book but it's also about the mythologies ation that happens within individual families so it's an emotional thing and the entertainment thing and a distraction but it's also an expression of injury. Yeah i mean there's there's there's a lot of the book which deals with injuries that people do to each other and whether those things off forgivable not the question of forgiveness i think is quite at the heart of the book and i i remember remember that actually in the satanic verses this one page in which one of the characters tells another character story but this man and this woman who are very close friends that they've never had a romantic relationship at the close friends and the man gives the woman as a token of their friendship a really hideous cheap glass vase which has no value of its own at all but it represents their closeness and then they quarrel and she picks up the glass asphalt smashes it and they never talk again and then at a later point she's on her deathbed and she sends a messenger to see him and and who says that the only person in the world she wants to see him and he says she should thought about that before she smashed the vase and the question is which side of that story on i mean many people would say that he's unreasonable and forgiveness is so important at such a moment and some people i would say yeah but there are things you can't give so in this novel. Most people are forgivable but there is one person who isn't and that is the benefactor and cousin of kiss show to his a corrupt doctor. Basically he's peddling drugs dot to spoil dr smile that is touching on the whole problem of addiction and we did a session that in oxford the other night on the day that the johnson and johnson story broke again. It's another sort of weird thing fiction presser. I mean i've been following this whole opioid thing for some years really and yes it's all all sub boiling up with the with the johnson and johnson <hes> case and with the oxycontin proposal to settle their cases against them for multiple billions of dollars actually interestingly if you leave the big cities in america. If you go out into this out of nowhere land you know the the red states the problems much worse. They're it's much worse. Their whole communities in which opioid addiction is rife so given that the novel journeys through those communities you know i had to take take this arm and then there are some true stories from from which it emerges. There's one particular case of as it happens an indian pharmaceutical entrepreneur governo. Who's i mean he's in jail now so we can call him. A crook thumb news company developed a very powerful appeared spray which was as an under the tongue spray of the most powerful the opioid dispensing hill made ventanilla's the opioid that killed prince and of course under the tong. It's even more powerful as gets into your system faster and this was made specifically for the use of terminal cancer patients and who is suffering from what the medical community called breakthrough pain which means unbearable pain and it's very very useful for that it works very well and has a real value but unfortunately it's crook crook dr smile and he decides he needs more money than that so he starts bribing doctors to prescribe his product what's called off label which which means for things that it's not the label doesn't say it's four and researching it. The thing that struck me was not that there are crooked entrepreneurs. You know i mean that's like saying the sun rises in the morning but how easy it was for people like dr smile to corrupt the medical profession the folks sums of money which are not life changing doctors all over the country have and continue to collaborate in this business of prescribing opioids that occasions to to people who don't need them and creating this crisis so i wanted to get into that as well as as big pharma you i mentioned earlier on this thing of racism which culminates in half the the racist turning into mastodons. How bad is america turning. You're turning people into dinosaurs bastards. Master massacre be fair elephants tusks. It's a fairly obvious reference institute the great absurdist play by eugene unesco in which people turn into rhinoceroses and i remember when i was a student at cambridge i acted in rhinoceros and i was one of the people who to write authorises at nineteen. I didn't understand the plate. I had to say to the director. I said you know what's this about about and he rather patiently explained to me that it's better for us all about that. It has to do with fascism. It has to do with nazism when unesco was writing a has to do with the with the terrifying realization that sometimes happens that your your neighbors that people you know a suddenly turning into something that you don't know that you don't understand at that is even frightening to you and i feel that we are in that moment. We're in that moment where this very divided society where people that you've lived alongside you know your children play together and suddenly because of the divisions that arise you can't speak to each other anymore. It's as if you're different species and so. I thought that unesco might need to rewrite. I and i didn't want to use rhinoceroses because he usable ready so i thought bastards you've come to the u._k. You've lived in the u._s. For twenty years eve arrived in the middle of a constitutional crisis in what is the difference between the two places well. I don't know not to wish to offend anybody but this is a much smaller country and these other problems of a small country detroit. Pretend it syllabi one country that hasn't ever got used to the fact that it's no longer a great imperial power but just a little offshore island and feels like little offshore islet trying to be king and it just ain't at the at least in america it is a huge and powerful country therefore what happens there is is more frightening because it affects the whole world agency or they'll have this kind of a nice change to get away from trump for a week and to have different problems to think about sorry about that and going back now from the public to the personal. It's a story that it's hard about about a man in his son and various different interests. Your father with sons have personal. Is this and you play those games like as you said samo. It's salman with correct well. There's there's a lot of fun and games of the book but also i think yeah i mean i've been i've been the parent of male children for forty years now so so i have some knowledge of the breed and i also was an only son in a family had three sisters but i was as i was the only male child i was the eldest so you know in india of course that gives you a particular relationship with your father as you're the eldest and only child and my relationship with my father was not at all good but it was very strained as a result when i had children. I thought it became very important for me not to make his mistakes if you like i remember saying i self if you're gonna make mistakes make different mistakes not make those ones so i mean i have this r- double memory out of which the portray the book come of one one quite bad father son relationship at a couple of better ones an i tried to use the knowledge of both and yeah there are two father son relationships one in each of the two storylines <hes>. They don't go to save way. That's one of the things i if they both ended up exactly the same way it would feel to didactic a you want them to have their own individual human life and so they they mirror each other they echo each other but they they are different stories the thing about key shotton and sanchez that keyshawn has imagined sentient being which in a way we do all sorts of imagine we think we imagine children into being but then sanchia becomes real and you describe this <unk> at various points about him going from black and white into color and then at at a key moment he pixellated but by that stage also invested in the color of him that it's it's like little of tragedy although you know that this is a hologram pip pixellated anti-israel you have to care about it i mean i.

america johnson dr smile rhinoceroses mrs dalloway kesha shaw writer breakthrough pain india ms salma eugene unesco salman detroit unesco ventanilla cambridge director sanchez keyshawn twenty years
"don quixote" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"I mean that donkey Hodie was one of his lifelong obsessions spent decades trying to make a film about Don Quixote, and I went back and reread, Cody when we were making this film, and oh my God, this Larry's everywhere said there's something about look reading guilty as young man. And then reading is an old man that. You know, the same way that looking at Orson when you're young. And when you're old, it's different. It's not as romantic, but it's but it's still touching. Do. You think that it? They key Hodie became a self fulfilling prophecy for him. I mean, it's I. You know, the question is did he want to start making Cody because because he felt he identified with the character. Or did he become the character because he was making it? I mean, I think I think ultimately the the questions of Quixote were things the resonated with Orson threat is entire life. Which is Cody like wells saw the world in a way that nobody else did. And everybody thought he was insane because of it. But as Cody would argue, maybe he was the scientist of the mall, and I think wells felt that way he identified with that that he saw the world in a different way than everybody else. And everybody thought he was crazy. And maybe who has but maybe he was the same as person out there. Let's talk a little bit about your big year. You've had as we said a hit film already this year when she'd be my neighbor about mister Rogers, you're the executive producer of ugly delicious, which is the incredible day. David Chang series on net flicks. And now you have this. I mean, have you ever had a year like this in your career? No, I'm have had busy years. I had a year where best of enemies came out music of strangers came out and my Keith Richards documentary under the influence on Netflix all came on twenty fifteen that was crazy this year's crazier. And you know, I mean, I didn't in a perfect world. Not all these things would cluster like they do. And it was really like I said the Orson Welles film was supposed to happen a couple of years ago. Ideally, and it was in the middle of making once be my neighbor, I got the col- saying guess what? But it just coming and says like, okay. Well, I guess this is going to happen. So soon as we picture locked much be my neighbour be immediately started at editing the lemming when I'm dead. And yeah. It's intense. But it's great. I mean, it's an amazing time to be making documentaries. I've been doing it. This year's my twenty fifth anniversary of making documentaries and twenty five years ago. There was absolutely nothing. Cool about it. And there were it was impossible to get funding. There were very few places to even see documentaries and to be at the place. We're at right now is amazing. I mean every could documentary filmmaker I know is there. Everybody's busy doing great things..

Orson Welles scientist wells Don Quixote donkey Hodie mister Rogers David Chang Keith Richards Larry Netflix col executive producer twenty five years twenty fifth
A new wind turbine inspired by a palm tree, big as the Empire State Building

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:57 min | 2 years ago

A new wind turbine inspired by a palm tree, big as the Empire State Building

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. When it comes to mobility, more and more businesses are turning to planet. M Michigan is home to the largest concentration of auto related engineers in the nation as well as various all road an all weather, autonomous testing centers to learn more head to planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where a big ideas. Mobility are born Ambra g. suite by Google cloud suite of cloud based productivity tools that includes g mail, docs, slides, sheets, and drive. You can make real time updates the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. And since all the tools are cloud based, your whole team can access the same document and work on the same page at the same time, make it with g. suite by Google cloud learn more at g. suite dot com. If you wanna make the next generation of wind power, you've gotta think big gargantuan from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying. The digital economy I'm jed Kim in for Molly would. The energy information administration says the US got about eleven percent of its energy from renewable sources. Last year, climate scientists say that's going to have to go up a lot to ward off the worst effects of climate change. The department of energy says the US is one of the fastest growing markets for wind power in the world. Eric law at the university of Virginia is an engineer who's part of a team building the next generation of offshore wind turbines if you've seen the ones towering on land. Well, those produced five megawatts of power. We want to have turbans as large as fifty megawatts, and the size of that would be like the Empire State building, even larger. So you talking about being able to power a small city with with one of these wind farms. And I think that's where we're going. That's what the future is, but plopping a winter turbine, the size of the Empire State building into the ocean is tricky. It's got to be able to withstand hurricane force winds and be lightweight to keep operations efficient and long lasting loss. And his team are tackling the challenge with a little inspiration from a tree that has some experience with standing the whiplash have hurricane force winds, the palm tree. The palm tree can adapt its trunk at the FRANZ as the wind blows so that without having to have a lot of material structure, they can adapt to wins. And therefore we see palm trees, you know, near hurricane coastal regions. Whereas a large oak tree which is massive and stiff and strong can be uprooted. Unlike turbans, we see today these blades face away from the wind, like a pinwheel you blow from behind the blades are angled so that as they spin around there more in concert with the wind, not fighting it as much that reduces the strain on the blaze, which means they can be built from lighter material. That means the blades can be much. Bigger to catch more energy and with aerospace technology, whether it's spacecraft aircraft or wind turbines, mass translates to money. So you really want to reduce your mass in order to reduce the cost of your project. And therefore, if we want to have a low cost of energy, we really need to reduce the overall mass where structure the new offshore models will cost more to install then land-based turbans, but they also produce more energy. Lots says keeping costs in check will be key for this new tech to compete against natural gas. We have to think about the economics, make sure that whatever we develop has very low cost of energy doesn't require any significant subsidies that can really stand on its own, not just from an environmental point of view, but from an economic point of view, because that's what's going to drive the growth more than anything else in the US and worldwide. The team is building a smaller test model in Colorado. Eric Louth says it could take a decade to see. See a full one in action. By the way he has a pet peeve, don't call them windmills their turbans. If Don Quixote went after one of these, he first of all need a vote. And Secondly, it'd be a much shorter book. I'm jed, Kim, and that's marketplace. Tech Molly would is back tomorrow. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. Our world is becoming more hands free. Thanks to planet m that will also include the future of transportation. Michigan has the most comprehensive autonomous real world testing under every road and weather condition and leads the nation and patents relating to navigation and smart mobility to learn more visit planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where big ideas. Mobility are born.

Michigan United States Michigan Economic Development Jed Kim Google Empire State Don Quixote Eric Louth Engineer Colorado Franz University Of Virginia Molly
A new wind turbine inspired by a palm tree, big as the Empire State Building

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:57 min | 2 years ago

A new wind turbine inspired by a palm tree, big as the Empire State Building

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. When it comes to mobility, more and more businesses are turning to planet. M Michigan is home to the largest concentration of auto related engineers in the nation as well as various all road an all weather, autonomous testing centers to learn more head to planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where a big ideas. Mobility are born Ambra g. suite by Google cloud suite of cloud based productivity tools that includes g mail, docs, slides, sheets, and drive. You can make real time updates the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. And since all the tools are cloud based, your whole team can access the same document and work on the same page at the same time, make it with g. suite by Google cloud learn more at g. suite dot com. If you wanna make the next generation of wind power, you've gotta think big gargantuan from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying. The digital economy I'm jed Kim in for Molly would. The energy information administration says the US got about eleven percent of its energy from renewable sources. Last year, climate scientists say that's going to have to go up a lot to ward off the worst effects of climate change. The department of energy says the US is one of the fastest growing markets for wind power in the world. Eric law at the university of Virginia is an engineer who's part of a team building the next generation of offshore wind turbines if you've seen the ones towering on land. Well, those produced five megawatts of power. We want to have turbans as large as fifty megawatts, and the size of that would be like the Empire State building, even larger. So you talking about being able to power a small city with with one of these wind farms. And I think that's where we're going. That's what the future is, but plopping a winter turbine, the size of the Empire State building into the ocean is tricky. It's got to be able to withstand hurricane force winds and be lightweight to keep operations efficient and long lasting loss. And his team are tackling the challenge with a little inspiration from a tree that has some experience with standing the whiplash have hurricane force winds, the palm tree. The palm tree can adapt its trunk at the FRANZ as the wind blows so that without having to have a lot of material structure, they can adapt to wins. And therefore we see palm trees, you know, near hurricane coastal regions. Whereas a large oak tree which is massive and stiff and strong can be uprooted. Unlike turbans, we see today these blades face away from the wind, like a pinwheel you blow from behind the blades are angled so that as they spin around there more in concert with the wind, not fighting it as much that reduces the strain on the blaze, which means they can be built from lighter material. That means the blades can be much. Bigger to catch more energy and with aerospace technology, whether it's spacecraft aircraft or wind turbines, mass translates to money. So you really want to reduce your mass in order to reduce the cost of your project. And therefore, if we want to have a low cost of energy, we really need to reduce the overall mass where structure the new offshore models will cost more to install then land-based turbans, but they also produce more energy. Lots says keeping costs in check will be key for this new tech to compete against natural gas. We have to think about the economics, make sure that whatever we develop has very low cost of energy doesn't require any significant subsidies that can really stand on its own, not just from an environmental point of view, but from an economic point of view, because that's what's going to drive the growth more than anything else in the US and worldwide. The team is building a smaller test model in Colorado. Eric Louth says it could take a decade to see. See a full one in action. By the way he has a pet peeve, don't call them windmills their turbans. If Don Quixote went after one of these, he first of all need a vote. And Secondly, it'd be a much shorter book. I'm jed, Kim, and that's marketplace. Tech Molly would is back tomorrow. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. Our world is becoming more hands free. Thanks to planet m that will also include the future of transportation. Michigan has the most comprehensive autonomous real world testing under every road and weather condition and leads the nation and patents relating to navigation and smart mobility to learn more visit planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where big ideas. Mobility are born.

Michigan United States Michigan Economic Development Jed Kim Google Empire State Don Quixote Eric Louth Engineer Colorado Franz University Of Virginia Molly
"don quixote" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Asleep for two weeks. So weak later, Don Quixote has a terrible injury. He has a bunch of teeth, broken tack, these goatherds or something and Sancho for once thought. I'm going to stay out of the fray and watched Don cow to take a beating from a distance. Normally, entre get in the middle and get worse this time he watched. Okay, I've learned something. So he goes to ten down Quixote, comes down the hill dunk days. These molars broken, Don Quixote. Remember all my potion drinks. The potion sauna comes down the hill and. Then song chose like, are you all right master and donkey goes, I think I've lost some grinders. Can you take a look and so right it. So he opens up his mouth sounds looks in and right at that moment, the potion his Don Quixote differently this time, not a coma and he vomits right into Sancho open mouth is own vomit which smelled of that potion which does sound show it. Remember that goes diarrhea in vomiting. He vomited right into Sancho mouth and then vomited right back into don't go as mouth. So this is great literature. What is everyone going about the fucking windmills. This this bombing diarrhea section is you know up there with the opening of Anna Karenin know something. Well, that is five-time. We're going to have to end gonna end without first of all, say, go and buy the extra mile on every and check everything else John written because it's own apart from the the threat other, they're all extremely funny and revealing regret regret writing any of those things. In hindsight, it would like the world's changed so much. You kind of wish you hadn't written some of it down. Well, I was looking through my old essay collections thinking, maybe I'd put together a best of and I thought, oh God, why did I write that? I won't include that in the best forgotten. Most of everything I've written like, I don't know if you're that way, but it's, I think we all changed so much, you know. So it's not the person who wrote the extra man is not really around anymore. I mean, sort of in this form anyway, I won't get into that. We're almost always going. Let's quite deep with this. I've met. You could do your sound. Yeah. We all have regrets and we all change. I actually go deep. How do champ we hopefully change for the better. We always try to learn. We tried to become more loving, more compassionate, try to feel empathy in retrospect for your brief crisis last night. Seems very real. You're upset about something you might think you've probably anxious about performing again. Yeah, yeah. Okay, and have done very well. Thank you. Go to speak in this one. It's been right. Do the sound, the sound John, just take a sip of water. If you could feel for. For the extra man impress. Okay. So the questions, spin publishing, eat herring. It's good for you, but you can't change the flavor even if you regard. All right. So this is a sound that my friends and I would make on the playground when being attacked by more normal children and. It's known as the Harry call because it was all about going hairy. And the original sound was made by this friend of mine, the child of a chiropractor and we were. Learning how to read. He was very chubby and he was a piano prodigy. And for some reason out of the blue, he we were learning how to read through headphones. He took the headphones off like that. This little per came out of him, struck me in the third. I anyway, the sound got louder and louder. We would communicate with that sound as a basis like emotions like he. Like that is how we would talk and we call this going hairy and we were hairy eighters and the very loud sound. The clarion call when we were being attacked by more normal, children was known as the hairy call. So I'll do a Harry call now I'll do three of them to send everyone off into the night or until the show. Yeah, is they're gonna have this show. So here are three hairy calls do the best I can..

Don Quixote Don cow Sancho mouth Sancho Harry John diarrhea Anna Karenin coma two weeks
New Details on Chris Pratt's Budding Relationship with Katherine Schwarzenegger

Lori and Julia

01:30 min | 2 years ago

New Details on Chris Pratt's Budding Relationship with Katherine Schwarzenegger

"He played the Don Quixote, stripper? On Jane the virgin so Yup. Yup and they worked out together at the same gem and he was too afraid aspects she. Was a, big, star right and so. Finally got up enough guts asked her out and they've been crazy for, percents is kind of a really sweet muscle she's darling yes he fled your dad Kim has commented, about the news of Michelle Williams's marriage earlier this summer saying, the ledger family was terribly happy about. The nuptials, Kim added that she Michelle. Is very private and I don't really like to make any comments about her but, we are very happy for her of course Michelle Williams, was with heath Ledger for some time and they have. A daughter, together Matilda so the family Guy Fieri jumped into action yesterday to help evacuees and first responders. Of the car fire in California ferry. Teamed up with Red Cross and operation barbecue relief defeat over fourteen hundred people the car fire very serious has burned through. Ninety five, thousand. Acres of land and has killed six people including two firefighters, so guy fear. We jumped in a. Van decided to help out and finally new couple alerted that is the question many people are. Asking about Robert Pattinson and models Sookie. Waterhouse who. Was previously with Bradley Cooper. They. Responded getting cozy together in London this weekend they went, to see mama Mia here we. Go again and then went and hung out had drinks at the SoHo house you, think this is something real or they're. Just hanging out Might be getting to one.

Don Quixote Michelle Williams Michelle Jane Guy Fieri KIM Heath Ledger Mama Mia Robert Pattinson California Ferry Red Cross Bradley Cooper Soho Matilda Waterhouse London VAN Sookie
"don quixote" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"A lot of ups and downs but you know it's it's extreme highs but it's how you handle the lows you know martin luther king said the character man is not judge you know by by success by how he did at my man you know what i'm saying so yeah you know so i wanna dress the elephant in the room we're here today no i don't know what you're talking about i don't know something about but i know what you're saying i call it the elephant but y'all call it the don quixote let me give you delegated heard about it why trust me i'm paid to remember thing in case you forgot tmz that you were sexually abused by i never said that i was sexually abused see that's the problem with media today and with the way things are spun i never said that i said that we've all been touched in at some point in of inappropriately which is true that happened to have at some point i i don't think i haven't been touched will you you might not know it though you might not know it there is he had a rumor about nine and a half inch dildos envy did so he definitely was listen man gosh i don't live my life based on with nobody saying about nobody would nobody said about me i got a whole lot of jobs okay one of them is not to give a damn with nobody thinks about me saying and people don't know what the hell a lot of celebrities have had to go through an endure to get where they are today to open up doors for other people to come behind him you don't know how many the nat king cole one of the greatest musicians thing is that we know he wasn't even allowed to walk through the front door of venues that he was planning and he had to come through the back door and these are the things that a lot of us forget about so i mean we all have been touched inappropriate for somebody is is is is rubbing his shoulders and you might not be thinking about it because you're entertainer and you're focused on what you have to do getting on stage saying these lines the pressure your agent your lawyer your manager your mom your wife your whatever you're not thinking about it you might.

martin luther king
"Wonder Woman" Director Patty Jenkins Will Make $9 Million for Sequel

/Film Daily

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"Wonder Woman" Director Patty Jenkins Will Make $9 Million for Sequel

"What's definitely give me a lot of right up around the interweb so i'm sure universally is going to have to deal with it in some way chris is there any other interesting salary info the last most interesting thing is this is a good thing patty jenkins got a huge payday she's getting nine million dollars for wonder woman to which is apparently three times more than she made for directing the i wonder woman i remember it took a long time for them to finally announce patty jenkins was coming back from wonder woman to and it seems like that's because she was working hard to get that that big pay day and i'm very happy about that because she deserves it since that's the only good film to this date so she she's earned it and that also makes her the highest paid female director of all time which is pretty impressive or maybe not impressive looking at the figure and probably comparing it to some of the the male directors that have been you know making films throughout hollywood for years but we're making progress right maybe i mean it's it's good she she like you said like that's a big payday but i feel like it could be bigger but we'll say baby steps i guess i mean considering rubber danny generic paid that money for spiderman homecoming and probably was onset for only a few days you know i'm not saying that acting isn't a hard job i been many movie sets in is.

Chris Patty Jenkins Director Hollywood Nine Million Dollars
Jordan Peele reveals title of next film; Lupita Nyong’o, Elisabeth Moss eyed to star

/Film Daily

01:52 min | 3 years ago

Jordan Peele reveals title of next film; Lupita Nyong’o, Elisabeth Moss eyed to star

"Bit of good news and that is that jordan peele has announced his new horror movie us this is his follow up for the f and tastic get out chris you're super excited about this what do we know yes someone say i'm too excited about this but this this news broke last night and i was over the moon about it because i'm a huge fan of get out and i'm a huge fan of just horror genre in general and i love the idea that jordan peele is sticking with that genre so yeah last night jordan peele tweeted out a teaser poster for his film the tagline says a new nightmare from the mind of the academy award winner jordan peele it's called us and lupita yongbo elizabeth moss and winston duke are all in talks to star in the film details are really they're not really any details about what it's about all we know is that it's it's about two couples one white one black that's pretty much all we know about it in the past and peel has said he intends to stick with the harsh honora and that's really it we know it's har movie we know who's probably going to be in it we know jordan peele is making it and we know it will be out in march two thousand nineteen and really that's enough for me to get very excited that's really all i didn't know to get excited about this movie and it seems that the two couples it seems like he's still sticking to you know probably saying something larger than it just a horror movie about the social political climate of today i assume and it's also in the l sorry i remember in the aftermath of out he said he was planning to do a series of social horror movie so it's probably along the same lines and it's cool that we could get to see a black panther reunion with this movie.

Jordan Peele Chris Elizabeth Moss Winston Duke
"don quixote" Discussed on Is It Transphobic Podcast

Is It Transphobic Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Is It Transphobic Podcast

"Yeah like she's just a terrible person and we're supposed to buy the conceit of the movies that was supposed to buy her as this like free spirited like emotionally like resident person but she's like just terrifyingly like racist and like has no sense of social boundaries and like is just cruel and petty and vindictive and like yet they don't really give her any depth anything like like they kind of they because i know that she ends up with i can't remember the characters liba philippe bay like shanzer with philippa at the end right i i kinda quit near the i guess yeah i just saw where it was going i was already putting in the numbers and i was just like yep our ad watch the last five minutes but they were definitely leading to she's going to be in a relationship with fully bay it's it's interesting that they played l pacino was the villain and then did a one eighty on it they i think that was actually pretty well al pacino's not out pacino's cozy you know method acting yeah he did a one eighty because don quixote is a yeah opal in virtuous man which as finish descendant myself thank you don't coat is all right you know the book itself as weird anyway i've cited for the terry gilliam film when it actually comes out if it ever does but yeah supposedly it's on its way yeah so where it was going with that is especially with like felipe bay and his entire family and jill like it's it's interesting that she got together with him just because she was pretty racist but even then like the fully bay character it just felt kind of like adam sandler is like let's get cheech marin oh let's get.

al pacino don quixote felipe bay adam sandler cheech marin five minutes
"don quixote" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Taking his hand to his chest two the lissette the emotion of the song of don quixote tilting at windmills and here a quadruple doubles sal cow costly jerry and now is even a metal it impossible dream at this point our into triple lou reverse hop direction and now crossovers to the right setting up a long back edge into a triple axel very nice this programme in boston two guys dolls one thing in the world championship he's won two world championships wearing easier on you triple flip half new triple south cow excellent guys nose to me hit the top of his abilities a second triple lutz inside edge though my opinion butterfly into the back hamel needs to get that leg fly fly over to the front sit side position what we call a broken leg spin and now reaching behind for the cross but spend to get that level four feature in the combination spin mohawks into the right corner the left corner of the rink in them lunge movement this finishing out the program with the step sequence right in front of the judges fearing to be a little bit sluggish shearer in this step swizzle to the left and a whole to the right the back inside loop the very familiar tune of that impossible dream every olympia dreams of a.

don quixote boston hamel shearer
"don quixote" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Well well you'll hit jonathan do after mention terry gilliam he's been on the show many times but as i understand it the the filming has wrapped on his don quixote movie nineteen years in the in the in the in the in the production preproduction for nineteen years and you all don quixote i am all done it's actually going to happen it was all the delays were all designed to wait until i got old enough to play coating i the most the best time i think ever filming uh in spain and portugal canary islands uh writing horse jousting um poetry uh it was the best absolutely bust he i think he's the other thing is for terry he's very pleased with it and that yeah everyone's happy because it is at i'm the i'm not asking him not running kley easy as good as we want it to be after old is delay because i remember watching in a man from the manch remember the whole thing falling down the first of our in bihac at invest an it after all this way easy as good as we wanted to be no hello salary sick i've i've only seen bits of it um and uh i i sincerely hope it is i mean it was making it was an extraordinary uh time um and you could see what was going on around you an adam driver who now plays at the uh they originally the johnny detter character adam is is quite wonderful and it and he came he was like a gilliam virgina my in by fourth foam with terry need i don't think adam new quite what had hit him but tom he came round in the end the need joint eka on on the team there is in the it goes by that i don't watch brazil and i i just i think that film is one of the greatest films ever made a night you know people can still shot out in our house as anyone seen some larry any hate it either iced i cannot imagine what it must be like to be part of something which is such a gr quintessentially great in a british movie that.

terry gilliam spain bihac adam tom brazil don quixote portugal johnny detter larry nineteen years
"don quixote" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"don quixote" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"So lofty the mayors of don quixote in me as a short fat sweaty sancho panza and we move through barak sharon oxfordshire and along the thames into london so i am a right that up lesoro travelogue and because you're next book kind carries on that machine say you're working at the club you put on the fantastically successful play to gleb festival yet we had a great time at the globen we were very expansionist and very free in all thinking and new new boundaries were limitations really which is the most exhilarating place to be in any autistic organization and is or whatever we did wanted to do we carried through we come up with an idea for the olympic year which was to do every player shakespeare's each in a different language each presented by the front company from abroad the globe to guy festival has recorded on this astonishing group of artists it companies from more of the world came to us brillion combinations of artists and play south sudan formed its own national that company to bring cymbeline to us three balkan countries came together to do the kenneth the six plays a nightmare the collapsing wonderful had never collaborator before it started a process of collaboration between those countries and others in the balkan area which has flourished ever since we had a comedy of errors from afghanistan that was rest in british cancel compound there until the combined with soon by insurgents and they had to leave they finish dressing in there and then they brought it to us credibly moving powerful simple grave version of the play.

don quixote sancho panza shakespeare barak sharon oxfordshire lesoro sudan afghanistan