20 Episode results for "Dolores Huerta"

Ep. 159: Dolores Huerta On Activism, Feminism, And Resilience

Happier in Hollywood

28:51 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 159: Dolores Huerta On Activism, Feminism, And Resilience

"So I think I officially have as many collared bright colored shirts as I need for any amount of zoom meetings night category of quarantine. Shopping is yes. I think it's going to be summer activities for Jack. Hi and welcome to happier in Hollywood. The podcast about how to be Happier Healthier. Saner more creative more successful and more productive in a backbiting superficial chaotic unpredictable. Fundamentally Insane World I'm Sarah Fain TV writer and producer living in L. A. And with me is my high school friend and Writing Partner. Liz. That's me Liz. Craft on this podcast. We talk about being writers in Hollywood how we balance career and friendship and how to survive the war of attrition. That is the life in Los Angeles. In this episode. We're going to talk to well an icon. There's no other way to describe her. Dolores Huerta who's rallying crises Safeway was the source for Barack Obama's two thousand eight. Yes we can. Campaign slogan is going to talk to us about activism civil rights and resilience and we have a Hollywood hack that were stealing from Kate. Bowler host of the PODCAST. Everything happens and she's in the project family now so it feels okay to steal one of her brilliant insights. I and update okay. Sarah you mentioned in the last episode that you did this insane. Rv trip you inviolate packed up a week's worth of food and drove to Missouri to pick up your step mom Anna who amazingly agreed to come to La and give you some adult backup. Yes and if you have to travel and RV is definitely the way to do it right now. But I wanted to take a minute after this trip to just give a shout out to the people who made our trip bearable truckers. Okay so truckers are getting a lot of well deserved credit right now for what they do. If you look around your house probably a lot of the stuff you have got there because of truckers. But I want to talk about how they do it. Okay so I drove thirty five hundred miles by myself in an RV and it was grueling. But I am telling you all of the truckers on the road. They made it so much easier. They are so good at what they do like. I had no idea. I think we kind of as normal car drivers on a normal day or like. Oh this truck is in the way and Blah Blah Blah. Yes okay right now. Most people are not driving so the truckers the roads and they are so professional. I couldn't even believe it the entire trip I was blown away. They drive on the right. They pass on the left. They go the speed that works for them. They're not jerks about. Who's in front and who's behind and they let cars like win. There were cars that were being jerky on the road. They just got over. Let the cars go by. It was Amazing to see what incredible drivers what professional drivers they are so Sarah big shoutout and gold star all the truckers on the road between La Missouri. Yes exactly and so much respect. Oh my God coming up we talk to Dolores Puerta. I is getting in shape. Doesn't have to be about losing a specific amount of weight or a magic number on the scale it's about building healthier habits and feeling better about yourself. Neum is the habit changing solution that helps users learn to develop new relationship with food to personalized courses. Neum has one of the biggest and most accurate food databases available that lets you track meal habits visualize portion sizes and see calorie density at a glance and it's got all sorts of other tools yet for me right now. Neum step counter is really helping boost my mood because we're all having a hard time kind of getting all those steps in but no with new Mike and look at that counter know how many more steps I need to get in a day. And it really. It helps motivate me and then I feel so good once I've gotten there you don't have to change it all in one day. Small steps make big progress. Sign up for your trial today at noon and Om dot com slash. Hollywood what do you have to lose? Visit NEUM DOT COM SLASH. Hollywood to start your trial today. That's an M dot com slash. Hollywood okay Sarah. It is time for from the treadmill desks of which we discuss. What's the most pressing in our work psyches and this week it's resilience and we are so fortunate to be having this discussion with the iconic. Labor leader and civil rights activists. Dolores Huerta to Laura swear to is the founder and president the Dolores Huerta Foundation Co founder of the United Farm workers. Dolores changed history when she teamed up with Cesar Chavez in nineteen sixty two to form the national farmworkers association although the mission seemed impossible deloris lead farm workers in a long and grueling battle to get rights including fair wages and safe working conditions. She's received too many awards to name including the Presidential Medal of freedom. The highest civilian award in the United States bestowed her by President Obama in twenty twelve on top of all. This deloris is the mother of eleven children. Dolores still works tirelessly to provide organizing training and resources to rural low income communities on May thirtieth the Dolores Huerta Foundation will celebrate Dolores ninetieth birthday with a multimedia event. The list of guests include Joe and Jill Biden Jane Fonda Gorriak Ferrera and so many more we will link to the information about the celebration in our show notes for this episode at Happier in Hollywood Dot Com all proceeds benefit communities impacted by covid nineteen delivers. Thank you so much for joining us. Pleasure welcome so. We watched a clip of President Obama. Giving you the Presidential Medal of freedom and he seemed quite intimidated. I believe his words were. Dolores does not play so we're going to try not to waste your time. It's an honor to have you here. It sure is so deloris. At the time you started your work the idea that a woman would be a powerful. Labor leader was unheard of even now many historians believe. You're not giving nearly the credit you deserve and we agree or question is when you look at the world now. How much better do you think it is for women? And what do you think we should be doing differently? That is great question. Laura think about this at nineteen crisis that we're going to and we see that in the countries that have women leaders like Germany. The people that have been so much better protected than we have been in the United States. Where we have a really chauvinist. President that really does not respect women in any way shape or form even continuing to attack the governor of Michigan colleague. That woman instead of the Governor of Michigan is the way he continuously attacked women especially women leaders like Elizabeth Warren Hillary Clinton and we can go on and on then we have to think and we have to reflect and think. Yeah we have come a long way but oh my gosh you know. The Big Glassy. Lean is still very very strong that glass-walled that really prevent women from being able to move up the ladder that they're still there and they have to be shattered so we have so much to do and this all important because we know that we the women are going to be deleted of the world and we have to start really educating I on growth on how leaders not to be afraid. That be intimidated. I love the educate them to be leaders. That is the key dealers. We talk about resilience a lot on this podcast and you embody resilience along with grit determination. Faith after so many years of pushing the boulder uphill to you keep going because we have to look at all the accomplishments and one good thing about night and being ninety fills is that I can look back and remember when we had not as many women in colleges when we know that maybe in many of universities that we have over fifty percent. Those students of women in professions like attorneys and doctors and many other. The number of women have increased in those professions that Congress today and see how many more women we have at their state legislatures and within see that women are advancing so that really gives us a lot of hope and when we think of all of the discriminations and misogyny that still suffering we have to kind of look at the bright side and say we are making it with getting there if we look at the Credible marches that we had around the me too movement and we see that women are standing up and especially the young women that are in leadership there on issues of gun violence on climate change and I was just on a on a Webinar with about our state legislature bills going through our sacramental legislature here in California and to see that the majority of the people reporting and working on different progressive legislation gets what the majority when reduced with the immigrant and the farmer community. And when we looked at leaders we just had again. We had a film called many of our leaders we had over fifty people representing all of our different chapters. We have and guess what ninety nine percent were. Women Wow you sacrificed so much in your fight for labor laws for civil rights for women you even. During a protest of then presidential candidate George Bush senior were beaten by a police officer. To the point that your family didn't know if you'd survive you touched on sort of the current state of things we imagine it's gotta be really disheartening to see the current president Vilnai's Mexicans and other immigrants. How do you maintain your face in the face of just so much hate? Sometimes it feels like we've got nowhere both sometimes things a lot worse before they get better and I think many of the issues that we're discussing right now we're kind of you might say not really visible them. And now with our current administration they have been made very very visible and sometimes things have to be so visible that then we can start talking about them before people were reluctant to talk about race. I remember Gloria Steinem. Many many years ago back in the eighties raise the issue of domestic violence. And remember the hush everybody in the room look at each other and said what is she doing talking abundant domestic violence in this really close e group of leaders and now we know that. This is a topic that you can talk about. Racism is a topic you can talk about because we really see it very visibly and then we see them infestations of racism like somebody traveling several hundred miles to kill Mexicans in El Paso or to kill Jews in Jersey to kill Muslims to kill people because African American then we can see the manifestations of racism and how horribly Cooley are and the people of Color. We know it's always been there. The way resources attributed the number of people of color that we have in our prison system including by the way something. We hardly ever talk about it about the number of women that are not being incarcerated. Our hope criminal justice system how it affects women and people of color unless these issues really made so. I'm kind of playing the web. We really kind of describes the horror of these issues and how they affect people. Then really don't do anything to address them then now they're out there and there's people and we know. Hey it's time to do something this what I love is it. You're clearly an optimist. No matter what comes your way. That's very inspirational dealers. I read an article this morning. About how white parents in particular need to talk to their kids about race right now. You have eleven children. I have a seven year old daughter. Do you have any thoughts on how to open up those conversations with kids? I have a very simple way that we can solve racism. Like there's two things that we have to do and especially when we talked to children because children as we know are not born racist. They are made racist by their parents or the culture that they happen to go up and with really simple way to end racism to remind everybody and this is science is that we are all Africans because the human race began in Africa. Went across the planet went to Europe. The climate is a lot colder people. I like to say people kind of lost their colors. Just go to the salon to the beach to get their color back then in our DNA. We all are applicants and remember that we are one human race. We are all Africans of different shades and colors and so then we discriminate against somebody. Just because what difference does the color of the skin color is there? Is that hair actually? We're discriminating I favor relative. We are all related and when I say this schools and especially when I speak to the little kids I remember once in Los Angeles and a very high end schools. The children there a private school. Most children go. There are the Simpson daughters many of the celebrities. And when I said to them you are all related. To Children's stood up ran towards each other and hugged. Each other was spontaneous. It was so beautiful and I think that the other way we can get rid of. Racism is to just include this knowledge of science into our our school system starting again with pre K. And children about how we are all the latest in at the same time we can talked about how men and women are equal and that women should not be discriminated start with signing with our girls to give them self confidence that they need starting with our young little boys and to get them to respect women who that early early age doors. I have a question sort of for our own benefit Sarah television writers which means we're in a union. The writers guild of America are members often radically disagree. And we know you and Cesar Chavez dealt with a lot of conflicts. How do you think a union can succeed despite that internal discord? Well I think we have to keep our eye on the prize end assessor and my disagreement often based on what I call the feminist point of view in the male chauvinist point of view. And I can give you really really quick example when I was doing great in New York then on the West Coast also. I started out with a little stores and I got the independence to take off the grapes and then I went to the smaller chain stores and then I went to the bigger chain stores into. We got all that stores that the graves out Caesar took on the biggest chain stores in California Safeway at the we had already cleaned up the East Coast. Chicago to New York them of state than all the way down to Florida. We cleaned out all of the great for the stores. Using that tactic. Here on the West Coast season decided to take on the biggest chain and I consider that the difference is gene. Wait a woman thinks in the way things does that make sense absolutely and of course it goes to why we think women as we started the conversation with why we need more women leaders doing things the way women do them that. I think one thing that hosts women back is it often. We buy. Hold ourselves back because We are offering to. We don't want to create conflict and so we give in and we don't really fight for our ideas as often in the strongest. We should also to organize other people to supporters. So that we're not out there. Just you know being the lone ranger but we have somebody with us when we're trying to get ideas approved and process and you have spent your entire life doing that. Can you tell us about the work that you're doing now? We have so much going on right now. Of course we're in the middle of the endemic. We are working to set of foodbanks for many of the immigrants especially the farm workers. Farmers are essential workers often do not get mentioned in the friendly talk about essential workers but there were working there every day. You have couples and so of one of the parents have to stay home with the kids. The kids are also not in school and so they're suffering a loss of half of their income and often the food banks are open in the mornings or the workers are still at work so we have to set up put bags and evening so that they can actually get through. In the evening. We've postured several hundred families to get some of the income relief that is being given up in the different areas partnering with the United Way and other organizations we are helping with. The children are home at school to get them school books and supplies and things that they needed. We had to fight to make sure that the kids were able to get food during the Easter break in elementary school area. Because they were going to stop giving out the school lunches in school breakfast during that period of time we're working on the census that we've been doing that diligently we started in. July of last year in our hearts account communities we've got a huge education program in trying to stop the school to prison pipeline. We have an amazing education director. They Mississippi the castle we deny and parents and communities to make recommendations of the a different school districts were active in about fourteen. Different School districts we have in California. A great program called the Little Control Funding Formula School districts that given the money directed by the states but as part of that they have to take conditions from the parents and students in the community for improvements. We had we used program also active in different areas. We have nine different chapters about organization and growing so. We have so much probably working. Al I think I know the answer to this question. We're wondering if your work is still as all consuming per you as it was when you were younger or if you can never relax now and all I really can't and in fact. I do a lot of public speaking of questions. Dobbin changed to virtual to virtual speaking that just this morning. I did a couple of graduation. Zoom for people and other remarks for the organization. So you'll know we're busy on many many great things that we have stab comey let. My daughter is our director and she keeps all wheels turning. We've gotTA LIE staff actually. We're up to about forty full time staff and we have also twenty part time staff and actually just before nineteen. We had a hundred twenty five time staff working on the census going door to door talking to people reminding them. Light was apartment get counted because everybody's gets counted rings in two thousand five hundred dollars with their families and for the communities and of course conquer representation so we're doing a lot of phone banking on the census. We could lease can do the door to door trying to their people get counted to make people are played because of all of the checks on Latino immigrant community that came from the administration so we actually joined other groups and we sued Mexican American Legal Defense Fund and I believe. Acl You were able to beat the trump administration so that there would be citizens of question on the census. Wow delores you have accomplished an unbelievable amount in your ninety years when you take a step back and look at your life. What makes you happy? Mostly happy is to see all of the people that are two days for women and young women. We can't forget the raging grannies like myself and it's still out there doing a lot of work that makes me just feel really happy because as an organizer in an activist. I think the one thing that brings me a lot of joy is when I say so. Many people that are becoming activist and it was in some house. Invert every person to become an activist whatever measure of activism that. They want to participate in. I think this is the way that we preserve our democracy. This shirts that many of the issues in an equality can be really improved and finally we can solve so many of the problems that we have and even found and I do have to so this in here problems of resources in the amount of money that we spend more for instance and I loved it close Scott King who said we will never have peace in the world until women take power we will never have peace in the world and so limited power but I have amended that statement. Just say we will never have peace some world until feminist dollars because we know that there are a lot of these lobbed. Yes that are men that also feminist and we have a lot of women out there. Unfortunately that are not sensitive so we have to continue the organizing until into have everybody become a feminist and stand up for the rights to emigrants and poor people. I'll be teaching unity type for climate change and labored live for unionized and they still have a lot of work to do. Anyway that is my passion is to just keep on organizing people and getting people involved in the leadership growth in people were never thought they could be activism. Couldn't make any kind of change but once I think people understand that they do have the power to make changes that is how we can create a better world for everybody. Yes absolutely dolores. We want to wish you a wonderful ninetieth birthday and thank you for your continuing work your tireless and we appreciate that and thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you very much for having me on yourself. We WanNA remind everyone to go to our website or to Dolores Dot Org to learn more about the online events celebrating. Dolores ninetieth birthday. It will be an amazing evening featuring artists and activists and all go to communities impacted by Cova Nineteen also the Dolores Huerta Foundation has a partnership with the little market. You can buy a lovely candle and half of the proceeds will go to D. H. We will link to that in the show notes as well coming up a Hollywood hat that will help you stress less but I this break. Life is full of tough choices and trade offs. Your beauty routine what you put on your body. Every day shouldn't be one of them. Well I am safer at home. Sarah have been focusing on my skin. Carer and true botanical 's is so great. I have been loving missing myself with their renew nutrient missed and then putting on my renew pure radiance oil. They even have a video about how to feather it on correctly. It's very moisturizing. Filled with natural and organic ingredients true botanical skin and body products. Give you results without toxins. So you can feel good. While working from home. Troubadours products can be calming during these stressful times and are delivered straight to your door. You've just gotTa try true botanical self. Get fifteen percent off your first purchase. A true botanical dot com slash. Hollywood that's fifteen percent off your first purchase at true panicles DOT COM SLASH. Hollywood true botanical hs dot com slash. Hollywood it's time for this week's Hollywood hack which comes from Kate Buhler. Podcast everything happens. Yes Gretchen and I talked to Kate. Episode to seventy three of happier and she had an idea for coping with uncertainty during this time of a global pandemic that really resonated with me. She said that she evaluates the situation every two weeks. So that's the hack evaluate the situation every two weeks and act accordingly and don't worry in between so if you're wondering am I going to go to the grocery store or only get my groceries delivered. Am I going to have socially distance play dates or not all those questions that were all dealing with? Kate thinks about every two weeks looks at all. The information makes choice. And then just doesn't worry about it for two weeks and I love this idea because I find myself. Just like torturing myself over these questions and it's raining right like when. Are you going to go to a restaurant? Yeah exactly and if you don't have to think about it for two weeks you can just release it. Yes and then in two weeks you see. Okay where are we? What are the doctor saying? What are the statistics? And you make choice based on where you are then so that is the hack to worry about where you are every two weeks make decisions accordingly and don't worry about it in between love it and that is it for this episode of Happier in Hollywood for questions or comments. Email US or send US voice memo to happier in Hollywood at G. Mail DOT COM. Thanks for listening. Please subscribe if you haven't already thank you to the incredible Dolores Huerta for joining us today. Go to Dolores Huerta Dot Org for more information about her ninetieth birthday celebration or you can find the information at happier in Hollywood dot com. Also you can follow Dolores on Instagram at Dolores. Huerta thank you our executive producer the amazing Chuck Reed and everyone at Saint Cola style. You can follow them on Instagram at San Colas. Thanks to everyone at cadence thirteen. And as always thank you to Gretchen Rubin. Happier in Hollywood is part of the honored project was into the other onward project. Podcasts happier with crushing Rubin side Hustles School. Do the thing withhold Thirties Melissa urban. And everything happens. Get in touch. I'm on instagram. At S Fain and Liz is atlas craft. We also have a facebook group search for happier in Hollywood on facebook to join in on the conversation until next week. I'm Liz Craft and I'm Sarah Fan. Thanks for joining us. It's a fun job and we enjoy. Oh My god Sarah Lawrence is just amazing. Yeah she's incredible and talking to her. I remembered she talked about the great boycott which ended actually before we were born. But I remember my mom. You know the staunch feminist activists that was my mother. When I was a kid she was really finicky. About like what grapes? She would buy and what grapes. She wouldn't buy and I didn't understand it until now as we've been talking to Laura's I suddenly realize like Oh my God that was like my mom being an activist that's awesome. I know From the onward project.

Hollywood Dolores Huerta Sarah Dolores Dolores Huerta Foundation United States Dolores ninetieth Dolores Huerta Dot Org Laura Liz Craft Los Angeles President Obama Cesar Chavez Gretchen Rubin Sarah Fain Dolores Puerta Kate Buhler Dolores Huerta Foundation Co California
Heroines Week Dolores Huerta (3-5-2020)

Chompers

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Heroines Week Dolores Huerta (3-5-2020)

"Rise and shine it's time for Ciampi's tonight to rushing show surp- rushing on the top of your mouth on one side and brushing little circles each. It's heroines week. Where every day we tell you the story of Roic woman from history. Today's heroic woman is Dolores Huerta. Who helped farmworkers be treated fairly by the people they work for Lou? The Laura sweater grew up in California and a family with Mexican heritage. Doors is father worked on a farm helping to pick the fruits and vegetables. Their family didn't have much money. But Dolores was a smart hard working student. And she grew up and became a schoolteacher switcher rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush all the way to the molars in the back. The Loris taught school in California near the place where she grew up and so she noticed that the kids in our class were too hungry to pay attention. Many of the children were sick and some of them didn't even have shoes to wear these. Were the children of farm workers and the children were hungry and sick because the farm workers weren't being paid enough to take care of their families. Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and keep brushing lawrence found out that the farm workers were not being treated fairly by the owners of the farms. She decided to help them. Organize a union. A union is when people come together to demand to be treated fairly by the people they work for. Dolores helped the farm workers organized a strike that means they refused to work until the farm owners agreed to treat the workers. Better Switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and brush your front teeth to the Laura's and the farm workers marched in the streets chanting see slipway which means yes we can in Spanish with the workers on strike. The farm owners had no one to work on their farms and pick the fruits and vegetables. Finally the farm owners had to give in an agreed to pay the farm workers fairly and treat them with respect and because of her courage and compassion deloris wick. That is today's chompers heroin. That's chompers today but come back tonight for more heroines from history until then one chompers production of Gimblett media.

Dolores Huerta Switzer California Ciampi Dolores Roic heroin Lou Gimblett Laura lawrence
Dolores Huerta - Si Se Puede!

Swing Left - How We Win

52:42 min | 1 year ago

Dolores Huerta - Si Se Puede!

"We've got to outreach to those that are not with us. We've got to educate them. We've got mobilized we've got a motive. That's the only way it can happen so I'm going to ask scholar view. Who's got the power? What kind of power right so we can do it yes. We can't see separately. Let's also you this altogether. Say Welcome to episode thirty seven of how we win all over the country people are staying home stink safe and still doing extraordinary things. We're giving you the tools that you need to make a difference right now right from your living room. The Best Antidote to anxiety is action. We need your help and we'll get through this together. We have a very special episode today as we have the honour of sitting down with legendary Labor leader and civil rights icon Dolores Huerta. We talk about how she organized farm workers in the sixties. How those lessons are applied today in the work that she's continuing to do now at the age of ninety spoiler alert. She's not backing down. Though she is not I'm Steve Pearson and Mariah Craven and this is how we went. Don't wait to be invited. She says step in and on a personal note Dolores was very gracious When I told her I had stolen or slogan Si Se Puede. Yes we cam knowing her. I'm pleased that she let me off easy. Because Dolores does not play poetic you know hearing Dolores where the talk is just such a bomb after the chaos of yet another terrible corona virus Rose Garden press conference this week right. I mean chaos is probably a nice way to put it. You know it was really hateful. Trump continues to show us who he is despite himself. Oh Yeah it had the Mondays Mondays. Presser all of the the trumpian hallmarks of misinformation racism. Sexism pouting the huge. It still didn't hold a candle. I don't think to What he was doing on twitter all weekend he tweeted almost tweeted or re tweeted almost two hundred times and I think someone figured that he was sending on average a tweet. Every lake. Fifteen minutes for the entire weekend dude was fired up. Well you know. I mean mother's days in inspiring time for many of us to get on twitter and and tweet stuff with righteous anger about a crime that he calls Obama Gate when asked to clarify what the crime was. He said it was Obama Gade. Yeah he said he said you know what it is. You all know what the climate says. No no tell you and what he also said in relation to that was it. You'll be seeing more in the coming weeks and and we will be seeing more in the coming weeks from from this. Their their playbook for November is a very very clear right. Now we're seeing it from the tweets about the election and see a twenty five when he's Degrading vote by mail and also denigrating having Polling places open so doesn't like to vote by mail also doesn't like people to be able to vote in person and just putting out blatant lies about that misinformation saying that the election is should be invalidated. These votes should be counted. It was really jarring to hear all that I think what the what the tweets showed us over the weekend. Aside from how deranged trump was is there? Glimpse into the future is that he's GonNa try to meddle in as many elections as possible especially if it seems like Democrats have strong pudding. And he's continuing to use the Department of Justice as a political tool and and bill bars going along with it by you know. Filing the motion to dismiss the charges against Flynn completely unclear why and thousands of former justice department employees have said. Wait a minute wait a minute. Wait a minute. This is not how this is supposed to work at all. But that's not GonNa Stop Them. Bar. Trump's personal fixer masquerading as the People's Attorney General. He manipulated the narrative of the Miller report. He intervened to block congressional oversight You know what we call checks and balances and now dismissed the case against Michael. Flynn this Obama Gate stuff that you were talking about this. We're going to see more of this is Going to be manipulated also by bar hand in hand with the power of the Justice Department to be able to weigh in. It's it's actually really scary and with the added compounding of the Russian interference amplifying. This just like they're already amplifying. These demonstrations infiltrating the demonstrators and these groups. You know it's It's a playbook that the Republicans have used used to last election Last presidential election and It's It's in full effect right now. So Yep so. We gotta stay vigilant Fingers are crossed that the dismissal that the DOJ is recommending for. Flynn doesn't make it all the way through. The courts actually happen speaking of the courts. When has been pretty cool? I don't know have you had a chance to listen in on the Supreme Court arguments. There teleworking right now so you can listen to them online and today. They're hearing arguments about the release of trump's personal tax returns that Congress had subpoenaed and at the administration has been blocking Pretty interesting to listen in. I think this is something that they should continue to do. Even after stay at home orders are lifted. I think the arguments and the questions are really interesting. And it's been kind of nerdy fun to see people. You know making predictions As how I think which way the justices are already people. I can't follow all of it. I'll be honest my casual legal background which comes mostly from watching law and order right. Didn't really quick for listening to these. But it's still interesting stuff. They should start every new case with coca comb or theme just to get people's attention now when sound effect that we did here last week when this was I live streamed was a toilet flushing right right so the questions has anyone cop to that. Do we know which one of the justice I don't even want to know too much detail but yeah as as we all get used to this new method of of interacting with each other. Let's just remember to step away to go to the restroom? Put your phone down before you go in or at least hit. Mute. I'm all for multitasking. Much more efficient. But I don't think people should be leave it in another Supreme Court you know circling back to the press conference is one thing that's been coming up. Repeatedly is the Ahmad Armory case down in Georgia. Which you know. The nation has been watching very closely in the last week only because there is now cell phone footage of what appears to be in a stalking attack and murder That happened in broad daylight on a public street a couple of months ago really horrifying footage and we've seen too many of these fortunately because of the power of social media the power of our activists groups. These guys who were walking around free not prosecuted. All there now been arrested. Justice has more of a chance of being served. We'll see how this all plays out but there was a threat. I don't know if you saw that was going around about all the things that You know white people can do that. Black people can't do basic things like going for jog. You know answering their cell phone Reading a book in the car all the all these things that Young Black Men and women have been shot and killed by police or by so-called vigilantes Doing and It's a powerful reminder but this whole episode and the unfolded very quickly was also powerful reminder of the power that we have as individuals and his activist to shine a light on on these things and actually forced the hand of justice. I mean that's a great point but I also think the other point is you know I. I know what you're talking about like I'm black. Of course I knew all of that stuff you know but what it comes down to is the general public needing to believe black people like I said. This shooting happened a couple of months ago and the only reason the only reason that there is any prosecution in this case is because there wasn't just video of the incident but the video was made public And I grew up in Georgia. I know the feeling of approaching people white people sitting in a pickup truck. I've never had anyone pull a gun on me but there is always a little bit of fear that in certain situations in certain communities that that you and I think that so often the black community as a whole is accused. You hear people talking about playing the race card things have changed and you know all the cliches about Oh we. We had a black president. How bad could things be or whatever but this has been going on for a very long time. It happens so much more regularly than we have video for and the ability of people to shoot a little video on their cell phone has been a huge game changer for us. It doesn't mean that things are happening more or less frequently. It's just that justice might be a little bit more likely to to happen because of it. I mean I always have a hard time talking about this stuff as a white male person of privilege. You mentioned Obama Presidency. I mean the big rap on myself and one of the reasons why I work so hard you know. Since trump has been elected I was one of those You know Super Liberal White Dudes. Who was so thrilled? That Obama was and we had our first black president and was had my blinders on a bit about the state of our country and was looking at the arc of history and the civil rights movement. And where we got to and now we have a black president. And Wow we're really heading towards More quality and you know what I didn't really take in was the full extent of what was still happening as you said not on camera you know not with cell phone footage in the stuff that was still going on and one thing that the trump presidency has really brought to light obviously is these white nationalist who have felt emboldened and have come out. And we've and and for many of us we've been able to see more overtly in ways that people of color have seen their whole lives. You know what still exists? You know beyond having our first African American president and it's it's stark in jarring and it shows how much work we have to do. And how vigilant we have to be when you have an administration and Republicans who are so willing to Push that cast that aside because they want to quote unquote make America great again and go back to a different time It makes our work so much more urgent. I absolutely agree with that but the only thing that I will say. Is You know since. We're talking about Georgia. I'll just add it acing. Something like eighty percent of people in Georgia who've been hospitalized with corona virus or black that's a vastly disproportionate part of the population. This is not only a in the last three and a half years. Things have gotten worse. This is a systemic issue And violence against black people is a systemic issue and these things. The disparities in healthcare and environment in violence have been going on for generations. And so yes. It's urgent that we take action because now we see that there are quite literally deadly consequences for all of these disparities but we need to take action in part because we are all to blame for this. This systemic problem. Yeah coronavirus is a perfect example of how people of color are disproportionately affected by my anything that The comes at us. And you know with our interview with Dolores Huerta. She talks a lot about that. And I mean when we talk about numbers of crony of virus cases and fatalities and everything are we including the asylum seekers and immigrants who are in cages on the border still today in those families and people who are not being allowed access and are in Mexico. I mean you know I don't know what those numbers are. But these are people who are undoubtably Getting sick and are being disproportionately affected by this. And don't have any resources to deal with it. We have a we have a lot of people. that we need to make sure don't get left behind in this pandemic and even further left behind in the pinned and the recovery that Shirley must come after it. Oh y'all I work to here. We do. I'm glad we had that discussion to it's it's you know discussions on racer so hard for fragile little white people like myself but it's You know I'm glad that you share that. It's a difficult conversation for you make. It is for a lot of people and And that's that's one of the first things we need to do is go ahead and have difficult conversations with each other you know and half. We have common goals. We want the same things we ought to be able to talk honestly with each other About so we can work together. You know effectively. So we'll keep having the conversation and encourage other people out there listening to you. Know be part of these challenging conversations to in the meantime website. Giving you hope this week Steve. Are you WanNa talk about murder? Hornets Murder Hornets in this show. Murder Hornets next murder Hornets. Yes yes murderer Hornets are. What's next well much worse could it? I guess what's giving what's giving me hope right now is You know we talked a little bit about the playbook for Republicans to win that includes trump trying to de-legitimize elections calling everything rigged and bar helping with the Justice Department the power that it wields to support conspiracy theories against Obama and Biden the Russian interference that will support an aid that that they will embrace as well. That's basically the Republicans playbook divide and conquer amplified the divisions that existed in our country. Try to hold onto their base by amplifying the racist rhetoric and to denigrate immigrants and of course we can't leave out the GOP's old friends voter suppression and Gerrymandering. That's their playbook are. Playbook is to be clear eyed about what they're doing so that the divide doesn't lead to conquer and also it's turnout. It's just you know we have to remember that. Mitt Romney got more votes than Donald. Trump did the fundamental reason that we lost the presidency. That Hillary Clinton is in our president. Right now is because Democrats did not show up and vote right so did I. Was there anything hopeful in the hope is the hope? Is that right? Now we are. We are still continuing to see even in the face of this challenging pandemic worth seeing people not stopping. Doing the organizing work talking to voters. Were seeing strong voter enthusiasm and you know I really believe. We're going to have strong turnout. We see people like Dolores Huerta at ninety years old. Civil Rights icon. Who IS NOT STOPPING? I mean she's she's an amazing example. We asked her like what keeps her going. And you'll hear about that in the interview but It's just exciting to see that even in the face of all this uncertainty you have one thing that people are certain about in. That's that they want to vote for. Donald trump all right. Let's do it. We Scott less than six months. We've got the playbook Steve's given it to us no excuses show up and vote for Democrat. That's our playbook to win and we have to do it. We have so much to overcome fundraising is looking good polls are looking good but I don't really WANNA dig into poll. Six months ahead of time. We need to organize. We need to keep contacting voters. And that's how we win agree. Don't at any polls right now if ever. What about you my reason for hope? This week is It was announced today that the Hamilton movie is GonNa come out and I really love Hamilton and like so many people and I went in when I saw it thinking over height. There's no am GonNa like this as much as everybody says. And they did and my wish after seeing it was that everybody would have a chance to see it. Because it's such a powerful piece of Art. And it inspired me creatively and it inspired my activism because it really is about how one person who's determined and persistent can really transform our country. Obviously he didn't do it alone but you know that was. It's called Hamilton. So it's really about Alexander Hamilton. I'm so anyway. My wish. The night that I I saw was that everybody would get a chance to see it. I I kinda wish that it was going to be on. Pbs But it's GonNa be on Disney plus which makes it you know a little bit more accessible than What the you know ticket. Prices are obviously bananas and I've entered the lottery so many times to see it again and never won anyway. People are going to get a chance and I. I hope that If you get a subscription or have watched Bernie when all of this is over or something that you can affordably see. Hamilton and be inspired. I can't wait. I'm really excited. I had the same experience seeing Assad here in. La The touring show and I number actually your. You had a much more generous response to it like. How can we get everyone to see this? I was just like when am I going to be able to come see this again? That was during the first number. I'm like I can't wait to see this for time already. Okay so now. We've got some reasons for hope. Some things to look forward to and we also have a two awesome items on the to do list this week. Yes exactly it's just party may is just full of parties right virtual parties. It's made springtime. It's time to party. Yes right almost some we have the May twenty four th letter writing party which we're doing with folk forward pantsuit politics. Steve's birthday we're all getting together bury the lead their lead with. It's my birthday. We're getting together on zoom to sing happy birthday and write letters and chat about political stuff. This is GonNa be Super Fun and productive the letter writing parties. We haven't participated yet. I what are you waiting for their really effective. They're really fun and you can do it safely at home. Which is the the whole point so hope you join us for that great and then later in the month. We're celebrating another birthday. Dolores Huerta her ninetieth birthday celebration on. May Thirtieth just to steal all of my thunder. I don't appreciate it. I'm sure that's why she did it. Her birthday was back in April. She didn't have to do it right after my birthday party. I will say as strong as our letter partying letter writing party. Guest lineup is pretty spectacular. Benjamin Bratt America Ferrera Jane Fonda Evil Longoria George Lopez Carlos Santana Gloria Steinem maxine waters. Many more. It's pretty cool party. Having a little party envy but but the good news is that on. These are two different days so people can attend to different virtual celebrations and for Dolores Huertas birthday. I shall be raising money for the Dolores. It Foundation which is doing incredibly important work. That's right so We'll have links to both of those parties. Obviously you can also go to Dolores where the Foundation Dot. Org to get information on on that party and we're going to hear more about it in our interview. There are few people who've made a bigger contribution to modern organizing than Dolores Huerta. She's dedicated her life to fuelling movements and fighting for Social Justice in partnership with Cesar Chavez built in co founded the United Farm Workers Union and ushered in a Cultural Revolution in America. She was awarded the Medal of freedom by President Obama. Who borrowed the slogan? She made famous. Yes we can or see Safeway. Dolores is an icon. An ninety years young shows no sign of slowing down. Miss Weta much for joining us today. First off how are you and your family doing during the corona virus pandemic well. I'm happy to report that my family is doing well. We're all sequestered All of our employees for the most part the foundation. We actually started working at home Actually almost two weeks before the Government California. Everybody to lock down. We were so afraid that there are people with get the infected with the virus that we're doing all doom. All of our staff members did lose some of his family but they were in Mexico but he did lose his grandparents to to the virus so and everybody has friends and people that they know that have lost someone and in our area. We have a because we are. We have a large Latino population. I'm here talking to you from Kern county yet. That is one of our agricultural counties and over sixty five percent of our population here that have been affected have been the Latino community many of them farmworkers frontline workers that were really not provided the kind of protection that they needed but thankfully to answer. The question Myself with my family. We're flying. It's great to hear this and our love goes out to your colleague who lost his grandparents And of course immigrants and workers are being hit the hardest and continue to be hit. The hardest by this and that's part of the work you've been doing. Since the beginning protecting working people Some of your earliest organizing work was knocking on doors. Having conversations with Latino farm workers in registering voters in their homes and in their communities. What was your organizing principle when you first started out. And how did it develop well? It's all about empowering people and trying to get people to understand that they have the power to make changes actually Of the knocking on doors. That we do mostly campaigns like when registering people to vote. Or when we're getting off the boat or like now we've been working a lot. On the census trending people to complete the census farms at. You make them understand why this is important. How they're going to bring money into the communities when they get counted and also how we give a presentation but actually are organizing methods or not knocking on doors. Organizing methods are actually having meetings in people's homes getting them to invite us into their home and we talk about the issues of is oftentimes people know that they're being discriminated. They know that they're poor. They don't understand how it happened. You know I was born into the situation. And they don't understand the power structures of the community that they don't understand or don't know about a pieces of legislation that have been passed a to keep them in the poverty situation that they're in or in the discriminative section Discriminated lives that they live in. They don't realize that they have actually just powers at work to make that happen and so once they can understand how how this came to be in how can change it but it it takes a more of a conversation than that then you can do it at the door suit. It has to actually have people invite you into their homes so that you can have a lengthy conversation and they can ask questions and they can finally understand what's happening because if they don't understand why the situation exists or how it came to be that way then they don't understand why they don't know how they can change it and you mentioned the census work that you're doing right now and we're GonNa ask you about that a little bit later but since you brought it up now that we're locked down and people aren't being invited into each other's homes. How're doing that work to spread word about the census? And how how's that going? I think we've come into your world so we're now having to do the virtually I of money by telephone lawlessly calling into people's homes and talking to them and you know trying to convince them on the phone by they have to fill out the census forms and so this is basically what we're doing now. A lot of zoom meetings with a lot of our leadership really fun to to see how so many of the people we work with people that we work with our low income people. They're discriminated in communities. Many of them have never been on his zoom meeting or facebook meaning before and to see them king on these meetings and how excited they are when something that they actually do. And it's pretty exciting. We had our last call. We had this a different representatives from our different chapters that got on his own call. They were so excited when they get calls. Were a lot of fun for them. Are they changing up their backgrounds and showing off their pets and doing all that stuff too? I don't know how to change the background. Of course you. How lobby kid interference difficult for them? Because a is you know Especially in rural areas people injured Internet access and this is really impacted the kids especially because there's supposed to be doing the work at home and yet they don't have broadband access to their homes. Mix very very difficult so we see that the children especially Spanish speaking population is really going to suffer in the going to be a really held back because they're missing almost the whole semester education and we don't know of course when it's GonNa end all to say that in our area here because we are again in Kern county which is elected like something and you Steve. You were here. So you saw like Alabama the city council in the Board of supervisors who were controlled by the Republican Party. They both voted to open up to open up the the city until opened up the county. Even though we have Our last count we had yesterday. It was one thousand eight hundred thousand people that had been acted with the virus. And of course you had some deaths also so to think that they're opening it up when we have this this many people that have been infected as crew crazy. I think that people are gonNA as some of these governments. Open things back up too. People are going to have to take it upon themselves to put their own distancing in place in prioritize their their health if the government is not going to do it but just are you satisfied with how people are responding to the census or are we sort of losing ground because of the lack of ability to meet in person. We're GONNA have to make that up. This challenge is basically With Donald Trump did from the day that he came down later when attacking Mexicans as criminals rapists and the constant attacks on Mexicans and Latinos. You all of the refugees came to the border. All the deportations have happened has instilled in our Latino population. Mike going to say fear of when they use the word terror people have been terrorized and The fear because you have a lot of families where you'll have someone who's a citizen in the family of resident immigrant in you'll have undocumented person in that family you know And so you have this fear that has been so prevalent in the community. That people are just. They're afraid of the government. Basically INISTER NOT AFRAID. They're mad at the government Cooperate with the government and when we say well the census is something that is running every ten years by the and run cooperate or have anything to do with it. You know so we have to do. We'll a deep education to say to them. Look this is a guy this. This happens every ten years. Yes this is run by. The government is going to give us money so when you sign up with the census you're going to bring money into your community and in California. It's almost two thousand dollars per person in. Don't sign up. They were going to lose that money and that money it goes for our schools. It goes for health care. It goes for infrastructure. So we're going to lose them. You don't sign up. And then we have to convince some of the census confidential right. Anybody shares the information. They can go to prison for five years that there's no citizenship question on the census because we with other organizations and a- led by Mexican American Legal Defense Fund. Aclu that they sued trump. And so we one. We were one of the plaintiffs and we want to. There's no citizenship question on the census. But that still doesn't really. I don't think it conquers fear. You know we're able to reach some people to say you know. Please cooperate more recently here in the Central Valley. They're telling people you don't have to put your address down the city. The Gillette thing so it's a lot of work in man. Of course he talk about representation because eventually hopefully we get a new administration and we want to get immigration. Reform we to get another legalization program. But that's not gonNA happen until we get people that look like us. The people that have our values that they elected to the Congress to the state legislature so the census also council up a representation. So let's talk more about Some of the early organizing you did and how it relates to the work that we're doing right now In nineteen sixty five. You helped organize the famous great boycott that eventually pressure growers into allowing farm workers to unionize one key. Tactic was to have farmworkers share their stories. Can you talk about why? Personal stories are so an effective and how we should continue using them. Today I did personal. Stories are a way to get the message but but the and I know people rely on a lot of people. Rely on organizing. But you've got to organize I before personal stories. I think have any kind of an impact in is in is hard work. You know. It's just reaching out to people talking as many people as you can bringing people together of so. The personal stories are important. But I think there's too much emphasis has been put on that and I know it was one of the people that came out of the farm. That kind of is really a spouse that but to me we talk about Marshall Ganz exactly were ruled at house meetings to do them but the way that we organize the farmer was union. When you talk about that try. It took three years. That says it. A nice spent Doing Hall swings up and down the valley with farmworkers to build that base. You have to have a base and two people three people but you've got to organize a base To be able to do the work in. Yeah the personal story is nice. You know when you talk about it but basically talk you know in general when we talk to people about the boycott. We said farmer workers are on strike. You know I mean. Farmers don't have toilets you know we didn't say Jose say the farmworker we said farmworkers in general. They don't have bathrooms in the field. You know they don't have a drinking water. They don't have the right to organize so I guess that's the story that you tell like. Today we talked about the people that are in these Cages at the border. The thought like one particular person talking about everybody that is there and when you talk about a personal story but I can assure you right when I earned basically boycott I was talking about who say or maybe I I was talking about is in general. Since you're being so open and honest I would love to hear about you. Know a think that as we look you talked a little bit about how critically important it's going to be to elect a new president in the fall as you're looking around at how people who might vote for for Joe Biden the presumptive Democratic nominee for president. As you're looking at the space what do you see that we need to change in order to mobilize enough people in the right places to get him elected well? I think we have to organize you. Go out there and and I. I don't know how long up people don't be in lockdown but is I'm assuming that it's going to Kennedy over mainly by July for sure or maybe August what that means we're GonNa have to organize like crazy of between now and November to get people to vote and there will be a story in. The personal story will be about a president who didn't protect the people of the country and who was incompetent allowed so many people to die. So that's a personal story. I think probably talking about okay. We have to change a champ. The change and make sure that the president is not continue to be in. That officer has power basically to be the personal delivers death to our communities instead of saving lives in contrast live by now the one thing that I did say to the Biden Campaign. I just endorsed. Hopefully a president barack going get elected. I did states to the bank campaign that you've got to adopt from of the policies that Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth. Warren has been espousing. Just can't have the same old same old. We have too many spicy young people like yourselves that that there's something so much they they they go to college. They have so much debt that they can't even afford a home. Afterwards marketisation we get a lot of lot of autism as of young people that have graduated from college and then they can find a job in the. They're saddled with all his school that they have so we have to retrain our economic system so that it is almost just a more just system and hopefully biden elected that he will listen to people. I mean he's already. I come out and said that he will do something about this student. Loan debt bright. We don't we do that. He's definitely going to do something about healthcare. And I think that's one thing that this Democrats really or spotlight on that. So many people don't have health care and people are exposed to this horrible virus and so telling people have died. Yeah Yeah and trump is still trying to take away. Healthcare from twenty million people and destroy the affordable care. Act in the middle of all of this. Which just I know. That's seems like a bad way to get reelected to me to try to get reelected but also extremely cruel thing in general but I think we have to take the take the phrase government of the people by the people for the people but the people have got to make it work and I think that's our message that we've got to say to everybody. You have got to become an activist. You'VE GOTTA GO. GotTa knock on the door to gotTa talk to your family. Better talk to people. Make sure that everybody votes because the only way that Biden will lose is people. Don't get out there and people don't vote and the discipline. Hopefully people will will be mad enough that they will go out there and vote. But I think we're are going to have to do that. There's no magic formula. I think it's just really really basically all of us have got to just Organiz as many people as we can to make sure that they get on on the streets to to again. Here's the door. Knocking really comes in knocking on the doors and going to people in talking to them at their doorstep at telling them why it's important for them to vote. You're ninety years old now and and by the way I was really sad that the California Democratic Party Edward got cancelled. Because you're having a ninety old ninety birthday party there that got canceled too so we're sorry that we missed that we have that like everything else is going to be online. Oh it's still coming up in the online on. May the thirtieth at six PM and we have some great folks that are GonNa be with us. Steiner was going to be with US Jane Fonda Martin Sheen Santana unles. Jeez there but we'll go to. Can anybody join? We want everybody to come on board with that. It'll be fundraiser. Par Foundation and the work that we're doing right here with all of our people who've been affected by the virus. Yes so it's GonNa it's GonNa move that ever Longoria America Ferrara and George Lopez will hope that make it funny awards. That sounds amazing. Well Yeah I'm glad I didn't miss a chance to celebrate with you but At Ninety now you're still working so hard and you've been through so much and been at the forefront of so much how do you avoid burn out? How do you stay energized and Do you give yourself a pep talk to keep going where you get your energy. I think I think I have the energy like you do see was I mean basically Energy comes from the fact that we have so much work to do. We have so many more people to reach a so many more people to organize many more people to become active. And so this is where the energy comes from the market within talk to the monthly people can motivate to build a country. Build a better world to get rid of all of these. `ISMS THAT EXIST IN OUR SOCIETY MASON. The misogyny homophobia you know racing the ignorance. We have our society. All of these `ISMs that we talk about they come from ignorance and and that's what we have to do. This organizes the ministers of shoes. We'll have to carry that truth to people directly and talk to them and challenge them make them understand and it takes a lot of dueling. It does it does take a lot of energy but when you can convince people they have to send up and fight for themselves. I think the rewards are so spectacular there just so amazing that you WanNa continue to do it and you want to reach as many people as you can because so many people out there. They don't realize the power that they have and that's what we have to do. We have to strike a match and lighter power. Would you've been striking those matches for a while since the fifties and you probably have some of the best historical perspective on where we are now but for some people? The past few years have felt really dire given your historical perspective in and and what you've seen has it felt that way for you are in a unique time or are we in a cycle and you know we need to just say this too shall pass Bulls and think we are in a cycle but I think that the powerful forces on the other side They have so much control over the media and through the media they are able to control so many people's minds and even in this pan-demic you know you still have people that get on their facebook and they hear all these crazy things likely started out by saying the was a hoax and this is kind of interesting. This is what you do is so important right here in our local news. You never hear anything. Negative about the president early ago from our local. Nbc CBS ABC Stations. Here in such later on even to public broadcasting has more you know pictures of what the trump with the president is saying the stupid things that he says he does that. You never hear on the local news. If you listen to local news it's all power and glory in the saving us from the pandemic. You never hear the real news and this is happening all over the country I was in Washington. Dc We had a really great celebration. Nc Pelosi for women's suffrage day Moore. Nancy was honoring me and That was speaking to one of the congresswoman there from Ohio and she said that the media there is so bad that she can understand why so many people will for trump and for the Republican party. 'cause the news is so sanitized so that people don't really get the truth they don't get the choose and Zyklon. I talk how people you know. If you're not getting the news on your station that you need to get you know. Listen to Amy Goodman Luther. Bear you know. Listen to Tapper Nola you know. Listen to the COMEDIANS. They'll get better of betty center line on from them that you'll get from your local television station that's really true. That's you know arts and satire play a very important role especially in fascism or times of Wannabe Fascism when the press is beings packed and manipulated and the artist really do become the truth teller. So that's a good point. Okay well tell us more about the Dolores Huerta Foundation and how it's continuing your work law. We're doing really good working. Like import different counties. Right now And we're working on attend school to prison pipeline up by racism on the schools right now. We're silicon on the census which he had to resort to phone banking. We're working on in child poverty campaign passing legislation at the state level and the federal level to get More a child tax credits for folks. We did a BA campaign to get some of our undocumented people here and luckily we have a great governor going there newsom a great leaders in the legislature So they able to get some financial assistance for the documented. We're getting ready to go into the Food Bank business as we did years ago because so many of the farm workers were still working out there and You might be able to still work like they need any kind of a number one Their wages are minimum wage for the most part but also because children are at home of one of the partners has to stay home to take care of the kids and so if they've got a loss in about half of their income that they would normally have to incenting uproot banks At at the time to take actually get access to food so a Lotta irons in the fire. Working really hard you're doing it just The the amazing work continues You've taught we've talked a lot about the you know what's GonNa come up in the next few months with the Census and the election into our final question that we ask everyone is very forward-looking. What gives you the most hope for our future. Well I'm hoping that out of this pandemic that a lot of people just we really really angry and we'll see why we need a better government not only at the national level here on my local level. Here we've had all supervisors in our County City Council of all said. Okay people in an open up the county right now. Even though we're having a lot of people that are infected by the virus so we work very hard to get good government and I'm hopeful that people will really start realizing how important that isn't that they will become active and also thinking about the climate change and how the fact that we don't have a lot of people on the road. This really helped our air to become cleaner. Our water could become cleaner and So people will see this as Things that we can actually accomplish things we can look forward to. You know gang or you're on the green on deal to make sure that we can Sink IN TERMS OF JOBS. That are not dependent on fossil fuels. And so I think there's a lot of Vision out there and we just have to the people coming in and Come on journey with all of us am hope like the pandemic is kind of in like a up call for a lot of people. A lot of people may be Leonard home to start reflecting on what's important and Maybe lives are important than the material goods or haircuts. Well I certainly haven't had haircut in a while. Also I guess I have my priorities in the right place. Thank you so much. Everyone is going to join your ninetieth birthday party. I'm really excited about catch. May Thirtieth at six. Pm In California Times Five. Five to seven. California time and It's a dolores. Huerta DOT ORG is a website and people can just go on Dolores Huerta Dot Org. And that's how they can sign in great will also be sure to to have that link up on our podcast page and and on social media as well so we'll share that with people who wanNA listen celebrate and support the foundation. It's going to be a lot of fun in in Mariah. I WANNA thank you to keep mentioning Stephen. You're doing the hard work also very very generous of you. I've not seen us the hard work. That's not true right as participate in then. I was very excited to have the opportunity to speak with you. So thank you so much for for joining us. Yes thank you. I hope we get to see you in person again soon. Thank you thank you. Thank you for joining us today. And thank you for taking action. This is how we win. We win when we all stay safe and get involved. We want to hear from you tweet to US AT BLUES Boy Steve and at Mariah underscore craven or email us at podcast at swing left. Dot Org. Thank you to our friends at Dem cast. Please be sure to subscribe rate and review us on apple or wherever you get your pods Sharon social media and use the Hashtag. How Win Twenty Twenty check out our page? It's swing left dot org slash podcast. That's also where you can sign up to volunteer. We really appreciate you being here with us. And we'll be back with more next Wednesday.

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Heroines Week Dolores Huerta (3-4-2021)

Chompers

03:21 min | 5 months ago

Heroines Week Dolores Huerta (3-4-2021)

"Rise and shine. It's time for chomping at night to rushing show surp- rushing on the top of your mouth on one side and brushing little circles each team. It's heroines week. Where every day we tell you the story of roic woman from history. Today's heroic woman is dolores huerta. Who helped farmworkers be treated fairly by the people they work for. Lou the laura sweat the grew up in california and a family with mexican heritage. Doors is father worked on a farm helping to pick the fruits and vegetables. Their family didn't have much money. But dolores was a smart hard working student and she grew up and became a schoolteacher. Switch rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush all the way to the molars in the back. The lawrence taught school in california near the place where she grew up and so she noticed that the kids in our class were too hungry to pay attention. Many of the children were sick and some of them didn't even have shoes to wear these. Were the children of farm workers and the children were hungry and sick because the farm workers weren't being paid enough to take care of their families switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and keep brushing lawrence found out that the farm workers were not being treated fairly by the owners of the farms. She decided to help them. Organize a union. A union is when people come together to demand to be treated fairly by the people they work for. Dolores helped the farm workers organized a strike that means they refused to work until the farm owners agreed to treat the workers. Better switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and brush your front teeth to the laura's and the farm workers marched in the streets chanting see slipway which means yes. We can in spanish with the workers on strike. The farm owners had no one to work on their farms and pick the fruits and vegetables. Finally the farm owners had to give in an agreed to pay the farm workers fairly and treat them with respect and because of her courage and compassion deloris wick. That is today's chompers heroin. That's chompers today but come back tonight for more heroines from history until then one. Thanks to our sponsor cheerios. Hey grownups with a happy heart powered by honey nut cheerios. You'll have the positivity needed to be good do good and spread good beyond the breakfast table and into the day ahead cheerios. Good starts with happy. Hearts chompers is production of gimblett media.

lawrence taught school dolores huerta switzer laura california dolores Lou Dolores lawrence deloris wick
Polls and calls for impeachment inquiry spell bad news for Trump

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

44:03 min | 2 years ago

Polls and calls for impeachment inquiry spell bad news for Trump

"Now time for the last word with lawrence o. donald good evening ritual and wish me luck because they're going to do something i'm not good at. I'm going to be interviewing. One of my heroes and i'm not good at hiding my awe in situations so it's going to be what it's going to be. We'll wholesale tips like are you feel like you know you're going to you. What's it like when that happens to you. I leave my body entirely. I imagined that i'm somebody else talking to somebody who doesn't mean much to me at all. Nothing you could say can have any effect on me. I'm i'm horrible but that's always what i try. It doesn't work <hes> mhm well. I've never i've never detected that. Everything you described has never actually happened on screen. It's only happened in your head and so maybe maybe we over worry these things. Maybe we do well. I wish you luck anyway and break a leg and all those things you're going to be fine. Just leave your body. Thank you rachel sites. Well well some guests who appear on this program might be on their way to the history books especially the presidential candidates. There's probably a future president in that group and a future vice president but tonight we'll be joined by someone who is already in our history books. She's in the one history book that i wrote about the nineteen sixty eight presidential campaign and many other history books she campaign campaign for bobby kennedy that year and it was on the stage with him when he gave his victory speech in the california primary election on what turned out to be the last night of his life. President obama gave her the medal of freedom to say it's an honor to have dolores huerta step out of the history books and join us here tonight does not begin to convey how i feel about being able to have her on this show tonight. I'm simply in awe of dolores. Huerta have been for decades. I've met her a couple of times in events in california -fornia and she makes that off temporarily disappear because she is after all a real person with real warmth real wit real kindness. She instantly feels like an old friend. Bobby kennedy thanked flores where to that night in los angeles and what turned out to be his final speech. Many people have thanked her before and since since then for her help people in fresno california are thanking her this week for her health dolores huerta went to fresno snow this week and what is the latest chapter in her lifetime pursuit of justice and she got arrested in fresno at age eighty nine dolores huerta will join us at the end of this hour to tell us why she got arrested in fresno this week and in that discussion i hope we learned something about what it takes to be truly committed to social progress truly committed to a cause most of us limit limit our commitment to social progress voting and salvos just give up on our candidate loses dolores huerta sore her candidate nineteen sixty eight get shot shot and killed right before her eyes and she did not give up. We have much to learn from dolores huerta america it has much to learn from dolores huerta and we will hear from her at the end of this hour in tonight's last word alan bennett's brilliant play the madness of george. The third had its premiere in london in nineteen ninety two two hundred years after the reign of england's truly early mad king it will not take two hundred years for play about the madness of donald trump to be written probably more than two hundred of those plays. We'll be written in the next two hundred years and the trump playwrights will have a much easier time of it than alan bennett had because they will have the video and the tweets of all of the madness the tweets saying trump is king of israel the second coming of god the video of trump. I'm talking about wanting to buy greenland the video of trump talking about himself as the chosen one the video of trump saying he fell in love with the murderous murderess north korean dictator. The trump and kim jong un love affair will be set to music in some versions of the madness of donald trump and others it will be played with the deadly darkness shakespeare's richard the third and if we're lucky future audiences watching all of the play is about the madness of donald trump. We'll be watching the way i watched the madness of george the third in one thousand nine hundred eighty two it will be watching something that feels like it happened a long time ago in a crazy moment in history. That could never come again if we're lucky when future audiences are looking back at it the madness of donald trump will look like a four year explosion in our politics six and culture that came and went within the space of two presidential elections and all of the polling that has come out this week strongly supports the possibility that the trump presidency residency will crash into democracy on the next election night and this time lose donald trump has an approval rating tonight which if it holds makes it impossible for him to be reelected the associated press chose sixty two percent disapprove of trump's job performance with thirty six percent approving approving and there isn't even worse number in a monmouth poll only thirty nine percent of voters support donald trump's reelection fifty seven percent say it's it's time for someone new that could not be more clear those numbers have to change dramatically and quickly for donald trump to have a reasonable chance just to win the next election and there is nothing on the political horizon that is likely to improve those numbers. Donald trump ran for president claiming he would revive manufacturing fracturing in america when manufacturing already doing reasonably well today the washington post reports. Thanks to donald trump's trade war that he is losing the u._s. Manufacturing purchases actresses index fell to forty nine point nine in august from fifty point four in july. That is the first time that particular closely watched indicator has fallen fallen below fifty since the first year of the obama presidency american automobile manufacturers have overruled donald trump's misguided softening of emission standards words for their fleets and have made a deal with the state of california for stricter regulation than the trump administration wants nationally. The state of california is of course the largest and most most important automobile market in the world and so no auto manufacturers are going to build a car that cannot be sold in california. Something donald trump did not realize about automobile manufacturing until he learned that the hard way the trump tariffs are becoming increasingly expensive to american consumers and could easily cost americans a thousand thousand dollars a year per person. The trump budget deficit is now a trillion dollars a year and going up donald trump talked about the national debt and the deficit almost every day of his presidential campaign but now that he's increased the national debt by trillions of dollars. He no longer says a word about it. That's one piece of ammunition. He won't have his reelection campaign and then there was donald trump's historic status as the fourth president in history to face the possibility of real impeachment proceedings in the house of representatives and today three more democratic members of the house representatives came out in support of impeachment illinois democrat brad schneider issued a written statement saying after months of relentless stonewalling by the administration. I believe it is necessary to evaluate the various congressional investigations of the president to into a formal impeachment inquiry as the only way to ensure the american people have a comprehensive understanding of the facts uncovered by special counsel robert muller's investigation and hold the president accountable for his actions special title council made clear that then candidate trump and the trump campaign eagerly welcomed foreign interference in our election. The special counsel also lays out the president trump subsequently acted on numerous occasions to block and obstruct the investigation into what occurred. I previously believed that congress has oversight and investigative efforts through hearing subpoenas and lawsuits were appropriate vehicle to uncover the truth. Regrettably it is clear that the administration has little regard for the constitution and is unwilling to provide any information in congress and is seeking to play the clock. The american people deserve to know the truth about what happened and those who are responsible must be held accountable impeachment. Inquiry is the only way to do so and i support opening one immediately massachusetts democrat bill keating announced his view of impeachment this way the report reveals several instances of obstruction of justice certainly enough to move forward with an impeachment investigation indeed if that vote today i support it california democrat mark takano said this about impeachment special counsel muller unequivocally concluded that russia interfered in our elections in two thousand sixteen and president trump's campaign welcomed the help and the president committed various ox that amount to obstruction of justice during this investigation in order to prevent it from moving forward contrary to what president trump attorney general bar and the trump administration claim the president was not exonerated of any crimes sometimes by special counsel muller in fact in his report the special counsel laid out his findings for congress to use as a roadmap to hold hold the president accountable for obstructing justice leading off our discussion tonight rick wilson a republican strategists in the contributor to the daily beast is the author of everything everything trump touches dies also this renee graham and associated editor and opinion columnist for the boston globe renee. I want to begin with where the president stands tonight tonight on the eve of his departure tomorrow night for a g seven summit with the world wondering about the mental health of the the president of the united states. I have to tell you lawrence. I can't help think that if if the president were building for the sake of public safety he would be torn down. You know what we've witnessed. These last few days in these last few days have felt like a month you know from the sort of delusions delusions of grandeur of comparing himself to god's to insulting jewish voters with this this anti semitic trope. There's just no limit but to add to that. The one ace in the hole that trump has always had the economy and the fact that the economy's in trouble. I think is really. I think that's it's really what's weighing on him and i think part is he's looking for any distraction. You can find to take people's attention away from what's happening with the economy <hes> rick wilson your assessment of of where the president stands as he heads off to the g seven look. I think donald trump has had a a a week in which he is proving that this isn't a eighty eighty seven dimensional chess game. This isn't some masterful strategy of communications or or persuasion. This is an old man who is sick and who has problems soon as mental disconnects and who has a phages and who has moments where he doesn't remember who and where he is and where the things he says that that he thinks thanks sound self-aggrandizing instead just sound like he's absolutely nuts and absolutely on the edge of of some sort of collapse that will will be a shocker to people in our politics that the master negotiator president big brain all this stuff. <hes> <hes> you know is not a stable genius in fact but it's something quite the opposite <hes> well. Let's bring in a professional opinion on this. Dr lance notice was a professor of psychiatry at harvard medical school. He first appeared on this program thirty days into the trump presidency <hes> with another other psychiatrist to discuss the mental health of donald trump which to them was already an apparent serious issue for the united states and those psychiatrists at the time decided they would embrace the principle of the duty to warn and go public with their analysis of the president. Dr dose was on this program last night. After this week of observing the president and let's listen to what he said last night. I want to make clear that there are a lot of grandiose people there. A lot of people who are narcissistic. Donald trump goes way beyond that there is a fundamental way in which as i said he's emptied. There's something fundamentally partly different about him from normal people. There's there's a it's a psychotic like state the more you press him the more you we'll see how disorganized and empty he is the more he flies into a disorganized rage and one of the things that's so striking about that is the language would you so simple about him being empty and has disorganized ridge and everything that the doctor says his something that anyone can observe in donald trump on daily basis you know i'm not going to diagnose donald trump. You know i'm not going to say that he's having a mental breakdown or any of those sorts of things. What what we are seeing however is a man who is not used to pressure you know i don't get the the the sense that donald trump has really had to deal with a lot of stresses in his life life and now he's got to deal with gun reform which is obviously shown no stomach for. He's you know dealing with. What's happened this whole situation. He created with greenland which didn't have to happen in the first place you know he's creating all these situations on top of some very real issues he should be dealing with and donald trump has never you know he's a man in who doesn't react well when he's desperate and he's desperate. You know it was great before he was president and he could be on t._v. And it could be funny and all that well these are wheel issues at play now and so we've gone from having barely functional presidency to a full blown tantrum and rick. I think that's where we are right now and rick. It seems to me that this story this analysis of donald trump a definitely connects to the impeachment story because when one a new democrat every day and this today three three come out and say i am in favor of an impeachment inquiry. It's very hard even for for republicans to say what how could you possibly of being favor of that impeachment inquiry about this man lawrence. The only easy day for donald trump is yesterday aw they always get worse. He always causes more trouble than than than he has to. He always piles one thing onto another of this large case that he's making can get himself and that's being made against him by others across the spectrum he is morally and mentally unfit he is a man who continues to do things that do nothing to advance the interests of the united states or protect the rights of the american people and so these things are adding up and i think i think we're names right. There's a pressure building on him and he feels the economic pressure coming from underneath the political pressure the fear of exposure of his taxes and business records the fear of impeachment all these things have ground up slowly holy and they've made a man who was already kind of a delicate a delicate little flower who was kind of a guy who lived in a tower his whole life and has never done it hard day's work working never taken a never taken punch in his life and he's the spoiled little brat who is now in the white house and he is feeling this pressure growing by the minute minute and he hates it he really he's lashing out and of course because he's so the honest is donald trump is not a super bright man but he's is a very fair all kind of player and he recognizes risks when they're approaching. He feels risk approaching from all directions right. Now that's why he's lashing out at everyone and everything and that's why these these cognitive deficits that are so like in our face all the time are coming to the fore because that pressure on every president has now reached a point with tamworth breaking him a rene to the question of impeachment one the any real serious advisor donald trump would upset as soon as they're any rumblings of impeachment as soon as independent counsel a special prosecutor investigating that he should behave as presidential as possible behave in a way that at least his behavior would be something that people could respect that people could could could see something presidential and but he has no idea how to do that and so when even as impeachment impeachment number gets higher and higher in the house of representatives his behavior just gets wilder and wilder he he has no capacity to behave like an adult. Let alone presidential. It's not going to happen who you know anyone who was in the white house who might have been able to to keep him on a short leash is gone and even those people pull failed at it. So who has the president's ear now stephen miller. That's what trump is getting and so. There's really no chance savings going to change yeah. Stephen miller does not have any ideas about what to do about any shakiness in the economy right now no and this idea that donald trump had that he's going to browbeat the fed into doing what he wants or that. He's going to unilaterally change the tax code. I know that constitution is an inconvenience from time to time but all these things that are that are fantasy base in his mind and the people who are left around him and we're not exactly really right there. The stephen miller is they're the ones that are the boot-lickers. They're the ones that say you know. Farts smell like honeysuckle he is. They're the ones who absolutely will never ever say no to this man. He loves that no matter how bad it is for the country or i was administration rick wilson and renee graham. Thank you both very much for for joining us tonight. I really appreciate you being here. Facts lawrence q. and when we come back u._s. Allies are now just as concerned about president trump's mental health as the psychiatrists who are publicly diagnosing him here in the united states new york times foreign affairs columnist. Tom i'm friedman trenice and there is a very deep crisis of democracy. Those are the words of french president emmanuel macron. He is hosting this. This weekend's meeting of the g seven in france a group donald trump is hoping to make the g. eight again by restoring russia's membership russia was expelled from the group group after invading ukraine yesterday. Donald trump blamed vladimir putin's invasion of ukraine and annexation of crimea on who else president barack doc obama donald trump presumably blames hitler's invasion of france on president roosevelt but no reporter has asked him about that one yet g. seven style summits have been occurring since nineteen seventy five and every summit has ended with a joint agreed upon statement issued by all of the countries involved as the host of this weekend's g seven summit president macron has decided to abandon that policy for the first time in history because of what he calls quote a very deep crisis of democracy to consider the dimensions of that crisis we are joined now by thomas friedman pulitzer prize winning columnist from the new york times and author of the bestselling book. Thank you for being late. Tom friedman. Thank you very much for joining us not really appreciate it on on the eve of a summit like this always wanna hear from you. What's your reaction to this first time in history declaring ahead of time. There's no sense even trying to form an agreed upon joint statement well. It's sad lawrence because the atlantic alliance g. seven which is not exactly part of the atlantic alliance but the atlantic alliance's been so critical all for sharing american values and building global institutions that are in our interest since world war two and i'm. I'm a big believer that these institutions really matter the world is the way it is because they exist and if we can't even agree on the simple statement simple statement like hey we should be working against climate change at a time when you know the polar ice caps are melting men were seeing terrible forest fires at our blotting out major cities in brazil. That's really unfortunate but but <hes> that's <hes> that's the trump era and prisoner macron didn't go into detail about the deep crisis of democracy presumably because everyone everyone knows what he's talking about. Those are seems to me everyone. He believes everyone just knows. Those are words that mean donald trump. We you know i mean i don't mind having having <hes> putin back in the seven. Make it the g. eight again if he were to actually take steps to reverse his violent seizure of crimea i i think it's better to have him in a rather than out but the question is in trump in but into do what into fight climate change more effectively in to reach agreement on non interference in one another in different countries elections for what purpose does he want him in and trump never says what do we know about how these how the leaders of other countries <hes> donald trump at this stage in their dealings with him especially especially this weekend when it comes at the end of a week in which they've heard him call himself the king of israel. They've heard him say he's the chosen one. They've i heard all the crazy things that everyone here has heard the president say well. I think there's a general consensus that you're dealing with an america that they've never had before four in america that really doesn't want to lead in america that looks at something like the european union as if it's a benetton store in a trump hotel that's not not paying enough rent and i think this is this is tragic. It's my feeling lawrence said both russia's putin and china's she she will be voting for trump twenty twenty for this reason because they know as long as trump is president. I states we will be an internal turmoil and chaos us and america will have a leader who will never be able to build a global coalition against russia and china have no doubt about it both putin and she will be voting trump in two thousand twenty so tom even china even facing the trump tariffs they would rather deal with the trump tariffs because they you see the whole regime the whole governing regime of donald trump as weakening america right at a time when china's focused on building a i and you know quantum computing and they want an america that basically can never build a coalition around them and that basically also can't build a high speed rail between new york and washington d. c. You know it's it's rather it's rather sad but i think that's what they want. They know also democrats kratzer anti-trade so there'll be no bargain either and the g seven. They are just holding their breath for eighteen months hoping that the election night changes everything in america yeah i mean i think that basically they understand that this america they hope is an aberration and they hope it's only a four year diversion and from an america that believes that these global institutions like the g seven are more important than ever at a time when we faced a whole set the global issues lawrence that require global governance like i'm managing all these global technology platforms now or combating batting climate change all these issues that require global governance but there is no global government all there is our institutions like the g seven likely you'd like the g twenty like the atlantic alliance and when they don't work for four years. It's such a critical moment in history. We all will suffer in the long run. What do you imagine it would mean to the g. Seven seven a tornado <hes> to the united nations if a new president is sworn in on the next inauguration day. What would it mean to their next meetings after that well you know it's really hard to really hard to know obviously they'd they'd rather have a more traditional president like george w bush tori or a barack obama but the fact is look. This is part of a larger dilemma we have. I think we're going into a world where just as averages over for every worker averages over every country now. It's going to be a real struggle. I think going forward to produce inclusive growth in all these countries and it can only be done through global collaboration. All of us are smarter than one of us and i think that the need for global cooperation going forward is is going to be more intense than ever and so having america. That's ready to play in that in that game again. We'll be essential for all these countries tom friedman. Thank you very much for joining us again tonight really appreciate it. Thank you lawrence coming up. Mitch mcconnell seems to be terrified. Democrats are gonna win control of the united states senate so terrified that he's actually gone so far as to warn the democrats not to get rid of the filibuster when they do take control of the united states uh it what it was at this hour last wednesday night that drama suddenly broke. Oh come on the show when we first brought you. The news that former colorado governor john hickenlooper was dropping out of the democratic presidential primary campaign the dramatic part hart being that it seemed very likely that has next step would be what senate democrats were hoping he would do run for united states senate in colorado the campaign to unseat the republican senator cory gardner. That step became official today. I've always said washington was a lousy place for a guy like me who was to get things done but this is no time to walk away from the table. I know changing washington is hard but i want to give it a shot. I'm john hickenlooper candidates the united states senate. I approve this message. I hope you'll join me in this campaign and he's ahead already. A new poll shows john hickenlooper leading incumbent republican senator cory gardner fifty three percent percent to forty percent. If the democrats pick up colorado they will only need two more wins to take control of the united states senate and not mitch mcconnell out of the majority leader's job. Charlie cook of the invaluable cook political report is out with new analysis this week on the upcoming presidential election and it all boils down down to this a lot can and will happen over the next fifteen months and things can certainly change but at this point this looks to be an uphill climb for the president's reelection. Charlie cook has the numbers that explain how steep that climb is and charlie cook will join join us next. I don't think cory gardner understands that the game she's playing with donald trump and mitch mcconnell kalle hurting the people of colorado. We ought to be working together to move this country forward and stop the political nonsense journalist charlie charlie cook editor and publisher of the cook political report and columnist for national journal charlie. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. I wanna start with your presidential analysis and you're talking about. It's an uphill climb for donald trump and reelection. What are the most important numbers <hes> that viewers should it'd be looking at in presidential polling now. We you know if you look at it. I mean when was the last time you saw a national credible. Edible national poll that president trump was ahead of joe biden they want. I can't even remember one. They're tied tied with biden florida <hes> and behind in every other swing state now think about that now of course bein may not win the nomination somebody else might but the thing is biden's clear leader eater right now and he's got a lead in every national poll oftentimes double digits and double digits in many of the swing state so this this looks really pretty ready tough for the president when you look at its core is about thirty five percent is gonna vote with him. No matter what forty five percent is going to vote against him. No matter what what in that twenty in the middle he's even talking to them. And what about the numbers. We're seeing that where people are saying definitely. There's the question of <hes>. I definitely will not vote for donald trump. That's one of the stronger indicators in polling because people tend to use that word definitely very lightly exactly you see somewhere between thirty two and thirty five or six percent the just say definitely they will not do it and <hes> and then maybe there another three or four or five that that are sort of leaning that general direction but these are these are tough tough tough numbers and this is with with an economy. That's been pretty good but now looks like it's slowing down and i don't think will be recession between now and november of next year here but the thing is. It's not very little question. The economy's going to be slowing down. What will that do to those swing voters that twenty percent or so in the middle that that's it's malleable the ones that are going to determine you know pretty much the outcome of this election. I just wanna throw up the n._b._c. Poll on the question of definitely problem combines definitely honestly in probably definitely probably vote for trump is forty percent definitely probably vote for the democrat is fifty two percent and charlie for an incumbent that strikes me as very troublesome number. Oh absolutely no question about it now. The thing is could there be another split decision election where the popular vote goes one way and the electoral college goes the other sure that could happen but rather than a two point gap even if it's a three or four point gap <hes>. Can you know at some point you know at some point these these are really hard numbers in terms of the electoral college <hes> so i'm against someone other than hillary clinton this this i mean i think that probably had a lot more to do. Two thousand sixteen anything else charlie of the united states senate where mitch mcconnell is out there writing and up in the new york times <hes> talking about the glories of the filibuster and why the democrats should absolutely not get rid of the filibuster which is something they can only do if they have control of the united states senate <hes> which i guess seems to be on mitch mcconnell's mind these days well yeah but remember in in his piece in the the new york times this morning mcconnell had warned democrats you will on the on the senate floor you will regret the day that you get rid of the sixty vote requirement for judicial nominee for nominations and guess what they did <hes> they do regret that and <hes> you know that's what makes the senate <hes> the senate as opposed to the house of representatives <hes> and that you're supposed to get more broadly acceptable <hes> nominations so the thing is i think harry reid and democrats made a huge mistake back <hes> what six years ago when they win they lowered the bar for for below the supreme court level and i think mcconnell was putting them on notice this one time where i think they probably should have listened to him. Last time i think gives every democrat in the senate would tell you that mcconnell was going to do it himself if the democrats didn't do it when they did it. But what do you make of the hickenlooper news. What does that do to colorado well colorado. These elect colorado was already going to be one of the top two senate targets for democrats. There were going to be going after martha mkx sally in arizona and cory gardner in colorado in both of those were gonna be top tier racist no matter what <hes> you know i think it certainly helps democrats to have hickenlooper can loop rather rather than a lesser known candidate but those were gonna be top targets anyway <hes> and and that gore carton gardeners numbers were already fairly soft even against less known candidates than john hickenlooper an arizona our most recent poll democrat mark kelly running ahead of martha martha mcsally for the democrats pretty much. All of the polls on looking at for the senate have a good news for the democrats. Yes although we haven't seen a lot of numbers out of alabama now as you pointed out the democrats need a three seat net gain to get up to fifty fifty with the new vice president breaking the tie if they win the white house but what about alabama doug jones <hes> there is a pretty good chance the democrats gonna lose. Who's that so what that means is that democrats need to win. Four seats gross four seats to net three so let's say let's say they get arizona. Let's say xavier colorado. I'm sitting in in portland maine. <hes> they're going after susan collins. That's going to be the probably the third target but after sure that particularly if they lose alabama that means they've got to pick up some well. One someplace else is going to be a david purdue georgia. Tom tillerson north carolina joni bernstein iowa. They've got to come up with one some place if they're particularly if they're gonna lose alabama which is a pretty good chance happening <hes> what about montana and what about the possibility of bullock dropping out of the presidential race as hickenlooper did following that pattern into the senate race in montana you know the book case is one where he says look. I'm an executive. I'm not a legislator. This is one case where actually kind of believe it. We're we're this is a guy that really doesn't want to join a debating society over the past been washington since nineteen seventy-two around on the hill since one thousand nine hundred seventy three the most unhappy people in the u._s. Senate or the former governors because they've had real power before and now they're in a debating society lighting charlie cook. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. Really appreciate it thank you. We'll be right back. Here's bobby kennedy in nineteen sixty eight celebrating the greatest victory of his political career in los sandals at the ambassador hotel on the night that he won the california democratic presidential primary. I wanna thank <hes> the-the shevess who is here a little earlier and and bert corona also also work with them and all of those mexican americans who were that the board and dolores huerta who was it's an old friend of mine and his work with the union the banker and how much i appreciate your coming tonight minutes later an assassin shot and killed bobby kennedy as he was leaving the hotel ballroom. No one in that room that night has done more to advance the kind of social progress in social justice that bobby kennedy was talking about in his presidential campaign then dolores huerta who is now eighty nine years old and still at it it all began and when she was twenty five years old she helped create a community service organization in her hometown of stockton california in nineteen sixty she co founded the agricultural ultra workers association and in nineteen sixty two she co founded with caesar cesar chavez the national farmworkers association she was is the first recipient in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight of the eleanor roosevelt award for human rights from president bill clinton for elementary schools else and one middle school in california are named after dolores huerta so is one elementary school in texas and a high school in colorado president barack obama cave dolores huerta the medal of honor and twenty twelve when says are shabas said dolores huerta down at his kitchen table and told her they should start a union. She thought he was joking. She was a single mother of seven children children so she obviously didn't have a lot of free time. Bud dolores had been an elementary school teacher and remembered seeing children. Come i'm to school hungry and without shoes so in the end she agreed. I'm workers everywhere glad that she did without any negotiating experience. Deloris has helped lead a worldwide great boycott that forced growers to agree to some of the country's first farmworker contracts and ever since she has fought to give more more people a seat at the table. Don't wait to be invited. She says step in and on a personal note. Delors was very gracious <hes> when i told her i'd i had stolen her slogan. <hes> see puerta. Yes we can dolores. Huerta has never lost faith in the power of community organizing and through the dolores where it's foundation. She continues to train and mentor new activists to walk the streets into history. The laura scherzer got arrested on tuesday in fresno california after this break. She'll tell us why the always busy dolores huerta they just left an event in san francisco at city hall where she was introducing nancy pelosi and making her way out of that event took so long with so many people trying to talk to her that we are going to be able to reach her only in the car on the way to the t._v. Studio where she was going to join us. We're going to reach a dolores laurus by phone in that car and joining us now is dolores huerta cofounder of the united farm workers and founder of the dolores or two the laura. Thank you very much for joining us tonight by phone and we'll get you on camera next time. Thank you very much larry so wonderful to see. That's great to hear your voice so tell us the audience y. You got arrested once again this week this time in fresno well i was there with home care workers <hes> not getting a living wage they have been trying for three years to get a contract with a federal county board of supervisors and the last negotiations they offer them ten cents a ten cent raise and they do search hard work karen people that are disabled taking care of people that singers they have to cook for them. They have to bay them. They have to be with them twenty four seven and you think that the board of supervisors without even give them any kind of a living wage the only african for a dollar an hour increase and it is outrageous as they supervises will make over one hundred thousand dollars a year and their salaries would not give these homecare occur workers in any kind of a wage they've been negotiating for three years and could not get a contract so the workers decided to get arrested and initially initially i was going to get a registered but one of the deputy sherf- a red blood or the leader of that union crews but my brother and he was a young a man by the neck and started choking them and i just got so outraged so angry not only the way that these homecare workers are treated but the way that they were physically assaulting the leader of the union so when it came to come get arrested. I said i'm going to also get arrested with them. And it's a shame that we're going to have to go go to these lengths to get their voices heard <hes> to make people do the right thing and you know. It's <hes> my taking care of people in their homes. He's either actually saving the county over fifty five thousand dollars a year but they are not respected and so many of these homecare workers <hes> you know the people of color uh of the the x farm workers that people that need to be respected and you know. I think larry and i know you're there. You've always been there but working people who our country. We need to be respected. They need to be getting paid a living wage and we've got to raise the inequity that we have in terms of income wages in our country adores really have about a minute left and i just want to get from you to our viewers. How you deal with the frustration you deal with the discouragement when things don't don't go your way and how you just been able to keep at it despite discouragement and setbacks along the way low tonight they're laying you know all we know that everything that's happening our country right now that we've all got to move to action we we bogged down and become activists all gotta stand up and we've gotta get involved because we can't make any better. Leslie are the ones that do it. Nobody's going to do it for but but everyone thinks that and then when they suffer a few setbacks activism visit more their candidate loses <hes>. It's very easy for people to get discouraged. What are you saying about. How are we can't afford to get discouraged. Caesar challenge to say the only time that we lose is when we quit and that is what the weather's slogan is about. It's about individual commitment to action and i bought a collective <hes> commitment to action shannon. We know that we keep on working and it's probably than joy employee said they can cut all the flowers but they can't hold back this spring and we are the spring we we are gardeners that have to sold the justice and they will bloom they will and we will make it happen. Swear gets tonight's last words. Laura's thank you very very much for joining us really appreciate thank you very much. Hey it's chris as from m._s._n._b._c. Every day i come to the office and we make a television show an everyday. I think to myself self. They're so much more. I want to talk about and so this is our podcast. It's called. Why is this happening and the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see <music> out every day. They're driven by big ideas each week. I sit down with a person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening new episodes of why is this happening every tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts.

donald trump president united states dolores huerta senate Democrats lawrence o. donald colorado california fresno america john hickenlooper Mitch mcconnell rick wilson obama cory gardner Bud dolores vice president bobby kennedy
Living Icon Dolores Huerta Is Still Fighting the Good Fight .

Latina to Latina

32:56 min | 1 year ago

Living Icon Dolores Huerta Is Still Fighting the Good Fight .

"See Thank you. Thank you very much thank you. That's eighty nine year old civil rights activist Dolores Huerta leading a crowd in a cheer of weather together with this Jarvis. The Laura Co founded the organization that would go on to become the united farm workers in nineteen sixty five. She helped organize the successful Delano grape strike and she was the elite negotiator in the workers contract. We recorded this conversation with deloris in front of a live audience at Seton Hall University and talked about everything income workers rights and racism to the importance of taking credit. And what it means to dedicate your life to a cause aimed beyond yourself deloris. What an honor? Thank you so much I wanNA go way back. Start at the beginning. You've said that your mother was the most dominant person in your life. What is your most vivid memory of your mother? Oh my God well. My mother was. She was not flamboyant had a very gentle demeanor spoken embrace soft voice but very very powerful and very strong always working. I think when we were kids she divorced my father because he was abusive. She worked two jobs as a waitress during the daytime and the Cannery Henry at night but then on Saturdays and Sundays she would be at home and I remember while she was ironing clothes she would would be reading a Bible stories. We show that we went to Mass on Sundays and then she finally got enough money to start her own business and then she made Richard it We had violin lessons and panelists about his tickets to the symphony. Even though she couldn't go herself so I guess when I talk about remember my mother I remember all the things she did for us I think in terms of her own persona like you said she was just a doer. She he was a doer. She's also the one who who instilled in you. This sense that social justice alright. Because he always he was very charitable because she was a great admirer of Saint Francis Xavier Your Saint Francis Xavier of course copied Saint Francis of Assisi. And the whole thing about always helping people. You had to help people even even if they didn't ask you to help them. If you saw somebody had a need. It was a responsibility to help that individual in a never expected a gratitude from on them because she would say if you want to be rewarded for something that you do you take away the grace of God for the act that you did so obligation obligation as human beings. Be of service to others. In her business she probably had a hotel a seventy room. Hotel and We always have people that live there. There were people in need. I remember young man coming to our hotel. It Loo- California. He was from Kansas. I happen to be there when he got there and he said to my mother. You know I'm new here. I don't know anybody I don't have a job and I don't have a place to stay in my mother said. Don't worry you know you can stay with us until you find the job impact when my mother pass away with bombed-out that we had so many people in my mother's hotel that have lived there for years without paying any rent but that's what she was unless you just whatever she could do in the community. Should I was struck by something that someone said in the documentary Delors. They said you were living this comfortable. Dribble middle-class life and new left it to advocate on behalf of those who have such lesson that isn't an easy choice To make take us back to the moment where you said what I'm seeing is not right and I'm going to dedicate myself to fixing it all again when you see injustice as you want to feel what can I do in a going up again. As a person of color get all of these discriminations throughout your life and school in wherever you are at work at Cetera. At that point in time we couldn't do anything about it but when I learned how to organize people how to bring people together and how to direct non-violent action to change thing that's what changed my life because then when I saw the injustice of the farmer because of that they weren't getting paid that they were so poor are that the children or so poverty stricken and I just said this is wrong. Take me back to the early days of you. F W you what did you get right. And what did you get wrong. That's an easy question to answer because when you're doing that work organizing people getting bad faith in themselves and knowing how desperate the situation is I think it's a miracle in itself that we were able to do what we did and when you think that when we started the the United Farmers Cesar Chavez his wife Helen and myself three of US organizing people's House etc we're able to get over thousand farmers Organiz initially in. It's kind of interesting because we made all of these plans of how we were going to organize the whole Central Valley of California which is eight different counties. It's it's a bigger than most states and yet we weren't able to do that because the Filipino workers went on strike and we had to support them so changed our whole plan. So I think I think I learned that not to be disappointed when things. Don't go the way that you want. And because optimum when things. Don't go the way that you want and you have all these. These plans is is because you're supposed to do something different this supposed to go in a different direction. But what a huge sense of responsibility to be on that journey and know how many people are relying on you to deliver for them right. The stakes are incredibly high. When you do the work that you do there was a lion in your official bio from your foundation on Dacian page that I loved it said as much as she was Sarah's right hand she could also be the greatest thorn in his side? The two we're infamous for their blowout arguments an element. That was a natural part of their working relationship. Tell us about one of those fights. Well Aw Kinda say. It's the way that women think in the way that men thing when we started the great boycott I was in New York City and Caesar said we should should boycott potatoes and I said no Caesar. People don't think of California when they think of potatoes. I think of Idaho so we had this big argument on the telephone so I finally said well I think I should fly back to California so that we can have this argument in person. I think we should boycott. Great Rookies California is is produces ninety percent of the Grapes of the United States of America and the employer that we were battling with that time. He both grapes and potatoes. Okay and still will. CAESAR DIDN'T WANNA pay my plane fare so he gave up. And that's how we ended up boycotting grapes potatoes. Okay in the other thing on. The boycott is I was in charge the boycott on the East Coast or what I did is I went after the small independent stores to take off the grapes this stores and they would eventually take off the grapes and we got the independent stores and then we went after the small chains and then we got to take off the grapes and then went after the larger chains and then finally the biggest chains so in California. She's doing in the west coast starting from Chicago. They were doing. The boycott procedure took on the biggest stores. Store's kind of like the macho trip. Then take on the biggest chains so while we were able to get all of the East Coast Clean Print Chicago to New York down to Florida we had all autographs out of all the stores and guess what in California they were still boycotting so then I looped to California and I did the same strategy that I did here and we got all. The grapes are under the stars over there so again. It's it's the kind of logic you take on the small ones Spurs and get them clean so then you have clean stores to send people to we'll go to that circuit. They don't have any grapes instead of just battling the biggest Shane. And I guess at one thing Caesar only did these fast that he did did he did too fast for twenty five days water only fast and his last was password for thirty six days and he wanted to bring to the attention of the the public about the pesticides economic points on our fluid. And that's why you did that last fast. But after one of his fast I think it was the first one in. I said it dive politics. Are Emily sorry that you know. I argue with you so much. And he said don't ever stop is because you keep me honest. Honest is he thanked me. You know we get a lot of the people. They kind of worship Cesar and they looked up to him and I I didn't see him in that way. You know I just saw him as a CO worker in somebody that I could disagree with what a thing to be able to say me me too. And the subsequent times up initiative from the outside it seems has been really mindful about being clear that sexual abuses says are rampant across industry. It affects women who are working in the fields. It affects women who are working in corporate boardrooms. When did you you first become aware of sexual abuses? That were happening to farm workers. Well I have to say that my own mother you know I would go work in the packing sheds and she wouldn't let me work in the fields and I didn't know why but then when we started the union will I did go out into the fields. You know and right away you saw as a young woman you feel like like the Hawks were circling around you. You know looking at you while you're working all all of the former would come around you. I was never sexually abused in the field but when I was negotiating contracts for the workers the stories were horrible. In one of the last Negotiations that was doing is hard to believe not only were women sexually abused in the fields. But there were some women that would have have children from the contractor's job security. There were other women that to make sure that they could get their job. They would have to meet the former or the contractor may be at a motel you know before the job started in. I think it still goes on today. But the biggest thing about the the fear that the woman had to report it because women they were afraid because they were afraid that their husbands or their boyfriends of their brothers or fathers that they would blame them if some kind of sexual harassment is going on is so it was very hard for women for them to lose that fear in California luckily though we have really really great laws in terms of protecting women when they are harassed the whole thing can be kept private and so that they don't have to fear that that You know their families going to the exposed the events and economic fear also because if women are harassed sometimes families worked together they would fire the whole family of the woman complain. This this is hard work. It's emotionally taxing work. has there ever been a moment when you wanted to throw up your hands and just walk away all never never and the reason I say this because I think the more people that we can reach out to the more people that we can empower and this is what we need to I do. It's like having a magic magic wand that you go into a community and you say to poor people you know what you have power and they kind of. Don't believe it but then and you give them examples. Is Mr Rossa to us with Fred. Ross you know showing US pictures of people in East Los Angeles how they had brought in street lights and and sidewalks and clinics into the community. How they police when in prison for beating up Mexican American youth and I thought man if they can do? I want to do do that to you know. I want to put a cop in prison for beating people up and it needs to see the people have the power to make those changes. I thought. That's that's it's to me like magic. I don't know that I've ever interviewed someone. Who does this type of work? And ask them if they've had a moment where they thought of work walking away and had them say no they they haven't so. I am impressed by your tenacity and it leads me to this question. which is do you consider yourself a person of faith? Oh you have to. If you don't I'll have the. It's almost impossible to do this work. It's almost impossible. You've gotTa have faith in the people number one trying to empower them That they can actually actually change sometimes. Have Faith in God that you're what you're doing. This is really going to have and I have to say this. Because when I you know I was a schoolteacher so I quit teaching school to come and be an organizer and when we started the Union of course it was no money in many members is a my family. Thought I was crazy. I'm sure I got a lot of criticisms it was like I had run away. Join the circus or something and taking all my children with me not knowing our annex. Meal's going to come from but also having to live like a farmer who's having to get my food from the food bank surplus commodities in eating what they were eating which is the beans and the rice and the corn meal. The flower you know the stuff that you get from the food bank being treated like farmer and it's really different when you're schoolteacher and you come in and you're just like a middle class person and then you know you're the same person but you're just like a farmer and you get totally different treatment. You you're just like a number. They did get a different treatment and then of course my family once we got popular. And we're in the news and everything they all change their attitudes but for a long time really really hard and it was Kinda lonely too coming from you know a city right grew up. I knew everybody and then going to delete California where I didn't know anyone and having to change some of my own behavior so to speak. You know like what you know what we're trying to do this healing work that I'm talking about. It's easy to get angry angry and to get mad at people because they don't agree with you but I I have the story I tell about a woman only started the union up a farmer. Kaz Pay Dues. They paid like three fifty a month and back in nineteen sixty two when we started. That would be like forty dollars a month. People were making like fifty to seventy cents is an hour that was their wage and yet they had to pay like the equivalent of forty dollars a month to join the union and it was very difficult and with sees it with say in you know and I had to really learn. That is that if they don't pay the dues now so that we can organize they will never be able to change their condition in a billion I believe need that and I remember going to this one. It was sixty two September Mexican Independence Day in. If I would have been in my hometown would have been getting dressed up to go to the dance. You know to go to all the celebrations so I go to this house in. This young woman opens the door. She's all dressed up and I thought I'm thinking I am in Delano California. Don't know anyone and I'm thinking. Oh she's probably going to the dance and she'll probably invite me to go to the dance with her and then when she opened the door and I said hello and he said I. I came to collect your monthly dues for the Union and she kind of gave me a dirty look and then she said to her father Pas de Niro put to the Nettle Dad. Dad they came for your money in a very sarcastic way. Okay and I thought well she's not going to the dance. That's for sure so I went and got her father's Jews News and then maybe about a month later. She comes to the office with a whole stack of income taxes. And she says here. I want you to fill these income taxes for our family with that tone of voice and insult deep. Breath went to the back of the office. I commented ten and then I came back out smiling and took the income taxes and later later on when we started this strike that same woman came into the opposite. Young Woman came into the office. And said I just want to let you know and I just took off my whole crew on strike. They're all on strike and I'm so happy that I didn't get mad at her. And now she's Michael mothery okay. She ended up one of my children. But let you know you never know about people so you WanNa get mad at them in a limo when they teach you wrongly or they don't agree with you. There are many who argue that the labor movement in the US is on the decline today. Do you agree with that assessment. Absolutely but it's not because as of the lack of organizing too many laws have been passed and make a labor unions a make it difficult. I'll give you an example of the labor unions have been trying to pass a law. Aw that if you sign a card to say that you want to get into represent you that would be enough evidence so that workers can give union representation and they have been passing laws to prevent that from happening. Well just think about it if your signature is good enough for you to buy a house buy a car get married. Did get a divorce you know and you signature should be good enough for you to choose a union to represent you and instead unions after go out there and try to organize the employers put a lot on a pressure on the workers and they fire workers or threaten workers not to join the unions. Recently I was arrested with homecare workers in Fresno there's no California They're trying to get a union contract and getting a wage increase. You know what the author was an abortive supervisors these public workers. Chris you might say the Working you know they have to be within twenty four hours a day. They have to obey them. They have to feed them if they care. They offered them ten cents an hour wage increase and the supervisors that they're negotiating with. They make a hundred thousand dollars a year. So this is the imbalance that we have right now in our society and it is very dangerous because labor unions are the ones that create the middle class. And as I said before it. We don't have a middle class. We don't have a democracy took the demise of labor is affecting our whole society and everybody knows that the wages have not been able to keep up with the cost of living in. And that's why you have so many homeless people you have so many poor people in the richest country as oral nineteen eight. I believe you were fifty eight years old. You're protesting against the policies of then presidential candidate. George H W Bush in San Francisco. Police officer broke four of your ribs. Shattered your spleen incredibly long recovery. What went through your head in that moment? Well at that moment I was just hurting it was it was a very violent attack on people were protesting the policies of a UH George W Bush at that time the one good thing that came out of that because it's a scene in Spanish it says nine Mile Noszaly. There's nothing thanks so bad that something good doesn't come out of it. Well the good thing that came out of that beating is it is it is inference cool and I get two thousand dollars a month till I die okay so because of that beating. I'm able to continue into work in a lot with my palm. Dacian of the delays with the foundation. I do not take any money from my foundation because I'm very political and we're a nonprofit organization But with the two two thousand dollars a month that I get from my beating up La- six hundred dollars a month where my social security. I'm able to continue to work for a long time but the other thing that is important to do a lot of people say well you got that beating and you seen people were killed people that were beaten with the work that we were doing. Does that change your mind about men violence and I say no you know before we started the union says it and I am. I didn't know the sesser studied. Blondie as I had a when I was going to college but when I met it made me feel good to know that. He also believed in Gandhi's philosophy and principles of nonviolence in so before I believe started. The Union We talked about that. We would incorporate into the farm workers union of the philosophies and then violence and of course we. We did follow that to see to did with his fast with the marches you know and even when people in the union were killed up we would do when someone was killed old. We fasted for three days everybody organization for faster for three days. I just you calmed down the violence. He'll when you see the violence that's been perpetrated across communities most recently the attack against Latinos happened in Texas. How do you square the Ghandian notion of a a beloved community with the violence that we see reaped upon our society? Well what I would hope is that that type of violence really really inspires all of us that we have to get involved in. We have to end the hatred and I would hope that every single institution in our country. Our educational educational institutions are publications are private organization that everybody starts making a commitment to end the racism in our society. Because I think that's where the violence stems from the basis and but also I think gender violence also. We know that many women are killed every single day in our country entry by someone does not respect that woman did sees her as a sex object or as a servant and do not really respect that woman almond. I like to say the people in remind people everything on this earth came out of the body of a woman they don't think about that often. It all even got snaps out. I think I speak for most of the people in this room when I say we look at you and think wow. This woman is fearless fearless. So tell me about the last time you were afraid I think right now I am afraid for our world world. I mean when we think of global warming and What's happening to our country into our world When again putting and the promise of humanity might see when people think of drilling in the Arctic because there's oil under the ice and when they do that it's is going to greet more global warming is going to make more methane and the plan is going to get hotter? It comes back to the electoral process about electing people. They're going to make sure that we can change. And I don't really know a lot about the green new deal. I know we've heard mentioned but I think part of the green new deal is putting in some dates out there. When can we get away from using fossil fuel for energy? We've already got the technology so again. It's a matter of will. It's a matter ladder of not just thinking about problems. But what can we do to save our planet. And that's when you asked me you know why don't I retire. I can't because we've got to to get the word out there. The people that they've got to get involved when you talk about the electoral process it brings to mind. Alexandra Cossio Cortez. Who is certainly one of the most is prominent Latinas if not the most prominent Latina in politics today? Do you see a connection between the work. She is doing and the enthusiasm she she inspires and the work that you have dedicated your life to. Oh absolutely because I think she got elected by doing a grassroots campaign in not going going to wealthy donors. And that's what we have to do. We have to go back to grassroots. I may not agree with her candidacy. I immediately issues sanders. Actually Supporting Camera Harris Okay. Okay because I think it's time for a woman. Okay women to take power. Winning are often taught not to take credit. I think let s are taught that especially it. has there been a time in this work that you have not been given the credit that you deserved. Oh let me count the Times. No I can name so many many times this happened and actually I think. A lot of women We are Kinda the field that we try to take credit for work that we're being conceited. I think the one word that is important for women to really use the word courage Ridge your courage to stand up for ourselves in this. Oh hard pros to do and you know I did the great boycott. I directed the great boycott on the East Coast on the West Coast To make sure that we got the growers to the bargaining table. I negotiated the contract but the day that they took the picture signing signing the contracts which I had just go she hated and I had just done the boycott to get the girls to the table. I wasn't in the picture. Okay why AW. Because I wasn't even in that frame of mind and I was sitting next to Caesar signed signed the contracts and vice president. You didn't Levy said. Do you mind if I sit there and I got up and gave them my chair really. Yes I did that. And so when you see you. Those very historic picture of the contract means sign. I'm not in that picture. Would you say that was a mistake. That was a very bad mistake and I know sometimes and I have to say this to myself often that when we find it hard to take credit for our work that we have to do it on behalf of women everywhere. You're in this artist about being conceited. But we have to do it for other women in the. I think you've seen that to myself because we're so conditioned and socialize is not to take credit or not to put ourselves out there in front you know and I love that saying a women's places where she wants to be a woman's places where she needs to be and I like to say when you see these big pictures of all of these men banking having meetings with this is the g seven or whoever they are and there are no feminists at that table. You can be sure they're gonNA make the wrong decision okay. They'RE GONNA make the wrong decision because they do. Lot have our intuition. They do not have our voices at the table when we talk about why women don't take credit. Part of it is that there is a penalty that women face when they do take credit. which is that we become less likable? I mean probably would have been manifest if you said No. I'm sitting in the seat and you can't have it sorry. Do you care whether or not other people like you. Can you do the the work you do and care about what other people are thinking of you. Well I think it depends who your enemies are you know. I think that something. The Bible says something like that when you're doing a God's work when you're doing justice work can people curse you criticizing. We have to consider it a blessing. Because you know you're doing the right thing so yeah people do say mean things terrible things but that's okay as long as did you have faith in what you're doing is the right thing. You're trying to help others. Then you have to just ignore what people say about you know and just keep doing the work year said than done. You have eleven children I have to. I can barely keep track of them. So that's my first question. which is how do you keep track of eleven children dron and how because I find this so hard as a mother perhaps the single greatest challenge of being a mother which is how I instill in them these values and these principles with which I have lived my life? Well I think to all mothers a Just bring your children along with you. Whatever you do my kids Kinda grew up in the moment and So it's part of the DNA basically they were on marches and and my son Rick my youngest son. He has really good way of saying this. Those of you that see the documentary. Dolores my son says yeah. My mother abandoned us in the parking lot of a store with a bunch of leaflets that we had a pass out and when people would come up and say you'll Connie's go back to Mexico says we we can't we don't have a ride okay so I grew up in the moment and even though my kids grew up really poor I just have to say. They're very resources will. My oldest son is a doctor. My daughter Angela's and oncology nurse My daughter Juanita became a teacher. Might might sending meals and attorney. And he's he's running for office this series for supervisor my daughter at least me right here. She's actually traveling me right right now. And she's working for our foundation so I mean my kids My Son Business Chef now. He's into real estate. Unfortunately unfortunately but anyway I wanted them all to be organizes but of course they all took their own paths. But they have to do but the thing is that. Bring your children with you. In the you're saying that you can teach them. As a legacy of justice you know because when when active and they grow up and go marches and they feel that energy and that power of people working together for a cause. I think that stays with them to live. What price have you paid for dedicating your life to this work well I? I don't think I paid the price I think my children probably paid a price war. Gazillion we weren't able to get mentioned. You my my mother did for US Glenn Up you know having all of these Wonderful Events and I remember being in Washington. DC once and we're going to about Leeann my daughter when he does it to me. I've never been to a badly before I thought. Oh my gosh you know when I grew up you know. We had the sympathy tickets and we were able to see all this wonderful performances and Mike. Kit didn't have of that. I had the piano lessons et dancing lesson the violin lessons. My children didn't have any of that and I think those are the sacrifices not that I made with the Mike is made and so for you. Nothing you really feel like you've not paid a price for this work. I had a very blessed life. I think I've been very very fortunate. And and Thinking of how many people have been able to organize and empower. I mean that means such an incredible gift to be able to do that and and I would hope that all of us can do the same thing there. Okay go out there and Organiz as many people as you can get them involved and take away that apathy here. Here's my last question which ages as you said. This is a moment in which even you the fearless are afraid and I think it can feel like is very dark times. What do you say to yourself in those moments when you have to organize and mobilize yourself? Well I just saying saying to myself we've got to get out there and do more work you know I like to the The Chilean poet Pablo and he said they can cauliflowers. But they can't hold back this spring and so I like to say that we are the gardeners that we have to sell the seats of justice. Don't in those those seeds of justice that we saw so not there. They will flower in. They will come back and but we're the ones that have to give a big round of applause. The thanks for joining us for this special episode. Latino Latina is executive produced owned by Julie Williams and me Maria Murielle is our producer. Caroliina Rodriguez is our sound engineer. Our Forbes Bizarre assistant producer this episode was recorded live at Seton Hall. University Hang Santos was is our field producer. We love hearing from you. Email us at all La Latina to Latina DOT COM and remember to subscribe. Follow us on Radio Public Apple. podcast Google Hookah podcasts. spotify Pandora everywhere. Wherever you're listening? Please leave review. It's one of the quickest ways to help us grow as a community

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BPR Full Show: Close Encounters of the Animal Kind

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:45:28 hr | 4 months ago

BPR Full Show: Close Encounters of the Animal Kind

"Support for boston. Public radio comes from harvard. Pilgrim health care. The right health plan can help you in your employees. Stay healthy and happy. You can learn about harvard. Pilgrim's comprehensive coverage digital health tools and wellbeing programs for your business at harvard. Pilgrim dot org head on boston. Public radio a hand sanitizer. We can't quit you but should win. Since it's all about the air we'll ask you. Then when covid nineteen hit grocery store warehouse in agricultural workers remediating label. The central society called them heroes. But they're working conditions didn't treat them like heroes. Nearly half a million culture workers have contracted covid. Joining us is legendary labor leader. Dolores huerta to discuss her life. Devoted to civil rights and why the mission of the united farm workers is still so relevant today. He can tougher of face meat alternatives in the market today but the multitude of products. Doing much to swear the more coniferous among us in fact studies show. People are eating more meat so white gives food posse right a corby kummer with break it down ahead and more on bossa. The radio eighty nine seven. Gbh broadway much and you're listening to boston. Public radio eighty nine seven. Gb h happy. Friday jen to you. And we're not reunited anymore. That was a two day kind of thing and now we're back home yet again. And i sweat pants. It's really important sweatpants. But they're so. It's good to see the cdc says it's curtains for what's called hygiene theater. Our daily rituals wiping down surfaces. Missing the air with disinfectant and pumping burell compulsively in. Her hands can come to an end. That's because the cdc is updated at surface cleaning guidelines noting that the risk this is incredible the risk of contracting corona virus touching a contaminated surface less than one in ten thousand remember the early days of the pandemic. We were wiping down everything. The rules early on. I'm sure you remember. Advise us not to touch any product in a store unless we're gonna fall through and by when we got home and wash everything we bought. If you order chinese food you had to wash the containers touching elevator button with your bare index finger. Remember instead of your fist like taking your life in your hands. Well now that is over and we're taking your calls asking you. Can you give up. Your decontaminating practices are the now so ingrained that the ideal even home without travel size hand sanitizer in your pocket feels reckless. Or are you an early adapter to stop the hygiene theatrics long ago numbers. Eight seven seven three zero one eight. Nine hundred seventy is our number. By the way i do not have a call screen marjorie so when we do take kohl's okay you. I have to say it in anticipation doing this. When we decide talk this. I just walked around the house pretty quickly i would say. In plain view there are maybe thirty bottles of hand sanitizer which probably means have one hundred in the house. I don't know and i have. I have a buddy had got struggle through this whole thing. He would tell me stories about how he would get. He would get the groceries delivered. Of course leave out on the porch for like twenty four hours almost in public radio. Emily's here of course was the fixations. Infomation sport has come down in favour of donald trump's twitter caver saying he didn't violate people's first amendment rights by blocking here reasoning. He's not an office suddenly more. So there's no longer a controversy but in the discipline clarence. Thomas takes a position that may have huge ramifications of indian tries to discuss issues from great. Britain's morning at princeton phillips has died ninety nine year old husband cleanly was longest serving constantly royal family history and the last survivor of fought in world war ii. Worked in callie. Crossley discussed this then back to america on the hypocrisy of mitch. Mcconnell's outrage over that and more ahead on boston for the eighty nine thousand six gb. After about a week. I was like super bowl. These leasing lost so. I think that we are to averse to to germ so. I'm ready to abandon all the all the parral. But i do have a lot of it too. I'm thinking maybe we should all have yard sales. Anybody coming by and by are some. Just tell you. Even though i intellectually read the cdc stuff. I know one in ten thousand is a real long shot kind of thing we we went to the studio. I was doing the exact same even intellectually. I knew you didn't have to do it anymore. Those old habits are pretty hard to break. I was wiping down stuff. I was pure selling myself as i went from room to room. Two bathroom to whatever. I have purell or some cheap knockoff. In the car every single time i get in the car doesn't matter what i've done what i've touched. I'm like bathing myself imperial so again. We've talked about this and other context about reemerging into society in some fashion. What you know in your head needs to be done and what you know was a thing of the past from the pandemic are often totally separate things. I'm guessing a lot of people you know. We all say we wanna get rid of our mass yesterday. And walking. Around with two mass. I'm double vaccinated. Why am i wearing to mass instead of one mass because the last three months i've been wearing to mass. See keep wearing masks so that's good. I'm double vaccinated. i'm going out for cocktails. Tell you that right now. This is this is our cocktails before your margerie. We all know this is like this is like nine eleven. Know peace talks about security theater. How it right after nine. Eleven everybody so paranoid about getting on airplanes that they were patting down the crutches of eighty year old women to see if they were hiding explosives in there and stuff like that that we that we went through a lot of on necessary precautions to make ourselves kind of feel better and is james fellows called the atlantic security. And it's i think it's the same kind of thing now is not the same. He's i love. James fouls is totally wrong. The differences the differences. This is there. We created a greater risk to us. Not based on fact here every scientists was telling us. You can't touch your face you have to wipe down everything you can't stop so following scientific guidelines. They now have changed their mind arguing that despite the fact that they've changed their minds people might still be legalized. I tyrod surface. We had to figure out okay. does that does. The coronavirus lasts longer on cardboard or stainless steel polyester sweater. I mean we had to go through this whole this whole thing and member. You're wiping out everything in the studio until we left the studio together. Ironically of course we are wiping everything down while you're breathing all over each other so that was because we didn't know about that then so the numbers eight seven seven three zero one. Eight hundred nine seventy. Are you going to have a hard time. Quitting and sanitizer is assuming. Do you remember in the early phases. You couldn't get it. Do you remember that. It was sort of colored paper in the beginning. Where the sponges have. You noticed you've been to cvs lately. They have no sponges auto. And there's no there's no but you know I think. I think a lot of people are tired of having to wipe down everything constantly. I'm tired of it too doesn't matter if you get in the habit and it was used thought it was at least in my opinion and you thought it was a life and death thing all the people in the world including resell wolinsky had. Cdc can say it's hygiene theater. She i don't know if use that expression but knowing that it isn't necessary and breaking the habit it's a harder thing analogous to moderate. You and i are different on this to once both of well. You're not formally free until sunday. Guess is your weeks. I was free as of last saturday. I was still really tentative about going into places even though once again i knew what the rules of the road were and i knew how safe i was. I knew how unlikely it was. That was a transmitter. it's just. It's a total disconnect. I think between emotion and intellect eight seven seven three. Oh one eighty nine. Seventy s the number at w. dot. Org is the email you can tweet us at boss public radio. Lucy says she will keep rolling because you so enjoyed a year without a common colds flu or any other virus and that is true. I mean the fluid way down this year and The people's calls up and down. But that's because we've been sitting in the house exactly when you're in a hermetically sealed unit for much of the years many of us were. I think that may have something to do with it. A korean war q are i. Thank you for calling curbing good morning. First time on time on the pike can honestly say that hand sanitizer is devils. Juice is diverse substance that we could have all gotten addicted to so long I have a huge proponent against there's no replacement washing your hands not doing this addiction that we have to hand sanitizer and you know i was working For you know distribution schools and when the school started to come back the biggest challenge they had with figuring out how to strategize getting the kids to wash their hands before lunch. And i'm studying there but they my head against the law mike. How come you've never thought about making the kids. Wash their hands until now lives now. Suddenly essay i. It wasn't a how people have completely forgotten about the benefits. Those corinne i mean y- pure on your hands at your skin is peeling off your hands like a band-aid coming off. I mean the the the dry hand problem has been a terrible scourge this season as well for. There's a wealth of information saying be misuse of hand. Sanitizer lead superbug. Yeah and wait a second. Wait a second does it does. Oh god yeah yes. There's so much information on how the misuse of of hand sanitizer leads. Doug and i have nothing to prove that has anything to do with various. But i just you know. Wash your hands before you go way since. Sounds like a lot about this. What i did for like eleven months is right before dinner every night. I'd take a shot a hand. Sanitizer was that a mistake was that was that it did. I give the bleach memo. That was the one. Yeah thank you great to hear from you. Thanks so much for your call. We appreciate it. Eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy so. Are you going to keep using your hands. Well it's only been a couple of days but the answer is i. You know. Even when i'm doing i'm sorry to be repetitive. Even when i was nervous to go into a store the other day. Even though i was i was freed as of saturday at nine fourteen. A m two weeks after my second vaccination shot. I knew that there was nothing to worry about. I was worried yesterday. As i said to you when i came to the office. I i'm like i am like so hand sanitizer up at the studio in the car back in the car in the house when i got here so the answers i hope i'm not gonna obsessively stay with us but if the first few days earn exception i'm not going to break free as quickly as i would like to break free. I guess is the answer. And i told you to mass yesterday. Wadi why am i wearing masks. Well you know. I mean you haven't come out of the house for most of this heaven for most. No but i think maybe you are. You are maybe hyper vigilant in in your efforts to keep from getting infected. Gotten the wrong car. Eleven times yesterday. I had no idea where eight seven seven. Three one eighty nine seventy. What ram is not believing this. He says commonsense would note that when someone has cova costs has runny nose etc touches things that could possibly mean a transfer. Find it difficult to believe. There's no risk of getting it from surfaces. Oh excuse me. They're not saying let's be clear. Risk it is virtually nonexistent. Isn't that the nordic winds ten thousand is going to say the. Cdc has one in ten thousand. Compare that to other risk assessments. One in ten thousand is borderline zero. Meaning it is really unlikely that you're going to get it makes sense it. Say someone's sneezing coughing or yelling into your being close to is in the air and gets into your through your nose or your mouth. Tom and maynard. Hi tom tom. Hi hi I never really did do very much. Extra surface cleaning kind of wiped doorknobs once a week. Anyway but i I think i wiped a couple food. Packages feel them plastic. And then i kind of lost interest but i hope people don't stop watching that that the touch surfaces like doorknobs and smartphones and microwave oven panels and stuff. I mean you really should be wiping those off once a week or something. Hey tom tom second said before. Long before the pandemic. You're wiping down door handles once a week. Yeah what's a what's a week or something. Yeah down once in my lifetime in my house. You're by tom clean guy. I have never wiped off doorknob. I must admit. I think i'm a person is the bottom. You're not looking germaphobe. You're like a normal human being here. Displeasing cleanliness yes. Well a little bit. You know your hands basically little typhoid marys at the end of your arm. That's i got it. That's a good line. That's a good line tom. Thank you for sharing your telling you never wipe down doorknob in your life and your your fairly clean person a doorknob now but i can see where you are if you are in an office. Obviously you want clean the microwave and all that but now in my house i just figured you know we all all get sick. That's the way it goes. Microwaves at gbh even before the pandemic like grown plants inside them. That office microwave is a whole other story officer frigerator. I mean talk. That's taking things. too far. Stepping contagion was made in our microwave by the newsroom. I'm tell you. Yeah that's the one we're paltrow dies some virus in the first thirty seconds which none of us should watch this. I think so in contagion. I wonder was that. Was that super virus or something anyway. Paltrow expires early on janine from shrewsbury. Thank you for calling paging. Hey I i would have to say that when we started with all the and santa clara reserve business stopped me nervous because twenty years ago and fifteen years ago My family was in a situation. Where both of my parents and also have my in laws Or oh on chemo. From three different doctors we were told to not over sanitizer. Put on this There from this is their whom they are in. Their bodies are used to their homes. They're used to anything that's in their home. And you and in. The process of the chemo are going to be diminishing their ability to fight back. You don't want to over sanitize and allowing for things to mutate change be stronger income in that's margin for the same reasons but that's where you are right marjorie. Yes go ahead. i'm sorry. Twenty twenty years twenty twenty years fifteen years. This is how we've been. That's sad soap and water absolutely all the time so we. When my kids actually were able to go back to school we sat down. We had a whole nother discussion. Like i don't care how much talent there aren't bringing you every chance you get your washing your hands so you have a choice to cam sanitized as you walk into or if you have chased us the sync with soap. You're doing the hora. Water adherent. Yeah absolutely is looking over. Sorry janine out. Thank you for the call janine. We appreciate what we're gonna say we're losing you know. The other thing is think about things you go to Maybe it's a family gathering. Maybe it's a wedding. Maybe it's a funeral. Maybe it's whatever it is and what is everybody doing the shaking hands and everybody running out and wiping their hand. Washing their hands before they Go to the table and dip into the hot bar future. So i think well maybe they will. But i think we've become quite hysterical about this this kind of thing speaking of that by the danvers. We're going to take a break but it would show you have to wait one minute before we take a break though. I almost did yesterday on. Because i haven't been room with people. I don't know in so long. Waiting kim janey walked into the studio. I walked right over to her. And i started to reach out my hand to shake your hand because that's what we used to do in times before and then she gave me one of those elbow deals and i quickly recovered elbow thing right right back. That's that's not the topic but it's the handshake. I mean. a lot of people found. She said six months ago he thinks of handshake may never come back. Is that not trouble. You hello i. I don't know because so many times. You're crushed by the handshake of someone. You really liked your not crush by anything are you kidding. We talk about that all the time. They fish handshake or the other. Oh i thought you meant crush like some guy who's trying to show you the fish handshake. That is a real serious. And there's a very famous person who we both know quite well Who is lord of the fish handshake which is really damning fish and shakes. So maybe it's just as well to get rid of them okay. We're going to be back in a second show will get you back soon. We will take a break. We're talking about a hygiene habits asking you not the cdc's cdc's as we don't need to worry about surface contamination. Are you ready to retire. You're decontaminating routines and seventy while pull the cranium. Welcome back to boston. Public radio jim brady madrid and just here during the break there. There's a little spot about the all inclusive campaign this fabulous new campaign that was launched a couple of years ago by boltzmann presentative very different much more diverse face. It's pretty great. If you're just tuning in we're talking about a year of living hygienically you'd call it. The cdc says we cannot dial down our compulsive cleaning habits since the risk of contracting the coronavirus from surfaces is so low. One thousand raskin. You are you ready to return to pre pandemic hygiene. Are you so used to sanitizing everything. Does it feel reckless. Or i don't know you're responsible to stop. Even the science says it doesn't make a difference. Scott is wondering if it's worth taking some dough and short-selling per burell make a little money short-selling am i know. I'm not going to explain it. I know that happened with that game. Stop thing i'm not gonna explain it jim. I can't would you like to explain it but thank you. Let me see in the stock market and listen to this. Lisbon sent this. I have not independently verified this. So i'm hoping elizabeth correctional system with some great studying hospital ers early in the pandemic that show. The most cova was recovered from the printer. Whichever used a course and the hand sanitizer stations are loaded with. I hope that's true. I have no idea. Eight seven seven three zero. Now seventy joe from. I thank you for calling. Hey joe sorry to hold you up. Well i gotta tell you. I think this is totally irresponsible. I'm a medical for fifty three years a registered nurse. I'm a registered re therapist and my board certified acupuncture surplus. I'm a frontline workers taking care cova patients. I've lost family members to friends. Those people i'm gonna tell you. Nasal camille infections are very important. That's helped people get contaminated with any germs. Not just cove okay to stop right now. Paroling i use more parrella all those people in your office. Yeah my hands are right. They're not feeling like okay. I'm gonna tell you it's just irresponsible. People need to be vigilant. We still we right now in massachusetts where i am we have. Are you still there. We are yes so we're listening okay. I'm talking on my phone. Not thought those speakerphone talked so I'm seeing so much right now. We're lucky it backing up. It's it's not so bad. But i was in maine the other day dropping my car off because it'd be fixed. They live a half hour from where it had to go and it just was in the border of maine had my buddy was gonna bring me back in a car so i said hey. Why don't we do have a bite to eat will take out so we go in. I go in my in ninety. Five becomes him with a regular mask fifty people in very small bar. We walk in the door. I get about ten feet. I turn around and he's already turned around and walked out because no one person in there had a mask right now. They have an uptick in maine. We're in massachusetts but keep in mind with all due respect. I mean you're the professional. And i'm not talking about excuse me you're talking about two totally different things. No one at the. Cdc is suggesting that that setting that you and your friend walked into is fine or appropriate. Because that's how this Viruses is transmitted what they are saying with respect to you about trust the cdc. They're not saying be reckless. They're still saying. Wash your hands and that sort of thing. They're saying the the hand sanitizer obsession needs not continued exist. That's all they're saying clean transferring one in ten thousand. So we're we're not appreciate your point of view and we appreciate your point of view. Eight seven seven. Three zero one. Eighty nine Seventy i mean. I'm correct that's what they're saying right. It's all about surface transmitter. Early on we saw all those diagrams. It was all about services all about cleaning stuff all about pirelli ourselves rather we had a producer. We've mentioned this before a young guy who's now cost right and when he was like a twenty three year old kid when we first started working fair bodybuilder fairly while young man terrific guy and we saw one. It'd be careful that we saw bulge in his pocket. One day ceesay expression. Why are you looking there. Jim i guess is the question. But in any case we saw bulge baga we said hey what's that and what was. What was it carrying which he carries in his pocket. Then this is fifteen twenty years ago. Three hundred sixty five days a year has little hand pocket size pure kind of thing so a lot of people were up even for this pandemic at least in rhode island. Thanks for calling either. Yeah hey there. It's so much money one is. I've never had my kids wash their hands when they were little. Not before meals or anything like that. They were the healthiest kids on the block. Truly all four of them. And then i have a couple of other funny ones So during the whole grocery shopping my beloved nice split duties and he would go. Bring it back. I you know. Wipe everything down and put it away. Well now he's gotten used to doing the shopping without me. So i've gotten out of going to the grocery store. That is wonderful separately. Well but i'm also in sales and i'm going to really miss handshakes an item is so glad you called whether you meet when you meet someone when you see the deal when you You know i you class them with both hands. Because you you're recognizing something i i'm that is the whole thing is beyond me. I am really gonna miss that. And i'm gonna have a tough time not getting back to it. You said it. So i am so with you every single word of that handshake thing. What's the name of the book written by anonymous till we found out who was marjorie book by the time. Prime primary colors primary colors jerry. Primary colors where the The character who really is bill clinton shakes your hand. And if you're good looking young woman the other woman the left hand starts sliding up the forearm that will be missed but that excel their cetera. But i am so with that caller. Any probably pooh-poohed this. I really don't understand. That was a huge part of like connecting to another human. Being is the touch their hand shake their hand. Grasped their hand fisher. Not we know. Nobody likes fishing. And that's that may be gone forever. I think i'm in the minority. Here i kind of like the elbow thing. I know a lot of people. Think it's stupid and silly dunno and if it's cloth the cloth like winter is that the same thing is touching flesh. I think touching shot the same. Things touching flash jim. But it's kind of fun i mean. Bill clinton touching flesh hand. Kind of i don't mind it. But i think i'm in the minority there. Sarah from boston minute. Sarah take it away quick on sorry. Go sure. i'll be quick. Thanks i cannot wait to get rid of this hand. Sanitizer obsession and to see the public hand. Sanitizer stations Disappear because back. When i needed hand sanitizer during soviet there is no worst feeling in the pit of your stomach then using that public hand sanitizer station and finding it's empty and realizing that the handle you just touch touched by everybody has grown this woman. Great point kimberly referred to ignore. That was a great point. That is a great point. Has that not happened. Stores who have the hand sanitizers and some places won't and you're putting your thing for your debit card. You know putting little numbers in and there's no place to wipe your hands but anyway i i'm glad to know that it's less likely we're going to be contaminated that way so we can rely very unlikely not just less likely virtually impossible one in ten thousand according to a shell wilentz gain or colleagues of the. Cdc that's good enough for me. Okay we are done coming up. We're gonna be talking to a recruiter yesterday. Moore's whereas legend deloris wherever i was momentarily confused there. Yeah we are talking to the legendary lor. Dolores huerta who was a co founder of the efforts to fight for farmers rights back in the sixties and seventies check in with her much going on today on the and she is ninety. She one june well. We'll find out next. She's on eighty nine seven. Gbh in boston public. Welcome back to boston public radio. She is margery eagan. I am jim brady. One of the first actions president biden took to reorient the values and goals of our country and to assert his vision of the united states was a symbolic one. He put a bronze bust late. Civil rights. activists than labor leader says are chevette shabas along with dolores. Huerta was a co founder of the united farm workers. They push for better wages. Working conditions dignity respect issues that have been highlighted amid the pandemic dolores. Huerta joins us to talk about her and chevette activism and work remains as relevant today as it did when it all began in the nineteen sixties and for those of you who live in california or washington state. You know that. She is joining us on the eve of dolores worth the day which happens to be your ninetieth birthday tamara. Dolores huerta happy birthday and it is a real honor to have you on our show. Well thank you. Thank you very much for having me our pleasure. Thank you and happy. Birthday for me as well dolores. So before many people remember the your battle for farm workers rights back in the sixties and seventies before we get to how relevant that is today a sense of what it was like back then. What farm workers were enduring. What those of you who tried to fight for their rights endured well but we started organizing farmer because there are being paid like seventy cents an hour. They had no bathrooms and deals at all. You can imagine what this was. This was like especially for the women where they're out there and field as probably twenty miles from the nearest town and no gas stations. No public bathrooms allow them to go to a. They were not provided a water. Oh by the way. I'm the bathrooms. You can imagine what that was like especially for the women where they had to take towels or sheets and make a circle around each other. Yeah when their business There were no potable drinking water provided to the workers at all conditions miserable no risk working from setup to sundown not overtime pay nothing like that so the poverty was just a cruel the poverty that they were living in so we definitely had to do something to change those conditions. And you did. And i think i think it's fair to say the two of you help change the world but when when you look at today despite the progress you made and you see. I don't know what the precise number is summer. In the neighborhood of half a million farm workers agricultural workers came down with kobe. Nineteen the working conditions and plenty blazes. Continue to be atrocious. Wh what does that say to you. Dolores worth well. We still us importantly a situation room. Cuomo salat respected or recognised just recently in the state of florida of the governor descent. Is there Decided that the farmer should not get back sedated or could not sit until they provided an identification and many of the farm workers are undocumented. Many of them do not live permanently. The city florida because there are migrant workers those workers will be traveling a to upstate new york. They'll be traveling to georgia north carolina and some of these a states and if they're not vaccinated if any of them have they will carry that with them and so i think this is very typical of the types of decisions that have made that decision to have made it a big farm workers. The other thing is that we have an employment insurance benefits for former. 'cause break comprehensive workers compensation to get hurt on the job disability insurance and of course the right to organize. Unfortunately i would say that the majority of probably besides california and hawaii. The other states of the united states of america do not have comprehensive workers compensation when they get hurt on the job. They don't have an employment. Insurance wonder caught between jobs for their migrating and And you know they don't have the right to have a former union so we still have a lot of work to do with farmer because had to stick. I think new york state just recently in twenty nine team. They did approve a bill of rights for farmer. Because kerry kennedy robert. Kennedy's donna had been working out for about a dozen years and in colorado there now just considering the bill to give some rice farmer because they don't have these do not include an employment insurance or the right to organize biden administration on vaccinations for people who are not american citizens who are farm workers who are working in the field. Jill biden california's day. Delors worth yes. She didn't actually. We actually had the discussion about what's happening in florida. And we were able to talk to one of the people from who just a got back onto the commissioner by both sick. His name is gone solace about the situation and he just was just recently rehired to work with the department of agriculture. So we're hoping that those conversations will lead to something to do something employer. We're talking with laura's wartime issues. The co founded united farm workers. You know dolores. I like to think that what you as organizers went through years ago will not have to be repeated. But i had forgotten until i was reading about you and preparation for talking today. The kind of violence you did endure picketers sprayed with with sulfur. You were beaten by the san francisco. Police you broke ribs. Yes and unfortunately we see that that type of violence still in effect when it comes to people that are protesting and that's important but but of course that doesn't mean that people should stop a protest march in because this is the way that you can get the message out to the to the american public of changes that need to be made when you were honored a couple well a bunch of years ago by president obama did the two of you have a conversation about cca or yes. We can which most people credit to barack obama. I think a lot of us know that it started with you. Did you talk to the president about that. I stole your line. Will actually the first conversation that i had with the president obama when i met him in that was of course when he was running a where person and the first thing he said to me after he said lull. I stole your slow. They told the story doors. Where can you tell the story about how it came to be my sponsor the president when he said that as i said yes you did thank goodness i love that the circumstances that caused you to say i think we're in arizona. Was it not on my right about that. It's right and actually cesar chavez has been doing twenty five day water only fast a because in the state of arizona. They had pass a law. That was signed by the governor. That if you have a farmer on strike they could go to prison in the form of anybody said anything you could also go to be imprisoned for that and so caesar started a pass to do kind of bring to the attention of of of the world. What was happening to parkas arizona. So i i was of course with other people organizing people to come to a join us every night. We had rallied. We had a mass and in speaking to some of the professional latinos in arizona. I said to them. I was inviting them to come in to help us in this campaign that we were doing against the governor and to join us sees fast and they told me in california. You couldn't do all of those things but in arizona. You can't in spanish. that's no say play nassir play in arizona and my response to them with and That evening when i went to give a report to the rally when i said Gave them that report. I mentioned that. I respond to the everybody jumped up. And he started clapping their hands and saying cease play. So that's how it was born. I like to save came from the universe. Well it did. And it stayed with us and beautiful ways. We're talking to dolores huerta. So how much does our immigration policy play to. What's happening with farm workers in twenty twenty one. Well it plays a lot. And it's a really interesting because i think part of the one of the immigration bills they have in the congress is to bring in more Horn workers into the labour force. And right now. A usually in all of the rural areas we do have high unemployment and pandemic. It's been even worse and so bringing in foreign workers. More workers will really not not help the situation. So we we have to really take care of the local farmer the farmer because that are in the labor force right now and make it easier for them so provide a proper transportation for them so they can get to a to the work site and transportation would be saved. I think one of the problems that we had during the pandemic is palmer transported often in either buses or vans and and there's no spacing they were not provided the p that they needed. That's why so many of them were infected. And in fact in some instances here in california farmer because actually had a work stoppage so employers would provide them with a protective equipment and some employers even of fired workers if they didn't come back to work when they protested because they didn't get the. Are you hopeful that we every few weeks delors worth that. We speak to ali noorani. Who is the head of something called the national immigration forum and we were talking to him the other day about the possibility of comprehensive immigration reform when senator mansion came back from the border and he said realistically what is more likely is a pared-down immigration reform one that deals with the so-called dreamers and one that provides a path to citizenship for agricultural workers in this country. Are you hopeful that there can be sixty votes in the senate to support such a thing. I think so i think so. I know senator feinstein has had a bill in congress for the last eight years or so Try to give a special recognition of farmer because in a special pass to citizenship for the farm workers. So i think that if Senator mansion says that kind is a good indication that that that could happen and i do see climate change in our country right now when we have more compassion that has been exhibited especially with our president is up to speaking of the poor and working people. So i think it's possible. I think that doesn't really take care of the total immigration issue because we have people that work alike in construction many people who do take care of the children at the elderly. Do the cleaning buildings cetera. The we have a lot of of the workforce is a documented in those those workers also have to be addressed. Also you when you say. We're making a lot of progress in this country on some fronts and obviously switching from an anti union anti-worker president to one who talks about those issues. All the time is a plus. But but we've heard preliminary results from very important union election out of bessemer alabama for amazon. Half the votes have been counted and It looks so far like a two to one. No vote was younger. I was a union president. And i organized in some southern states harder by the way our greatest inspiration was you and says are shabas. I should say so. That's why it's so thrilling for me to talk to you today. If if unions continue numbers continued to decline it. It's very hard to achieve the kinds of goals that you fought your whole life. Isn't it yes it is. It's unfortunate that you have this anti union sentiment especially in the south and places like texas these right work laws when you think of unions. They are part of our democratic institutions. And because basically what a union is. It's an organizational workers and when you think of the employers. They have many organizations that they belong to. I can tell the agricultural employers they have. You know the federation the western association of growers associated farmers on and on and on so when workers should have that same democratic right of having their own organization be represented not only on the work on the work site but also in the state legislatures in the us congress so this anti union sentiment is actually anti-democratic and we know that. Labor unions are essential to our democracy because labor unions create the middle class. And you cannot have a democracy if you do not have a middle class. Have you met The former mayor of boston. Who is the new secretary of labor. Who as you probably know. Marty walsh comes from union background. He was the head of the building. Trades here in. Boston have got an opportunity to meet him adores worth. I may have met him in the past is his name is very familiar to me in his face. But you know in my travels. I have met many many. I have been in boston In the past. I may have run questioned. Question you're delores were. I learned that you had eleven children. They're grown up now. Obviously grandchildren as well. But i also know that you're a big supporter of the yarra the race for for women. I'm wondering how what you learn trying to be an organizer co-founded united farm workers and bring up eleven kids. Women have a very bifurcated life in this regard. The workforce and and home tell us about how you how you managed and why sport the ira. Well i pretty much did. We'll women's you have to ask for help with our children. And i think that's important that women need to understand that i know we're supposed to have responsibility to raise chilin daycare for children. But that's why universal childcare so important. And i know that this is on the president. Biden's agenda because we do need women not only in the workforce but we need women and civic live and every woman should every family. I should not have to worry about. The children are being taken care of and we have universal childcare. Not only are they safe but they're also being educated. So this i think is a relief. Top priority for women and for the equal rights amendment. My goodness in two thousand twenty one. We can make history in in twenty twenty. We celebrated the one hundred fear. Women having the right to vote but anniversaries. Who when women got the right to vote of but in two thousand twenty one with actually celebrate equal for women will be part of the constitution of the united states of america. So this is really important impacted. There is a website right now for the list. We want more information on equal rights amendment e. r. a. Y. e. s. Twenty twenty one dot ord r. a. y. e. s. twenty twenty one dot org. And we do hope that the us senate a will clear the path so that we can have finally the equal rights for women be part of the constitution of the united states by the way for people were confused about what the status is is last year. Correct me if i'm wrong. Deloris the thirty eighth state which was what was needed. Virginia ratified which should have made it part of the constitution but opponents of the ira contend that. The deadline for ratification has expired. And that's why the critical the house has already accepted. The critical issue is whether the senate can pull together the votes to say that the there was no expiration date and that it is now part of the constitution of the united states of america that expiration date has been moved a couple of times and there is a legal decision. That says that it can be moved again. You dolores huerta you worked for many years. Of course with says. I chev as people for guard him as a hero for his bravery in uniting the farm workers. Obviously with you as well but you got any good little inside dope stories. You know about him that we may not know that part of his personality a part of what you enjoyed about working with them well he he was not a very good joke teller off his jokes were very corny but people would laugh at the just to be polite. Remember any i. Don't i really don't but they were not really funny. So that's too bad. But he was. He was very committed individual. He was totally committed. Farm workers people. With to caesar well. You're the leader of the chicano movement. And he'd say no. I'm not he said. I am the president of the parmesan cheese. It was very very humble and often when people would say i remember once when people were shouting diva chavez a child and i kinda winced and i said something wrong he said. I really don't like to hear that that. So he was and he was also very forgiving in that. Many people remember another time when one of those people was shouting viva chavez and he said i remember one that individual dot even. Give me a meeting without even meet with me to talk about organizing farm workers while then people would the bad baltia hammer it. Because during the sixties we were considered by some of the very militant organizations we were not militant enough to them and then the organization on the right wing. They would call us communists and radicals and so we were kind of in the middle and some of those people and afterwards would come up to season. He was just very very polite with them even though they had been saying terrible things about him. You know by the way before you go. When you mentioned how humble the great cesar chavez was the great dolores huerta was pretty humble herself. I remember the story about when he said who's gonna nominate you for vice president of the union. Your response was i. Don't i don't need that title. I don't need it isn't that isn't that what you said to him. Yes that's exactly. What i said in my i just want to say that In terms of being a feminist and having feminist lens on We definitely have to change that mac. It's been a little difficult for me to change my stance on something like that. Because i think we as women often we are so socialized that we are here to serve others especially men and that we have to climate change that to take credit for the work that we do not to be able to stand up and and be proud of who we are and and kind of you know just adopting conceded when we stand up ourselves and i think just socialization that we have to change us women but on the other hand on the other hand i always feel that i get a lot of recognition but i'm also standing on the backs of the five martyrs that were killed in the united farm workers. I want a young woman from boston. Named an friedman who was killed in a sugarcane strike in florida to down by a truck i second. Marta was an arab. La was killed by a deputy sheriff here in kern county california and then we had three of their martyrs. Goofy contreras was killed by met by halo bullets in a letter strike and collect cicle and donate lopez you know at the young man who was killed because he organizes company to vote for the union. This was after the ale. Rb was passed and then we had one. the coosa was shot in the heart by labor contractor. So you know. I get a lot of recognition. All of our five martyrs and many of the farmers who were beaten in the winter jailed. Many lesser homes lost their cars. So these are the shoulders of the people that i stand on. And of course it says it also and they're not recognize. The names are not known. Dolores we're almost out of time here but I know you're celebrating your ninetieth year. Here you sound like you're about fifty. Do you have any tips mean lot. Take forty jay vital secrets to share about how we can sound like you if we make it as long as you have. Yeah well. I'm actually going to be ninety. One ninety one god. Excuse me well. Basically i think we just have to keep busy. Keep active and i. I keep very very busy. And i'm also vegetarian. All i think that also helps a lot. The main thing is just keep back. It keep physically. I keep mentally active. I think that helps a lot. Okay happy ninety one and we are thrilled to be able to speak to you today. Thank you so much for calling in. Thank you very much and by the way. She's a has canada double meaning. Because not only does it mean. I guess we can but it also means yes i can so i think that's really important for all of us are remembered by working together taking recommend non-violent action that we can only make progress and our nation especially at this critical time. Thank you very much exposure to talk to you. Thank you very much thank you. That was the voice of labor activists. Dolores huerta she of course is the co founder of united farm workers and we very much appreciate joining us up nex. Emily roti stripper famous lists of assertions and aggravations. Keep your dial on eighty nine seventy b. h. boston public radio head on boston public radio an increase in anti-asian violences prompted many asian families the streak frankly with each other about how to protect themselves boston. Globe business on the show is young. Right for generations of asian americans were taught to keep their head down quietly assimilate shirley join us to discuss. How silence might no longer be golden and more evangelical minister. Franklin graham is coming under fire from his own base facing criticism over facebook post read said he believed jesus christ would have advocated for vaccines. Reverend's i own price will join us to discuss this where anti-black racism and anti asian racism intersect and more than the bestselling biographer of leonardo. And steve jobs walter. Isaacson will join us to discuss his new book about gene editing. All that ahead on possible. The radio eighty nine seven. Gbh welcome to our number two of boston. Public radio eighty nine seven. Gp h hello again. Jim you don't ever finish talking to dolores worth during the break house thing. We should have given a shout to his. Wendy murphy is worked was talking about the fight to To convince the powers that be that the Deadline has has not expired in one of the lawyers actually leading. That fight is wendy. The person who we should great great work on a whole lot women. Yeah in any case. That was That here with us in studio three for famous list of fixations foam nations. That was a stall by the way. Because i forgot we were doing second. And moore's emily rooney hopes to beat the press which you can catch friday nights right here on h. Two at seven o'clock. I remember who you are. Hello marjory how are you great to talk to you. So it's it's disheartening. To see pose like this writers ipsos poll disheartening. Disheartening varies. heartening is not go ahead. I'm okay you say it's tragic falling is calling and lamma paul's any case three months after this january six on the capital about half of republicans believe the siege was a nonviolent protest or the handiwork of left wing activists Trying to make trump look bad. Six and ten republicans also believe the false claim that the presidential election was stolen. So what what is to be done to people. Just keep living in this World of false information. We have the same reaction to these kinds of polls and i wonder if they really believe this. Or they're saying it to be in lockstep with clue they believe is they're fearless leader. Donald trump do. They honestly believe i can see why more of them. They believed that the election was stolen. But do they honestly believe that. The people who attacked the capital were anything other than supporters of donald trump to. They really believe there is no evidence that any antifa were involves whatsoever. There's been a thorough documentation. That has come out of every law enforcement agency in the world and there will be more coming during trial i mean. I can't believe that they honestly believe well. Laura ingram tells them that they belong. No there's somebody else who tells him that name is donald trump understand and a couple of weeks ago. Trump on on fox news was talking. About how a loving the thing was yeah. No one was hurt. How they've loved fees between some of whom are dead said that no one posed any threat which was clearly wrong. All you have to do is look at one video to know that it posed severe threat to all to every lawmaker in that building and other individuals including the capitol police concerned. Enough about this frank. No i'm serious regardless what. It is as sincere belief or because as you. Emily said i maybe they they think. That's what their leaders trailing jim. This is an alternative reality extremist party. I mean how do you go forward in a democracy when half of the other party or more is living in a false alternative reality sixty percent of them still think that And this i'm with you on this. I think they do believe this one. There's not a legitimate president of the united states of america. Some of this stuff is gonna come to trial too. I mean i for one. I'm not big on suing the news media. But i think those two lawsuits filed by demands. Mannix against fox are going to be extremely relevant tori because like where did that get going that those companies conspired to have somehow switch the votes from donald trump to but where. Where did that even start. What's the genesis of it and if they can break that down through trial and prove that it's false. I think more people will be convinced. What else you know. What else is is hard for me to understand. Why is it that if you make a mistake in the newspaper or you make a mistake in your news broadcast you got to correct it. Why don't they how. How did they get around. That was they owe cels newsmax. They've already responded to that. It's actually the most i can't. I don't have the quote right in front of me. It's humorously You know it's so fox it says we are just following the news so in other words there was a rumor that got going whether it was sydney pollack or something and not sitting politics. Sumitomo is city policy film director. Who is now saying in her proceedings against her who what reasonable person would ever believed anything. I said that's her defense litigation against her. That's that's what fox depends is weird just following the news. So if giuliani said it and What's her name's. Sharon said that that they're just picking up on but that wouldn't work work for the boston globe that if the boston would just. So that's what i want to any legitimate news. They may be part of what emily saying. These dominion case very serious being the ending of these companies first amendment lawyers say they have a really very thin and because you've got to prove actual malice and all that stuff. They've they've got it in this one. Well you know. It's great by the way martyr. You're tournament this last week. Win a guest and because they're so concerned about litigation when a guest propagates one of these these phony theories. The anchors are like in panicked trying to shut them down now so they won. No even the illegitimate because they this buttresses. The case against them you know there were reporters all along who were saying that it was bogus and their voices got no. Sean was his name. It people people were saying it. They were correcting the anchors. But got an actually now. Fox is using that. As part of their case you see we did rebut that on air but love smith before he left. What shepard smith used to correct yes see repeat though how he started this piece of the segment sixty percent either. Believe or think it's appropriate to say they believe the election was stolen and fifty five percent think it was either a peaceful demonstration or that there was left-wing activists just trying to make trout sam group. That says we're not going to get the vaccine to god family ruining speaking out saying so no baker. Our governor said during a press conference wednesday when he was asked about the vaccine covid nineteen vaccine porce passport. he's joining some other republican governors. In this. what do you think emily. You know i honestly can see both sides of this. Hate to be. Wishy washy. But i can. I can see why companies airlines movie theater. You name it. Restaurants would want some proof of vaccination before you resume. Nightlife is normal. Let's put it that way. And i can also see why it would appear to be an extreme invasion of privacy. I mean i was trying to do a little research on this to see if it was ever enforced before. Vaccines were enforced in boston and cambridge during the small pox epidemic. And they're enforcing you had to. Have you know a car or if you refuse to do it. You had a card that said that you didn't you hadn't had one. So they has been some precedent for this. But i mean. I heard for instance one of the reasons. We all got those cards when we left. Our various vaccination sites is because they were warning you that you may have to prove that you got a vaccination somewhere down the line. I mean those little cards are hardly going gonna fight it. Because they're easily repr- reproduced and that kind of thing so anybody could just stick one of those things in their wallet. But if they had some more formal Approach to this. It might be okay both ways. I'm where you are. I do see both ways. There are privacy. Concerns are also great equity concerns because when you talk about access and that sort of thing it's clear there's less access for low income people and get it not because they don't want it exactly however the other side of this to me is again. I don't know where lena win. Is the former public health commissioner in baltimore. Who's on cnn. All the time fabulous spokesperson these issues. I don't know where she is on the passport. Thank but she was critical of the cdc's several weeks ago before they came out with guidelines. On what you can do if you're vaccinated. And her argument for and they finally did their her argument. Forward is let's create an incentive for people on the fence to get vaccinated. You can do x. you can get on a plane. Whatever let you can't without you know that kind of thing and so the think. Maybe now's not the time. And i hope that's where baker's going. It's just too early. Because i was. I think having a conversation reading from the globe about creating a barrier before people have even had an opportunity to be eligible vaccinated. Let's focus on getting people vaccine that he may be right about that however once everybody's had an opportunity to get a shot. I like the idea. Maybe the passports the right vehicle. Maybe it's not to say this is the way you get to do all this. You've been missing for about what i could see airlines for. One thing wanted to enforce that when you want to know the everybody on your flight vaccinated unless you're in crazy florida or some other banning private companies. It seems to me that these your path years for private companies to do it. I was reading this morning that some bar in colorado was vaccines. And the you know what hit the fan out there but it could be just private companies saying you wanna come in gillette. You wanna go to fenway. Wanna go to some that. They've already said so. The airlines have said that don't have a arguments courses. I can understatement overreach. It is government overreach. Maybe it's temporary. Both ways kaplan same thing that he he doesn't think it's going to be medical emphasis not going to be a government kind of thing it's gonna be better and frankly you know when you can't make this argument obviously until people do have the opportunity to get axion. You're not gonna do it when we're still and i also think if you have the wherewithal to go to a game gillette stadium and see the patriots play. You probably have the wherewithal to get a vaccine. So what do you do. By the way we're talking about domestically how about internationally just for a second. I had vanessa curry on the other night. Who runs seed global health and obviously at harvard medical school talking about some of the countries sierra leone zombie it wherever she's dealing. I was looking up some data that day kenya. just listen to this statistic. There hope the kenyan government is that by the end of twenty twenty three. I'm not misspeaking. Twenty twenty three thirty percent of the population will be vaccinated two and a half years from now. They're hoping to hit bad. Is it even though i don't i don't know but i just know that countries have not been hit that hard. It's not no. But i'm what i'm saying vaccination rate and the ability to move so there's a there's a domestic taxing passport issue which is really what we're talking about and there's an international one of the international on the equity thing is on steroids serious concerns. We're talking to emily ruining Just one last thing. Jim is that issue with kenyan these other countries they don't have the poverty. They don't have the money to purchase the vaccines the players by expertise. What one of the things. Vanessa curry dr vanessa. Curry was saying the other day. The number of deaths in amongst healthcare workers around the world. It's like seventeen thousand one every thirty minutes. It's happening to some degree here. but much more. In poor countries around the world there is not a healthcare infrastructure that pre existed the number of doctors for example per ten thousand people as infinite testimony. Small compared to what it is here so i think the primary thing is less. I hope i'm right about this. Less the financial. You're right and i more more the The infrastructure the other night one another incredible statistic hadn't thought about for this discussion kovacs which he knows that international effort to get vaccines to poor countries around the world so far to eighty six countries. They've delivered thirty six million doses. That's less than five hundred thousand doses per country at per country and that's the major international effort for the non wealthy part of the world which shows that they have a hell of a long way to last least of their worries vaccine passport. And it's probably true. So emily rooney. You're the you're the media maven costs. Call me run to emily's media maven on this story Apparently leaks were gushing out of the trump white house. Not so with the buying white house. I don't think it was true of the obama white house either. So so what's the difference. Well i mean. I'm telling this story for the press tonight so i was going back and it's actually just astounding. I mean some of the stuff. We had forgotten all about like remember that all that stuff with that beautiful hope hicks. Who was the communications director and rob porter the eventually got fired from so there was a lot of there was sexual intrigue. There was all that stuff with all the chiefs of staff one by one by one who dropped anthony scaramucci basically running rents re rinse priebus at town. Then there was all that stuff about like when When the bipartisan group of senators got together they had a meeting and then one of them leaked that trump had called haiti a blank whole country and it was one after the other the other so the washington post wrote this piece. This week says reporters drank lustily from the fire. Hose of leaks. That emanated from the west wing. During the past for years president donald trump's inexperience in chaotic management style bhagat west side story level infighting among subordinates. And they go on to say since then. The pipeline has gone dry and one of the elements. I was actually watching that Greg gut filled show the other night. Because i've been doing it for a piece tonight as well one of the things that one of the people mentioned on that show while i was watching it was that all those reporters bob woodward michael wolff jim acosta jonathan karl who got these book deals about things that trump said to them interactions. They had with trump. i mean none of that is happening. And basically there's a thirst for some of that even if we look in deep into our souls we can probably say some of it was intriguing and entertaining and you know so much of what came out in. The trump white house was so cookie. I mean one of the pieces. I look that was from the view and i had forgotten this that somebody who only worked at the white house. Three months had access to trump's daily minute by minute schedule and they leaked out this diagram. That showed how much time he spent on twitter. How much time you spent watching tv. How much time he was doing this phone calls and know dallying around versus executive time. And you don't see now one bit of that coming up. I mean i would have a hard time recognizing ron claiborne. Who's the chief of staff. I mean it's like okay. I mean gen- pakistan. Tv most days but a lot of these peoples good. Yeah she's very very low key. There's nothing to compare her to. Sarah huckabee sanders or sean spicer. Who got everybody. Fired up a riled up or angrier. Whatever it was you know by the way that person will only been there. Three months ago that access. He was working part time at the white house. Part time at mcdonalds. wise it suggestion. I have a suggestion for you. Emily for the next beat the pressure. Maybe down the road or something. I have really noticed that. The the the mosque the flame like attraction to racing. The latest news has as hoped for really dissipated since by became the president. Because there isn't any okay. It's boring going. There was news. Every thirty minutes in quotes. A lot of it was twitter but we made it news to jim. Let's but i mean. I always argued that anything. The president said or tweeted was legitimate news. It's the president right and states regardless of how ridiculous it was if it was the fake new york times. I mean that's what he said. But you know you can watch. You can watch other fiction shows on tv. You can read books. I mean. I feel liberated from the the president who was in my brain four-lane highway for four years. Gone now and and you know i can actually like pick up a novel. Yeah i mean it's a whole new things don't always sixty percent of them. A republican got. You gotta admit in marjorie to fixated on cnn and don lemon and you know absolutely. I don't want you to any more. I just do. I watch jeopardy possum time. Okay so emily is here for those things as well as for this show. I'm so we done the same thing about the guide niagara falls when i saw him standing there. Okay because you have to explain weeks ago. Last time i was on On boston public radio. I said i'm going to do a list of things that are are my niagara falls and had gotten that phrase from my daughter who said it came from this old abbott and costello. Where did they go crazy over. The mention of these certain things and slowly. I try to get this skit if they don't get it at all. But that is become a freeze and lexicon which i wasn't familiar with but my daughter said to me when i complained about something she said. That's your niagara falls. So then i made a list of things that are my niagara falls but ladies and gentlemen of ballistic community. Jim has made a list of his niagara falls. So we are going to a. He said she said niagara falls. You can you can speak to all of them. Do you wanna go first emily. I'm gonna have to repeat some of the ones. I already because my the first one on on my list from a few weeks ago is i go crazy with any kind of a beeping noise any. Gp noise whether it's a battery or something outside you know honking horn eighteen anything especially steadily beeping. And especially if i can't find the source drives me crazy okay. Did you all doing number one. This one is me and while blast emails. I can't even talk about martin both in the same boat. There's nothing in the english language. I hate worse than when someone uses an adjective before the word unique. Very unique unique. Or it's not right. It's not very unique or particularly unique or pay one year anniversary or ten year anniversary. That's up there. See what are you talking about. It's either the tenth anniversary or ten years since so all right now as you all know i love animals i particularly like dogs but i go crazy when somebody loves their dog bark just incessantly says i mean i'll open my window and say your dog is barking six. Oh my god. I mean there are people in the cape who tied their dogs up. I do like i feel so good. There's one to across the street from me and both of them are beautiful dogs. But you know. I'm sitting outside. You know clipping my hedges or reading. It's like the dog is barking. And what can i do. Okay ma contrite so you go to. let's say i don't know the supermarket and you're looking for a space and every spaces full. Yeah finally some guy. Walks out puts his groceries in the trunk. You'll excited they sit in the driver's seat. You're getting ready to go. And they start eating their lunch talking on the phone and don't move rather than leaving. That is an excellent right shows. Jin has to park in the fire lane. Jim once and that was twenty five. That the you're gonna you come up to a traffic light and you're like the fourth car back the light less five seconds. You don't get to go more. Come up to a traffic light. This one in brooklyn drives me nuts. It's three minutes three minutes before it's my turn is figure another way to go. So lights are either too short line for too long. Has the longest red lights. I'm sure means they turn a smallish person sitting in airline seat in front of you in full recline to the point where you can not sit in your seat get out of your seat and the pain in your knees is excruciating and as we know you gotta get first class tickets as you know forum and flight back from london several years ago which i've talked about on the air before i was told i was removed from my seat and told i had to stand for the for the rest of the flight and if i pushed up the seat of little eight year old boy sitting in front of me one time more time the air marshals me at logan well let me tell you i almost kicked him but that's fine go ahead this is one that drives me crazy discontinued find a sneaker or whatever it is whatever it is the next time you go to get it. It's discontinued products. Do this all the time trying to save the next. no. I want the thing that i got. That works discontinued okay. Here's my last one. And i have to choose to left. I was gonna say. I hate the expression the pond when referring to koshin. But i hate it so much. I can't even mentioned. I will do this. One instead. is my final one. You're sitting in the theater. Who were the last people to come but the people who have the middle seats. That's bad. no so they climb all over you and then when there's an intermission they get up they go out and who were the last people comeback in the inner mission into the middle seat. Those same one more. You get one. More ahead certainly. I think i'm gonna tear my radio. Listening to seventy s annoying commercials like non vise. Oh my god knows cleaning. Hello cushy how about that obnoxious biglou. Who's talking about trophy wives like. Are you kidding me. Kars for kids. Don't get going on the backstory on cars to google. It okay do. it's a. It's a i hate to say but i won't say it's more like a cult than it is. It's not it's not a psa. How about hint water. How about moines have you heard moines on my god. It's just like you know what are you trying to say they're monitoring the email is correct. Your grammar what. They want to remind you that very an adverb. Not for bags. Whatever don't modify unique. I can't believe. I have to suffer through this sarah marjorie. Correct me. I can tell it is not. It's ryland and robert. They're both you on. Sorry robert what are you doing tonight. I think we did quite well. What are you doing. We're looking at the no week thing. And then i guess sixty minutes story which is actually pretty interesting. Sharyn alfonsi did the story about rhonda santa's governor they're choosing publix supermarkets to distribute the vaccine. Because they had given him one hundred thousand dollars. He gave a very detailed and thorough explanation of how he came to land on public's which has nothing to do with the distribution itself. Apparently the worst problems with that but they didn't use that they only used a very small soundbite and i mean democrats all the media critics from both sides of the aisle. So it's not like and sixty minutes. So far is standing by their story. But i think even media critics like dan. Kennedy's super liberal has. Has they have blonde this one and they need to either correct it apologize so speaking of reporting say one more thing we rarely do this island catch. Do raise on your television show. You do on friday nights. The clerks award on cnn was the first western to get into myanmar and she did a piece. That was one of the most brilliant operates pieces not just on her part. But on the part of people standing up onto. and if you haven't seen it google Claris award rounding up people and me and more brilliant piece of putting children we. What's the other thing you're saying. This new guy got feld. Yeah we're taking a look at that. It's not good. He's he's got his own show now rallies was on at five o'clock. We're juba costas. I teach him accustomed. Cnn during the week. I guess he's doing the weekend. Well no i'm you know have always change white house correspondence with the new administration. They changed white house. I did not know that often to see you again sometime soon. Enjoy the family life. Emily renewed joins us. Every friday can keep with her on friday nights right here on. Gbh to seven o'clock for beat the press my second favorite show after course gyms greater much. You're welcome up next andy. Nocco hit over the latest attack headlines including this is very exciting. Some very good sleeping news for people that have issues about their sleep. They listen to eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio. Welcome back to austin public radio. Jim brady and marjorie and join us. Cover the latest headlines. The intersection of tech policy and commerce's and do not go and he's a tech writer and blogger. You can find his work to not go dot com. That is i h n eight. Tko on twitter and good to see you guys so andy. Let's start with this supreme court story for a present blocked people on twitter And there was a ruling that he had violated people's first amendment rights when he did that now. The supreme court has overturned this and justice. Clarence thomas has said some things that are a little bit nerve racking to you and others. Yeah it's it's all the talk this week Though you'll remember a couple years ago. That trump got sued. Because someone said that look you know if you're if this is a government account and trump's to count and you blocked me from being able to reply to your tweets your denying my first amendment rights and a lower court said. Yep that's right that's right. That's right The supreme court on monday they didn't necessarily overturn it. They just said that. We'll look. i mean this is a moot point because trump isn't president anymore So they basically vacated it which means that it never happened so they can't. This can't be used. That ruling can't be president but the weird thing is the thing that we're talking about is clarence thomas. The instead of the there was no formal written ruling about this. This is just like a one. A big document that got released on monday with all the different like one line will decisions that they made. But clarence thomas wrote page after page after page about this decision making the point that this is the correct thing for the supreme court to do but also discussing. Well look if we're calling. I if if this if this lawsuit was descr. Describing trump's twitter account as a as a government controlled space so to speak just like a courtroom just like a a state house or whatever like that And they're saying that well look trump can't prevent people from speaking there. Well then what do we do about twitter because twitter could twitter was able to prevent trump from speaking there so the argument. He's making is that if twitter does have this power to remove the president's personal twitter account than they are actually they actually also have the right the the ability to remove the first amendment rights of everybody in the united states. And that is something that he's saying again in page after page after page that maybe legislators might want to take a look at and so that could be very very troubling because it does. It has no legal force. This is just a an argument that he's making but he's market so forcefully that he essentially firing starter's pistol saying hey everybody who wants to modify modify section to thirty and reduce the rights of And the freedom of a facebook and twitter and google all these other platforms. You have a very very willing audience and at least please this person on the supreme court. I hate to say this. I don't know if i've said this before. I partially agree with clarence thomas. The issue for me is what does he think is the solution. That's probably where we disagree. But there are a lot of people who are were among them who were worried about the power that jack dorsey and other in had a twitter and other individual humans have to limit the speech of people. And you might say well you know it's not it's just twitter. It's just all. These are the primary vehicles for communicating with a lot of people these days so the underlying and by the way when trump was shut down. I have a feeling we discussed this with you any the time we talked about it a bit. There were people like navalny in the in russia merckel in germany and a significant number of civil libertarians. Free speech types. Who are very concerned even though they were not fans of donald trump so the underlying issue that he's raising is a is a totally legitimate. One isn't it. yeah. I know. I had the exact same reaction saying he. I'm not a fan of of this particular justice but he does make a certain point. Actually he was in in the the pages and pages of stuff he wrote. He actually makes the same arguments that you were making specifically said that. Hey look i mean. Facebook is controlled by just one person and that and that's that's a lot of power for one person to simply simply have Making the further point that this isn't this isn't like saying. Hey look if you don't like this hotel. Find book a stay at the hilton and then in the mary. They're saying that well here is the size of a google for instance is sort of like the gatekeeper to how people understand the internet so they were to decide that they don't want people to see certain things they can do that I should say. Google has never ever done anything like that. They're they're very very good custodians but the point he's making is that there's nothing there's nothing that's requiring google to be fair nothing requiring facebook to do stuff like that and one of the things he's pointing out is that part of the terms of service and twitter are that they could to cover themselves. The the boilerplate says that. Hey look we can pull your account at any time for any reason without any explanation and he's also plenty of that they will. Normal amount of power is not saying that if you violate this rule with israel so he's suggesting that maybe Visit argument for having these these organizations these companies de beers the public utilities Like to make to say that Just like the phone company. Catcher simply cut my service without any and from without any information or explanation or warning. They legally prevented from doing that. Perhaps the a twitter and facebook and google and other these large companies should be under the same sort of restrictions He doesn't he does He again i. I hate to bring with them so much because he he also is he also smart enough to point out that. Look this this. This opinion is not saying that. You can't have the first amendment. You can't have free speech without regulating these companies but simply it is. It's disturbing that there isn't any sort of a legal definition of what these companies can and can't do and that's that's going to be problematic. Moving forward talking to india nocco andy. I spent ninety nine dollars tax. Because you this morning about five thirty a m so you better know what you're talking about. What something that. I'd never heard of does reading notes in preparation taught you to call a nest hub. Which at least the one function that appeals to. You appeals to me hugely. Can you describe what this thing does. Yeah absolutely basically what it is is. It's sort of like a google smart speaker. Only it has like a little larger than a smartphone display but smaller than like an ipad display. And you put it wherever you want. But i'm putting it on my nightstand and what it does just basically is that it's a screen so that when you give it we ask it to do stuff where you can actually give you information back to the display so you get actual like a weather report. That goes on for days and days Or displaying pictures from your photo gallery streaming streaming content All this sort of stuff again very very basic but the with the second generation display. They added something that was very very relevant to me too. I'm having problems sleeping. And i don't know why i don't believe it sleep apnea At it's been a weird year anyway. But i've always had a problem sleeping and one of the key features of this upgraded that they've added a whole section of sleep tracking controls that so it uses all of the sensors that are built into this. This way which. I'm i going to say does not include a camera as he set it up. It's also it's almost like saying four times. Look there's no camera it doesn't even have a camera. Don't worry about this camera looking at you while you sleep but uses things like a It uses things like The the microphone to listen to you. If you're coughing if you're snoring if external noises like dogs barking babies crying that might wake you up. It has it will use things that most importantly i'm kind of a built in radar. That sort of like is looking for movement from From like the top half of your bed so it knows what the the upshot of all this is that it presents really really clear picture of your sleeping without you. Having to do anything i tested out for for a few years now After you can put on your phone Apps for for smartwatches even wearable devices. That do sleep tracking. The problem is though. That's not how i fall asleep. I don't say okay. Well it's eleven twenty one. It's time for me to go to bed. And so let me take up my smartphone activate this app put i i have. I have to be in bed reading for about an hour. And a half. And then when i sense it okay. I've really started to fall asleep. That's when i turn off the lights turnover and start to go to sleep. This is what. I don't have to light up my brain again to use all that happens. Is that just like just like this morning. My alarm woke me up and there was just the time that's being displayed in. This display has like a little sort of like colorful like little circle on it that kind of like the fitness rings for the apple. Watch this gives you a very very quick graphic suggestion of. Here's how well you slept last night. Both in terms of how long did you sleep. How deep was your sleep uninterrupted. And also are you on a regular sleep schedule and if you tap on it it'll give you fine grain data but basically you wake up the okay. It's it's gosh. it's nine. Oh three in the in the morning but i can see that instead of being like a tight blue circle it's like three overlapping orange rings which meant that. You didn't do quite so well with the sleep as you might have. And if i want to tap on this drill down and we'll say oh well there was a some sort of annoys. What i think was street noise from outside. That woke up at six thirty. And then you didn't really settle back down again But i ju- it just works the way they want it to Because it it goes so far as to say well look. You've got into bed at eleven but you didn't actually trump the whites and go to sleep until one thirty so take that as take that as information as you will so. There are a lot of reasons why this was a valuable addition to my nightstand. the smartest the The sleeping sleep tracking really really sold it to me that i'm not gonna i'm not gonna just like one and return and thirty days like okay. I'm gonna buy one and just like keep this going for six or seven months. I really really like it over the past week. It's been it's been very very helpful. One last thing about this. You have a few more okay. You mentioned you have sleeping problems. So is the hope. That by recognizing you're waking and sleeping like you said in this example you could fall back asleep at six thirty in the morning then sleep for five hours. I guess if you got time to sleep till eleven thirty but it's going to help cure you of these problems or just you just want to know what you're doing in the middle of the night. It's it's what it is. It's like my the step counter on my fitness tracker. It's like the scale in my bathroom. All it does is gives me a number. And i can do with that number what i want. But it's really really. It's it's really really helpful. Because there are times when i don't know key. Gosh i quote slept for fourteen hours. I just couldn't get out of bed. Is that because i'm depressed. Is that because of some other factor or no actually according to this. It's because you got you you. You didn't really get any good sleep until really didn't start sleeping until six thirty in the morning at that point you slept for five hours straight. So that's why you're and so that gives me the information okay. So why was i not sleeping. Well that i have power. And i remember that. Oh that's right. it's because you're you're you're you're you're putting your trying to organize a whole bunch of books and you re getting really really tired so rather than taking the books off the bed you just sort of. He's just sort of like flipped. Slept on the the extra like half of the bed. That wasn't being occupied by book. Perhaps clear off the bed before you know things about this by the way this things called tub. I am really excited. I sleep perfectly and never have problems on the opposite you but the answer your question marty. It sound like i know what i'm talking about. But based on andy's review on. I read tumor of this morning. It can help you if you if it says you you wake up at three. Am and you find out the day before you walk up at three am and the day before three am. There may be an external thing. That's happening. Why did i if you don't have sleep problems. What because i fall asleep right away. I don't mean i fall asleep. I i'm dying to know. Aren't you interested in knowing what happens while you're that's what fascinates me. It's more curiosity than anything. But i've one important question here again. I read no camera. And i read again. No camera which obviously is critical. They say you can. Disable the the microphones are three microphones. And i really worry about that. We talked about a colleague of ours. Who has had some problems with stuffing picked off picked up theoretically when her smart speaker was off. Are you confident that the disabling feature on the back of this thing really works and really kills the. Mike's yes. I am should be built into any sort of a microphone on a device like this. It's it's actually a physical switch on the back about like you tap a button and then software decide. Okay well league. No anything coming off the microphone. It physically cuts the connection between this device and its own. Microphone so it so it has. The sensor can detect the microphone is off so maybe occasionally if the oh by the way my microphone off but that's a so i'm very confident so google has a very good track record for these things are Are concerned not so much that i trust them implicitly but it means that if there was a company that i would trust to have an open mic in my house. Twenty four seven google on that short list along with apple of companies. That would trust. Well mine's coming tomorrow. Looks you know in the next couple of weeks how it went. Thanks to the recommendation there. Andy we're talking india nocco. Okay andy more upsetting news about millions of people's people in this case five hundred and thirty three million people that use facebook their personal data has been placed. Online again was not their fault. Not of course not yet this. This is why they're companies that. I trust those companies. I don't trust. Facebook is resolutely on the. Don't press list this comes now. The the original breach of data happened Years ago like in two thousand seventeen twenty eighteen where they facebook did stupid things by not securing a certain feature that lets you let the user say. Hey i wonder who else. Who if there are other people that i know friends of mine. Family members on facebook and any sensible company responsible company. Would i ask. How could this be exploited by bad people. Facebook not so much. So as a result hackers were able to not not breaking into servers or anything like that but just simply by writing software that uses the feature of the way that an ordinary user would they were able to extract personal data from five hundred thirty three million users data including phone numbers names birthdays location data in some cases their email addresses but not all ways. But it's a huge huge treasure trove of information and the reason why this is coming up again. Is that sponsor reminder that just because this was a new story in two thousand nineteen when When facebook finally patched this hole and people really found out about it. This data is still out there. And it's kind of like this ghost ship that keeps coming to land and causing Causing havoc Initially you could the the people who did this hack. They were just selling this This this pilot data to again other people on the dark web then later got into the news again in january because Another enterprising hacker created like a bought. So that if you wanted to say if you want to buy access to just certain kinds of data zing hey. I've got this phone number. Six one seven five five five one two one two. Does that connect to any specific name in this facebook database. It would sell back you that information but now recently all that data the five hundred thirty three million users data has just been shared for free on hacker on hacker forums. Which now makes this an exponentially bigger problem because It used to be accessible to people who are who see themselves as real criminals sorta speak. Now it's like if you are a phone scam or if you're a company that sells software to phone scammers. Well guess what you just have now have database of millions of brand new phone numbers and email addresses. You might not have had before. Or if you're conducting a marketing enterprise where Because of i could only legally Get this piece of information from the website By tracking this person by need to know what their phone number is gets. What yep hello. Hello. we're here we're here. Heard a voice saying hello. are you there But that's the thing so now it's now it's something that anybody can get access to an abuse for any reason not just to create really really horrible crime but also to the hi. I'm calling you because your your extended warranty is up is gonna be expired. So this this thing he's ever ever end facebook being facebook isn't still isn't taking responsibility for it. They're just before they are they. They put up a blog. Post said well look. It wasn't a data breach. We were victims of hackers who scrape data and by the way. This was the same excuse. They made with for the cambridge cambridge. Analytica break Again they didn't secure the feature pro properly. They're lying about when they learned to the original problem. They said oh well this is also saying oh. This is old news. This is just a repeat of information that happened admitted to in two thousand and nineteen and this they just absolutely don't get that they ever responsibility to users and that even when they left the after they've let the horses out of the barn they have responsibility for when those horses are running through the running through the people's houses and kicking over their. Tv's they just absolutely don't care so a couple things about this. By the way one of those you know being soccer berg means never having to say. You're sorry. is you know much better. They're than us disliking. One of their spokespeople said it's sort of like you know years ago your number would be in the phone book. Talk about this ingenuous in the phone. Book the value and the value of having someone's phone number twenty years ago as compared to having someone's phone number now like with two factor authentication. It's it's so disingenuous. But that's not what i wanted to bring up. How do you pronounce the word. P w any andy. I generally i generally Proud sit by the no pope. Paul sorry toned politics. it's basically. It's a hacker speak for only with instead of over pronounced with but go ahead so you mentioned there is a if you want to check to see if you were part of any of these breaches. There's a site called. Have i been p w any d dot com. I went on at this morning. And i i typed in my phone number. No no hacks congrats. Good news or something. Then i talked to my email address. And what i got back was ono. You've been pw any d nine data breaches and found no pace. I have no idea what pays means. But then it says subscribe and this is free. So far and check sensitive breaches. What does that mean what was telling me in. What was it telling me to do. When i checked again if people want to do this have i been. P w n e d dot com is how you check. What is it saying that think that has owned but with a p. instead of yeah it's a it's a it's a free service that's being done basically for the public good every time. There's a a large breach like this. They get they get that database of data set and they put into this database on site and so whenever you can search for dozens and dozens of different breaches accounts that have been that have been exploited so what it does so if you sign up for this whenever it gets whenever there's a new breach like for instance just this week i think Linked in had a similar breach where five hundred thousand five hundred five hundred thousand. Five hundred million. I'm sorry Account scott exploited the same way as soon as bad as soon as fast discovered if they find your personal information the email address refund number that you have given this service it will. It will send you an email saying oh by the way your phone number is now appearing inside is now available to hackers inside as part of this breach that is a very and that's a very very important thing. Because as you mentioned a lot of services now use two factor authentication where the tex mex tex message to your phone. Your mobile number to make sure it's really view. However there are a number of techniques for spoofing your phone numbers to that so that hackers can intercept that That validation email and get access to your bank account or whatever it is being secured this way so very quickly. We only have thirty seconds before we go. What am i supposed to do. Subscribe and check sensitive breaches. What does that mean. It means that that means that will search all these databases once you find out that your email address is in here. That doesn't necessarily mean that you're under attack. It just means that if someone were to want to find your phone number As a and they have access to this data set they might be. that mad. person might be able to do that. So it's up to you to decide what you wanna do after that. It might encourage you to make sure that you create brand new like a free voicemail email addresses for every new service that you sign up for or if you are some people are really are in situations where their phone number really is absolutely vital their security and it might encourage you to say well look. I've had the same phone number twenty years. I feel much more comfortable giving somebody else like like you said. Twenty years ago. I had the same phone number. I have six one seven area code man. You know how that is. Because i got my phone in like in the nineteen nineties but that reverend the nineteen ninety s. We didn't really think that disclosing your your cell phone number was a really really big deal. Now it's not quite as bad as disclosing your social security number. But it should be considered as privately held information on when i used to be a reporter you could go to white pages dot com and you can pay extra money. Everybody cell phone number. I mean we to that. All the time is reporters. Yep you can do that If you've been trying to secure your phone number by making a private and might not be in there however the other thing is that you don't have as a reporter as an individual you can find out what one person's phone number is maybe what you can't do is write a script that will say i've got one hundred people to find out trying to determine who they are and apply this against this database that you have or strip mine it for again. A bunch of phone numbers to to sell to some sort of a scam marketing campaign. Okay andy we gotta go but thank you so much. I love the sleeping thing. Jim's gonna full report week and how he's doing you can tell us how he's doing too and not nocco joins us regularly. As a tech writer and blogger you can find his work at nocco dot com or follow him at nocco. I h and is a nancy. A. t. k. As in kleenex oh poor become is here to talk through the latest safety guidelines for restaurant workers and diners. Keep your john eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio wasn't like the boston public radio. Jim brady and marjorie and joining us. Aligning latest stories at the intersection of food policy and food cultures. Corby kummer corby is the executive director of the food and society policy program with the aspen institute. Senior editor at the atlantic and a senior lecturer. Tufts friedman school of nutrition science and policy. Corby kummer. good to see you. Good afternoon to you. Well corby kummer. The long awaited guideline is safety first protecting workers in restaurants to open. You've got it in our hot little hands here and the first page is the safety. I from the director and of course that is you corby. Kummer telling us what we should be doing with. The restaurants should be doing so. Congratulations congratulations. do tell well. I was very glad that timeout national timeout said the only rules. You need to dine out now when they were writing about it. So this is this is meant to be a nationally easy to use easy to post especially guide for all restaurant. Owners managers workers diners As a way of feeling safe as you go back to dining indoors as we did just last night and You want to know that the restaurant is taking steps. That are absolutely the most common sense steps and that they're going to protect themselves and a you especially so we've been working for seven months on this with weekly meetings with the restaurant owners and public health officials and ventilation engineers to figure out. What are the simplest ventilation guidelines that cash strapped restaurant owners or renters. Who have no leverage over their landlords can use so very proud of our one pager on ventilation guidelines about what you can do to keep people safe and buy cheap. The very basic portable air purifying units that cost under one hundred dollars on amazon as long as event them so air doesn't blow across people's faces so it's full of common sense steps that every restaurant needs to take especially right now because places are all cities are reopening. They're trying to reopen and we want to help restaurants and city health. Localities prevent a shutdown again as yesterday's headlines in the new york times about covid spikes in the upper midwest. You know we don't want localities to get ahead of themselves. But they are so eager to help restaurants reopened and so are we so We're very glad that we were joined by. Jose andres world central kitchen and the independent restaurant coalition. Which tom click and many others headed to get the twenty eight point. Six billion restaurant relief and the james beard foundation And one fair wage which gave us very good tips on how to make sure that workers are protected for possibly un compliant hostile diners and don't endanger their tip potential and that is they gave us a wonderful script for the anybody who is seeding. The party at the table reads the rules about wearing a mask And and requests about that rather than putting diners in conflict with in conflict with servers. So everybody's protected at first of all things great. And congratulations all of you. You particularly is the goal at a restaurant when you make a reservation for example and they confirmed by text or email or whatever in theory. They should send a link to this thing for people to see and the second. Carla re question is even if you're not gonna restaurant next week if they want to get a copy of this thing independently. How do they do that. So i'm glad you asked and are going to nationally suggest to every restaurant in the country that if they send out confirmations they will Enclose the diner code of conduct which is a simple graphic. We first released in december with our friends at resume amex But now we want just every every restaurant to be able to use this post so yes that one simple Step in it's been getting lots of tweet activity which is really good It's a simple diner. Code of conduct five or six steps about masking what the restaurant does to protect your health. What you do to protect everybody else in yourselves. Really simple really straightforward. Anybody can get this by googling safety. I aspen that'll brie right to our page. Just one quick question and your wear a mask thing. The code of conduct should wear a massacre actively eating drinking from what i've seen. Nobody wears a masks unless the server comes over. You do see some people do that because they are kind of sipping and eating most time there in the so assume. You're not sank. Should take their mask on and off between bites sips or are you. I am saying that if you were speaking for a long time and you're just not eating because you're done with a course in your way down it would be ideal to put the mask back on and that certainly when the servers are approaching the table you put your mask back on. I was watching the behavior in in our indoor dining at a very fancy restaurant in baltimore which was really fun to sort of observe a servers. Were absolutely in masks. The whole time and the diners. Sometimes when people came usually they took. They took the time to put the mask back on. That's when it's most crucial and one more plug. I'm so glad that the main restaurant response guy. Whose name is jerry. Guy at. The cdc published an article in the journal of the american medical association last friday with a scary preamble about outbreaks that were associated with reopening bars and restaurants and then said if restaurants reopened here the steps they have to follow about masking distancing. And they're exactly what we recommend partly because we've been wired into the cdc every week but it was really gratifying that this was the message coming from cdc. It's not over yet. You have to take care as places reopen your one last quick thing about this. I don't get into it all local policy basically superimpose these standards on whatever. The policy is in the particular state in terms of capacity one hundred nurses fifty or vaccinations but stepping away from your reporting. Wouldn't have been far better. If restaurants had an open until their staffs were vaccinated and that been safer for everybody in it would have been safer for everybody and i we've often discussed Restaurant workers should be absolutely at the top of the vaccination priority list. And i would say one of the things independent restaurant coalition is doing and i think the big push now has to be is for restaurant owners to offer paid hours or workers to go get vaccinated and as lots of members of the independent restaurant coalition of they take it upon themselves to make the appointments for the staff to line up appointments and to work with their staff to coordinate so they will all be vaccinated. That should absolutely be the priority. So corbet now. We have another reason to hate the delivery services that we hate already and by the way. Don't know why we hate them if you haven't been listening as they unless their legislatures like one in massachusetts that cap the delivery fees at least during the pandemic. They charges serious rate so it tough enough to the restaurant reservations. It's even tougher when they take all the restaurants profit when they're delivering the thing but to compound things something margin i use the fight about. I think you were part of these fights at the time or maybe you weren't at the time i don't know if we knew you then was this marjorie said these calorie count things. She wasn't favor them and then she said she moved because she knew she was wrong. She wasn't in favor of them at fine dining establishments but it's part of obamacare the affordable care act. No marches still says. They have to stop when dessert comes. Okay fine so but the dining dining services delivery services everything basically saying it's not our it's the job of the restaurant whose food were delivering. So they're totally circumventing most of them circumventing the mandates of the affordable. Care act which. I think for a lot of people who know far less about nutrition and galleries marjorie thinks they do that. Information has virtually disappeared. No so it's a long and tortured. History this is how long it is. It was years in the making to get the affordable care act to include a national calorie labeling mandate The state of massachusetts was one day away from mandating a statewide calorie labeling requirements that taken more than a year to negotiate with the master's restaurant association and the fda called the state and said no it's going to come in the aca. This was two years before it came in the aca came in the aca in two thousand and ten when it actually go into effect two thousand eighteen the middle of two thousand eighteen so that was ten lost years in massachusetts but ten happy years for marjorie. Not having to worry about these. Their hobbies unintended consequences when the aca was being written in past there. Wasn't this incredible. Grab by the restaurant delivery associations which are delivery services like grubhub and and George bush to steal as much of restaurants prophets and business as they possibly could so right. Now what's at issue. They will not post. The calorie counts when they re post menus often without the restaurants permission Or they set up ghost sites as if they are the restaurants sites so that they can get all the orders without the restaurants permission but because the restaurant had posted the menu. So there's not bothering to post a coward counts. Why should they do that. And they're very happy to say the fda it's their responsibility not ours so central for science and the public interest is calling on the fda to say. Hey you left something out. You have to require the services to repose. The coward counts. And they're going to require madeira. Who knows you know the is really great about all kinds of nutritional advocacy but they're pointing it out with a very good at is bringing this to our the public's attention this yet another way that the delivery services are trying to eat into the business model of poor impoverished restaurants and health set marjorie desserts. See let me just say brief partner debate. If i can say my thesis was with which marjorie disagreed is when the average main course of the cheesecake factory includes the average daily allowance for calories for a month. Maybe it'd be good if the consumer new. You're exaggerating the week. Just the week right. But but here's what. I wanna know kobe. You mentioned earlier that you went out for dinner. Lovely swank restaurant in baltimore the other night. So if you're going out for special occasion your birthday or anniversary whatever it is. You're going to really high price place it would normally not go to. I don't know because it's so unusual like go into the cheesecake factory. It's not like going to mcdonalds or dunkin. Donuts or something you have to have you know the stake or poverty. Whatever some fancy dancy kind of thing do you need to have calorie counts. They are to your friends at the food and drug administration specifically had you in mind when they exempted all chains or restaurant groups under twenty located point so when massachusetts was going to do it. There was endless discussion with the state restaurant association. They settled on fifteen. The fed settled on twenty. And so if you're going to a swanky restaurant it with will any luck. We'll be with any luck. We'll be independently. Owned these are the restaurants we should be going to anyway. They will almost certainly be exempted from the calorie requirement. And you will have an undisturbed happy. Thank you now. would you like to make those restaurants. Jim those swank places that you go to maybe twice a year if that have to have every calorie in every dish i am satisfied with law. But if you're a excuse me. Excuse me if you're a swank or slinky as gorby goals it. If you're a swanky swanky restaurant. That is part of a chain that has twenty or more restaurants. The answer is i don't care how fine dining is the law make sense and they should carries the damage to ruin everything he really is. It's okay by the way all seriousness here. Just for a second. You're gonna hate this because there's no compliment. You've ever gotten that you like. I know i'm not heavy heavy. You're very fit person fist. People i know we got that tommy. Tell me that when you see that. A dish that you're about to order is twelve hundred calories instead of the four hundred you guests. Aren't you saying. Maybe i'll have an alternative to probably just exciting. No because again. How often do you go out to these places. You don't usually. I was really surprised at dunkin donuts. I really like the jonas. I was stunned when i found out that the plane dunkin donut has more calories than the butter crunch which is my second favorite with the muffins and the muffins are like our. Yeah really and. I've seen them at whole foods to where they're like six hundred calories. I was stunned by that. So okay. that's something you might do more frequently but if you go out to the swank restaurant and you're gonna get some creme brulee for dessert and it's full of fatness full of sugar and it's not very good for you. It's not something you're generally going to be eating. I had creme brulee four desert last night. It was probably a ten inch. Ram can and i had every bite and yes. I'm glad there wasn't a calorie counting well but look at you two. I mean the two of you've never been overweight. And maybe you shouldn't even be part of the discussion with respect. Except your mr some and let's get back to the main point which is that visa restrictions caused chains like mcdonalds to reformulate their menu items so that customers don't have the same sticker shock that i think is the most valuable contribution laws make rather than making people feel bad about themselves. Okay thank you a brilliant analysis. Okay let's go onto the the there's more of this fake meat. And i must admit i did have some little fake meatballs at my daughter's house couple of weeks ago no surprise how good they tasted. Of course they were heavily sauced. But we're still eating as much of the real meat as ever. So is that because we're just boring or afraid to try and possible meat or what's going on corby that with all these substitutes that start day increase the market for the real thing while they're market is increasing. I think it's going to take a while for these to be accepted by you. When you a heavily sauced item or clover foods wanted introduce them in an italian Sub that had like spicy tomato sauce. Which is the general way. I think what's really going to drive. Consumer behavior is when the alternatives become as tasty as what they want or acceptable enough and if prices are competitive or they decide they wanna spend less on beyond me or impossible meat than they do for factory farm meet. I think it's going to be really a question of price sensitivity and taste meeting the demands of consumers marjorie when you. I thought you said you tasted the meat polo. Whatever even without the sauce was was my recollection wrong. It was all sauced up as you tour. I think it was. I think it was saucy mean. It was good i could not. I could not tell the difference. It wasn't like eating a cheeseburger or something a whole big thing morning. Spit it out library. When when corrie brought us long ago i do was rather rude but this was. This was much better. The texture was was meet like tasteless meet lay have grown increasingly in expertise these companies. They're much better as especially for texture. Know corby before you go something. We've talked to you a lot about through the years or free lunches and obviously there's certain jurisdictions for a while like ours here that had free lunches for everybody for a whole variety of reasons either for efficiency of management. More likely to get rid of the stigma that a lot of kids feel and maybe don't even get the lunch because they don't want to be embarrassed that the reported and that sort of thing there's a body of thought that That the fact that these free lunches for have been for everybody during the pandemic is going to cause there to be a serious move post pandemic to continue that direction. Sorta lucky get your foot in the door and then you leave your foot in the door Should they be free for everybody. Long-term and will they be will they be is the big question. I pray that school lunch will be universal and school breakfast. I think the time is way overdue to remove stigma where move school on debt shaming which we've talked about on the show. This is one of the i would say. Let's just say there are two main ideas. I pray will happen in twenty twenty one and one of them is making universal school. lunch permanent. And the other is Credit access for by jacques sued entrepreneurs equitable and trying to write decades of problems so there's increasing momentum for both ideas universal school lunch. It became one of the only happy pandemic Public assistance stories I to the trump administration. We have to name them because they did this. They allowed all students in a family to get free lunch if only one student was eligible. So they're heart warming stories in this monitor. Piece of very nice story in launder was originally from springfield ohio. So that the the lunch ladies could say oh take one lunch but dough your brothers and sisters ask you know finally instead of saying oh you have to take the cold sandwich because your family is in arrears and we can't let you on the hotline so you know this is huge and As one school lunch administrator or no it was a family it was a it was a mother whose relied on these and didn't want her name us over the years off and on when she had to said you know for years the government the usda said it was completely unaffordable and then suddenly during the pandemic it was affordable. And one of us to that. I want to go into more and learn more about is There's a lot of there. Isn't that much uptake when they're made universal so the cost don't necessarily increase that dramatically for school systems so students pay more attention when they have full bellies and it is. It's not wasting public education and if education is public school lunches should be free for everybody to. I hope you're listening to records. Greg -gratulations again on the product. Yeah it's great dealing is real thanks to become a joins us. every week. He says. Deputy director of the food and society policy program with the aspen institute. The place that just put out and he did it. This great list of do's and don'ts at restaurants. Do's and don'ts i should say corby that the atlantic and a senior lecturer at the tops friedman school of attrition and policy coming up prince. Philip is dead at ninety nine plus the enduring hypocrisy of mitch. Mcconnell callie crossley joins us for that. More callie crossley is next on. Eighty nine seven h. Boston public radio. Welcome back to boston. Public radio jim rowdy modrica and joining us as she does. Every friday is the host of under the radar with galaxy. That would be of course. Kelly cross the end. Hello callie crossley. Hey jim hey marjorie crossing great to talk to you as always so. Let's start with this rate piece in vogue about amanda ormond people remember. She's the young poet who was so elegant in her poetry in her dress and everything at the inaugural and also with the super bowl. I should that great yellow jacket on a yellow coat on. I should say and this is a fashion spread and a real picture of her beyond poetry. So tell us about this vote piece. Well you know for some of who've been following her for a while. This is not new information. But i think it's gonna be fascinating for a lot of people who you know. Saw her just dropping. It feels like she dropped in on the inaugural and they didn't know where she came from but she has a twin sister. She's raised by their mom and both of them were heavily in to reading and writing in fact the tv broke as this article makes clear at some point early on in a mom. Just enam fixing it. So so i don that but i hear you. So she has a great amount of Interest and discipline around reading and writing beyond her genre and understanding people and the love of words and her craft working on her craft and it's obviously an intellectual place of exchange in her house with her mom and her twin sister. She lives alone now and she has. I think a very sobering sobering us with the right word. A very Careful not bigheaded. Look at all of the stuff. That's come her way since that statement. That's that's what's impressive about her. She's mature war but she's not big headed and and i don't think it's an act. It's not like oh look at me. You know she's really cognizant. I love this piece about you know. It took a whole village to get me to this place. I i recognize that is not. It's just couldn't just me. I may have some skill and talent. I appreciate that so there's a lot to anybody who is interested in her even a little bit. We'll find this just a fascinating Profile i thought this woman did a great piece. And i go ahead jim. Any liebowitz is one of the great photographers of our lifetimes. Took the photographs including the cover and they're spectacular. Kelly speaking the content of the photographs of gorman are just really i mean i don't know or i just know over but they seem to me so capture the essence of this young woman gorgeous. You know that she's gorgeous plant gorgeous. That was one of the things. I love it. I think it's dennis smith. Another poet said about amanda gorman quote is like they made her a tree and there is something about poetic about her whole being and also that you know the pressure. She feels when she said how do you. How do you think matched the last thing. you've done. the she that pressure but there's also she does a swear. I thought that was quite interesting. Because young woman and i think a lot of young women and a lot of older women swear quite a bit. So what do i never. Tv probably contributed to that but also she has such a love of words and to pick the right word. at least. My mother told me that was lazy when you went to that well. I'm real lazy on some fronts to go using those words if you thought about it should be have a dif- different way to expressing yourself. I think she has such a love. And respect for words that that just doesn't appeal to her the rise and rise of a mandate women which i loved Me to get really well done. People should read it okay. Prince philip's is gone. Philip ninety nine years old. And i am sad like everybody else death but i know i know. I'm sorry i am totally nine a great life. I don't know if you're both monarchists. Whatever you are. You're interested in the monarchy so take it away you to go ahead. Well i have to. And this is gonna sound really shallow. My first thoughts were obviously. I'm i'm sorry for the family because the losses and a family loss a big one no matter if you're the the prince or anybody else but the second and third thought it was. What's the crown going to do. How they're going to be ready. And our mac and are meghan and harry go home. I mean that was my second is like are they going to go for the ceremonies or whatever so i don't know and also in the stories that we've been hearing about and reading really bring up all the points where he just said all the kinds of really inappropriate things in places so it makes you go back to the part of the interview. When harry insisted that it had not been his grandfather. Yes said said the thing about the color of the baby. And i'm thinking mas really. Yeah possible yeah. I wondered about to kelly on royal. Watch while i'm not a big time real on occasion royal watcher. They had this whole certainly the queen. Mother mary that died a few years ago at one hundred and four whatever elizabeth fill it. They had this kind of stiff. Upper lip thing. You just kind of strung up. There was a line in here where he said i become a caricature and i'll just have to accept it. And even though he had no use for the press on them meet a bunch of bloody reptiles his quote not mine but that they were more as opposed to what we just saw with meghan. And harry which is more of a let it all hang out what we saw from diana which is let it all hang out i mean they kind of they they mostly shut up about this kind of stuff and i'm wondering what you think is it will re re better off when they shut up or better off when they were more honest about what life was really like as with anything balance is good and we don't everything that we've learned about quote unquote the firm. And by the way he was known to be the head of the firm ran the country and he took care of the firm business which is very interesting. I'm not sure that that any of the people raised on the firm as it is or has as it has been will ever be the people that just let it all hang out. Yeah so there is that And i'm not sure that harry and meghan by the way though they were candid. I don't think they let it all hang out either I think they had some things they wanted to get across. But a whole bunch of stuff. We still don't know About went on behind the scenes and that was deliberate. And actually as you will call in interview with oprah a couple of times each of them individually around a different point said you know. I'm just not gonna discuss that. But that's true that's true. They didn't do a total hang on. That's what i did this morning. You too because i wanted to feel like i could actually participate in this. This guy is i. Did i read the obituaries of so i could hopefully find out something interesting so i had a conversation found something both interesting and deeply troubling ladder with you to certainly. We're either of you. Monarch watchers aware of the fact that prince philip. The late prince philip. And is that what you call him. Prince phil. Yes lay prince. Philip and the queen were both. I repeat both the great grandchildren of queen victoria both the great grand that new york times. I wait a second. What do we go. Is that not a processed the incentive. It seems to me great grandchildren. The same person is that a problem or not. Well it's don't know how. How will the crown handle. We know what was so interesting about about prince philip number of the early crown. How he didn't wanna have to defer to hurt enough to walk behind her. Didn't you know he was and then in several of the stories today they talked about how and you may already know this. I didn't know at kelly that that in private she deferred to him constantly. And i didn't know that either so he. He was concerned about his manhood being undermined or something like that or why and they said that behind the at home so to speak he. He wore the pants quote unquote old saw. Yeah and then though. She could obviously have been beheaded if she wanted to. But you know i mean. She's she's the queen but but she deferred to him. Yes and that and more. It's actually more than deferring. It was not as straight deferential. As we may think of it but in fact she valued his opinion and that he brought a lot to the monarchy he did he worked toward the modernization of the monarchy. In many ways he gets. He embraced young people. He was really interested in science a lot. Stuff that maybe The mina kim self might not have moved as swiftly in that direction. I was fascinated in this piece. About how he in the guardian. How he dismissed the debutante presentation because he was like really no. We're yeah yeah interesting. I was raised in the monica. You would think he'd cling all of these traditions and he was like let's put the okay. I have one more question for you. Kelly if a very handsome guy and there was an assumption. I guess diana was supposed to realize that the future king of england was going to have a girlfriend on the side. Why should she be surprised about this. Of course she was surprised about camilla parker bowles. But i haven't read about. I mean maybe. I don't know enough prince. Philip affairs wasn't in the first of the crown. This is my didn't they kind of indicate there was some of that going on. That was the first season. Maybe i don't know. I don't know it doesn't feel like it was an ongoing thing. If that's yeah at least we didn't hear about it. Yeah so so. I find that interesting too because what you always read about. Diana's that she was naive. Voice can excuse me can get back into this conversation. Yeah first of all. It's great great grandchildren. Not great grandchild was wrong. How come you both glossed over this incredible piece of information. I added to the conversation that we said. It's horrible assessed. And that's it on. How will the crown rewrite it did. You not hear me correct. I forgot you could say how martin had no interest in this. And why is that margaret. That's fine far enough apart there. Aren't you you think so. No it's not close. We need some investigar. Actually work with dot com incest dot com. It comes up there. we're talking. We're talking to kelly a crossley not gonna talk about something that i'm interested in my favorite politicians mitch mcconnell. Now here's mitch mcconnell. The senate minority leaker leader. I am a pretty bold kind of persons margarine. Knows i can pretty much say anything. I could not say anything in front of a camera. That i know was a one hundred. Eighty degrees different from what my position was on the issue. Like a nanosecond. Before here is mcconnell issuing a warning. I think it was this week sometime to corporate america. Stay out of politics. It's not what you're designed for and don't be intimidated by the left and taking up causes. That puts you right in the middle of one of america's greatest political debate. So let me get this out of my system. One stay out of politics except when you give hundreds of millions of dollars to packs that support other republican party and two weeks ago we're gonna have a scorched earth policy if you mess with the filibuster and try to ram things through like we ran through supreme court justices and other things mean one of the most fraudulent leaders and and he blithely goes ahead doing his thing with absolutely no consequences. Well no consequences that we know of just yet. I think a number of people certainly have responded to this is like capital h. Hypocrisy means unbelievable. So i have you know two names for him my pillow guy and goya really a really speak to me about the right staying out of politics. Because you just don't know what you're doing mitch mcconnell. I mean you're sleeping on the pillow and you're eating those you know you are so you can get more money for the for the for the rightist right and then on top of that. We're talking about voting rights. So it's this is not just any old you know back and forth nasty debate. We're talking about taking away rights of people to be able to cast a ballot. And i if everybody is not involved in this and i mean everybody i. I don't know where we are in terms of supporting this democracy so is apocryphal. Makes me gag Everybody should be calling him out on it and it annoys me that We don't have many more voices. Saying i mean we've heard a lot of people pointing to really come on. Come on you know. this is your thing and don't try to act like it's something new that the democrats or as you would put it. The left has done for the first time. This you and not having both been great. Grand great great grandchildren. By the. It'd i i think i don't know what's happened to the republicans i just. It makes me very upset because they don't respond other people know to respond to that or or maybe they just thought everybody knows that. So much hypocrisy where i can't even respond to. What is that. i don't know. I don't know but but it's coming. There's this tennessee that would kind of found shocking with with trump coming into office. Okay you look at the sky. No this guy's not blue it's purple and now it seems as though that's been embraced in in across the party. I mean you have kevin mccarthy the minority leader saying one thing the next week a night is one hundred eighty degree. Turn you have mitch. Mcconnell saying it was trump's fault on january six then you have one hundred and as we and saying things talking about the leftist mobs taking over there he talking about and it. It just seems as though they could up there and say these things are totally untrue but apparently works because we have vast majority republicans think the election was stolen and then tif attack january six bucks and they don't get the big lie was based on black voters which is at the heart of this nasty bill that they just passed so looking at. Brian kemp plead like. Oh you're hurting all the people you wanna support. Yeah brian and that's why you sign that bill underneath the sign of the plantation. Get away from me wondering if win corporations wake from their political slumbers whether it's a reaction to a moment or if it's an epiphany i mean we talk about some of these business leaders who are now forced to do the right thing only after there was a lot of not major league baseball. Which is the right thing right away. But you know the the coca cola's and the home depots in the dells. I'm not dell's the deltas nell in places like texas and we go to silicon valley where. I was not aware until this morning i was reading the majority of. Ceo's the majority leader's. I guess in the c. Suites of silicon valley asian americans and they in the story i read described themselves for the most part is staying out of politics and keeping their head down sort of thing. Now they're getting involved also in the wake of a year of anti asian racism reaching. I don't know if it's an all time high but at a troubling high and obviously after the murders in atlanta so when you see things like this or the reaction to the georgia voting law. Do you think. There's a possibility that that socially responsible business doesn't remain an oxymoron for most of corporate america or these are just one and done kind of things kelly grossly. I don't i think The issues that we're dealing with Voter suppression of voting rights and asian. American attacks are ongoing so it's can't be a one and done for variety. Somebody might like to be one and done but it's not going to be. I think that when you get a situation where you have on the cover of this piece. I'm looking at For marketwatch we have the open table. Chief executive is debbie sued the hyphen capital founder. As david liu and the youtube cofounders. Steve chen these are major corporations. That are in the lives of most americans and when they step up to say you realize that's me you know you're talking about that could have been my gramma. You're you're beating up on and you're acting as though this is something brand new. No i got to speak out. And i'm using my platform you have to hope That somebody's gonna listen. They have more of a platform for someone to hear. That's for sure and they can continue to use it. I think that's extremely important. We should note that they've raised more than twenty million dollars to combat the growing instances of anti asian hayden. By the way i would say i. i don't see. This is so much as an uptick as as much. I see it as all of this stuff. That's been going on revealed publicly actually by the way this guy. Chen is is back in taiwan. He's thinking about staying there so we have to grow up in the race car but you know it it seems to me. I am constantly humiliated by everything that i've learned this year about african american. History nominated about that. I didn't know everything involving violence against asians americans. We had three women on your show the other night jim and i it was it was including surely young a regular guest with us. Who talked about this. This is a constant in their life. And i think i'm embarrassed to say i was not aware of a degree of this just like you know we don lemon ago talking about this this slave uprising that i was the most gruesome thing that nobody either so i think if you i i'm maybe this is naive of me but i like to think that when people become aware of this They they think much differently than before when they were unaware of it so to it usually ends up taking something like that horrific attack on the streets of new york where by the way those security guards were inside that building and close the door. Yeah fired you know. It has to be made visible at that level. I think sometimes to get people's attention like ways with george floyd. This is not new. What happened to george floyd but seeing it at that level Hopefully does what you say. I hope that Just just on behalf of my my Asian friends and colleagues. Stop mixing them up. This happens to black people all the time. Pay the damn attention you know. Everybody's name is not grace. You know there are different. People take a look and stop asking people where they're from back and relate to both of those before you doing sunday night. A very reliable source who was a friend of ours. Margaret just texted me and said ah vis-a-vis prince philip's dalliances yes. There was a russian ballet dancer who obviously escaped us. Really pretty dancer da. What are you doing something. They're kelly well as it happens. Ama- doing a my first segment is about The asian attacks and white. And i want to talk about the history and want to talk about you know how it has morphed into what is happening now and why what what we can expect because not going away some ways of trying to make people more aware as we've discussed here and You know it's painful conversation but I think it's a it's important to have The second part of my show is about an. Hbo documentary called our towns. It's based on the book. That jim and deborah fellows did when they travelled around the country to go to small towns and cities and find out people there why people wanted to live there what they were and why they were enthusiastic about it. And what they were doing to thrive and in some cases and it really is a story about community which is at the core of course of what we've been discussing because of covert so it's really brought us back to thinking about what community means my god. It's a lovely two. It's a lush looking documentary for one thing and the people and of the the things they've done in their communities are fascinating. I are the closest one to us the closest small town to us as profiled as eastport maine and. They're they're quite something so it's really interesting. Yeah we talked to him. Jim member when the book came out. i do. it's fantastic. Kellie kelli kelli cross is the host of under the radar with callie crossley. Which you can catch sunday nights right here and eighty nine seven at six. You can subscribe to her under the radar podcast on itunes and follow her on twitter at callie. Crossley thanks again to callie. Crossley coming up. The boston globe is reporting that in the nineteen hundreds wild alligators once populated the city. They were in fountain at the boston garden. Jim were asking you about the unlikely. Animal encounters your having the twenty first century as an right now. That is next on. Eighty nine seventy h. boston public radio. Welcome back to boston public radio. Jim brady and marta. Regan it's not a jungle out there. It's a jungle right here. During the pandemic turkeys rabbits bears coyotes. Or as alex team calls them. Coyotes took over our cities and streets backyards their home that we humans are reentering society. There've been some some collisions between human kind an animal kind from raccoons taking son. Best on people's Coyotes roaming millennium park to the turkey's ruling the roost. I was gonna say in harvard square. It's all of cambridge and brookline open lines asking you. Have you had any close encounters of the animal. Kind eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy. You're worried that road rage will be get a lot of roadkill since animals have grown so caused them to roaming are empty streets. My favorite one of these the alligators stories. Great in the boston globe story. I don't know where it was near times. Something about how. What are they called. Wild boars are roaming the streets of haifa in israel. Really yeah while boys. that's right. yeah sleeping. In people's paddling pools going across lonzo kick residents soccer balls and play with their dogs. But let me just say this conversation. The number eight seven seven three zero one eight hundred seven. I know this will shock. I do not have a call screen. So you're going to take the calls. Okay have you noticed while you're not a man's you would notice but men out there. Have you noticed that every wild turkeys beak is exactly at the level of you know what i mean. It is almost like unbelievable. They're all exactly the height. Are you know if they were come. Peck at you. What they'd be pecking at. Doesn't that make you nervous so it doesn't make me nervous. Actually i've kind of come to a a truce. I guess with with the turkey turkey's well you know there in my my little front yard lot street a lot. Yeah i go walking a lot. And i see them all the time. The place where. I walk your mentioned. Somebody's making a kid. I think she's emerson or someplace else. She's making a movie about the brookline turkeys documentary on a turkey town. And they they you know five years ago they used to come sometimes seem to come after you but mostly now they just seem to ignore you. They almost become used to human. Be as a kind of like the kennedys. You see it. A place like the boston college reservoir. They kind of know that you're not gonna come out if you man's crotch is what they say search of. I'm telling you right now. I love the the turkeys are kind of unattractive animals and i must say this newton caracal whatever the other things that hanging off them. Not very the not very attractive with the alligators story. Which is kinda gross that for awhile. They put them in the pond there. The public garden and there were baby alligators and people would people would go. Razan there and watch the baby obligators. Those one hundred years arrest. Well it was. Yeah it was one hundred years ago but boy you know again. Is that really fun to watch them. Eat the fan of rasp. But i really don't watch the alligators. I don't think with all due respect that much in the early nineteen hundred so you went. You went out got a few rats and flipped onto alligators. Honey wasn't that a great saturday night at eight seven. Seven three zero one eight nine seven the most. I dunno frightening unsettling animal encounter. I've had in the last year. Is it a possum or possum. What does that animal coal that ugliest little animal up awesome right is whatever it is. There was one of my front porch. They are the fallas scariest looking things. I ever saw and always doing sitting. There didn't matter if i approach nothing. It did not move. So that's my number. One animal non turkey animal encounter of the past year by the way i think one of our colleagues. Just send us a photo of a baby wild-boar 'cause they're really sorry as full grown. You're about the cutest little things. ever chipmunk. sort of thing. Yeah it does. And i must say our local news site universal and patch or doing a great job taking pictures. Universal had picture that little raccoon sleep because song jamaica plans absolutely adorable little picture anyway. Seven seven three one eighty nine seventy is the number the ordered right after the your did right after it was sleeping in the sun. What you do jim. You didn't read. The story. obviously gave rabies to the whole family. That was really touching. I mean these are wild animals. You know they're wild animals that have been and by the way it's our fault. Obviously it's a climate change kind of thing. It's an overdevelopment kind of thing. You're not you're so nonchalant today about everything. Incest and the royal family nothing serious. Nothing bothers you not saying is technically but possibility event officers. Well maybe that explains some things. Jim maybe that does turned out. Some cases franken maldon. Thank you for calling. Hi hi Iona of victorian eight built in eighteen. Seventy and it's been we've been hounded by animals ever. Since we bought the house time we had the first time we had Any encounter with with animals was I was sitting in the living in the playroom and You can you know how you can run around Victorians you can go from one room to another to another well yeah. I woke up to hear this wash. And i looked up and i didn't see anything and i heard it again and again and get another finally saw. The i saw a bat flying through the room. We around well. I go i go call my wife and i go. And and she sits up in bed and she screamed like as if she was the bride of frankenstein. Another time bats came and they fluid into the around the house and chased my children and they they scream to the whole screaming wreck. Everybody's different different different. I got a different time but different family members screaming. Listen nobody likes your. Thank you for your call. Bye-bye you've read about in your house marguerite many times actually have you really. It's very disconcerting. Yes yes right. Yeah no Yeah th they would commit. You had to be careful to keep all the windows. Leave anything open at dusk. Because that's how they could in in your house but we had a bat in our house one time it was in the tv room so we just close the door and the next day. My nanny's husband came over and the bat was was rolled up like a little cigar on the windowsill and he put a little little little brown lunch bag underneath the bat. The bat in the lunch bag and then to the lunch backout nope into. He's screaming like the family of the caller or no. He did not scream. He did not scream. The bat was circling around. That's what the circle of you now but but during the day went to sleep on the windowsill and that was how we get rid of edward bass seven seven you eight seven. Seven should really good story. It was the wrapped up kind of bad putting a paper bag. What'd did you attack it with a broom would you do. Actually we told her service and only cost three thousand dollars and they came and got bats. I was i wish i had known your husband. Wonderful walk great job. Eight seven seven hundred eighty nine seven. We're looking for very quick animal encounters. Go ahead robin jamaica plan. Thanks for calling. what's up tim and marjorie. I have a cre- right in front of my picture window and about two feet outside of it. I watch to morning gonna build building that and then they've been sitting on to egg and then finally they had and now three weeks later. The parents are starting to leave the nest alone and birds. That chicks are starting to venture out onto nearby branches. They haven't flown off yet. But it's just been wonderful to watch the plan that's great. That is great. How cool is that. And it's sorta like a film. It's like you're sitting in a theater looking out your window. it life being created. That is pretty great. That was that was that was. That was a great call. Eight seven seven three zero one eight nine seven. Vpi w. g. b. h. dot. Org ac- email charlie from framingham. High charlie charlie. Hello hi. I was calling because first of all We'll the backstory reminds me. When i worked at amorous go boston They're a great resource when needed about your house Secondly possums are terrifying like pin rats and one came upon came up the trash can on the back porch and i made the mistake of trying to yell at it. Scared away at random. Five hundred then turnaround in history. Me and i ended up running back to the house but yes candidates. They're so bold and they don't. I've never seen them be aggressive. But they don't get out of your way and he just walk within a couple of feet of him and they just stare at any time and it's just really like any moment they could enter the same height as turkeys as you were talking about. It's very nervewracking. Well let me tell you things you go one. When i was in the cambridge city council i would say fifty percent of the two years i was there. What we were discussing. Was the canada geese on magazine magazine park. That's the big issue that we dealt with and so go back to some of that video you might wanna check it out number two. What's your i'm sorry. I remember call screen. What's the next time. You have a possum or an possum. Whatever it is at your house my advice if miami giving you advice is you. Wait till it's on a window sill marjorie nannies husband puts it in a bag and takes it outside. So it's not that it's resolvable. Thank you for your call. It's really cool to see the bats player. They're all wrapped up like that. So that we're cigar. It's really quite an amazing. The canada geese do dogs. You know because the dogs are trying to get the dies. They were always hits my little dog because he was a little dog his so much at the great big early dogs nancy from taunton. Oh we're almost real quick. Sorry wow okay. I'll be fast Gang of turkey's on saint patrick's day engaged in their meeting ceremony. They were making a racket. I sang to them. And they quieted down. Won easily especially in trance and he kept knocking on my door for the morning. Well did you. Sing is having my baby. Is that what you're saying. I'm not sure that i was the object of their interest. It just gives us a couple of notes of your song Oh i i. I wind it. I just made it up as and it was funny. They went from screaming and gargling. Just picking at the dirt and all quiet. It was really funny. You must have a lovely boy thank you. Did you try that jim waist. Okay hundred same to the turkey's next time. Ask young beatles next time. I'm watching that movie that's right. That's us favorites movie. What's it called. Metamorphosis microcosms if you're into doug beatles having sex stature movie sex is ever body he took most dung beetles and william hurt and kathleen turner. Those are the two whatever Whatever gets you going in the morning. Thank you very much for listening to another edition of boston. Public radio tim on monday. We're going to be joined by the reverend iron munro and emmett price e. j. dion for the washington post on national politics and christopher kimball on his latest cookbook. Looking really turn out those stories. this is great anyway. I wanna thank our terrific crew chelsea. Murray's matthews you believe aidan commie. Mackenzie farkas our engine. Is john far parker. Miles smith and dave goldstein. Run our remote studios which back in today. jim. I hope you have a very nice weekend. Nice weather at least van tomorrow. I'm margery jim bradley. Thanks again for tuning in. Have a great weekend and hope you see on monday.

cdc boston dolores huerta Cdc harvard united farm marjorie janine central society corby kummer princeton phillips margerie james fellows tom tom wolinsky jim brady united farm workers tom clean arizona
How We Win Season Two is Here!

Swing Left - How We Win

02:49 min | 3 months ago

How We Win Season Two is Here!

"Season two of swing. Left's how we win is here all over the country people like you stepped up to help. Hold the house win. Control of the senate and put joe biden and comma harris in the white house. Democracy is precious. Democracy is fragile at this hour. My friends democracy has prevailed. The america's democracy is not guaranteed. It is only as strong as our willingness to fight for now. We have an incredible opportunity and responsibility to wheeled. Are people power to fight for our democracy. Trump may be gone but the gop is still clearly the party of trumpism. We must stay engaged to make sure we hold onto power and expand our majorities. But how do we do that. In the face of historic attacks on voting rights conspiracy theories that defile the truth and systemic racism at the roots of our institutions season. One brought you answers and tools to make a difference from guests such as speaker nancy. Pelosi this is a hot. It's ridiculous dangerous assault on the lives the livelihood and the life of our democracy deray mckesson. Police have killed more people since the protest not less at third of all the people killed by stranger. United states sexy killed by police officer and this is the first year ever were black. People are more afraid of being killed by police officer than being killed by community violence. Actor billy eichner. If you're not gonna get involved now to try to defeat this guy then. I don't know you need to have a conversation with yourself about what your priorities are stacey. Abrams where the band tells us what we are allowed. And where we are now as what we've been willing to get there. I have hope. Because i know we've got farther to go. But we've got the capacity. Senator chris murphy you rep maxine waters. Dolores huerta adam schiff alyssum. Alano michael moore kathryn hahn karen bass and many more season two. We're going even deeper into the issues that matter the most and of course what you can do about it. We don't agonize we organize. And we've got a lot of work to subscribe right now on apple and everywhere you get your pods and join us. Starting june second for insight action. And your reasons for hope i'm steve pearson and mariah craven and this is season two of how we went.

comma harris deray mckesson joe biden billy eichner america white house Trump senate gop Pelosi Senator chris murphy nancy Dolores huerta adam schiff Alano michael moore kathryn hahn Abrams stacey maxine waters karen bass steve pearson
Farmworkers Will Soon Be Able To Receive Overtime Pay In Washington State

Boston Public Radio Podcast

20:17 min | 3 months ago

Farmworkers Will Soon Be Able To Receive Overtime Pay In Washington State

"Support for boston. Public radio comes from. Cic health offering covid nineteen testing for organizations and individuals public testing available in massachusetts rhode island vermont and connecticut. You can schedule your test at. Cic dash health dot com. Welcome back to boston. Public radio margarite. Margarite margarite is who's next is a shirley is soon is it is it. Well let me say. I would say since he's right there. Zoom look lovely as he always does it is corby kummer joining us. Jim join us online. If that's the case over the latest stories at the intersection of food policy and food culture is corby kummer. Corby is the executive director of the food and sally society policy program at the aspen institute. He's a senior editor at the atlantic. And a senior lecturer. Toughs friedman school of nutrition. Science and policy look closely. It is gorby gummer cory. Welcome to the show. Good to see. I have to learn to do good vocal limitations of your other guests. That's right that's right. That's no good corby so we cover. We talked a lot about the plight of farmworkers workers Now washington state is done. Something which didn't realize was a hangover a from some Something that fdr did back in the new deal. So what's washington state done. So washington state has finally agreed to pay farmers living wages by agreeing to overtime so there are a lot of First of all it's great. Washington state is taking the lead in employment protection and saying that farmers work much longer than forty hour weeks They work after hours. Their employers are required to pay time and a half for everything over forty hours. So i think you know we agree. Gee that sounds good. It sounds like why wasn't that the case and when you read that the average workweek for farm workers is sixty hours and that it has never included overtime and that since I state minimum wage laws at least in washington state. They were nineteen fifty nine went into effect. They kept these exceptions for farm workers. And the idea that that they have never been Exempted and that. There's as racist legacy built into state. Federal confederal labor laws which exempted farmers from these protections. And this article says it's because fdr had to support democratic southern lawmakers a who were representing regions that were all relying on low wage black workers and they said no no no. We can't protect them. It's kind of like the racist history of tipping in which employers refused to play. A black servers are workers a living wage. And said you know the customers can make it up. If you're really good you'll get a tip. You know corby apologies if you said this in explaining this to us. They're not liar. Washington state now. Yes i mean this is. I assume this is either the first of its kind or one of its kind of. It's kind this article in the counter. Says that is prophetic. Is truly incredibly pathetic. And it says in california forty hour per week threshold for farm. Workers is gradually getting phased in but not until twenty twenty five and in hawaii workers are eligible for overtime with a forty hour mark but There's a seasonal exemption which employers for half the year can opt out of that washington state. Is i think we can now state after two examples this week of farm worker friendly. We had the incredible thrill of having. Dolores huerta founders. Stay before ninety first but her birthday. If you recall marjorie it was dolores huerta day in washington state and four days so obviously somebody in power there. Whether it's jay inslee or the governor people before have respect for these workers and good for them. I was it was news demand both case you know or by the way where we know. I've heard her in person at least twice in. It's in the past five or seven years so she is remarkable because pre pandemic she was actually travelling to speak and of course she was fiery. And you know a god of this movement battleship stiller's. She was incredible anyway. is warmer the subject of farm workers. We've talked a lot about a covert and farmworkers. Because of people being transported in vans and people working very close together not having the correct Cetera et cetera. Apparently though we still don't know it's impossible to tell how many workers contracted cova. Why is that well if state health departments in Egg friendly states to slaughterhouses have their way. We will never find out. So this is one of those One death is a tragedy a million deaths as to tick Sinisoo cynical rules where Food environment research network Did this incredibly brave survey of what are the cases of covid. And how many deaths in slaughterhouses all through last year and we might think that this has been over that it's been solved but it has been nothing like solved And now They're trying to revive this and find better statistics but many of the states are just not releasing it and they're not compelling slaughterhouses to release the statistics which are are still horrifying. It was a hundreds of debts. firm is reporter traced more than twelve thousand five hundred cases and thirty nine. That's just two fifty seven tyson plants. There were hundreds and hundreds more if you count the people around to the workers when they came home and in multigenerational households and in the small communities. Where the slaw slaughterhouses were but smithfield foods and these An iowa and nebraska nebraska. The governor in may stopped health officials from publicly reporting cases at meat packing plants. And you were called. The trump administration was calling them essential workers not protecting them allowing employers to walk away from responsibility for protecting them. 'cause they were doing essential work on the job. So we're not reading about this and we're not seeing it because the companies are not compelled to report. By the way. I was as you were speaking. I was reminded on. Just looked up the name. Because i couldn't remember. I think it was called appears to have been called hidden. Toll frontline did a fabulous fabulous piece on the kinds of working conditions. I use the term loosely that Farm workers and meat factory workers were a- laboring under In the early stages of covert and how grotesquely inhumanely they're being treated by their employers is just gross and i would. I'm sure it's on the gbh website at pbs. Should check it out. Colton and visited to slaughterhouses in nebraska and iowa in my time and the fact that i visited them i was not one of the undercover pita workers. I wasn't that brave. i was completely authorized. And you know gowned up and booted. It was horrifying to watch the repetitive stress injury. And how people were absolutely shoulder to shoulder. it was clear. There was no ventilation and there was no separation core. Become a. i'm depending on you to explain to me what's good and what's bad here. My understanding in semi related stories is joe biden has cancelled the trump food boxes that were a pandemic creation at the same time the wick program women infants and children which is stunningly least underutilized is about to get more federal support. I assume both moves are beneficial to low and moderate income. People are are they. Oh of course wick is the wick is one of the best nutrition interventions anyone who looks government nutrition interventions. Could ever imagine it. Just as a lot of women good when they're pregnant and children up to five and the biden administration has proposed covering children up to six. That year is a very important bridgier until they can go to school and qualify for school food. So that is already huge. But they're going to cut some of the red tape and increase women's access to this ineligibility. There's all kinds of good things you can say about. Women's infants and children started in one thousand nine hundred seventy four By spouse was Wicked administrator at a week family. It's not it's it's not tied to income it's just tied to whether you have children. And you are in a municipality that offers it why percentage of eligible people who make us so pitifully low i am i am not. Emily brody leave Leave at the harvard law school food law and policy clinic. Ed somebody i really admire. She's quoted the story. So i can't give you all the reasons but one of them i think is they don't know they're eligible. I don't think it's the same as a lot of the snap. Gap in people getting it who are eligible as they were worried about running into election officials. I think with wickets that people just don't know also at the beginning whic was coupons like food stamps that you had to trade in but unlike food stamps it was quite restrictive about what you were able to buy it. And that's why nutrition advocates have always loved it because it said okay. Here's the kind of milk and whole grains and things that we defined as healthy foods that wick is going to reimburse you for And formula and the idea of formula one. A wonderful former colleague of mine is now an editor at the new york. Times op-ed page. She just tweeted this week. She's got a baby and she said why in the past month has the infant formula gone under lock and key to supermarkets in the cvs in my neighborhood. And you know you've often seen this. I'm sure in stores where this becomes a a high theft item which is incredibly disturbing that a women feel they would need to steal it and when you read what is it. Sixty percents uptake. That means forty percent of people who are who are eligible for wicker. Not getting it so You know the idea of publicizing this more and having some of the money that the biden administration wants to give to this to allow greater reach of people who are eligible and lower. Red tape will be a good thing. So corby kummer. I'm reading a story from cnn about Kids meals the healthiest meal. The day coach was school cafeterias and this is a pretty dramatic turnaround and they say the turnaround was mainly after two thousand ten. So i guess we can thank michelle obama crusader for better food and schools for this. Or am i misplaced my credit. No i am thanking my dean of tufts friedman school dr. Dorothy motza ferried who conducted the study. It is the lead off or worse. Yes i thought you'd like that. So yes indeed two thousand and ten current agriculture secretary. You know much criticized for being brought back after eight years. It was tom ville sack. Who really helped put the healthy hunger. Free kids act which was indeed michelle. Michelle obama sam. Cassell policy director. They push through. Tom vilsek knew how to get. It passed and so he did. What did this mean. Higher standards of nutrition for school food and this resulted in much better nutrition. Often the best attrition of the day for school children came from what they were getting in schools. But what really caught my eye and this was over the fifteen years of this study. Is that the amount of unhealthy food consumed from grocery store by children decrease from fifty three to forty five percent and adults from forty to thirty two percent and Dr moza ferry and ardine says Greatest opportunity for improving di quality which is really a coded way of saying big commercial supermarket. Step up and increase your food. Nutrition standards as indeed during the whole michelle obama time Great value the house brand of walmart did impose nutritional restrictions on all of its vendors. Vendors did private label for star market and safeway in many other markets so it started reducing the amount of sodium and increasing the amount of whole grain available in these private label brands but the idea that supermarkets are very powerful way. It's just the food you put in front of people and house-label is always cheaper so the idea of having these cheaper foods with better nutrition is a powerful one that hasn't been completely exploited yet. I'm sorry my pa. I missed the name of your dean. What was your resume. I repeat it again. Doctor dr ish was is asking recognize so you know the other day we were talking about oliver sacks and probably the thing maybe other than awakenings that he wrote that people most remembers the man who mistook his wife for a hat. You know doesn't. Do you know that he was contemplate you. I know this since your food got you know that instead of the title he was thinking of calling it the man or actually the woman who mistook a croissant for a trio. Are you aware of the fact. That saks was this close. I have it on with the polish jews. And you know we didn't even know we were trying to figure out where to fit in this story because it doesn't really fit anywhere but margin. I love and chelsea to loved it so much. We decided we'd give it to you. So can you tell this delightful little story out of krakow. Please fill fairy. Well-meaning woman in krakow poland saw a strange immobile object stranded on a tree outside our window day after day it was dark and lifeless and she was extremely worried that someone had abandoned tiny woodland creature opposite her window and she called the a krakow society for the protection of animals and said. Why don't we like this story around here. People are scared of him bids for two days in my tree and inspector atom. of course he would be named adam in crack came looked at it and at and he was very sympathetic to this reporter. Which i'm sure is all over the news and said indeed rats hamster's cages. Maybe it's an iguana which this woman thought it might be but a maybe a legless and lifeless and very dark iguana and so with is spector's paid a visit to the woman straight and the direction she gave make this completely make the whole story. It's halfway down the block on what blooms in. So if you can figure out what blooms at bay and find the block. They founded it was on a lilac branch and they approached it gingerly. No legs no had and then they realized they could be of no help at all because it'd been previously baked and it was a quantum. How pathetic are the three of us for loving story out. A crack often criticize talk show hosts particularly right wing nuts. Who like pick one story out of like some podunk town in nebraska. And try to generalize it. How do we justify taking public radio time to discuss a quad song. Mistaken for an immovable animal and a tree. How do you know why because we've given children a project to get them outdoors To judge how long they can get a croissant to stay on a tree branch before it falls out. We'll ask them not to climb to high so no accidents. But you know we're member. The wonderful and heartbreaking stories of the teacher who early on in arizona was sadly felled by covid but one of the things she had done was go to all of her students. Far away from the school district in arizona and deliver them signs project kits so that they could get outdoors and participate in class and actually watch something so. I think that something about natural study a very young woman in my life. She's now thirteen. She was twelve last year when she did. This bought every kind of soap that there is on the market and gauged. How long it took to dissolve in water and in fact this was a very useful experiment to figure out. What will last the longest but in other words doing children it was it was i ever. I think that was hardest whereas dove up right but dove and such which are moisturizing does offer fast because they have a high moisture content but in any case how long will the cost saw and then if they will buy the costume from local bakeries they will be patronizing local businesses. That need to to stay alive. There's a there's a great mystery here that remains unsolved mystery. well how did the quad saul wind up. You know forty feet above the ground or whatever on your window. Have not idea was to the idea they had was that somebody threw out the window to feed. The birds often. In fact when i am in a city which one day may be. We all will be again every croissant. I possibly can. This is no joke. I do it I have one bite. And i will usually tear it up. Shred it and put it in a public. I say for the birds my spouse says it's for the rats but in any case i do indeed try not to throw out food but have it be. Is animals now so this means that the question was put there for the birds and the birds rejected. But we don't know actually clan by saying an ordinance this proclaiming pieces. I have stood beneath many window hoping that across will be thrown out. It and i've always been disappointed looking up at the sky. Just keep your head high and your eyes in the skies. okay corby. it's a pleasure as always thank you for us. Thank you goodbye. Crummy camera joins us weekly. He's executive director of the food and society policy program at the tufts at the aspen institute. Excuse me senior. Editor the atlantic and a senior lecturer at the tufts friedman school of nutrition science and policy. Thanks corby coming up ruskin. You is the work from home. Induced back pain going to be the one thing that's going to force you to return to the office and other words working from home. Do you find yourself now. Unable to stand up or for that matter sit down. That comes asia's next eddie nine seven. Gbh boston public radio.

corby kummer washington Dolores huerta biden administration corby Jim join food and sally society Toughs friedman school of nutr gummer cory fdr nebraska boston aspen institute Michelle obama jay inslee Emily brody Corby Washington harvard law school food law an wick
Changing The World

TED Radio Hour

54:36 min | 2 years ago

Changing The World

"This message comes from NPR sponsor could veto live culture drinks, celebrating all the lively cultures that NPR brings to life now in over twenty bold and refreshing flavors bubbling with effervescence and alive. Like you. All let K E V. I T A dot com. Hate before we get to the show when I tell you about a podcast from Ted called work life with Adam grant, he's an organizational psychologist and in each episode. He takes you inside the minds of some of the world's most unusual professionals to discover the key to a better work life this week hetero. Member anything how memory is a skill. You. Can learn powerful strategy every workplace can harness this. Is the Ted radio hour. Each week round. Breaking TED talks talks. Ted technology entertainment design design is that really what I've never known delivered. A Ted conferences around the world, if the human imagination we've had to believe in impossible thing, the true nature of reality beckons from just beyond those talks those ideas adapted for radio. From NPR. I'm guy Roz so back in nineteen sixty three ruby sales was a first year student at Tuskegee university in Alabama. What did you? What did you study there? I stood it American history, which has always been my passion and. How did you get involved in activism? Well, this was a period where black activism was very much alive on historically black college destroyed out about the unwelcomed unwanted on warranted. And forcing him because he has the cut in Montgomery, and you had had the integration of university of Alabama. And so that the Alabama was a hot Bill activism have a right here. Protected by that bottle and have a right regular here. I was already proved to be open to a conversation about becoming a movement activists, and I've been trying to find mine police as a rebel because I had always been a rebel. And so I was ski breaking all the rules. Streaking wine at the pun swimming, naked with the boys until I became really aware of a movement. And that changed my life and from that day forward. I was committed to social activists. Creed is the conviction about some things. So dear some things so precious some things so intented true that they went and dying for a man to be easy for you to get involved to go to a meeting and to meet people was on campus. It was on campus. Will the first thing lose that we went to so moved to March across the bridge owes in always in the back in so, but at the time, it got to be my turn to walk across everybody was turned back in a remember just chaos and having and then with the beatings, the whole body of students at to ski became more and more galvanized in the dean of students range for us to have out first demonstration as a student buddy in response to the beatings on Elma Pettus bridge at the capital to Montgomery. So the dean, LeRoy. Early in conjunction with the president was a student body literally chartered buses for us to go to the capital to stage a protest. Right here in Alabama amid relief that they have them. We've on stand up on the tear gas. We're going to who's in the protests. That I begin to realize that the white world had a very different vision of who. I was then what my community has taught me. And so it was at that moment that I realized in the base of dogs Billy clubs in charging horses that white people hated me enough that they would kill me. Was it was there? Do you remember feeling fearful energize absolute loaf? Well, there's always a moment of fear. We face people who have weapons that can hurt you. But there's something about a movement spirit where you transcend fear, and you become a part of something larger than fear, and so terribly I felt afraid, but the fear dissipated in the face of the community energy and the resolve and the bravery of ordinary people on that bridge that day. Of power in the state of Alabama fan win going that nobody around. Later that year in nineteen sixty five ruby had another experience with the movement that would change her life forever. Here's more from ruby sales on the Ted stage. And just a quick warning. What you're about to hear include some violence and graphic language. I've want to share with you a moment in my life. When the hurt and wounds of racism were both deadly and paralyzing for me. And I think what I've learned. Can be a source of healing. But all of us. When I was having teen. I was a college student at husky university. And I was a worker in the southern freedom movement, which we call the civil rights move during this time, I met another young twenty two zero white seminary college student named Jonathan Daniels from Cambridge Massachusetts, we had come to Laos county to work in the movement and on the hot summer day in August, Jonathan I joined a demonstration of local young black people who were protesting the exploited Shen. Of local black sharecroppers by Richland holders who chooses them out of their money and on the morning that we showed up for the demonstration. We were met with a mob of howling. White men was baseball bats, shotguns, in any weapon that you could imagine. And they were threatening to kill us. Sheriff understanding that this was really very dangerous arrested us and put us on a garbage truck and took us to the county jail, which was an Hain veal in there were fourteen young women like myself and the rest were young men, and Jonathan Daniels and father Mars row who come down. He was appreciate comedown from Illinois. He was also arrested with Jonathan and the rest of the group that Jay, and we stayed in jail in the most incredibly barbaric circumstances, where the white Joe's strength to threaten us with being raped where we were told that we had to drink water from the toilet. It was pure psychological warfare and out of nowhere. One morning. The sheriff told us we had to get out of jail. And we said, no, no one is supposed to Bill. Why would you make us lead? He said get out of my jail right now or you'll be sorry. So against our better judgment. We've left to jail, and it was one of those hot August days. If you know how the heat papper taste from the pavement in the south in August. Jonathan Daniels bother Marshall Joyce Bill, and I were designated by the group to go and get sodas everybody. And so we walk down to the store, which we'll always gone to the store. So we didn't think that we meet any danger. It will be got to the store. Tom Cole was standing there waving a shotgun and threatened to Bill my brains out. Injustice added the words Dunn's Jaas fool me back. I fell down on the steps and. He took the bullet that was intended for me. And father Marsh role was with Joyce Bill and seeing that Jonathan had been shot in the head. He had been shot. Also, he started running with Joyce belly. And he held her hands. I could see out the corn amount is when I realized I wasn't dead. And he only let go of her hands when Tom Coleman shot him in the back. So he lay hot Alabama son crying for water. I can share his voice today. Crime for water and some Coleman was walking over his by with the shotgun during any of us to give him water. And he later on told us that he was taken to the hospital in a hearse on top of Jonathan's dead body where he's lay in a hallway of a hospital for hours because white surges would not operate. You were kit. I mean, you were seventeen years old when that happened, and you describe how for six months, you you couldn't speak after that. I couldn't speak. I was traumatized. And I was trying to make sense out of being a survivor of trying to make sense journalists, Jeff, and so I just really went inside of myself and just shut down would not talk. The only time I really talked was when I went to the trial because Termine despite the threat of life. I was terminated. I would show up and testify on behalf of Jonathan and father Mars road. Is there a part of you at that time because I can imagine how much fear that and the terror of that experience. Would have triggered their moments. Who are you? Thought that you would just. I don't know stop fighting that you will just sort of. Andro fadeaway. No, actually that drove me to fight harder. About. Feeding. People will not. Even the marching mighty on. The world doesn't change on a tone. People who believe in. Willing to fight for it even against all the odds. Today on the show. We're going to explore ideas around activism, what motivates it why it starts out? Just one person can make all the difference. Kill Jonathan Daniels was acquitted by an all white jury. Father Richard Morris row was also shot survived and seventeen year old ruby sales. She committed the rest of her life to the call of activism teaching the next generation do the same. Wondering when you work with younger activists today. Do you feel like there's a sense of impatience because what you went through the civil rights movement that this was a decades long struggle still is so do you tell younger people to be patient, or or do you understand that sense of urgency? I think young people is the nature of young people to be impatient. That's what gives them the edge to change things. I'm not expecting a young person at thirteen years old to have the patients that I have that. Then breaks spirits, expect them to be demanding. I expect them to be ruthless. In the demands, I expect him to push in to have a high expectation what I don't expect them to give up with one demand isn't met. But I find it particularly refreshing that they have high expectations. But a forty year old should have learned something that thirteen year old doesn't know if we were to tell a thirteen year old will be patient. They probably say what I said when people told me be patient patients be damn I want to now. So I think we have to lower young people that we have to have them to be demanding allows them to push us with allow them to say, no not tomorrow. But right now. And they will have to let them see that. It doesn't come right now. That's ruby sales. She's founder and director of the spirit house project. It's an organization dedicated to the fight for social and racial Justice. You can see rubies full talk at Ted dot com. On the show today ideas about how to change the world stay with us. I'm guy Roz, and you're listening to the Ted radio hour from NPR. Hey, everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible. I into it. If you run your own business or someone trying to get the most out of your money into it has financial tools that help you achieve prosperity easy to navigate software like QuickBooks. Turbo. Tax and mint help you take control of your finances. So you could live the life you want. Learn more at into dot com into it powering prosperity. Thanks also to Mercedes Benz, featuring the new A-Class with M B U X Mercedes-Benz user experience that learns the way you speak to it. And the way you drive and then make suggestions based on your individual behavior. The class can -ticipant your needs and fulfill your requests through natural voice recognition. Learn more about M B U X in Mercedes Benz a class, m b USA dot com. Hey, it's fear. Eisenberg host of NPR's asked me another and were making the month of April all about women in comedy. We've got grittily and Leslie Hedlund from the Netflix series. Russian doll, the beloved Reta from NBC's parks and recreation and many more spread the word. Listen and subscribe now. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz and on the show today ideas about changing the world. Do you remember time where you were? So scared you almost want it to stop. I remember being very scared, but I never wanted to stop. I was terrorized. My home, you know, threatened with guns. And then of course, beaten by the police in San Francisco, very severely to the point that I almost died, but the thought of stopping has never entered by mind, this is Dolores Huerta. She's a labor leader had a civil rights activist and the co founder of United farm workers around the same time ruby sales was involved in the struggle for civil rights in the south to Lawrence Horta was organizing migrant farm labours in California fighting for better pay and working conditions. Deloris has been an activist for over sixty years. She actually just turned eighty nine. But even today, she still pushing for people to get involved. I have so much faith in the organizing model that if. You can just reach people and talk to them in meet with them and show them that they have power can put some that they have power this is such an important element because we're going to keep our democracy alive. People have got to get involved. And they've got understand that they have responsibility to participate in that they can make a difference for Dolores. She discovered her own power to get involved back in the nineteen fifties. When she started working in California with a man named Fred Ross, here's more from Dolores Huerta on the Ted stage. I wanna give an example of how I found my voice, and I was very fortunate in that when I was twenty five years old, I met a gentleman named Fred Ross senior who organized a chapter of a group called the community service organization in my hometown of Stockton, California. This was the best organization, and I was recruited to be a volunteer. So day will. In the sitting in the office. If farmworker comes in and his paralysed, he could hardly walk. He has a crutch and he needs help he needs some of the happen down to the ball opposite making -plication so eyeballing tiered to do that. But when I got to the office, they would not let me make an application. I didn't know what to do. I was little laws. So I went back to the office. And I told Mr Ross, and he said to me very sternly you go right back down to that whopper. Apas a new demand to see a supervisor. And you demand that they let him make an application, and I thought, wow, I can do that. So I thought about it, and I kind of overcame I inside of my fears. I went out the wealth Brahms, and I demanded to see the supervisor sure enough he came out and they had to let the Serbis make an application for Welker, and he got his disability for himself and his family. But that taught me a lesson. That taught me that I had a voice. You did that. Right. And I wonder when you think about activists today are people who are considering what is it that prevents people from becoming active and involved. A lot of it is fear. Apathy that they don't really know that they have power a lot of people just feel that work belongs to somebody else. You know, doesn't really involve me at the lot of people, especially people that are working class. This busy just trying to survive. You know, you have parents that had were two jobs and got a razor children in even when when they hear what's happening in the world. Again, they don't realize that they can have a role to make sure that that is that they don't have a role to they can make things better. And I think that's why a lot of times it's hard to get people to vote because many people get cynical. They don't feel that if they make any difference. So it was just we have to do a lot a lot of education civic education to make people understand that they can make a difference. I want to give you an example of a woman in art loaned Asian just to show you that sometimes people they have power, but they don't fill the tissue is an immigrant from Mexico only has the sixth grade education and speaks very limited English, but she was very concerned because the children at the middle school in their town called we've patch. This is in California's central valley. They couldn't go out and play in the school yard because the air quality is so bad. So she and her husband went out there. And they passed a bond issue to build a new state of the art gymnasium with the kids at their middle school. That was a big success. Then she heard a rumor that the principal was going to end the breakfast program for the farmer. Good children because the principal thought it was just too much paperwork. So litigated self elected as the school board. They kept the breakfast program. And she got reduced principle. And this is just an example of a woman never went to high school never went to college. But she found her power. We recently had with term elections in the United States of America. And what did we see we saw the toll many more women young people people of color LGBT were all elected to public office. And so we now see we have this potential. We had this attention to get rid of the apathy. And it was get everyone in while get everyone committed I want to just remind everybody we have power, but in order to achieve the piece of we all yearn for we've all got to get involved. A lot of young people are are looking at our political climate and impatient. Right. There's there's a sense of urgency that things have to change quickly. Do you think based on your experience that that activism and social Justice require patients? I agreed with the young people think I do think that we have to move a lot faster. They move we have been moving in terms of social Justice issues. But at the same time, the young people have to understand that we have to institutionalize. Some of these demands we want in some of the changes that we want. So it's not just about protests about making sure the things that we want to change our embodied in some kind of legislation. So kind of a law. There's a difference between organizing and mobilizing you can mobilize people quickly. Like, we have seen in these massive marches that we've seen. The women's March when people are of the same mind or the industry and the issues, but in order for people to get mobilize. They've got to be organized to begin with. They've got to be educated on the issues. So I think it we can somehow expand organising model, you know, sit in people's living rooms talk about the issues that they can understand what's going on. They will get more participation in terms of activism. As you look toward the future. Are you as Optimus today is you were in when you began as twenty five year old community activists like do you think you were more optimistic than I am still very optimistic? And the reason I'm optimistic is because when it comes to knowledge, and it is acceptable. People can't hide so many of these inequities that we face society, they're only visible, but they're acceptable. So you know, who the players are. So do I feel very very optimistic? Actually, they were going through a hard moment right now. Just like we did in the sixties. But because we are in this difficult moment. A lot of more people are coming out of their apathy. A lot more people are getting involved, and I see a lot of getting involved, and you know, to quote credit, Scott King who said we will never have peace in the world. Until women take power. I see that happening. It's Dolores Huerta labor leader and civil rights activist. You may have also heard of the other co founder of United farm workers. A man named Cesar Chavez, you can see DeLores full talk at Ted dot com. So many of us activist. We think of participating in a grassroots movement going out on the streets. Is that like a good definition of what it means to be an activist? We'll look I think the basic impulses. The same right is is people binding together in pursuit of some goal challenging power in some way. The way that plays out in the twenty th century. Does look pretty different and the repetoire of activism. I think is brought oh this is Jeremy hymens he works to mobilize activists around the world. Yeah. I've been an actress really all my life. I started as a child activist back in a strata where I grew up in fact in the early nineties when Jeremy was twelve he'd tried to stop a war. With a fax machine. Germy hymens picks up his story from the Ted stage. It was the eve of the Gulf war. And I will get is the global campaign to flood the hotel the continental engine Eva where James Baker and Tareq Aziz were meeting on the eve of the war. And I thought if I could flood them with faxes will stop the war. Well, unsurprisingly that campaign was wholly unsuccessful. There are lots of reasons for that. But there's no doubt that one sputtering fax machine. In Geneva was a little bit of a bandwidth constraint in terms of the ability to get a message to lots of people. And so I went on to discover some better tools. I co-founded avows which uses the internet to mobilize people and now has almost forty million members. And I now run purpose, which is a home for these kinds of technology powder movements. So what's the moral of this story is the moral of the story? What kind of clips by the mobile phone? This is another story of tech determine. Well, I would argue that is actually more to it than that. I'd argue that in the last twenty years something more fundamental has changed then just Mutek. There is being a fundamental shift in the balance of power in the world. So in your talk, you introduce this idea of new power, what is it? So we think of new power as this kind of critical method, this critical mindset that you need in the twenty th century. And that is this ability to harness the energy of these connected crowds that are all around us. So the metaphor that we use. We contrast old power and new pal all power is power as currency. It's the kind of power that you can hold up. So the more of it that you have the more powerful. You are you use that power? You spend it to maintain your position but new pal works differently. It isn't the kind of power you can hold up. It's how as a cart. We need current is like water or trinity. It's most powerful when it surges. It's most powerful when people participating and the more people participate the stronger the current gets. And so that's how we think about the difference between old power and new pal? Right. So in a world where everybody's connected where everybody can spread ideas can mobilize communities and followers. Very quickly. The realm of digital activism is a whole new spice that's opened up in the last twenty years that it's able series of different kinds of movements to emerge. So like what? So you think about the made to movement? I think it's a great example of the MU kinds of movements that you see in this kind of new pow world, right? So to come back to that metaphor of new powwows works like current with the may two movement. You get this incredible surge of energy that kind of more or less comes from knowing so Toronto Bill could Bain seating this idea for a decade. But then all of a sudden it catches fire and the way that it does many people take that energy. They adapt it and make it their own. So in France, the metoo movement becomes denounce, you'll pig much, more French balanced temple in Brazil. It becomes my first assault. Because the problem is so prolific there and the structure of these movements is different the way people participate in them is different. The speed. Lead the scale, the density of participation is unprecedented in a movement like that. What's interesting about new Powell is the white feeds on itself. Once you have an experience of new pal you tend to expect and want more. So let's say you've used a peer to peer lending platform like Linden tree will prosper, then you figured out that you don't need the Bank and who wants the Bank, right? And so that experience tends to involve new tends to want make you want more participation across more aspects of your life. And what this gives rise to is a set of values. If you were if you were thinking about something like the civil rights movement, and you go to sort of say, okay. This is what it would look like today under a new power structure. But what what would it be? I think you could look at black lives matter. The founders will women two of them will queer women and the head of very particular perspective about how to lead a movement. They felt that if they made the movement all about them, and they didn't credit context in many leaders could emerge a decentralized. Why that the power of the movement would be limited? And I think that was very effective for creating a lot of energy around criminal Justice police brutality that kind of movement can be less effective in pushing very specific policy outcomes. And that's why you kind of need almost like a relay between old power and new pal when you pal creates the energy creates a lotta decentralized. Activity spreads in idea, and then opine institutions can sort of help push that into for example, a state house legislate shop where you've got to do sort of particular kinds of gritty work in order to get a particular Bill passed the most effective movements today. Combining all power and new pal. Now, the NRA is a great example of this. Right. It's got a brilliant old power strategy. You know, it's got a FIA some brand project this power, they project this ability to change an election and at the same time, they're very good at new pal at kind of releasing control cultivating, the energy of this opponents and those supporters go far beyond the people who pay Jews to the NRA and what they do is. I basically, cultivate that energy. They fund little blogs and gun clubs and local activists. And then they essentially see the stuff that's bubbling up the stuff that's taking off. And then they bring some of their old power might and resources in and they really amplified. So you're talking about really big movements. Right. But but what about like on a smaller scale because it's almost truism that the squeaky wheel is always gonna get some grease, right? But in the past squeaky wheel, you had to show up to be a pain in someone's. But right, and today, if you wanna be a squeaky wheel, it's not it's not that hard to mobilize people quickly to urinate, somebody to the point where you know, a politician or journalists or somebody in the public eye is going to respond and react as a result of your complaints. Exactly. And companies and organizations still haven't quite learned how to respond to these huge kind of currents of new power institutions are good at dealing with other institutions than not very good at dealing with with movements. And I think you're also ride that anyone can be a squeaky wheel. I mean, I think one of the fascinating things if you're a kid today. You know, what you'll learning every day these skills of mobilization every kid has. Follows every kid is thinking in a way about how to build community around the content that they produce. So that's why it's so much easier. Now for anyone to take that up. And that unfortunately is also why it's easier for extreme ideas to spread. But it also gives me a lot of hub because you know, kids today saw this wonderfully with the Pocklington kids using these skills to fight for Justice digital activism is an entree to those more committed forms of activism. I think that the the version of activism that we have maybe an kids the vision that maybe we tell stories about in films. He's an incredibly important full of activism, but it's not the only form of activism that matters. And it's not the only form of activism that has brought about change. So we need all these kinds of participation. Germy hymens co author of new power. He's also the CEO of purpose. It's an organization that helps build and support movements around the world. You can see his full talk at Ted NPR dot org. On the show today. Ideas about changing the world stay with us. I'm guy Roz. And you're listening to the Ted radio hour from NPR. Hey, everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible. I zoom when you can't be there in person zoom zoom is used by millions to connect face to face across town or around the world share files video anything and connect through any device, desktop laptop, tablet smartphone or conference room system. Zoom videoconferencing zoom rooms video webinars zoom phone lets you do business zoom visit zoom online to set up your free account today. Need happy with zoom. Thanks also to first Republic. Buying a home can be a complicated process with first Republic by your side. You have one less thing to worry about from budget planning to closing the deal. They have the expertise to make your home buying experience. Seamless whether it's for your first home or your dream on you can count on first Republic. Learn more at first Republic dot com. Com. First Republic Bank member FDIC, equal housing lender. And before we get back to the show. A one a shirt some news about the other podcast. I host how I built this. We're returning to San Francisco for the second. How I built this summit supported by American Express. I'll be joined there by founders of companies like Instagram slack away. Bliss jet, blue and many many more visit summit dot NPR dot org to learn more. And I hope to see you there. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz and on the show today ideas about changing the world, and for some people the idea of getting involved of joining a movement can seem a little daunting, especially if you're an introvert. Oh, absolutely. This is Sarah Corbett and quite an extreme introvert. But Sarah is also an activist in her approach activism. That's quiet. Reflective even intimate something known as craft of his so craft ISM was a coin in two thousand three buying American lady cold secret, who's a nigga. And notice that lots of knitting groups talking about pass, no issues also political issues, and for me, I think it's mice defective is a foam if gentle protest so making something for yourself and us in the time of craft into think deeply about how you can be at good global citizen. So that's what I do my craft. Visit. Our corporate explains more about craft of his them from the Ted stage. I use craft like needlework as a way to bring gain. Nevis quiet in prevents into activism by doing repetitive actions like Hyundai craft econ. Do it fast. You have to do it. Slowly a most repetitive. Stitches help you meditate on the big complex messy social change issues. But doing needlework to get as well extra vets an internet because it's a quiet slow foam activism while you stick Shen, you don't need icon type of people. So for Nevis invents. It means that you can stitch away next to someone or a group of people. I'm ask questions that you're thinking that often new job got time to ask people or you're too nervous to ask. If you give the my contacts. So you can get introverts who those big deep thing could scien-. That's really interesting that you want to do that form of activism, and that's about shea human people quickly go out somewhere. Who you trying to talk it? And how is the best way to do it? So means you can have these discussions in a very slow, y which is great for the extra bet to slow down and think deeply, but it's really good for the introvert while to be had and feel part of that movement for change in a good way. One example that I do a lot with introverts. But with lots of people is make gifts for people in power. So not be outside screaming at them. But to give them something like a bespoke kind Qatif scien- don't blow it huge powerful goods. We know you've got a difficult job in your position of power. How can we help you? What's great is for the introverts? We can write letters while we're making these gifts so Feroze marks and Spencer as we tried to come pain to get them to implement the living wage, so he made the spoke kind ca chiefs, we vote them letters. We bucks them up, and we went to deliver gifts and to have that foam of intimate activism where we had discussions with them. What was brilliant was that the chair of the boats told us how amazing campaign was how hot felt it was? So that was like intimate foam with activism. We had lots of meetings with them we then gave them Christmas cards Valentine's God's decided we really want to encourage you to implement in the living wage and within ten months, they denounce to the media. They would go to pay but independent living wage. So the other folks on the episode are all somewhat different from you in that. They I don't think that they would describe themselves introverts. I don't want to speak for them. But avenue guy, we all high, right? There's you know, you can imagine them with a bowl horn, you know, and speaking to hundreds of people singlets mobilize in come on. Let's go do this. And so I think when people think of the word activists, they think of somebody who sort of an obvious leader who can speak extemporaneously to lots of people really quickly, and you are an introvert when I think I obviously knew activists is, you know, people who do the big speeches. But I also activists is people who would you know, when we were squatting to save social housing. There was a writer for people to be in the house. And so that the bulldozes couldn't come knock them down. I I'm just as important as the people making the cups of tea to encourage people. So I never had to my head's activists have to be loud and on a stage and on a podium, and I think, you know, growing up in a Christian family pass me humility is a huge assets that we talk about you know, whether to save caused. Not to be a celebrity and familiar one of the big click moments in a way was in secondary school. I was nominated to be head gal for my peers. Which I never wanted to be head go like don't like people looking at me don't like being on a stage. But on the other side, I could see I was quite unusual. It might be that I didn't know how to chair meeting. I knew how to write minutes. I knew how come pain on what campaign and doesn't have to be petitions or demonstrations or strikes? It can be asking questions of the right people. Find out who influences them the most effective success campaign is if someone makes a decision who's already empower can put that decision in place, and they don't even realize that you will help and to change their mind. You don't get any price for all right? And they might not even be allies that you've helped change their heart, or they mind or the business policy or the, you know, the law in government. I think there's this ID that people who believe in change feel like they can't do it because they just don't have the power the ability or the willingness to stand up and to speak out. But I mean, the the idea here is that that is not a requirement that does not a job description for how to change the world. Oh, yeah. And to stand up and speak out with sometimes we need to sit down. Listen, not do that. I know. So campaign contained a lung time. You know, everyone loves my mouth and Spence's story because it's nice and compact and shiny and took under yeeha. But that's very rare most come pains, you know, it will take a long time. But I think that's really important that we see it as progress. Not as transactional, we need to see the strike has one piece of the jigsaw puzzle. Not the whole puzzle. I think it's really important that we say everything listed cle-. I know role so humble with. Yes, I'm one pass. Listen. So I might not be able to to change the world. But I also can do a law as an individual. The idea. Yes, that the you're pushing for is that you don't have to be charismatic or loud to know, make a change. You can you can do this in quiet ways to I think my worry is with the loud extra vets stuff is one you'll excluding half of the world's population. He say I can't do that where I'm too nervous. But also quite ego leads, and you know, I think that's very sobering. Divest Selanne about the importance of taken a step back and breathe in and going. Okay. Do I need to lead this movement? Or do I need to be behind the movement? Helping quiet where where all never get them praised. But what I've done which I think, you know, often there's more power to be alongside people or to quietly help with his. So I thought to Kohl's to action Videon travek. I'm for the extra beds, fit the extra vets. I wanna say that one euro planet campaign think about intra vets think about how valuable skills are just as much as extra beds slowing down thinkin, deeply Embiid detail of issues, really good bring them out. Wade good intimate activism so uses in that, right? I'm went good intrigue and people by doing strange things that helped create conversations and both introverts my rock for years. I know you like being on your own. I know you like being in your head what activism each you. So sometimes you've got to get out. It doesn't mean that you've gotta tan into an extra vent. And and that's no use for anyone. But what it does mean is that you should follow you the skills and traits that you have the activism needs. So for this free your next or an internet, the wild needs you now more than I've got no excuse to get involved. Thanks. Sara Corbett she's founder of the craft of his collective and author of the book how to be a craft of it. You can see her full talk at Ted dot com. When I when I say the word future to you think. Optimism or do you go down darker path? Man. This is such a loaded question for me. This is Angela tala. She's a designer and futurist. And sometimes when I'm asked that I know that my answer is really going to make some people uncomfortable because I am sometimes in the room in order to bring unbridled optimism about change and about how we're gonna move towards change. But I don't think you need to have the unbridled optimism in order to believe that you can change things. So I think it's kind of like a spectrum. I think you can either think that the world is getting better or that the future will be much better than it is now or you can think that the world is getting worse. But that continuum isn't as important to me, actually, as idea of do you think you have agency in this world that is either getting better or worse in Angela believes that if you want to change the world, you have to think about the future because the way we think about the future can affect the way we act in the present the future is continuous iterative process. It changes every single day and your ideas about it changes. Also as you test, and as you play with that idea of the future. So for me, that's the most important thing. Of course, there's a present. But there's this transition period before we reach this future that we. Can envision Angelo Tele picks up her idea from the Ted stage? We love to think about the future. We have all of these predictions about what it will be like when it comes the future of meat is lab grown. The future of music is a chip in your brain, the future of chairs is a pair of bionic pants that you put on and then you just kind of lean back into the future film of work of love. We talk about the future. Like, it's this thing that will just arrive one day. But why do we think that? Talking to your watch. This is the quintessential self fulfilling prophecy. Pop culture has told us that talking to your watch is the future. So we've constantly tried to produce it into reproduce. It. And then there's the nineteen thirty nine world's fair in New York City, which showcased the world of tomorrow, forty four million people attended these exhibits, and they were told that this is what the future will look like master planned cities and suburbia superhighway's futuristic kitchen appliances. This helped to define the American dream, which meant that it ultimately helped to bring that specific dream to life. So these kinds of visions the creep in and then they stay with us from Hollywood from tech companies from science fiction. And I don't think it's a conspiracy. I think we all collect visions so that we can have something to aspire to. But in the same way, our visions inspire us. They can also start to limit us. If we hear the same narratives over and over again. And if we see the same visuals over and over again, then that becomes our scope of possibility that becomes our benchmark for what we believe is good. And what's not? So today, I want you to think about your assumptions about the future because there are just so many different futures alternatives out there. And if we choose to be more curious about them, then they will make us rethink what's possible. I mean, it's overlaid it right in the context of this episode. It's about trying to envision or make a better future a better world and talking to Delors who and ruby sales. And you know, asking what keeps you going because today in the United States? There are many reasons to feel pessimistic especially around the the issues that they work on social Justice, racial Justice. We're living in dark period right now seems like we are and in what came up again. And again was I have to imagine a better future. Because otherwise, I couldn't do what I do in the present. Do you think that? Activism or the idea or the desire to change the world requires. A belief in a better future. Yeah. Yeah. I do think. So. But I don't think that you have to know the point at which that future will materialize. I think it's just an idea that we are on a journey towards something the way that we see things now it's not working. So it's sometimes it's not even better. It's just different. So sometimes without even adding the value, judgments, it's just what we're looking at now is not working and a lot of ways we can see it's not which is why we have this period of mass redefinitions of a lot of things we're opening up. Okay. What about work? What is the future of work? Look like, what is good work travelling can I travel as someone who cares about people and the planet. What is good masculinity? What is good femininity? I think there's a lot of things that we are understanding that it just doesn't quite work the way we've defined success in. Some of those things don't quite work anymore. So we need to think about things differently. And for me that is what motivates me because in some ways. I don't know what a better future could actually look like. But I do know when things are broken. I can see when things go wrong. I would like to envision something different. Choose to be curious about the alternates. And we take them seriously. We'll start to think in new ways will solve problems in new ways. And we'll just start to see possibilities that. We couldn't see before. When it comes to our futures. We have hope we have fear. But sometimes we forget that we also have influence, and that means we can choose the futures. We want to work towards nothing is written in stone. So reconsider your vision of the future take a chance and be surprised. Thank you. Angela Tulloch she's a designer and futurist you can see Angeles full talk at Ted dot com. Hey, thanks for listening to our show on changing world this week. If you wanna find out more about who's on it. Go to Ted PR dot org and to see hundreds more, TED talks checkout, Ted dot com or the Ted app. Our production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers son as Michigan poor west grant, Casey Herman, Rachel, Faulkner depot. Motoo Shum James Dila Lissa. Great JC Howard with help from Daniel Shchukin or intern is Katie monthly on our partners at Ted, Chris Anderson, Cohen Helms and a few in Janet Lee. I'm guy Roz, and you've been listening to ideas worth spreading right here on the Ted radio hour from NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple easy. And awesome.

NPR Roz Alabama Jonathan Daniels Ted founder and director founder California Dolores Huerta Fred Ross United States ruby San Francisco Marshall Joyce Bill Jonathan Jeff Rodgers co founder baseball
119: He Said

The Slowdown

04:59 min | 2 years ago

119: He Said

"I'm US poet laureate, Tracy case Smith, and this is the slowdown. I appreciate the ways different poems. Encourage me to think differently. Sometimes a poem insights gratitude other times a poem causes something inside me to Royal against wrongdoing. Some poems make me want to change something about myself. Others teach me to love myself the way that I am flaws and all I don't think I'm being wishy washy or contradictory. I think I'm moving via different poems through the range of feelings and realities alive and present in each individual life. The very same range present in the broad collective scale. And it's worth pondering its worth wrestling with and mucking through and accepting and determining to rectify and defy what else are we here to do. I'm writing this episode on one of the first true spring days in New Jersey, not an anomalous warm day in the middle of a week of cold. But a day that seems to know what it's doing here a day when the sun, the new leaves the gentle breeze and warm air and bright blossoms and all the birds and their orchestral conversation seem secure that this temperate calm, gentle, beautiful feeling isn't going to up and disappear. And so I find myself in agreement with the grateful speaker of today's poem he said by Gerald stern because comfort even modest comfort can feel like a tremendous blessing and because the freedom to follow your thoughts along the strange path. They map out can feel like nothing short of. Relation. This poem makes me especially aware of that fact, because the speaker starts off just looking out the window with his coffee and a copy of the Enquirer, but he ends up somehow pondering the Iraqi leader the poem makes reference to the prophet Amos from the bible who challenged members of his community to stop perpetuating injustice against one another and in the final line. I'm even made to think of figures like Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta and Martin Luther King junior who enacted twentieth century miracles. This is Gerald Stearns. He said thank God for summer. He said and thank God the window was to his right. And there was a wavy motion behind him and moon in the upper right corner. Only four days old and still not either blows e or soup. Thank god. He was sitting. He said with his feet up on a rubber hose. Half facing a morning glory. The last or the first and thanks for the ledge. He said to put his coffee Cup on and the Bush for his inquirer and the watering can and the pot of red petunias, and for that drain, and it sixty one holes and had small black metal ridges and the bug that wanders back and forth and the leaf that somehow rests on the sand between the bricks and the stack of wood and the green plastic garbage bags that act as a carpet and Blake the poet, he said a dove both black and white and Moondog whom he watched night after night in the early fifties playing instruments and moaning and Amos he said placed by the gideon's over. The flowerpots who hated coldness accommodation extortion oppression and roared in the grapes. He said and melted mountains. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation to get a poem delivered to you daily. Go to slow down show dot org and sign up for our newsletter.

Smith Amos Gerald Stearns Gerald stern New Jersey US Cesar Chavez extortion congress Tracy Moondog Dolores Huerta Martin Luther King Bush Blake four days
CDC issues new recommendations for fully vaccinated people

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

41:28 min | 5 months ago

CDC issues new recommendations for fully vaccinated people

"Ooh have a very special guest joining us tonight. She is already in your history books. She is in american history books in her ninety years. Dolores huerta has been involved in several chapters of our history. She co founded the united farm workers with cesar chavez in nineteen sixty two. She was on stage with cesar chavez in the ballroom of the ambassador hotel in los angeles on june fourth. Nineteen sixty eight when bobby kennedy had just one california's democratic presidential primary was probably on his way to the democratic presidential nomination. And it was that night. When bobby kennedy stepped off that stage that he was assassinated. Dolores huerta has been a witness to history and the maker of history and she will join us at the end of this hour and get tonight's last word we begin tonight with a very big deal and i cleaned that up from the original by. Wes was whispered to barack obama on the day. President obama signed the affordable. Care act at the white house. When joe biden thought no one could hear him but because of microphone sensitivity. The world could hear him. He said to his friend. This is a big effing deal. Ladies and gentlemen. The president of the united states of america barack obama the senate has now passed the biggest deal. Any democratic president has ever made with congress. The biden covid relief. Bill is the single biggest spending bill in history that a democratic president has been able to pass in a democratic house and a democratic senate. This is the single biggest increase in anti poverty spending in american history. You have a fourteen hundred dollar relief. Check coming to you. That number was never compromised in the legislative process. You also have thousands more dollars coming to you if you have kids three thousand dollars for each child so if you're a mother of two at home tonight you're guaranteed seven thousand four hundred dollars from this legislation and more if you are receiving unemployment benefits and if you're worrying about when you and your family are going to get vaccinated against the covid. Nineteen the biden covid relief. Bill is going to speed up the day when we will all be vaccinated in this country. Here's what the president had to say. When the bill passed the senate on saturday it obviously wasn't easy wasn't always pretty but it was so desperately needed urgently needed when i was elected. I said we're going to get the government out of the business battling on twitter and back in the business of delivering for the american people. Making a difference in the lives giving everyone a chance. A fighting chance of showing the american people that the government can work for them and passing the american rescue plan. We'll do that as always happens. When legislation moves from the house to the senate members who voted for it worry about how much the senate might change and in what ways the senate might weaken the legislation members of the house progressive caucus kept publicly in effect. Lobbying the senate to preserve the most important elements of the bill the progressive elements of the bill and after the senate passed the bill. Are i guess tonight. Congressional progressive caucus chair pramilla giant. Paul said importantly despite the fact that we believe any weakening of the house provisions were bad policies and bad politics. The reality is that the final amendments were relatively minor concessions. The american rescue plan has retained. Its core bold. Progressive elements originally proposed by president. Joe biden and passed in the house. Relief package president biden. Promised to deliver one million vaccinations per day for his first hundred days in. He is now delivering an average of two point. Two million vaccinations per day and on saturday hit a record. High of two point nine million vaccinations in one day and the last two weeks coronavirus cases have fallen twelve percent. The number of coronavirus deaths down ten percent and the number of hospitalizations from corona virus has fallen twenty nine percent and today the cdc has issued new guidance to the thirty one million fully vaccinated americans saying that they can now visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing and visit with unvaccinated people from a single household who are at low risk for severe covid nineteen disease indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing sh even if everyone at the white house bill signing of the biden cove relief. Bill is fully vaccinated. We can expect the biden white house to still require wearing masks and safely distancing leading off our discussion tonight democratic congresswoman pernilla giant paul of washington. She is the chair of the congressional progressive caucus and democratic congresswoman madeleine dean of pennsylvania. She is a member of the congressional progressive caucus Let me begin with the chair tonight. i'm presuming in everything. I just said that this bill being sent back to the house will pass the house in the form. The senate has sent it to the house. I believe that to be the case. Obviously every member makes makes the decision at the very last minute sometimes but mike conversations. I think people understand that. This is a bill that does what we said we would do. It puts money in people's pockets. Top priorities for the progressive bacchus though survival checks the unemployment insurance benefits the child tax credit. Those are critically important pieces for us. And in addition it crushes the virus. Which is the other piece that is inextricably linked with how we are going to get out of the crisis that reface so we are excited We had to put a lot of pressure on as you said lawrence to make sure that it didn't get weakened more and had it been weakened more while we would have had a different decision but we are going to see how government delivers for people and how government is truly the great equalizer of opportunity in the moments of the most desperate crisis carson dean a water the main points of this legislation that you want to tell your constituents about is for having me on it's a delight to be on with the chairwoman from all I served with are also on judiciary and is international women's day. So i am excited alongside pramilla because my constituents are excited. I am hearing from them and had been hearing from that. They want the vaccine. They want shots in arms. They need those survive checks. They need the enhanced inclusive a federal unemployment checks. We have in their twenty five billion dollars for restaurants. Some of the hardest folks hit our the restaurant hospitality industry. We need children in schools And i really do want to point out the notion that this is international women's day what's going on right now. In terms of out hard hit women are if chiller with two million women unemployed as a result of this pandemic recession and so many tour between family and and tried to help their children in schools virtually and elsewhere this will lift families out of poverty is will lift children it will cut child poverty by half. This will decrease hunger and you notice. I won't say good security because children are hungry. Adults are hungry is a very exciting time and i really complement formula on her extraordinarily campaign a dog campaign to eat this progressive measure. Moving forward on a forward voting. Yes paul in. The history of anti poverty legislation in the congress The opposition to it has always been a position to giving people money frequently. The opposition would take the form of trying to amend the legislation to provide something other than money. Money seemed to be the thing that many in government were most reluctant to give to the people who needed it most. And what struck me about the movement of this legislation. So far is that there has been so little of that particular kind of rhetorical opposition to this republicans might be saying the bill cost too much or that. We don't need it but the argument that this money will be abused by people. If they get it seems to have been simply not just a losing argument but it seems to have been a now lost from this debate. I think that's right lawrence. And i think a lot of it is credit to our progressive movement across the country. Madelene are members but also the move across the country that has been you know beating the drum on the dire crisis that is happening. The food lines that stretch around things that people haven't seen frankly in their lifetimes many who were not around for the great depression. I think the idea that people are struggling in this way and at the same time let me say the countervailing force of billionaires who have made one point three trillion dollars just in the last year that contrast i think really put that argument to bet and i think that the reality is the crisis headlined with the fact that you know everyone. In republican democratic districts has people who are suffering. What matalin talked about is exactly right. People across the country are talking about how they need relief. And how excited they are. The polling is through the roof on this in the most popular items are actually those items that you talk about the ones that get money to people money in people's pockets you know those survival checks so popular and i think that is also the reality of where we are last thing. I'll say. I just think that what happened during the obama administration with Last rescue package was also a lesson to people. I think that we understand that the level of crisis that we face requires a solution that matches the scale of that crisis. And i believe that that is what we will be delivering when we pass this through the house and win president biden signs it into law in economics classes. I never heard. Economists satisfied with anything that the government would do especially legislatively. When i was working on the senate finance committee. I never heard. Economists compliment us of for the quality of our work. Let's listen to what nobel prize winning economist. Paul krugman told chris hayes earlier tonight about this legislation. I'm pinching myself wondering if this is some kind of a dream because we're really are actually responding more or less adequately to the crisis at hand cars mundane of that is just something that economists are not used to seeing no. We don't hear that and we don't talk about the poor often outside cruciate that last conversation you just had but when you and rachel we're talking just a moment ago i could see in you sort of joy that you are getting to do the job you were here to do. I feel that very same way. In passing in crafting in honing this legislation of fighting for it passing it. This is the stuff i came to dc to do. We saw with the trump administration tried in their huge tax breaks to the wealthy with a hope that that would invest us somehow in greater growth in gdp. Down the road and trickle down to those who were less fortunate at didn't work. Now we get to do what we progressives came out to dc to do which is to invest at the bottom and that will be economic engine or gdp every dollar that we will spend on. This will return at least twenty five cents a dollar twenty five. This is the right thing to do economically. It's also the right thing to do. Morally and i have to tell you it feels good as a democrat to be able to put into place the policies that we have been calling for fighting four investing in the poor and in the middle class and in working families cars one dana and carson giant. Paul thank you both very much for starting off our discussion tonight. Thank you thank you. Well it was a big day for joe mansion on a bunch of the sunday shows yesterday where he said he is open to some changes in the senate filibuster rules and that surprised everybody. It sounded like he read last week's washington post op. Ed piece by norm ornstein or maybe heard norm. Ornstein talking about it on this show. Thursday night norm ornstein is back and he joins us next. Well it sounds like senator. Joe manchin has been listening to our next guest discussing how to change the so called filibuster rules in the senate. Here's what senator mansion told. Chuck todd yesterday. If you wanna make it a little bit more painful make him. Stand there and talk. I'm willing to look at any way we can. But i'm not really to take away. The involvement of the minority congressional scholar norm ornstein appeared on this program on thursday night suggesting changes to the senate rules that joe mansion might be able to accept even though senator manchin wants to preserve the senate minority right to filibuster in some form. Senator mansion might have been listening to what norm ornstein had to say thursday night. Or even more likely. Senator mentioned probably did read norm. Ornstein op ed piece in the washington post last week entitled democrats can't kill the filibuster but they can gut it in that article nor instincts suggested changes to the senate rules that he thought specifically joe manchin might consider and which joe mansion appears to now be considering and so joining us now is nor morriston congressional scholar at the american enterprise institute norm. When i listen to joe manchin. Yesterday i fought two things i thought. This is a huge public breakthrough in his thinking about the senate rules and two. I thought he's been reading and listening to more. I thought the same thing lawrence lusa giddy. As a matter of fact. I'll look we still got a long ways to go and we'll see what details work out. But you know i consciously and al franken and i have been talking to senators and we've been talking this through for a while as well but consciously wanted to look at something that i knew would resonate with people like mansion and cinema and feinstein and some others who were not gonna be willing to completely abolish this rule twenty two but would actually make a real difference in terms of giving democrats a fighting chance and more to get some top priorities through you know something else. I thought Along those lines in the last day or two gabby giffords is now spearheading the effort in the house. And they're gonna vote on it very soon to get universal background checks. If we didn't change the rules on something like this would just die in the senate. Nobody would really pay attention to it. Ninety four percent of americans support make him go round the clock make them have to come up with forty one votes on a regular basis that have to explain to people why they're against universal background checks for guns that democracy reform and other things we can begin to get some traction if we can make some of these sensible changes a norm. What i loved about your article. The reason i wanted to have you on discussing it last week is that you said in the article told us that you had been listening very carefully to what joe manchin has been publicly saying in the past about this senate rule. You've been listening very carefully to what senator cinema has been saying and what you tried to do was come up with a proposal that actually answers the concerns that joe manchin has publicly presented and that is exactly the way you find compromise in the senate. You first all listen to what that person is saying and it i it sounds impossible is nothing i can do with this. But you thought your way through it and one of the biggest ideas you have. Is this flipping of the sixty vote requirement. We currently have the senate a sixty vote requirement to end a debate. And then go onto voting. You're saying make that a forty vote requirement to continue the debate that would give joe mansion. The minorities protection that he wants to give them but it would be much harder for the republicans to actually achieve that the way you see it exactly so and the idea here is if you believe what mansion has been saying this sort of notion that we want to have a minority that feels intensely about an issue. Have to go to the mat literally and the mattresses literally to make their point of view known to be able at least to block things for a while but now there's no pressure on the minority. They have to do nothing to filibusters on any issue. So let's return and make it painful to us and we can add a number of things that make it more painful and more difficult at minimum. They're only going to do it. Infrequently will be a difficult thing for them to entertain and if we can do this on issues that really matter for people where they're strong majority support we can break that and we can actually accomplish some of the areas of progress in areas like democracy reform which are absolutely essential. And we have to as you say you know the senate inside out. If you're going to get to fifty you're gonna have to meet people and meet their objections. And i think there are ways to do this and ways also you know. He wants to have debate and deliberation. This is going to require the bait and deliberation and if we make them stay on the floor and it has to be germane no reading of green eggs and ham by ted cruz or others but actually addressing those issues. A lot of people are going to pay attention. And there's going to be tremendous pressure on them normal. I was so struck by was You have been carefully paying attention over the last year to joe mansions language about this. The language he was using a sunday included this new element. That would he said to every interviewer. He wants it to be painful. He wants it to be painful for the republicans to try to get up there and block things. And that's that seems to me to be the zone in which you can work. Some kind of rule change The kinds you've been outlining in your washington post piece with joe match exactly so and you know i. I gave it a laundry list of different elements. There are many ways to go about this. My favorite would be making. I'd actually make it forty one. Not forty a required continued debate. They're gonna have to be there. Continuously of no seventeen of them now. Sixty nine actually with roy blunt out of it are up for reelection next time. They wanna be home campaigning. They don't wanna be around through weekends. And back on mondays and going through the night and having to sleep on lumpy cots off the senate floor and if we make them do that. They're going to have second thoughts about a lot of these things. And you know an important element of this if we can make it painful. It also means that people are going to pay attention to the obstructionism which they don't do now and there will be a price to pay for that and that's really important norm. I think the lesson what you've done here most important lesson is. You listened very carefully to what joe mansion was saying when he was talking about his position on this and you found a way to reach him on this and this is this is is really i i gotta say i all i was thinking about when i heard him say that on sunday was what is going to say about this and thank you very much for joining us again tonight. And i'm really appreciate it anytime. Lawrence much i enjoy being with you. Thank you very much thank you. We'll coming up the district attorney in fulton county. Georgia is following the example of the manhattan district attorney and hiring a special prosecutor with experience in racketeering investigations to join the criminal. Investigation of donald trump. You'll cut y'all joins us next for tonight's episode of defendant trump. Roberto minu runs a tattoo shop in newburgh new york. That's where he was arrested saturday by the fbi. Roberto manuka is a member of a deranged group of people who call themselves the oath keepers. He was seen on video with donald. Trump's friend roger stone the morning of january six and later that day he was seen invading the capital with a can of bear spray new york times reports location cellular and call record. Data revealed a call tying a proud boys member to the trump white house. The fbi has determined what they discussed and the official would not reveal the names of either party. That piece of evidence will surely strengthen. The lawsuit brought by congressman congressman. Eric swale well against donald trump rudy giuliani and other defendants for their encouragement of the on the capital which endangered garson swale wells life and the lives of everyone else in the capital that day and which took the life of capital police officer. Brian sickening other developments. In the life of defendant trump on the criminal front include manhattan deter. Any sivan's reportedly issuing a subpoena related to one hundred thirty million dollar loan. The trump organization received to build the trump tower in chicago. One hundred million of which was forgiven and fulton county. Just turnkey funny willis in atlanta has followed the manhattan district attorney's example by hiring a new special prosecutor experience in racketeering investigations. Joining us now is neil cocktail former acting. Us solicitor general at an msnbc legal contributor. Neil year you're donald trump. You're you're out on the golf course today. And maybe someone tells you are. Maybe they decide they better not tell you. That funny willis has hired john. Floyd who literally wrote a net wrote a book wrote a national guide on prosecuting state. Racketeering cases what does that do to the next time you approach the ball on the golf course is that maybe break the concentration a little bit absolutely one hundred percent lawrence. Donald trump has been bouncing around. He was a reality tv star. He was a businessman He was president and now he's finally found his calling defended in iraq appearing case. And you know. This news is really significant. Because john floyd as you say has literally in the book on prosecuting. State officials for racketeers for state State entities for racketeering and ms willis herself. The district has a lot of expertise in the area. She prosecuted folks for cheating on standardized tests nat racketeering offenses network. Nearly racketeering is about murder kidnapping violent crimes but georgia's statute defines it much more. Broadly to include false statements made to state officials. And when you go back and listen to those calls that are now on audiotape for the world to hear that sure sounds like he is inducing a falsification of election results. You know. he'll have some defenses. This is significant and conspiracy is one of the elements that the district attorney is reportedly investigating in that case. It wasn't just donald trump picking up the phone and calling the georgia secretary of state and clearly violating the law. And that phone call. It's who else was in his attempts first of all to in decision to make that phone call who else was involved in his other ways in which he was trying to affect the vote in georgia. That's one hundred percent right lauren. so intrinsically conspiracy is problematic because if you're involving other people you know that's a worse crime but here the prosecutors good prosecutors have a reason you know if they have probable cause to look at conspiracy and that is because they can use it to flip these other defendants and so. It's reported that lindsey graham speaking looked at giuliani's being looked at the former. Us attorney for trump. joan pack is being looked at so all of these people are targets for prosecutors to say. Hey tell us what. Trump actually said a near linear times is reporting this about the evidence collection on january six. They're saying that the fbi has received information from the major cell phone carrier's on the numbers called by everyone on the capital's cell towers during the riot. Everyone every member of congress every staff member every writer who was in the building It strikes me that that that vein of evidence Could be among the most important they have absolutely and you know the re- the capital was invaded and so for people who think. Oh you know. Law enforcement should have those powers. Here's a good case or where you want them to. As long as the information is properly held controlled people's identities or masked. And so on you know except for the most urgent law enforcement needs but this is significant evidence lawrence absolutely and there's also that evidence of the they they know they have a proud boy phone call being made connected to the white house exactly so they're gonna try and tie all of that together as prosecutors and say you know. Is there a criminal case. That can be made if not you know. Maybe there's that civil case that you mentioned representative swallow has made under the ku klux klan. Act which i think has you know likes to it as well. So there's both possibilities here civil and criminal bill koch al. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. And coming up the top democrat in the new york. State senate andrea stewart. Cousins is now calling for new york governor. Andrew cuomo to resign. that's next. There is no more invisible. Job in american government than lieutenant governor. Ask almost anyone anywhere. Who their lieutenant governor is and they don't know california's lieutenant governor got more votes then any governor of any other state and in my informal poll of california friends. I have not been able to find anyone who knows that. California's lieutenant governor is a lady on alaska's in my informal poll of new york friends who do not work in politics. I have not been able to find anyone who knows that. New york's lieutenant governor is kathy. Hokuto kathy hokuto might soon become the most famous lieutenant governor in america as pressure builds on governor andrew cuomo to resign and the focus begins to shift to the person who would immediately replace governor. Cuomo if he does resign after a weekend of more reports of inappropriate behavior and language by andrew cuomo from a female members of his staff over the years. The governor said this. There is no way i resign. Let's do the attorney general education. Let's get the findings and then we'll go from there. Miss hinton Every woman has right. That i'm forward. That's true But the truth also. What she said is not true on the Massless i say to people in the office. How you doing How's everything you're going out Are you dating That's my way of doing friendly banter. i take pictures with people at ceremonial events. They never met the field. Make anyone feel any uncomfortable. After the governor said that yesterday about the two latest accusations against him the highest ranking one in the new york state legislature senate majority leader andrea stewart cousins. A democrat released this statement every day. There is another cop that is drawing away from the business of government. We have allegations about sexual harassment. Toxic work environment the loss of credibility surrounding the covid nineteen nursing home data and questions about the construction of a major infrastructure project. New york is still in the midst of this pandemic and is still facing the societal health economic impacts of it. We need to govern without daily distraction for the good of the state governor. Cuomo must resign. The democratic speaker of the state assembly where an impeachment proceeding would begin issued a statement saying the allegations pretending to the governor that have been reported in recent weeks have been deeply disturbing and have no place whatsoever in government the workplace or anywhere else i to share the sentiment senate majority leader stewart. Cousins regarding the governor's ability to continue to lead the state. We have many challenges to address. And i think it is time for the governor to seriously consider whether he can effectively meet the needs of the people of new york. Joining us. now is jerry. Zaremski was bureau chief for the buffalo news. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. We should have been following your reporting on this. Because i think it's important to follow reporting around the state and Back when i was working in the senate for senator morning the buffalo news was one of the very important newspapers in our office of. What are you seeing in the way the democrats in the legislature are reacting to this. It really seems to be split. There seems to certainly be a lot of concern among the most leftward leaning legislators and also the legislative leadership which is very very significant. When you have the two leaders of the two chambers indicating that the governor should resign that is pretty bad but underneath it. All you have a certain number of legislators that are remaining. Very loyal to the governor. There was a letter written today. Signed by twenty one women legislators Pretty much backing the governor and saying the investigation. The attorney general letitia james is doing to just continue to its end so right now there is no consensus. I don't think regarding what should happen with the governor. Those polling of by quinnipiac which was completed on march third is completed over march second march third as we know the story was continuing to evolve over that time and more accusations have come out since that accusations will coming out while the polling was being dot. That poll shows fifty five percent of registered voters in new york. Do not want the governor to resign or it should say did not want him to resign as of last week wednesday of last week at that same in that same poll fifty nine percent of new yorkers new york registered. Voters did not want to run for reelection. Which is which is what he has been planning to do. what what do you make of how that polling of which i think could be very different by the time we get to wednesday of this week What do you think the polling is telling the people in albany who are trying to decide what to say about this. Well i think that right. Now that polling isn't going to influence people nearly as much as the day to day drip of news. And that's what really we've had for about ten days now. A total of five women have come out made Allegations now and as long as that news cycle continues. I think the opinion of people in power of the legislature. Legislators who have not taken a really strong stand will continue to evolve. I think the polling data itself is probably dated simply because we've had more allegations come out since the poll was taken. You did reporting this weekend on lieutenant. Governor hoke who is from buffalo and so people in buffalo are very familiar with her. You made the point in your reporting that the stylistic contrast between andrew cuomo and kathy focal could not be more sharp. Yes that's really really true. Kathy will is a very warm people person. Sort of politician whereas governor cuomo has always been very strong and publicly forceful figure so they. They wield power and influence in very very different ways. The way a phrase that my story was that. I think that kathy hogan you could not be Temperamentally any different than the temperamental governor. Cuomo and new york governors traditionally do not include their lieutenant governors in just about any of their real deliberations and so it would be effect of. And we'll talk about this more possibly another night An outsider coming in to that administration after if if governor cuomo to leave or forced to leave in some way jerry's renske thank you very much jerry's ernest you. The buffalo news really appreciate you joining us tonight. Thank you learns. Thank you coming up the legendary dolores. Huerta is now ninety years old. She is in american history. Books as a co founder with cesar chavez of the united farm workers and for much more of the work that she has never stopped doing for people all over this country. Who need her help. She got her first corona virus vaccination shot in central california last week and it is an honor to say delores horta will join us next and get tonight's last word covid. Nineteen vaccine is coming to essential workers in california who deliver california's most important product to every state in the rest of the country. The farm workers. Who do the hardest work that exists in california and provide us with our food in the process have been going to work. In fear of the corona virus casco on thursday ninety year old dolores huerta who was a co founder of the united farm workers with cesar chavez got her first shot of the covid nineteen vaccine in the central valley of california and joining us. Once again tonight. Is dolores where our civil rights leader co founder of the united farm workers with cesar chavez and founder of the dolores huerta foundation. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. It is great to see you and it is great to see you getting your vaccination shot. How did it feel to get the vaccination actually painless and it was administered by dr joaquin. La who is also in the state legislature help. And of course we're break maple the guts governor gavin newsom. A who set aside at. He's vaccine for the workers and this is really important because so many of them got sick from the covid nineteen we have you know an inappropriate number or ordinate number of people that have died in the latino community so hopefully with the vaccines at some people can more people can be saved. We also just want to add that many of the farmer. 'cause you know are undocumented in the back that a passive the stimulus package to be able to help people in in that pack that many of the undocumented workers farmworkers were putting the food on his table. Every single day will also be protected. Grateful between everything that we can until let people don't get the vaccine is going to be available in. We want everybody to get back to needed. She separated lawrence we. Can you make sure that we're all saying the the california numbers right now. They estimate they estimate that forty six thousand agricultural workers have been infected with covid nineteen. And that's an estimate it could be significantly higher than that yes. We oftentimes workers complaints that they weren't back to ended that they were given a protective equipment that they were working to closely In its emphasis is actually had to go on strike a gb the protective equipment that they needed and oftentimes the knicks. When they protested they were actually told not to come back to work so it became very difficult for the workers in of course litter families. So we're very grateful that the vaccines are finally a being made available by a governor gavin. Newsom farmers will find protection division. The packing house workers to because for them. It was very very difficult to have any kind of distancing of when they did their work. You know what we showed some video at the beginning of this a farm worker talking about getting the vaccine and she could not even turn away from her work to talk because the work is so constant so nonstop. And that's true whenever you see. Video of the farm workers They they will talk on video but they will never take the time to turn away from the work because they're not allowed to in the pace of the work in the course of the day bomber because at be very physically strong do the work they do all kinds of people think that it's very easy work and so we just have to remind everybody in a lot of republicans voted against the relief. Bill that these are the people that are putting the food on your table and so we always want to be grateful to the bomber guessing about them. When you're when you're sitting down eating your meal A little pair of thank you for the work that they do keep everybody the they keep us other nutrition that we need the loris where it is always a thrilling. An honor for me to get to speak to you. It is great to see you tonight. And i'm so glad you got your cova neck. Nineteen vaccination thank you very much for joining us. Thank you also lords but thank yasser dolores. Huerta gets tonight's last word.

senate joe mansion norm ornstein joe manchin president biden dolores huerta cesar chavez biden bobby kennedy white house Donald trump united farm joe biden lawrence house progressive caucus nineteen disease
Delores

PODSHIP EARTH

26:04 min | 1 year ago

Delores

"Welcome to Japan. This is your host. Jared Blumenfeld the challenge of C. Safeway or yes we can is a rallying cry for justice freedom and dignity that was born from the heart and mind of civil rights revolutionary. Dolores wet the chant of Si Se. Puede his been taken up by many movements. From Barack Obama's two thousand eight presidential campaign to the fight for climate justice to the continued struggle for workers rights to Spain's anti austerity campaigns of 2019. Martin Luther King Junior said that the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice we all know that it only bends towards justice because of individuals willing to put themselves on the front lines of the Civil Rights Struggle Laura Sweater who turned ninety on April tenth. Twenty twenty has never left the front lines. She's a force of nature that has transformed the lives of those who grow and harvest the food that sustains each of us creating the phone welcome movement with Cesar Chavez she is the mother of the modern labor movement also came up with the idea that consumers have the power to shape and push industries like great growers to improve farm worker conditions. She then that. Labor negotiations to memorialize will can benefit in the nation's first of their kind collective bargaining agreements. Deloris is a fearless and incredibly effective advocate legislation. She championed the landmark building nineteen sixty to allow people to take the California driver's examination in Spanish. And and she's never stopped last year. She helped enact leads to create California's Fund for safe and affordable drinking water Quetta who describes himself as a born again feminists consciously incorporated feminism into her fight for workers rights and push Gloria Steinem and the one thousand nine hundred sixty s to expand the feminist movement to include issues of race thereby helping make feminism and Movement for all women not just white women from the beginning. Dolores wet has also been an environmental champion fighting to protect workers from harmful pesticides sanding shoulder to shoulder with native Americans at Standing Rock and picking up litter after every rally she led. I Talk About a fiftieth anniversary with my hero and living legend Dolores Wetter Kelly. Working Fourteen hour days with Heff Foundation to make sure farmwork has have access to protective equipment food and benefits during this pandemic. And if you thought you knew everything about Delores also talk about why she loves burning man. Dolores where are you right now all right now? I'm in the belly of the beast. I'm in Bakersfield California Bakersfield and all of Kern county. You are going through really rough times right now. Dolores is a lot of people that have been laid off. I think it's over a thousand oil workers that have been laid off. One of the company is completely. Shut Down Lager. People EARN EMPLOYEES CIVILLY TRAGIC. But we know at the same time. And that's why we see that our air is a little cleaner a usually here in Kern county. We are women the worst areas of pollution for air pollution in the country. And we know that that air pollution really affects not only the physical health especially if the children but also the mental health of children. Here we have Not only to freeways that can make your highway ninety nine and highway five of but then we have all of the pollution that comes from the Agricultural Industry Caesar industrial growers that have not really converted their tractors They're so easy in a lot of diesel. It's a big struggle and when you try to bring to the attention they consider this to be an attack instead of thinking. Okay what do we have to do to make them more economically friendly jobs for people so these are the challenges that we have ahead of us as we try to convert all of the fossil fuel industries into industries. That are more friendly for everybody. So deloris in the late fifties and sixties when you have founding the farmworker movement and and really bringing those issues to the full when whether environmental issues like drinking water and air quality and pesticide runoff. How did those issues fest? Come to your attention right at the beginning at the very beginning you know. I grew up in Stockton California which is also like a cultural area. I was in a field in. I see this what I thought was fog rolling in but I thought how can you have fog in the summertime? Well it was a pesticide residue. That was rolling in. That was one of the first things that farmer who's complained about about the effects of Pesticides. And so we had so many cases of pesticide poisonings. Sometimes Terry crews like thirty. Forty people would been poisoned at the same time. How can this happen? Slow regard for the health farm workers so one of the first contracts that I signed a day. Employers tell exactly how many pesticides they were going to spray and where they were going to be spread out and then we passed legislation to make sure that the appeals are posted of when they sprayed some of these dangerous pesticides and then we work very very hard to get some of these dangerous pesticides restricted and banned forever and unfortunately a lot of pesticides we had because like Didi they were then shipped to Mexico to Latin American countries. And so here but we had all of these farmers could children that. Were being bored with these horrible deformities being born without arms without legs so horrific here you had children in Mexico and parts of Latin America. That were having exactly the same type of affection disabilities that were coming from pesticides my son in law. His father who spray pesticide died of lung cancer. His fifteen year old cousin died from pesticides now. His mother is suffering from cancer. So these terrible things that are happening here in the valley you know. The real name is economic poisons economic poison. So it's it's an ongoing issue. And I wish I could give a picture of that. But unfortunately I can't Dr you've been at the forefront of pushing to get safe and affordable drinking water for Californians for a very long time. Luckily we do have some light on the horizon on that one for over a decade we've been trying to pass a bill in the state legislature and Years we couldn't get it passed and we finally got it passed in the last session of the legislature with the governor. Newsom coming in and they're going to spend millions of dollars down to clean up all of the contaminated water because there were over a million people in California who actually had to drink contaminated water water with arsenic and pesticide residues. Tpc ETC and Eventually we'll say clear cools wanted for the people in California know. It's always poor. People they get the short end of the stick so to speak so in many communities including my own daughter who lives in a rural area where people were actually had to pay water bill in at the same time had by motor to be able to drink into people to wash their clothes in so it was very expensive for them to have to pay water. Bill it's hard to believe that people in California in twenty twenty half to pay for drinking water that's not fit to drink and then they also have to buy bottled water. How do you? How do you stop yourself from getting cynical? Well I think we don't become cynical and we don't become discourage We just gotTa look and see where we were at before and just see what the future looks like the one thing that we know that so much of what we do just depend on who represents us at the state legislative level who represents us in the Congress. I think that it's really promising. Is that now? When we celebrate Earth Day this is something that is on everybody's agenda especially our young people in doing demonstrations that we think Greta learn fourteen year old young woman who has made such an impact in when kids have been walking out when doing this demonstrations then by do appeals hopeful about making sure that our planet is taken care talking standing up for the planet. Dolores didn't you go to standing rock and protests the XL pipeline. I was in at standing rock at the Sioux reservation. There in North Dakota when you had so many. Thousands of people were gathered there and trying to stop that pipeline. And here you had like an entire city that just overnight and all of these thousands of people there That came together to try to stop the oil pipe and being built in the old people cared about the environment and interesting twos. I think that we don't really respect or celebrate by native American cultures. As much as we should hear you had thousands of people that gathered. There was no drinking water. There was no electricity not none of the usual infrastructure that we think about and yet people were able to share food. They shared resources of people supported each other and it was just a beautiful way to show the people community support each other and take care of the environment in that way but the fight for the environment so we don't know exactly what that is all going to end but we see native American people in Canada that are also fighting for the environment so I think we could do more teaching of on native American principles about caring for the earth and something that we can start maybe even teaching in in our schools because I think children understand that we are contaminating. The earth and that they're the ones that are going to have to suffer the consequences. I'm more impressed because every demonstration that I see on TV that relates to the environment or workers rights. There you are at nine hundred ninety. So how do you have the energy in the stamina? I'm just stunned at your incredible capacity to be present to show up to fight to to say what you believe in to grab a megaphone and be so eloquent like. How do you find the energy to do that well? I don't think we have a choice when we've got to get out there. We've got to demonstrate we've got to do the advocacy in any way shape report that we can to right the wrongs in To correct the damage that has been done and so with me. It's not even a question of should we be out. Should be working. I mean there's no choice on this. We all have to get involved. It's educating people to make sure that our carbon footprint is is small. There's some things that we can do as individuals and then. There's other things that we have to do that. The legislative level and a on a grander scale. But it's like right now with the pandemic everybody's we to stay at home and not with some people. It's a lot harder than others but just by staying at home. We know that we are helping. Stop the spread of the covert nineteen virus in. I think it we can get this mentality kind of instilled in everybody that if all it was stopped using plastics. This is one way we can help the environment. Did that might seem like a little thing to do. Maybe not by things that we don't need you know our whole materialistic culture also adds a to of harming the environment we do have a materialistic culture going back to the indigenous way of living within. You know just a by the things that we need in this so many other things that we can do this song. Packaging know that elaborate packaging. That doesn't need to be packaged. Even bar groceries. You don't have to have everything. Pack is just think ways very simple ways that we can stop contaminating the planet. How would you suggest labor and environmental organizations and individuals could work together? I think we have to kind of focus also on creating jobs. That are ECO. Friendly for the Labor ruin and trying to get a good wages for those equal jobs and then I think we will get more support from the Labor movement. I remember the you much with Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden back in the eighties to stop nuclear power plants. You and Jane. Hundreds of so active still to mazing fund is continuing to have her now. She's doing her F- I feel Friday's impact will be having in Bakersfield tomorrow at the San Joaquin Valley calling attention to how the fossil fuels are contaminating the earth but it's this kind of activism electing to takes and just to keep doing it until people into sand and making it easy for people to participate. And that's how we can make it happen on a personal spiritual level. You spend a lot of time in fields outside in California all over the entire state with work as how is your own relationship to the land and the evolved or changed in your life well in my upbringing. I was a girl scout to the time I was eighteen. And then Became a senior scout after that so I was actually guessing cutting for about thirteen years of my life with the things that we learned in girl scouting was of course how to take care of the earth and we had to go scuttles was we had to create a better world and that my kids make fun of me all the time you know. I'll be picking up litter and they say mother don't be too. I can't help it. I'm a girl scout and we would have our big rallies with the farm worker movement. We've had like a thousand people at a rally and one of the things that Caesar always told everybody. Please Everybody every year at take up. Whatever papers you can so. When we left those parks they were pristine. They were clean. Laura I heard a rumor that that you're Abana that you went to burning man. Is that true? I've been burning man. And then you have. Like sixty thousand people to congregate for the Burning Week. When you lead burning man you gotta pick up every little piece of paper glitter feather. Whatever is out there Us You know what if you don't? You're not welcome become back and I've never been to. You have to tell me about. Oh it's quite an experience. I definitely recommend the. It's an art experience because they build all of this beautiful artwork and in a night is absolutely magical in again in burning man in a place where you don't have the infrastructure of a gas or electricity and get everybody gets along it's so beautiful People share everything There's no money exchanged at all. The only thing you can buy at burning man is coffee chocolate and ice when you go to burning man. You've gotta take a gift with you that you can give out to people and you've got to take up your own food. It's like camping but at a much higher scale so dolores not only been one of the world's most important civil rights leaders have also been a mother tat eleven children which is an incredible accomplishment. Tell us about that all of my other my children. I lost my oldest daughter. She had schizophrenia and she passed away appears ago. They're all very involved either with phone or they're all doing justice work on your own. My oldest son. Fidel is a doctor and He's a family practice doctor and he I worked with Kern regional center. He's in charge of all of the children of special needs. And some adults special needs and my daughter. Angela's a oncology nurse as she was an er before my daughter. Monday Elena is director but Y W C A center in Los Angeles and they do incorporate by the way environmental practices in the community work that they do their Camilla. Shabbat was my youngest is executive director of our foundations keys. The one that keeps all of the wheels turning and moving foundation right. Now we're getting ready to go into a lot of the delivery of services to Farkas guiding them to the resources that they need so that they can survive a that we've been working on the census very intensely since July last year. Doing THE DOOR TO DOOR. But we have to convert that to foam banking in. Were active in about seventeen different school districts. Making them a more friendly to students of color to stop the expulsions suspensions of a minority kids. It's hard to believe the amount and the strength of what you're doing. What are the needs? That farmwork has have right now that you'll be providing to them during this pandemic well some of the lawmakers are central workers and they are working. The problem is because the children are school. One of the parents has to stay home with the children. The problem is that you have these food banks that are open or not open during the time the former Koska can access the food because they go to work early to get out of work late and by that time all of the food banks are closed. So we're in the process. Right now. Sitting the uproot banks will actually be operating during the time that the workers can actually get the food. Dominion the farmers documented. So we're getting ready distributed as some of that funding to undocumented workers or active like in four different counties were occurring to Larry and Fresno counties and also disamred up in the antelope valley up their place called California city and Part of La with Palmdale Lancaster area. So we're really working out quite extensively and we're also doing some work with the homeless people up there in the Antelope Valley to make sure that the the homeless people have access to that food. Thank you for that work. I one of the things that I noticed Laura's when I was talking to farm workers in Salinas and Monterey counties were picking strawberries is they were saying that they now have cell phones and so they kind of crowd information through their cell phones to let people know whereas a good place to work where they'd have proper benefits and where the bad people says amazing. How technology is helping the movement. And that's one of the things that we're actually going to enhance. We've had our persons who call with some of our leaders and it was wonderful to see all of these leaders from our different areas. Get on one zoom call and they were so excited because many of them had never been on his own call in their lives and we have tablets that we were using for the census on our Goto door. And now we're going to distribute those tablets because part of our plan is to be able to communicate with everybody. The other people ask in Holland going to identify undocumented people instance or people that meet services to make sure that the people that really need them will be able to access them while. Were actually using our program. I'll give you an example again in Lamont California which is one of the places that we organize our organizing this Alberdi. Identify over fifty undocumented. People that would be eligible for the stipend that they could receive a number of years ago. You were the subject of Life threatening assault when you're protesting at the time George Bush in San Francisco and I mean it nearly killed you. How did that change the way you view activism? I'm amazed at how forceful you still given. The your life was put on the line. Well yes you know. There's a saying in Spanish. It says Knowing got mile care uncle you know solid in English that translates into. There's nothing so bad. That something good doesn't come out of it and in my case because I didn't have any kind of pension because of work with Farmers Union We just work for a small stipend but we didn't have any cash in hand and so what happened. After my beating Hesse Lee sued the Police Department and I receive a monthly check of two thousand dollars and that was my minimal social security which is six hundred dollars a month. This is the way that I am able to live and to continue to organize and so in some ways. It was a blessing in disguise. Because I don't know what situation I would be in if I didn't have that two thousand dollars a month. 'cause my social security is so small it's only six hundred dollars a month. That would not be able to live all of the money that I raised a For goes to the foundation and might not be working on the huge capital campaign. 'cause we want to build a center or we can do organizing and have a credit union a daycare center a a museum art gallery and it will have another story in meeting spaces and offices who want to the work and wanted to try to get more people all over the country to join us and get people that would come of us and make them understand that they do have power but we ought to have the harness our power not only our individual power but our collection power by working together so that we can protect earth cleanse mother earth and make it livable were generations in both California and Washington. Now April tenth is officially Dolores. Huerta day so happy birthday walk President. Would you want from all of us at? But they of course is to get out there in the be sure to read should be should the vote and please. Organiz somebody else to come into the environmental movement. You know we should keep talking to people. Sometimes they will listen to us the first time but if we keep talking to them they say it takes seven times for people to really get the message through but we can keep talking to people organizing them and say. I'll join together. Caesar Child is actually passed away. April twenty third. You know in. I know this everywhere celebrating Earth Day on April. The twenty second and says it was a person was so committed. You know he was a vegetarian as I am But he again coming up from an indigenous roots. Caesar's family were a minor from Chihuahua Mexico. But he was somebody was talking about living the life of an environmentalist This was such In he instilled that the lot into all of the movement and of course Foundation. We follow a lot a lot of the philosophy Sunday Sessa and by the way his philosophy came from Gandhi He was a devoted. Gandhi is I was. We have so many great teachers out there in the Follow those practices and those methods and make them part of our lives are our daily life but also in terms of the behaviors that we have and the habits that we can incorporate into our daily lives suit. Make sure that we protect the environment and the world and huge. Thank you to Dolores Huerta for talking with us today are indomitable spirit fearless advocacy on behalf of farmworkers women's rights and the environment and have boundless energy is truly remarkable. But what you the most when you're in deloris. Presence is her humility and compassion. She knows exactly who she is. And despite being awarded every on a under the sun including the Presidential Medal of freedom she continues to walk shoulder to shoulder with farmworkers early in the morning to make sure there needs to taking care of before her deloris is truly selfless. She never thinks about how she will profit or benefit. Only how? The lives of others can be improved. This selflessness is contagious. We all want to be around generous loving giving people. These are the people that ultimately make the well to better place. Thank you delores. Forgiving asks the courage to act from the heart and to take the steps. No one thought was possible. And thank you so much for being part of the chipper journey from the entire Pudgy path through sound engineer. Speight executive producer. David Kahn and from me. Jared Blumenfeld that's fake every day. Dolores sweat as Beth.

Dolores California California Caesar Years Dolores Huerta Kern county Jared Blumenfeld Bakersfield Dolores Wetter Kelly Dolores wet Deloris Barack Obama Martin Luther King deloris Cesar Chavez Twenty twenty
Im Ida B. Wellss Great-Granddaughter, and Im Still Fighting Her Fight for the Vote

TIME's Top Stories

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Im Ida B. Wellss Great-Granddaughter, and Im Still Fighting Her Fight for the Vote

"Brought to you by lucky charms magical mission. Let lucky the Leprechaun take you and your kids on an interactive adventure through the eight magical charm lands to restore magic available on your Smart Speaker just open lucky charms, magical mission or search for it wherever you listen to podcasts. I'm OUTTA BE WELLS' great granddaughter and I'm still fighting her fight for the vote by Michelle. Duster Duster is the author of the forthcoming book. Ib Be the queen the extraordinary life and legacy of it wells. My great grandmother to be was a suffragette. You probably have not heard her describe this way before she most often honored for her journalism exposing Lynchings in the south to me. She is what great grandmothers are too many a teacher from IDA. I learned that there is no end to a fight for justice while most famous separatists, Alice, Paul, Carrie Chapman Catt. Ended their fight in nineteen twenty I did not. She continued to push for black women's voting access for the rest of her life and taught me lessons that I take into my fight for suffrage I to suffer just because in two thousand, twenty many Americans still do not have access to the vote I grew up hearing about IDA's willingness to speak up against injustice inequality and indignity about her refusal to be silenced sidelined or marginalized I heard about the time. She wouldn't go to the colored car on the Chesapeake Ohio and southwestern railroad in eighteen, eighty, four and rather. than. Leave the car for which she had purchased a ticket she was forced off. She promptly secured an attorney and sued the railroad I heard about the time when eighteen, ninety, two, three of her friends were lynched because they own a grocery store that competed against a white owned store and she wrote about it so much in the Memphis free speech newspaper that her own life was threatened. She encouraged black people to use what little power they had to protest, destroy Kat and ultimately to leave Memphis if they had the means to do so she was not interested in. Being second in anything she learned that pride and deserving attitude from her father my great great grandfather, James Wells? Who spent most of his life enslaved and Mississippi after the civil war ended in black men got the right to vote through the Fifteenth Amendment in eighteen seventy. He and his friends met at the House to talk politics. He encouraged IDA who was among the first generation of formerly enslaved people to legally become educated to read the newspaper to them. She learned that people should be politically and socially engaged shaping their own destiny. She learned that her voice was important. When her father cast his vote for a different candidate than the man who had enslaved suggested he lost his carpentry tools and house rather than be discouraged. He rebuilt and continue to live life on his own terms idol learned from her father to do what was in her heart and be willing to suffer the consequences sometimes the price of dignity came with the. Loss of something else and that was okay I attended Shaw University now rust college but still couldn't cast her vote like her father. She did not have the right to vote in eighteen ninety two when she spoke out against the murderer of her friends, she did not have the right to vote in eighteen ninety three when she traveled to the UK to speak about. The atrocities of lynching. She did not have the right to vote in eighteen, ninety six when she co founded the. National. Association. Of colored women she did not have the right to vote in nineteen o nine when she co founded the N. Double ACP in nineteen thirteen, the women of Illinois gained partial suffrage with them the ability to vote in presidential and municipal. Elections Ida dove into taking advantage of this new right with the assistance of two white colleagues, Bell Squire in Virginia Brooks, she founded the Alpha Club, the first all black suffrage club in the state in order to exercise the power of the vote, she was also selected to represent the club at the nineteen thirteen suffrage parade in Washington DC with the Integrated Illinois delegation. In deference to southern white women, the organizers of the parade ask black women to March in the back. My great grandmother famously refused that request after all she was fifty years old had been fighting for racial and gender equality for more than thirty years and had founded a suffrage club herself. She was not about to comply with the request from white women who were half her age or any white woman for that matter as the parade for a seated down Pennsylvania Avenue. My great grandmother took advantage of the chaos got lost in the crowd then inserted herself front and center of the Illinois delegation. She deserved to have that place in history and she knew it. Ida's refusal to comply fortifies me whenever I face my own dilemmas making myself small in order to placate someone else do I remain silent and compliant or do I speak up? Do I play their game in order to make them feel comfortable or do I run the risk of being considered difficult and be true to myself? I must speak up I must not accept mistreatment silently in nineteen twenty, one, hundred years ago this month the Nineteenth Amendment was adopted theoretically giving women the vote on a national basis but the fight for women's suffrage do not end in nineteen twenty many women of color were unable to vote until the voting rights act was signed in nineteen, sixty, five and extended in nineteen, seventy and nineteen, seventy five. When we honor suffragettes, we should not only think of. Susan B. Anthony. Elizabeth Katie Stanton or even my grandmother women of Color in more recent history rightfully need to be considered among them African Americans such as Fannie Lou Hamer, and Ella Baker. The Latino Women Including Dolores Huerta and Felice Cone Dick Gautier fought for suffrage well into the nineteen sixties and beyond even today we are efforts to implement barriers to voting that disproportionately affect communities of color. Even today we're fighting for suffrage. There are increasingly strict requirements voter ID's. That are more difficult for people of Color and younger voters to obtain laws and targeted areas that now require voters to have a street address, which discriminates against people who use po boxes do not have a permanent physical address fewer voting materials available in different languages, voter roll purges, eliminating millions of eligible people of Color based on small discrepancies and how their names appear or how recently they last voted the disenfranchisement of those with felony records in most states. Lack of funding for elections in specific districts, which has contributed to malfunctioning voter machines and areas that are highly populated with people of color, reduction of early voting days and hours plus last minute changes in voting locations that have disproportionately targeted communities of color, which effectively makes voting impossible for people who do shift work or lack flexible work hours. The combination of all these barriers has reduced the number of people of color who have been able to cast their votes. More than one hundred years ago. My great grandmother fought so that all women could win she showed up, she wrote organized spoke and advocated for change while raising four children little. Did she know that women of color would need to fight for several more decades? Now eighty nine years after she died it's time for White Americans all. Americans to continue the fight for her during. This centennial year of the Nineteenth Amendment it is important and exciting to acknowledge the determination and sacrifice of those who work to pass it. But in the midst of the tributes and celebrations, we need to dismantle the false narrative of a whites-only suffrage movement and broaden the scope to be inclusive and reflect reality. The next generation is watching and we'll be inspired by the truth.

IDA Illinois Memphis Michelle James Wells Leprechaun Ida UK Shaw University Mississippi Susan B. Anthony Chesapeake Ohio Carrie Chapman Catt attorney Elizabeth Katie Stanton Kat Dolores Huerta
Happy 100th Episode Beloved Listeners!!

Latina to Latina

30:11 min | 1 year ago

Happy 100th Episode Beloved Listeners!!

"One hundred episodes. Dude. In some ways it feels like we should have five hundred episodes. It does. Great. Work that Goshen I! I don't have as many grey hairs. Time, we hit one hundred. So I think that's that's. Testing to our endurance put us to like at some point. We figured out how to do it. And that high in the process that it's funny, going back through old transcripts to pull some of our favorite clips for this episode and your notes to me were clearly notes from a stranger was like Alicia yet another great interview. Here's some things I would change for next time now. The feedback just like you gotta do is different than the next. The courtship phase versus the marriage vase. Agreed. Agreed at. That's part of what makes the show so good and so relatable? It was about a year ago that we told everybody that we had hit the big hundred thousand download marker. And we were figuring out. That was amazing. And then very casually like three weeks ago, we had six hundred thousand and text. And then something said we'll check that and I went back to win. When we have sent out the hundred thousand email. And I was like no way we got half a million listens in the same amount of time. No Way. And then I just I was floating. Honestly I was floaty. It is wild for me as someone who has spent so much time chasing video and television as A. Form! That this podcast is the place where I have finally found and been able to build the community that I have been seeking out in the fifteen years since I graduated college, a man and so thank you for finding us. Thank you for showing up week after week. Thank you for sharing us with the people in your life. I can't tell you the joy. It brings us how grateful we are and how grateful I am to now be a part of your lives. This is the media I know that there are some of you listening for whom this is a podcast, not as the only way the interface with us, but there are also a lot of people who are now having conversations on her instagram platform, having conversations in our twitter using our Hashtag Latino Latina have stations without us. All yet told me. which is how you know, there's heavily that there are now just having conversations about you without you. Know in you when you and I met, you were a year until Antigua Williams and Coco. Yeah it was a year it and he was through settled the freelance, writing some other jobs, and some other things that I did that I was able to get to a year later when you and I met and and still have the company and so. I'm so happy that all of the sacrifices that led to us working Latino Latina, that was able to make the sacrifices, because making this show was helped me to solidify who my audience was for everything else that I do. Like this show is what gave me the clarity to say. There is a huge audience that deserves great content, and that deserves attention, and that's when a focus on and if you look at everything that we've made, we're making it for this audience. Where we go from here. into a million baby and we're taking everybody with us, so here's the infomercial. We set the goal to hit one million downloads on January, first twenty, twenty, one or before, but that's our deadline, and we want every single one of you listening to be part of it one. I think it'd be amazing to do that, but more importantly we want to send the message to podcasting us an industry that we are here and they have to take us seriously and that there is. Is a huge, untapped, sophisticated smart audience that wants this show and many other shows to meet their needs, and so we need your help. We want you to do this and crossed that finish line side by side with us, so listen and Shea are and share again and listen again. We WanNA. Get to one million by January first twenty twenty one and we're going to keep you updated on progress. Hey Latino. Latina listeners to Jamaica executive producer of this show. I want. Invite you to listen to how to talk to mommy and poppy about anything. It's my show that I host and every week I talked to children of immigrant parents like me I'm you probably? we talk about things that are difficult, especially conversations that we've been avoiding with our loved ones things like. Mental Illness Being the first to go to college politics. We get into all of. Described how to talk to my poppy about anything wherever you listen to your favorite. Latino Latina thanks. I there was the pandemic which we also watch. Disproportionately, impact, black and brown communities were living through it, covering it as journalists and then. Just as that story felt like, it was beginning to subside. It gave way to the peaceful protests that we've seen calling for justice accountability, reform. Yeah, that's been. Very difficult to watch, and you and I have talked about a text about it, and you've been really great about checking in on me just for context. My husband is African. And some racing to black boys in the United States right now and so I just see their faces everywhere. When anything happens I just see their faces. It's been difficult, but at least the also to bill show and she had the clarity. To say we need to do something. And I was so thankful that she did because I was you know I was caught up in my feelings, and we would have missed opportunity, and so she really quickly put Marisa Andros episode together, and I was so proud of us for being able to do that for understanding that it was important to do that for audience, and to have our show acknowledge beyond participating in blackout Tuesday. To. Have the show really acknowledged the gravity and talk about Latinos role in bringing racial justice to this country. Thank you guys for coming along I. Love that you trust us. And, it's not NEC- trusts, and he said trust that we hold in a very sacred space and bad. We always taking the consideration where we're making decisions about who to bring on the show. I will tell you. There are a lot of moments from the past ninety nine episodes that I find myself thinking about on a pretty regular basis. Like things I that people have said that I go back to in my mind. I know when I said to you. Oh, we should pull some of our favorite clips for this hundred episode. There was one that jump to your mind immediately. because. I've took it as a personal mantra. As soon as I heard like, I was listening to the episode to Edit and Christie Hall Burger was talking about her experiences and she said. I. Don't fail I either win or I learn. And I was like Hallelujah Amen at light candle like I will never forget that because he crystallized for me. Being of understanding that you grow from everything that happens to you. that. Yes, you can mourn things that happens. You don't go your way that you can d-mass failures, but you Kinda miss the opportunity to grow from them, and the opportunity to learn from them, and so I think about that all the time. And I hope that other people were able to pause on that message because that was an amazing interview I. Think about it all the time and I. Ask Myself. What am I learning from this? Like what is the thing I'm supposed to learn from this? Have you ever failed at any. Time like what? It fell to go the gym this morning. But I. Think there's a great opportunity in failure in I always say like I don't fail either winner. I learn right and. If, you can get rid of your dignity right and use every failure as an opportunity to learn because you're willing to ask people. The question is what could I have done better. What didn't work for you here? All of those things I find to be really really. Easy to ask stop I I'd like so like it's you and you're about a time. Let's see. At one point, I realized I'd hit up for Latino. Hit Up two hundred Investors Cup five yeses. Got One hundred ninety five knows. Your call each of those a failure, right? There are people that I'd like to represent that we don't represent. You know I felt so far you know my job is one of persuasion and I often failed to persuade people. And you know if if I hadn't failed so much, the industry would look like. The world. Right and it doesn't yet. So. I've I. Feel like until that's righted. I'm not done. But you also picked out a really good one. If feels like yesterday that I was walking into the into Univision, and having this conversation with Ilia other own, and what struck me, is Elliot in the interview is pretty reserved, but there was this one moment where I felt like she let her guard down and was just like. No, this is the way to. This. Like. She wasn't cerebral about at all. She was like just you just go for it. And the ethos and the energy of of this exchange has stuck with me. Talk to me about two thousand one and making that leap from Columbia to the US market because I have to imagine that was the biggest leap you've made in your career. I was in Colombia, working for semi one of the main news gust in prime time. I came to the United States on occasion and I wanted to know. Got Every? We'll come to Miami. And they go to live in south swung by Telemundo. Telemundo to see how the journalists that I used to see work so I went there through a friend that a friend that works there. They give me a tour. And when I sat down with my on the water, by wanted to mention her name, because she was the one that changed everything. She told me what are you doing? I'm news anchor in Columbia. But, why didn't you do the Casting Columbia? Gusting won't eight months ago. We went to Olympia. Gusting, we brought the main anchors in the country, and you were not there until like one. The one told me about A. just like. Casting now say like a four is, and then she called the vice president of News Antonio and he told me La Zukas seeing what. A right place right time but I. Don't know that I've ever heard a story like that so. He came. We did the cussing the very same day I was sitting with. The! President of Telemundo and he was offering me a dose. Is there any part of like? We gotTA pump the brakes. This is all happening. But you know what like you said been at Wright, played ragtime, but at the same time making the seasons and not being afraid of making big decisions. I had a relationship in Columbia for two years ago. Romantic My boyfriend and we were in a serious relationship, not engaged in a serious relationship. And when these opportunity open for me, O like I'm. By? I ever. Buy Everything I had my mom and my sisters my side, he understood of course he was not going to ask me to stay I was not going to ask him to come with me because he had his own career there. So in those terms, everybody was good. You know sometimes when you see those big opportunities. Come to you. You have to say yes. You have to. To leave all the fears behind and see this is mine, just happened for a recent to take it. We imagined this to be very much conversations about let the professional journeys, and that certainly is where we've put our focus, but. It is a lot of the personal moments that have really stayed with me. Same I definitely agree with that I. Mean I've definitely learned a lot from hearing about people's professional journeys. But the imprints you know the things that have really lingered with me have been things like hearing. Nina Vaca Reid who started a company with three hundred dollars and now is. The sole proprietor of a company valued at one billion dollars I hearing about how they lost her father. And how that emptiness that? Losing apparently us in you and your spirit, how that has really propelled her not just to achieve, but bring a ton of people with her. Honestly hear her hearing her talk about her dad. Helped me. To think about my dad, which is a subject that I basically just avoid. any. He gave me a little bit of pause about the need for me to create a place for that emptiness and to acknowledge it. Your parents owned a travel agency by fifteen. You're basically a travel agent for sure one hundred percent. My sister and I would race to see who could do a reservation faster than the other end everything changed when my father brought a saber dumb terminal to the business, it was our first computer. It was with the Green Screen, and it transformed my father's business. It revolutionized it. It was a very manual business back then you used to actually handwrite tickets, and so we used to keep the ticket stock in the back room along with the plates and a safe, and that was very valuable to a thief. Because! That is the challenge of talking about the travel agency, which is both brought incredible opportunity into your family's life and also incredible tragedy. Yeah. Can you tell us what happened? When I was seventeen, I woke up one day and I I I found out that my father had been murdered in his travel agency. Because, we kept the ticket stock in the back, and they were blank, and the plates of every single airline was there. It became very valuable. My family was devastated. My father left behind five children. And! We were devastated. My father didn't have any life insurance. There was no four one K. program to say that it was a devastation in our family. It would be an understatement. And so we decided that the best way for us to propel the families to actually get an education. And my sister made me promise. She said it's either Mir. You and we decided that I was going to go to college, so I went to my mother and I. Asked her if she would put me through school I told her. I didn't want to run the business any longer. my sister back me up and encouraged mother sell the business. and My mother sold the business and my mother and my older sister put me through school. If it weren't for my sister and my mom, I wouldn't have a college. -cation in that. That college education is the beginning of a twenty three year story. So. You guys know at least cries on average one out of four episodes already episode. Thank you. Super rounded up in. A one point seven times. Out of every four episodes, but her interview with Julie's rattled founder of resource corals had me crying. We actually sat in this amazing moment where she had just learned that her product line was going to be picked up at target, and so very often was in Reseda. We're talking with people that stones are in in the rear view. And she was in it, and so the motion, and the reality of it was so real, but I think part of the reason that you and I remember that and you'll hear it as second is. There is a lot of emotion, a lot of gratitude a lot of love. And then she pivots so fast. To. The reality of the moment we are in when it comes to opportunity for Latinas that that that second part. Gave Me Whiplash Posted a video on instagram after received the first photo of a customer, seeing the product on shelves at target, and there's need up saying in the video, which was I'm not supposed to be here. Who Oh yeah, so that makes me really emotional, because it's true I feel like I. Don't know if it's imposter, syndrome or what it is, but I feel like it's different when you grow up in communities. Where like that doesn't never happens when you don't see like the when you think of entrepreneurs, I feel like a lot of times like. That word is never get situated to Latinos. Ever gets attributed to like somebody who. Comes from immigrant parents, so I feel like for me and you know my customer and my family. Being on the shelf. Isn't just like. A product being on the shelf. It's a testament to like all of my my. Family and my communities hard work and termination and. For me, it's like I think about. Seeing that product shelf. I think about all the work that went into it from. My Dad wanted to come to this country like having been going through a rat infested sewer to. WORKING SOME CHOPS To working so many jobs to you know sacrificing so much. So that I could have everything, so that I could have access to better schools, so that I could have education that I could. Be More than he had. Like, my mom never went to school at all like she barely learned how to read it right when she was like already an adult. So I think for me when I say that. Age just means like. People that grow up like that. You just think like that couldn't every be meet? That's where it comes. Massey one state. What is your advice for other Latinos who WANNA make products for other women. Oh, so my advice is. So I don't know if you guys have read the. I think it's a twenty nine thousand nine Neilson Report on Dina's. Sorry you just hard pivoted to like MBA school to. We just tell these weird like. Let me just wipe this live here and talk to. You must have statistics. To school real quick. Let me. Just tell Ya I. Don't know if you guys have read I. If you haven't downloaded, look up, let us two point. Oh Neilson report. It's about a fifty five page report analyzing nothing the in every single industry. As consumers, and showing how much power were and how extraordinary they are in how they are drivers, economy drivers, they are trenched drivers. They are drivers in every single industry from music to art to culture to to food everything, right? Take report and know that that report told every single big company that probably doesn't care about us doesn't understand us. That has A. Workforce. That doesn't look like US and they're out here. Trying to now capture this market, but you guys have an advantage. If you Latinos the first, you don't just create a product, you create a solution to problem y'all already have an advantage in that. You understand these problems so therefore creating solution is so much easier for you because you come with this insight what they have to pay so much money and research and you know on. On onboard all these people and do all these things you already know innately because you are, you are and you know how to speak your consumer better than anybody with millions of dollars like my mantra has always been what you lack in marketing dollars. You make up for it in creativity and Hustle and let me tell you so many of these Latino that I. Meet whenever I do these events. yeller mothers Y'all have a side job. Make hats y'all out of like. You! Guys have swear so many different hats and have are. Talented, you can create things you're a producer. You are an innovator. You have so much more. In insight than you know. We asked for Y'all to send US notes in honor of the hundredth episode and You did not disappoint. Not An UN I will say I cried. Listening to these first time, my cried listening to these second time so. I only cried the first time I know! Listen. Get it. You're the strong one. Let's. Let's let them play because they speak for themselves. Facie Alidina to Latino on your one hundredth episode, while one hundred was just added to the list of difficult words for me to pronounce in English. anyways I cannot wait for one hundred episodes more of conversations that are simultaneously deep and funny and Inti must analysis what I love most about. This podcast is at least way of crafting the perfect question every single time. Everyone sounds like they are being. Cells, and that is truly precious. Good asked Latina to Latina on our grand. Highlighting to Latina. Your podcast is one of my favorites. I. Absolutely love all the stories I love learning about the likability track I. Loved Leela Rivera's quote about how for US letting US failure is simply not an option, and your podcast allows me to unpacked so many different things, which is great and allows me to figure out different things to when it opens up conversations with me and other Latinas in healthcare, which is what I am and it inspired me to start my very own podcast. You guys are amazing. Keep doing what you're doing. Thank you. Hello beautiful people over at Latina Tila Latina. This is Diana biggest fan. I just wanted to say. Congratulations on your one hundredth episode in I wanted to tell you that. I absolutely adore the show I've laughed. I've cried. I've been inspired by listening to all the interviews. And you inspired me to cremate own podcast, and also you helped me overcome my fear of driving because I drove all the way out to New Jersey. To See You Talk to Dolores Huerta and that was like one. The best days of my life literally I overcame fears. I met at least yeah and unique in person. And I met the lowest. So it was an all around Awesome Day I. Wish you much much much much success. A lots of more mazing conversations and keep lifting up all the voices. And the stories of all the amazing thing is so combat's again. At least congratulations to you enjoy on the rest of your team on your one hundredth episode. It's my writer Dai podcast and the only podcast and look forward to week after week. Thank you for creating the space for letting us to share their stories Auger sacrifices and celebrate their compliments. Especially that episode. You Lisa my the only one that cried listening to it. I'm proud to be a listener and supporter, and here's the ten thousand more episodes, Felici that is. The, first Latina to Latina episode that I listened to was Ramona's La's. This is the first time that I was listening to a podcast that was really directed to the Latin community and I being Puerto Rican. On my father's side I always felt. That identified as Puerto Rican, but. That others didn't see me. That way and I downplayed may be parts of that. And listening to your podcasts had made me. Feel much more connected to my community to my family to myself as a Puerto Rican woman. As a Puerto Rican artist. And I'm forever grateful. Thank you. Hi and let the let the congratulations on this hundred episode milestone that is such an impressive body of work which I'm sure you're very proud as you should be. I am a Latino Myself. That recently relocated from San Diego in southern, California to Portland Oregon for the editorial job, but I've been chasing for some time, and while I'm super proud to be here and happy to be here. I am definitely still struggling to make connections with other people of color mainly because I am now inside all the time. Thanks to our girl, Rona, a bud to this place definitely is just not as diverse as where I come from, but having podcasts like these might ears to released digitally. Introduced me to activists directors. Musicians women running. You know billion dollar companies you are just spreading the word about that the US that are out here forging paths bravely unapologetically, and often imperfectly, which is just so inspiring to hear for those of US trying to do the same in our fields, so please keep doing what you're doing. Thank you again for the content. You Create I. Hope you get to do so for hundreds of episodes bar. That was auto damaris Diana Keen, Tina, and Vanessa thank you for your beautiful words and thank you to all our listeners sent us. Your Voice Notes always curious about how you experienced this thing that we're putting into the world and making with so much love. Literally run to read your reviews so again. One million episodes January one twenty twenty one. Let's do this or before it's in your hands, even with my entire family, listening and Julia Carr's entire family listening. We cannot get to one million downloads without you, so please keep doing what you're doing will keep you updated every step of the way. Thank you as always for joining us, Latino, Latina is executive produced and. Julia. Williams and me police you Menendez's Cedrick, Wilson is our sound designer Manuela Padilla is our intern. We love hearing from you. Email Asset Orla at Latina to Latina. Dot Com and remember to subscribe or follow US radio public apple podcast Google podcasts wherever you're listening and please please leave a review. It is one of the quickest and easiest ways to help us grow as a community.

United States Telemundo Columbia twitter NEC Goshen Alicia Puerto Rican Miami Julia Carr Univision Antigua Williams Marisa Andros Shea Christie Hall Burger La San Diego Jamaica Dolores Huerta
TCF Ep. 491 - KK Ottesen

The Candid Frame

55:57 min | 1 year ago

TCF Ep. 491 - KK Ottesen

"It's rare for a person into talented both as a photographer and as a writer the joke is if you claim to do both the likelihood is you do one or both badly sadly. That's not the case K. K.. Otis and who has enjoyed a successful career as both a writer and photographer for the past ten years. Her interviews and photographs have appeared in the Washington Post magazine as well as numerous other publications in her. Most recent book activists portrait's of courage. She leverages her skills as an interviewer writer and photographer. She explores what it means to be an activist by by interviewing a diverse group of people both liberal and conservative some of them include Dolores Huerta Edward Snowden Gene Mancini. Any Harry Belafonte Shepherd Ferry and congressman. John Lewis each chapter challenges us to reconsider what we believe in activist Chris to be. And what motivates them. I thought it would be. It would be a very fulfilling project and hopefully it would be useful. It would be helpful and it would make people you know the the way that I do it right. Sit Down and talk with somebody. In their own words and then the portraits are sort of hopefully very intimate very close us. And I didn't WanNa make a coffee table book either. I wanted to make a book that was beautiful but also accessible. So you could sit down and almost feel like you're talking with that person like you are getting a sense of them. A sense of their humanity a sense of their beliefs and you know in a way that was showed their dignity K. K. is fascinated with how people speak as with how they look inner photographs. She understands that both as a writer and photographer. She has to understand and respect the role. She plays in sharing someone else's story but I had my tape recorder because I couldn't write it all down. Everything is there and the way that people said things the way they said the regionalisms just their voice and their stories. It was so wonderful that I thought you know I couldn't like how could I reduce that. All of these bullet points to being able to share those stores so recording. According them at transcribing them exactly I was just a fiend. About getting every little way. They said it. And try. Not to. 'CAUSE even when you're transcribing you hear hear what they say and if you go too fast you say the way he would say it and she got a back up and get it exactly the way they say it and then it reads much more authentically. We'll talk decay AK about the challenges. She faced interviewing so many high profile subjects for book and share some of the amazing stories. She heard along the way. This is about an ex and welcome back to the candidate frame. Thanks for making time for me this afternoon. Thanks for your interest. I like the book. Thank you so much. I haven't gone through everything. It's really is a a fascinating read. I love the photographs but the content really gives me so much room for thought. Yeah it's making me sort of consider consider what I assume. Activist is or who an activist is. Yes I felt the same way I was very curious about it and then meeting different in people I expected far more strident characters. You know loud very thoughtful very generous very you know just I mean there. It was a veil range obviously but so many of them defied the stereotype. Is I think what was your idea. Going in in terms of what you thought this would would be. And how did it change. Well you know I was curious I really was in the last bunch of years you know as things have been getting more are in more. The dialogues been deteriorating. All kinds of really terrible things have been happening. You know problems with the democracy and it's very frustrating and so trying to figure out how to how people done it before like you know we've been through very hard times before we've been through terrible struggles as a country as a people Roland. So how do what do people done before. And so I thought well let me just talk with people who have been through the different struggles. You know starting way back. The early civil rights pioneers the nearest who are now in their nineties. Eighties nineties and then all the way up to see student activist today and look at the idea of first. How did you do it and what was is it called you to action you know? How can we learn from that? And what are the different paths and the different ways to approach it in different ways to say these are my tools. I could and use these in this way. And that's that's other thing that I really enjoyed talking with this group about is it. There's so many different ways that you can become an activist. Divestiture can become active. You can be useful and so if you. Are you know like the photographer Pete Souza I mean. He was a documentary photographer. His he was not somebody who's ever focus on you know politics or telling his view of of how things should be but he was so offended by the situation that we find ourselves in and he said look. I've got this unique perspective and I need to share it and if I don't I can't be comfortable with myself. It's really interesting because some of these. So many of these stories are people who are been witnessed or themselves experience some form of injustice. Yes and there are many people like them. But it's interesting to kind of hear what was the catalyst right. What was the one thing that made you make the choice right to take some form of action right and I think that that just the idea that I heard it again and again all different words but the idea that you cannot be at home with yourself unless you act you know and that just listening to who you are and you know obviously as you said it varies for different people? But you're in a situation where you just say this. This isn't right and I can't not do something whatever it is. I got to do something at another thing. That was really interesting with that for so many of those people because you have to have a sense of agency to do that right. You've gotta have a sense that if I do something it will make a difference right. Otherwise there's no point right. You have to have at that sense that if I press this something at least will happen and so for so many of the people which I thought was interesting and again not nothing. I'd ever thought of before going into the project was that so many had been involved in something when they were younger and so twelve years. Fourteen years old often day day themselves had had seen something done something where they wanted to make a little change and something happened and they thought okay and so then you know they'll do something else and then there they are on their journey. Yeah that's really really fascinating. Because some of the stories. The people an elementary school took action. They may not have succeeded exceeded but there was something about standing up and raising their voice. That was empowering and maybe in some ways even intoxicating waiting John Lewis talks about when he was first arrested. Yeah that that moment in that moment he felt freer freer than he ever had in his life. Right and that was. That was a remarkable statement we just gave me an even greater appreciation association for him and all the other people not only in the civil rights movement but where wherever has had to who has been oppressed in some way and finally says enough is enough enough right and you just feel like as a human being you are standing up and you're doing something about it and that feels right and Cecile Richards also talked about wanting to protest the war and she was in seventh grade. I think it was so she was a new kid on the school bus and she wore black armbands because people were doing doing. She didn't even know kids at the school. And the principal colder aside right away and so of course. She was scared she was like a good kid. I never did. I didn't question authority authority but suddenly here someone was listening to what I said it just because I wore this so that the idea that you can be heard she was talking with somebody who was talking with one of the the young highschoolers. I think who had walked out during the the march for our lives rallies as for the anti-gun rallies this past year and she met up with an young person who said she was the only one who left her school and just how uncomfortable it it is. You know when you do something like that on the one hand you know because on the one hand years like you're comfortable that you did something finally to represent yourself and other people but on the other hand it's very very uncomfortable. It makes other people uncomfortable. You know we sort of tense up. We don't want people to speak at line and she said but every time I've done that you you know I've always had somebody come up and say you know I was thinking the same thing and so we sort of give other people the permission or the pathway to then also stand adop- which is pretty profound one of the things that Harry Belafonte said was something. I've always thought about myself when I see movies. Y SI characters who are fighting oppression take arms against injustice. That has an audience. We get very excited and we just associated with the people who are fighting the good fight it happens in our real world. We're often not supporting the very people or if we're the very people doing doing it ourselves fighting resistant but all of a sudden there are these people who are against us and just made the point. He couldn't understand why whether it would be cheering. These these fictitious people in film but when he was doing himself there were telling him to be quiet and accept things as it were exactly. No No. I think that's exactly right. And I think that was when I was writing the introduction and I was thinking about the discomfort and you know how somebody chooses to do that I guess I I came across a statistic that when Martin Luther King Junior was killed that year his disapproval rating in the. US was seventy five percent disapproval rating. You know when you look at him now and he's sort of almost universally considered a saint in this country the closest they comes to it but but yet at the time. People didn't appreciate it at all. They were uncomfortable. They didn't they didn't took took time in. I think for so many of the individuals angels in here. It was really interesting talking with the older people who have seen that whole wave. So what what Harry Belafonte stood up for. And what Phyllis Lyon Ryan who is in San Francisco and she and her partner del Martin where the first same sex couple to be married in San Francisco and they you know they started the first lesbian rights organization you. They went through all the negativity and people. And now you know and Billie Jean King was making this point to now. If you're an athlete and you were to come out you you wait. Get a call from the president. You might literally you might get off in the president and you know she was just absolutely band and lost. All sponsorships lost everything you think and so it takes a long time to catch up with some of those things even if maybe we agree with them at the they make us uncomfortable and it was interesting thing in the book to see that this is a cross section of activists it is not just traditional quote unquote liberal activists. They're conservative activists in there and one of the things that I did appreciate. She ate about reading their reading. The text about them was several of them really spoke from really personal places as to why they chose the path that they did and then oftentimes. I realized that I myself sort of shut down any sort of dialogue with things that I disagree with largely because because of rhetoric just. Because it's so polarized and hearing hearing some of these voices it was like I could appreciate Y Y. They had come to that choice even though I didn't agree with it. I think this really speaks to the idea that if we can look past all the annoys we may not necessarily change our minds but that we can recognize the inherent humanity of the other person and not have to fall. Oh back on. Such sort of divisiveness hate vitriol. Yup that's exactly I. You've said it beautifully. When I was hitching reaching the book actually to begin with this was sort of? I guess maybe right after the first women's March and very polarized divided time you know and it was sort of like you're in this campaign here in that camp and there's no we're not talking to the other person I wanted to include different perspectives because I thought that we need to talk to different people like as you said. We don't have to agree but we do have to recognize that where we overlap. The Ven Diagram is is pretty big and if we if we can talk to each other and we're going to hear the other people then we're gonNA see their humanity and it's fine to disagree but it's not find it just right off people. It's not humid. I think John Lewis said it. Just incredibly movingly. When he was talking about he talked about I? Can I get a little mood but just a number of years ago. A one of the people from the clan who had beat him and left Minna Pool of blood in South Carolina came to his office on Capitol Hill. And said will you forgive me. You know. So that his son with this guy's son was there there. He was seventy s now and they all the sun starts crying. The man starts crying. They're all hugging each other and cry. And he's that's the only way forward the power few. That's the power of love you know. And he was saying even in the nonviolent training would say even if you're on the ground even if someone's kicking you you try to look them in the eye so that they see your humanity you know because we can't you can only treat someone that badly if you don't see their humanity and and so you may not agree you may not treat them very well but you have to treat them like a human being and I think that that's really important point really like with Gabby giffords says in the book when she says that if changed is ever to be hope for there has to be a time where we come together and that really sort of struck me because that's not something that I'm hearing frequently today. Yeah and considering what she went through with the extended determination and the ongoing physical challenges she. She's she's faced since then is really amazing that all that she is still both altruistic and realistic about the chains that she wants to affect. Yeah no I think that's exactly right. And she said look we're GONNA work together. We're going to figure it out. We have to so there's no we don't have the liberty of saying just this and nothing else. We have to work together. You know and she you know she said she and her husband Mark. They've always been gun owners so she said I get it and I'm not trying to say all bad you guys. You all are bad. But we can't have this carnage which we cannot have. You know. Young people afraid to go to school afraid to be in school and expecting a school shooting. That's not the country we want. We'll tell tell me about the germ for the book because deciding to do a book is one thing to happen is an altogether different different effort. I I know so so tell me about that. I studied political theory when I was in college. And I have always been interested in sort of you know. Sociology and Sort of political theory political philosophy and just the way that people make it work the way people get along together the way we try to shove ourselves forward to something something a little bit better. That's always sort of rumbling around in my mind and then with everything as I was saying earlier that's been happening over the last chunk of years you you know. The police violence the election of Donald Trump. You know just the increased polarization. I really just wanted to figure out out what is it. It's just. It's just a real curiosity. What makes people stand up? What is it that can do that? And can we learn from that and also for myself off. I thought it would be very inspiring. Thought that you know if I was I needed to find a way in this time to do something productive. There's a lot of negativity out there. Yeah I don't really want to blow up any more of that negativity I wanna see if we can find that path forward and so I thought it would be very fulfilling project and and hopefully it would be useful. It would be helpful and it would make people you know the the way that I do it right. Sit Down and talk with somebody in their own words. And then the portrait's are sort of totally very intimate very close. You know so that and I didn't want to make a coffee table book either. I wanted to make a book that was beautiful but also oh accessible so you could sit down and almost feel like you're talking with that person like you are getting a sense of them. A sense of their humanity a sense of their beliefs. And do you know in a way that was showed their dignity and so for me. It was a great project to do just because it it it meant a lot to me and it it was incredibly doubly inspiring to talk to these people and then you know getting it done as you said it's hard because you've sort of okay. Let me try to find this person and you get online and you try to sort sort of sort of like when you're sailing right. There's no straight lines use attack this way and then you to act that way and you know incredibly inefficiently moving toward a target right and so that's what it was. It was just sort of you know trying to talk to one person the other Anita once you once you get started on something that means a lot to you then you just gives you energy right. It makes you so excited that you are this is I got another one and the publishers. You had to say no more people in this because it was supposed to be it was supposed to be like thirty thirty five people and you know at forty one. They're really stop like we. We you need to turn this in and we because and this and that's what's so beautiful also is that these are just. These people are incredible phenomenal individuals but they are just one tiny slice tiny slice of all the people out there doing really great stuff and that also. That's the most hopeful apart right what we can do but we're already doing so. That was that kind of kept me going and once I was doing it it was sort of figuring out like God. I gotta just figure out a way to make. It's happened and so I can share these stories. We often hear about activists on the news and the news feeds in your in your using hearing the moments of a highest conflict right when the demonstrations and things like that everything sort of leading up to that or even what may have been initiated is sort of served as a a note within the body of the of of the story and I think this helps to sort of flesh it out all the more but I think one of the things that really struck me was that these people are they're not quote unquote special. People they're not a unique breed lead of people they're just normal human beings who made a choice. Yes and I think the most I think if there's anything that I admire about many of these people in here even some of the conservative voices is that they were willing to sacrifice something exactly and I think that's probably the idea that Kinda stuck in my mind is that Being comfortable is probably the biggest obstacle that most of us face in terms of you've taken the risk to speak out about something right and yet these people Whether they were in a situation that was completely uncomfortable or oppressive or still school. Had A level of comfort still made the choice to put some of those things at risk. Oh absolutely often you know even if they are in a place of comfort then they're eh sacrificing their reputation and the ability to command. What their commander ready I mean? Dolores Huerta talks about it. Well assertive she just. She's so funny because it's not even asking her. Well what do you feel about. There's no it was all like. Let me tell you about the next thing. I want to do. The next thing. Because she's so focused on the work and she just said you know it's leaders and activists leaders are not made. You just have to be willing to show up and to sacrifice your most precious resource source. which is your time when she did this? She had eleven children and she managed to do so every time. I don't want to go to a meeting at night or something I i. They had eleven children. I only have two quick figure this out but she. She made the choice and she had to. She chose to bring her children up in the poverty of the fields whereas she had grown up in a middle class. Upbringing had dance. Classes went to movies things that her children ever had so she made that sacrifice supercell fan for her kids. That'd be one of the things I love about your stories that you you made a career for yourself by getting talk to people people that a lot of people wanNA talk about talk to and make their photograph. Yeah and I was like okay. How how'd you manage to make that happen for yourself? Yeah Ah I mean well you know it's always a hustle it's always a struggle You know I think that it is. It's great you know it's it's really obviously there's there's no job security in any of this you give up give up the job security to do something that you really want and then you just figure out an and whenever you do things on your own own you are the one who provides momentum right it. Just no one's going to tell you the worst Boston. It's me all the right exactly can you. Just you know you can't get away from yourself but it's also sometimes you just want somebody else up. Push something forward and not Zeroed Rhode momentum all the time so that's the part that's sort of the dreary part about it is just. You could just get tired but then I'm sure you have the same thing then once you talk with somebody or make take the picture and then we get to go back then. It's like woo all. That energy is back again. And it's just it's just great. It's such a privilege and just and being so eager to Cher that is to communicate that out through the words through the stories through the images and to tell their stories. You know in a way that that does justice justice to them and let other people see inside them and see what we can all be what we can do. But I'm sure that when you earlier in your career when you say I I right and I take pictures both. Just choose one or the other right and okay so you're probably not good at either. Yeah no I know. I think that you know you'd sort of like at the post when I do step at the post I have one editor for the writing and then I am a different editor for the photo and then you can deal with people you know in in each field and you know you probably know this since you do the interviews and you also do the photos there there. Is that sort of time as you switch between that where your mind kind of grinds 'cause if you've been if you've been in the pictures for a long time I don't know about you but for me. The words words just kind of you know they don't come easily right because you're just you're just in the visual realm and you're just all focused in that and then you've got to kind of switch gears and get into the words again and do you sort of you know takes awhile to to go back and forth but it's also great because if your mind thinks that way and wants to tell stories in those both both of those ways than the ability to put it together at the same time you know. It's it's great economy then right because then you can use. People aren't going to read everything they're not going to read the interview from start to finish but if you can call that and then you use the photo to show something else or something deeper and that's a really great puzzle. You know that you get to put together to tell somebody story as best you can with those two pieces because I wish I when I'm doing it. I basically have to be two different people one. I have to be when I'm doing like this. I have to be intent listener and asking the questions but most importantly listening to what's given back to me and and then later on when I'm making the photograph it's all about being president but in a completely different way. I'm observing what the person is presenting to me and trying to elicit something completely nonverbal and both demand a lot of energy from from me in a very different skill set so hot. Is this normally work for you. Are you doing both during the time that you have together. Are you separating the from when you're interviewing them how does that work on average. Yeah Yeah great question. I know when I walk in. It's like I don't know if you remember the movie. Mary poppins opens with the old. I forget his name. The Guy who played all the instruments and how these stuff hanging off him walk in right the people like Oh. Can I help. You staggered at the room with them is fine if I so I prefer usually go in and interview the person I because because I like to be able to just sit down and talk with them and then I can also observe them see how they talk about things see the way the the way they move right the way their face looks when they're saying this or that just you know it gives me ideas for what I WANNA do afterwards and so I don't usually simultaneous. Sometimes I do if a really short on time you know. And that's on one hand it can be good because then someone's just talking and they're just being themselves. I do a lot of voters. So it's not we toss at anything with your mouth open weird thing or so. It looks like a real moment feels like a real moment. Yeah but you do some of this consciousness then because you're just talking with each other but as you said there's a limit because I I like to listen to who I like to look somebody in the face. I like to feel like we're having an exchange and so then when you put the camera in there you know it's that can interrupt it right and so usually I'll do that afterwards once. I have a better sense of them and it's even better. I think if I can do it on a separate occasion you know if I go back or sometimes I'll do a little data then go back and do more in-depth there or in a different environment or something and I like that because it's just another touch also and again. There's a familiarity that develops I've received so many kind find messages from people who have recently discovered the show. It's incredibly gratifying. To hear your enthusiasm when you say you are beginning to explore floor previous interviews. I'm both excited and impressed. Because that's hundreds of hours of free content but I'm so glad that interviews from over a a decade ago. Still hold their value. They still make a difference. And I'm so grateful that you have walked along that road with me and have continued. Can you to support the show in so many ways but we can always do with your financial support because your contributions are essential to us being able to do the work. Work that we do. So if you haven't already please support this show by becoming patriarch supporter by contributing. Only five dollars or more a month. You can help us to to do the work we need to do to deliver great interviews with great photographers visit Patriotic Dot com forward slash the candidate frame and become a a patriotic supporter. Today thank you. I mentioned that one of the challenges is that many of these people are camera ready and I just don't meet in terms of what they present in front of a still camera or video camera in terms of how they speak in terms of what they say Basically in terms of how they present themselves their ideas thoughts what's their sentiments. And you have to sort of break through all of that to try and get something genuine. You just don't WanNa repurposing racing of everything they've ever said or done or been in front of a camera. Yes so what what works for you in terms of being able to get past that facade. No it's a great question and that's definitely something I think about a lot especially with people who are well known for this book or for my other work interviewing doing politicians or people who speak all the time and and they have they have something that they wanna share and it's been vetted ready to share and some some of that is good because that's what they wanNA present but as you said it's very important to get beyond that and to get to who they really are and just the more personal side of them and and have them think on the spot and have them say something in a different way and it's interesting because a lot of times you'll have somebody say you know hadn't really share that before I hadn't thought about that for you. Know I think one of the ways that I do that I try to do as much research as possible on somebody before I meet them because the more I can know about them the more I can know about where they're coming from first first of all what they've already said so that that's out there and I hear it. You can kind of hear it anyway without having read it before because it sounds very tight but also oh also I think if I know particular things about somebody if I can ask better questions than I'm going to get better answers so if I if I can know what somebody did what they wrote in this novel you did this if I can really have read their work. There autobiography whatever work. They've done seen their movies. Then I can have a much better sense and we can ask much more nuance questions. Where they can then within? They have to think they don't just respond to the same questions that they get asked to get the same answers all the time. It tends to for me that that works so. When did that start for you? I know I know for me. I think one of the things it like really sparked my interest in this idea of being able to sit sit down and ask somebody questions and answers from them when I heard the recordings of studs terkel and I think I was in high school when I first started that I just it is fascinating me that you could just turn on a tape recorder start talking to people and they would start talking with you into sharing something and other two things happened in my life. It's sort of built built on that but I'm wondering for you. Can you look back in time where you felt like that. That Jerem of what you do now was was born. Yeah I mean I I also read studs terkel and I also in some of the sociology classes like tallies coroner reading those books where you know people went in and just sat with people. Listen to them and learn from them. Those were influential but I think the time that it really sort of came together as you're saying was is when I was doing my first book and that was it was called Great Americans and it was the documentary. Look life across the United States so I drove off fifty so I flew Saluda. Hawaii and Alaska drove to the rest and interviewed one person and took their photograph just to get a snapshot of the country at a moment in time and I had originally thought that it was going to be more photo driven so there would be photo of the person and it would be more like sociological information like you. You know name religion age but I had my tape recorder because I couldn't write it all down at everything and say right and the way that people said things the way they said the regionalisms just their voice and their stories was so wonderful that I thought you know I couldn't like how could I reduce that. All of these bullet points so being able to share those stores over according them at transcribing them exactly and I was just a fiend about getting every little way that they said and and try not to. Because even when you're transcribing you hear what they say and if you go too fast you say the way you would say and you've got to back up and get it exactly the way they said set and then it reads much more authentically and then you can hear them in it and so that was when I really just fell in love with telling the stories in people's own words and having having having them tell their stories basically just editing them down the so then and then matching that with the photos was just like. Wow the light went on recording. When I listened to it again I hear differently? Yeah focus during the conversation. Then there are other things that I didn't pick up on four real often subtle things but it's always you know fascinating part about just US listening to each other's like it just reminds minds me that what I think I'm hearing in the moment isn't exactly what I think of metering right. It's like reading a great book that you read before I knew say oh I didn't I didn't even I didn't hear that at the time didn't see the time I mean photos of the same way right. You know sometimes I was. I was talking with a group of students and showing them Photos and interviews. I've done for the first book. And then they brought out stuff that I hadn't even seen and it was so great to have them because they were approaching it from a different perspective and they found something else in that photo that I hadn't seen before and I just thought that was wonderful. It'd be able to share it and talk talk about it and and run it through these different perspectives so tell me about the photographic process. They sit down interview them. And so you have time afterwards to photograph them right. You shift gears. So how do you approach each person so that each image isn't reliant on just a repeatable luck doc you know. Put a light here. They're here but Manson blank wall. And make a photograph. I mean each of the images various distinctive. And they're not there's there's not this big stylish flourish around them but they're all very unique so explain to me that causes behind the the photograph. Yeah we'll in the book I wanted to. I wanted to pull. You could've been environmental portraits right. That would've told a different story but I decided I wanted to sort of you. You know again. Make this or a person to person and strip away as much of the background as I could so the really just focusing on the individual and so for for the most part. It's a dark background of some sort. You know what I traveled. I had a black cloth that I brought with me or sometimes a grey one sometimes varied but just to kind of make it very simple very easy to focus on the person themselves but then you WanNa get ghetto. It's I'm talking to the person and I'm trying to again. Have them be themselves as much as possible their authentic selves and so as much as they'll share with somebody they don't know super well but you know so sort of have them be comfortable comfortable. Have them be talking. Have them be in their space in a way. That seemed like them. So it's not the same. It didn't matter sometimes. I would go in often when I would go in with sort of an idea like you know. Let me try this. Let me these angles. You know little body little close in started the general stuff but again you're responding to the person in front of you when you're there and there's very much in the moment trying to figure out how do I show that and like like John Lewis Photo. That is where his his eyes are closed. I think it's my favorite of the whole collection. It was in his office. We had the interview and that I was doing this. And you don't have a lot of time. I'm and I'm sure he had a zillion other incredibly pressing things to do that day but he was going back and he was talking about these experiences that were you know horrific horrific being beaten on the freedom rides and just just horrible stuff and then you know how he came out of it and and and you can just you know his eyes which were sort of tired and they would sort of flutter closed and then you just pause for a second there so for me. He's got that deep deep creased down the middle of his between his eyebrows and so it just felt like as he was going back into his memory. Almost are pulled into the vortex tax of that memory. Right you down that you're into that worrier back in those thoughts in those experiences and so that that seemed like for me that was very powerful limited him because that was I didn't say oh I'm going to go in and get him with his eyes closed but that was responding to what I saw and the emotion of it and trying to convey that through the Chato when I do a portrait session. Sometimes it's very difficult for me to get out of my own head and sometimes it's it's like I am when it doesn't work for me is is what I am trying to get the person to do something. That's so much in terms of posing right. I want them to give me something and really only works when I let that agenda go and just see what the person is willing to give to me right and I think that that results in a much different interaction between between the two of us. We're still in control and I can give direction but there's no singular way for me to get there right so one of the things so you have to do not with your camera not with your subject that you have to do with yourself to get into the right mindset. Were you can elicit something between between the interaction between the two of you to get a good photograph. Yeah Yeah I mean. I think it's funny. I was interviewing a basketball player. Wants Elena beard. Who has Dr Duke? And then she went to the Washington mystics and she was just saying it or she was such an intense person that she would go in with. Exactly what you're saying that this is way to do it and this is the plan. Dan and she said one of the best piece of advice she got from a coach was just hold on loosely. I can be there. Have a plan you know. Bring your intensity. But you've got to react to the moment you've got to be in the moment and you've got to take it's a back and forth with with and so it's the same thing here you go in and you're you know as you said Eddie just so tired after them to after the interviews after the photos. Because you're just you're all self as they are you're alive completely alive and trying to have all your sensors up. I've been really understand. This person really meet them and see them for who they are. So I think it's the same rece- similar or analogous is to win. You're doing the interviews where you are just trying to get the person a place where there themselves. I'm not overly saying I have to have this angle of your face ace. Hold it right there. We don't do a lot of that. You know it's more interactive and we're talking and we're laughing or something where they're themselves a sit like themselves or they move like themselves or whatever. It is that that they come to a position of just comfortably inhabiting and kind of forget about me snapping snapping away that works best to me. I end up with the best photos. Then as opposed to when I'm overly worried about the angle and the light how it's hitting them. Ns that's secondary conducted hundreds of interviews and people asking asking me like who was the most difficult Blah Blah Blah and. It's never been anything like that. There's been the issue. The biggest issue for me is that. I'm so intimidated by the people because of who they are to me. Yeah Right Roy wondering. Do you have a similar story of one of the people that you photographed. Yeah it's interesting little intimidating photographic traffic Pete Souza because he's a photographer really really good one so that was sort of like. Oh my gosh. Who Am I to tell this person out a movie? Yeah I mean. It's funny because I think with any of these people well you know. Some of them are credibly well-known rebel day Or John Lewis Heroes Heroes of mine here as many of ours and so on the one hand you could be sort of flummoxed by that the other hands as the case when you sit down to talk with anybody whether it's the person next to on the bus or whether it's somebody who's famous you're going to meet its there's that moment holman of sort of you know oh my goodness and then and then you're just two people talking like it's not that you know you're just two people talking and it's so oh that kind of fades after. I do remember actually after I left. John Lewis's office. I think I deserve one. And it's the people who work in the office like I know I feel that every day. Okay good it's not just me but you know yeah of course and and then to WanNa tell their story well and did not mess it up or you know do justice to these people who are phenomenal. I mean Marian Wright edleman like all these people who are just phenomenal you WanNa you WanNa do them justice and so that's why. Ud Work like a maniac to try to get it right. And I don't know if you do but you know because it's quite because some of the people in the book are already iconic and some of these people may eventually be considered iconic they may be well underway. Hey you know given the progression of of time you never know by but but as always you have to come down to that sort of common thing like just another human being being their flesh and blood just like me they were born and they're gonNA die. They eat they sleep. You know different for me of in the circumstances of your life and the choices that made so I think you always have to come. Come back to that whether you're interviewing someone for written article or making their their photograph right but you know we're we're all we're all sort of conditioned to think of us in terms of ranking of importance of all those things and with with with politicians in because they're so used to being having certain level control of the dialogue. How were they to the photograph in comparison to other people? Because all of these people like I said before they often have agendas teams that politicians are very adept at you know wanting to the Sidon hidden in giving you just exactly what you want right and I've not photographed interviewed many politicians. Just because I don't think my skill set is up to it but I'm wondering what your experiences Not just with this book with other work that you've done yeah. I think that they're very adept at speaking. And saying what what they want to come across but and this goes not just Republicans but for other people too and you know some of the icons in the book. I think they're also people who often really care about something thing. And so you know they can geek out on something just like anybody else. We all have that thing that we're just loved to talk about or that we're so excited and so it's Kinda just beating them there and sometimes I I sort of you know and this again. This goes for that type of interview as well as other ones you just I think he I just don't approach it necessarily from an efficiency point of view in like an again while you were saying with the photos I need this out of you. Just go niessen and you listen really really hard and then you try to find. You could tell when someone's really excited about something when they're talking the and it's not necessarily all their talking points. Maybe there's it's something that they've really really care about and so if you can get them talking on that and then ask them questions that really get to why they care about it and why they decided to do something in the first place something that makes it personal to them then you really get in there and then you're ready to really get a conversation going and not just a speech delivered Robert. We spoke earlier about your first book where you traveled across the country but graphing people. I think it's really a a wonderful way of getting to know a real cross section of the that make up and you know like you said you have an opportunity to hear them in their own voice and see them in their own circumstances and not through the filter of television. And I'm wondering what you learned from that experience as an interview. Enter photographer directly. Help with the work that you did for this latest book. Yeah and I think that it probably also goes the point about whether you are intimidated by somebody or not. I think the more people you speak from different backgrounds and different. You know we all to have that sort of moment where we think we might know some but the something about somebody or we might know you know and then you speak to them off any rob and so you know I think the people it was just such a beautiful experience because the people were I mean it was such a great variety of people and I didn't curate it so the idea idea was I'd choose one person in each state and I took iconic American names right so whatever and so but it was just that person so I didn't know them I just you know I mean maybe in some cases like Edgar Allan Poe and Oklahoma Comanche Oklahoma. I thought but that sounds like a cool place. Let's just go there just because because it sounded like an interesting place but other than that I didn't know anything about them and so just going there and then having to kind of think on your feet get to know them well. You don't have any context. I neither does so. It's like to you know people circling each other. It was like a domestic exchange program because we're both like whoa arson and you know. I interviewed interviewed one guy. Pastor Paul Revere who's basically a separatist living out in rural Oregon you know he and his family I guess they had been shown off off their land by the feds sort of like Waco situation. That didn't go violent thankfully but so they were living in what they call the Embassy of Heaven even not in the US they didn't consider themselves in the US. Seceded fascinating and they're living on these gutted school buses together and you know at first I thought well do. I need to be worried or not and you know. They invited me for dinner and I stayed on with them and with the Song Ministry. And we're having you know rice and beans and Bible jokes on the you know it's just like like just crazy just really wonderful experience but just human to human people to people and it's just so interesting that you really do find the the areas of overlap and they really are bigger than not right there. We have much more in common and it seems so obvious obvious. But I don't we don't act that way a lot and so I think of it. You know getting getting to meet people from very different backgrounds and spend time with them really helps to see everybody that way. You said earlier that this work that either either that you hope or for yourself that this the book makes you hopeful and that you hope that that's what when people read it is get back right so why is important you. Why is it important? Well personally it's important because I think we all feel I think we all feel that we want the world to be better we. We don't want as much you know. We don't want a lot of things that are happening in the world to happen. You know I have two kids you know I want them to see a world that it is safer and that exists after twenty years or fifty years whatever it is you know. I think that they're just a lot of problems and I think that. Ah I need to believe that. We could do something to make him better. I mean if you don't believe you can can make anything better than it is. Give up right and and what's the point. You know you can go down adding sort of like it's like expression in sports you just leave it on the field you know this is it so you might as well do something being useful and I think that you know. I think when you see people when you're around people do make those sacrifices or just those decisions to just do something instead of complaining leaning then it's you know it it gives you that little kick to say okay. You know what that's not that hard I could do that or maybe I don't do that hat. That's not my sphere. But I could do this or hey I already. I'm doing this and it's doing this good thing. Maybe I could do one more. You know something like that to just and it can get it better but it only gets better if people just make it get better and they push if they show up whatever it is like you know. You can't be passive I. The kids have sick of hearing it. But you know I heard this little phrase a little while ago. I can't stop saying it but a comfort zone is a beautiful place but nothing ever Grows there right we all love. Of course we all need our comforts on sometimes. But you can't just Kinda give into it you got to keep pushing. It's but it's also your responsibility to do that. And so hearing these stories seeing these examples you just remind us that Eh you can do it and as you said before these are regular people everyone starts as okay. Some of these people have become icons but they didn't start that way they just started. It does a kid who heard someone speak on the radio and it spoke to them and they decided to show up and then they decided to show up again. You know and you know and then it became a pattern of that. That's all it is. It's just a series of decisions. And you just have to do it and it's worth it. I mean that's that's the message. It's worth it because it does work sometimes not always But you might as well go down trying and then the show says you know those are the moment you feel alive. Yeah exactly right and you feel connected connected to other people feel like. That's that's the point. That's why we're here with my last question that ask each guest's is i. Ask them to recommend another topographers for listeners. To discover and explore on their own and it can be anyone some maneuvering admired or someone. You've recently discovered so. Would that one photographer being why well. That's tricky can I give to. I greatly admire. And I'm sure people already know Plato on and I just I love I mean I just love you talk about bringing out the individual I just love it and I think he I don't know him but he must have an incredible gift talking with people in order to bring out a person. I mean yeah and just gorgeous. You know technically just unbelievably gorgeous. I also have another other photographer named Alan Chin who is somewhat. I've known for many years and he is just just another great story about someone who's just going out and trying something so he. He studied photography in College. And he's in New York and he was just trying to make a living as a photographer in New York City which is really really hard anywhere in New York City La. I'm sure everywhere and I think for a while he was like listening to the police scanners and going to try to make get to the scene of an accident to get some photos just sort of like not what he wanted to be doing and then the war broke out in Bosnia and he just decided he bought himself up a one-way ticket no money funds in one way ticket and just showed up and the The day before the time is photographer had quit so there he he is ready to work. And then he sending. He's working for the New York Times Christian Science Monitor covering all these zones and he's just one of these people he's a big intellect elect and he just loves life and he's fascinated by things and so curious and so he just dives in and just you know embraces came back his glasses or have shattered. Look but he's like he's alive and he's and you take the risk and you do something and created. I mean these beautiful photos. The captured should what was happening over there so that we could see what was going on so people could understand it and understand the import of it. You know so many comfortable miles away. So that he's just. His work is beautiful and his approach. He's now working on something called documenting Detroit with a bunch of other photographers. So yeah very cool work. Thank you for the recommendations for your time and for a wonderful wonderful book. Yeah thank you. It's a real pleasure talking. Thanks to cake for sharing time and story with. Let's find out more about her work by visiting K. K. OTAS and DOT com. You can find our book. Activists wherever books are sold but please consider using our Amazon affiliate link as it helps to support the show. You can also support the show by writing a review wherever you listen to podcasts. And even better if you really enjoy an episode spread the word via an email to a friend post on your social networks networks or word of mouth. It makes all the difference and make sure to check out our youtube channel where offered comments on photography submitted by listeners who contribute Butte to the candidate frame flippable check out the TC applicable and our youtube channel by clicking on the link in the show notes and the website. My latest book making taking photographs developing a personal visual workflow is now available. You can purchase it today and receive forty percents off the list price when you order it from the rocky nook website. Use the Promo Code Parrella forty at checkout to take advantage of the discount and you can also receive three free copies of previously published e books by signing up for candid frame mailing list where thoughts about life autocracy and keep you updated on. CCF events and remember you can support the show by contributing to our patriotic ground effort or donating through paypal. Thanks to Christian KNOB. Lock Jeffrey Nessler. Derek Hayes Warren Hollister and Lon Smith for their recent contributions it helps and it's making a big difference. Thank you and thank you to the many people who have written reviews about the show including warrant from Canada Fazel Ninety one from Thailand and flogger from the UK. Now not all episodes available on your podcast or APPA choice so to download listen and share any and all episodes of the candidate frame. Download the APP for Apple and Android and because of your support art. It's free. The candidate frames audio engineer. Is Martin Taylor who you can find the other Martin Taylor Dot Com show senior producer. Cynthia Parker and our music is from Kevin. mccloud WHO's royalty free music can be found adding COMBITECH DOT COM and this is about X.. And this is that candid handed for him

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Episode 52, SF's Mission District: Vero Majano

The Trip

1:01:31 hr | 9 months ago

Episode 52, SF's Mission District: Vero Majano

"Since this is your neighborhoods sees me. Now let's tell me. Tell me what the bureau like. What the audio from the mission. The miss someone yelling. No just kidding actor. Walking used to be all auto shots or they used to be auto supply places and then glass places like they would saw big glasses for like like windows this. Hey how's it going. What's happening how you doing good smart in her very very meet you. The brits cover story. Oh wow do nothing. Like a symphony. Only was all prisoners. Will her mason place on your son did you go. We have big prince fans and actually here. It's okay hi has been here living here. And i said send me an you guys know was born and raised here right like week walked i every time i walked down here. I feel like you're one of the most consistent things that that's always here and having children do a camera here you guys would have captured my whole growing up this walking off always a pleasure on. Yeah you right. I'm so glad you guys do here. I don't know where i'm at by guy. I'm glad you guys are still here. If there was a motto for the old mission district this would be it a little nod of solidarity for the mission district of auto body shops and the bayreuth market. And taka's like la where carlos santana wash dishes and press tortillas long before you amble down too lazy bear and have a three hundred dollar meal anchored by miyazaki ridi- and natural wines. I am not from the mission district. When i went to live with my father from middle school on i mostly on the west side of san francisco trapped under a heavy layer of fog with a bunch of chinese and russians and jews. But even from out there you knew that the mission was the heart of san francisco. It had this weird sunny micro-climate it had stoop life. It had that big old mission building that gave san francisco. Its name in the first place. Santana was called the mission district a jukebox. That there was a constant open air soundtrack. Music from cars. Conversation from the students calls from street vendors. It was a neighborhood of families. Strivers hustlers artists all out in the open but the mission has also always been abused neglected by politicians. I'd hungrily developers. San francisco is america's perennial boomtown and the newcomers. Forget every single time that this was a mysterious so city from the start. My goal in the next few episodes is simple. I wanna see if those guys are still there to see if the jukebox is still playing. If the latest insidious boom rico vid which was the rise of the tech bro changed his place dramatically. I couldn't start. Those conversations often. A better spot than with the inactive euro mahane together with her partner the target for kerry or vic she part of one of my favorite indie artists power couples. She is also deeply truly from this place born and raised ready to remember and defend in correcting clarify. We reported this episode before covert or any ensuing bullshit but you'll recognize the themes of persecution in her work about looks yet they seven. Latino boys railroaded for the killing of the san francisco police officer in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine and yet you'll also hear in this conversation. The bureau has a far less combative view of change and cultural conflict. Than even i do visit grace in the way she handles these shipping streets of the mission. Which sort of humbling and extraordinary. This is nathan thornburgh and promotes kingdoms. You are listening to the trip drinking with exceptional around the world. Let's have a drink right salute loot shit. That's a. that's a double dank. I think it's a double something that's super good. So oh it's just west coast. That's all i need. That's that's the only recommendation. So this is. I haven't seen. I haven't drunk a lot of beers that have been signed to the person who somebody's did a signature of this. It's a latte laughing monkey brewery here in the bay area and the baby. You and a friend of mine's. He did the artwork for this lotus. What the special edition beer and Proceeds go to foundation. That's bad so that's that's a guy who signs so you had signed it on like we know what we could drink. That's awesome limited edition and we're not going to recycle. That bothers beautiful man. It's it's got a little light kind of crystal outline shape And then a just like this fantastic painting of dolores huerta in the beers called reminded the lawyers. It looks like she has fair posted here a little bit yes. I thought it'd be cool to share this beer. I'm into it. in Central has he's very artist born and raised here so that'd be cool since we're talking about the mission. How many of you are there now. A couple of us around depends like this old school mission art school. some of them are around in Than the mission homey artists like myself around the couple's right. It's like but it's like a ven diagram of endangered species right mission locals and then like you know artists and in san francisco like you know the economy is coming for you from both directions cab drivers if we're gonna take a cap that a lot of cab drivers are. Oh jeez at had been a long time. And i feel like if you've been here in san francisco more than twenty years. She could discount somewhere. You know the this funny you know they have that in and actually in key west. The other place where i grew up was They'll give you a local card and you can go in. And just because every all the prices are so jacked up but here you would need discounts for you need like housing couch. Cheer for housing. You know. I mean this was the thing when i came back for my Whatever high school reunion. Everybody had gone like nobody. Could the only people who were still living in san francisco. We're in their parents homes. Because you're from here. Yeah well. I'm from the west side from richmond district and you know it's the same problem. I went to lowell high school in south west. And like you know everybody's got good jobs or or they don't it doesn't matter like they can't afford to live here anymore so it's Yeah it was crazy to just see the big exodus. The let's start. Let's get right into that. I mean to be totally honest. Like i think the reason why i'm doing this as a few episodes that's just like san francisco in the mission is just knowing you and following you and having been so excited about what you've been up to in the stuff i've seen from afar Particularly with remember los yet they and it just reminded me that there's this like ocean of memory and art that you are working with the people just don't know about when it comes to san francisco and i wanna dive into that so so tell me. Tell me about that project. And we'll just we'll just get from there so remember. Let's this the last piece last project. That i just finished in april and it was a life cinema production and it's the this year is the fifty year anniversary of the los hit. The movement will see at the plaza and nine hundred sixty nine seven central. American young men recused clean a white police officer in the mission There were acquitted. Took that almost two years for them to get acquitted. Also lada A lot of movements in the mission were created out of that trying to freeload. The in collaboration with like the black panthers address organization had like a magazine called bust. Us gives me a newspaper code buster year. That was polish together at the back. The black panthers black panthers lender lawyer gary Charles gary who was You're familiar with shells. Gary people's lawyer. I saw clips of him going off. Yeah yeah that you used in your show right. Yeah it was great. Like i mean is so powerful. And i actually a new bombshell scary through other There's a documentary about him. And it's just you know he was called the people's lawyer so yeah. I decided to tell the story. I mean i worked on it forever. Ever and Luckily the fifty year anniversary was coming up. And that was kind of like the. If you don't do it now it's not gonna happen you know and and what was it. I mean louisiana was obviously these kids who were arrested. Said they'd kill the white cop. The charges were like super thin. They were ultimately acquitted. But as the people's lawyer was saying in that clip like they'd spent like over a thousand days in jail collectively. And i guess just the whole setup so outrageous that that was finally like breaking point for for this neighborhood of this community is that i mean is that was the experience of it. I think it's the for some really organizing happening in the in the mission district at the time and it was like most movements organi in organizing who instigated our young people so there are a lot of young. They were young men. Young people were their friends. And who were inspired to do that. And a lot of actual outta the young folks. We're also doing a lot of work at the strike. Say esab strike was happening right around that time also so the so a lot of these kids and i say kids 'cause they were like twenty years old. We're starting to get Inspired by organizing some of them they were at the hugh new in rally at the federal building and they were all like raising their little. Red mao Bugs and happened to be one Donna james happened to be standing by one of the police motorcycles. And she heard like the you know. What do you call that announcement that copter looking for these people when she heard the name sir. They're like yo that's our homeys and actually one of them was with her that there was one of the suspects that they're calling so yeah. I think that there was that. That incident really was an important marker for a lot of folks to continue to to organize in through this to this day. there storage. Nineteen you know and was of the sense of these. Were political arrests or is it just a symptom of like the systemic racism where they would just frame up any central american kids and say that they had done this. I mean as no similar cisco doesn't have a good reputation with police officers and people of color. I mean if you think about it compared to today the same story the only story is that there is just as for the young boys who were accused of the crime. And yet i think it became very political and then also political how to talk to the community about Freeing these boys and continuing and how people can get involved get some community. The parents the parents they had their ideas with the black panthers were so in other organizations who are trying to figure out. Is it a good collaboration. How how are people gonna take fat until they started flying Images of the young boys and the senate in english and in spanish. This could be your son. So that's a lot of parents started organizing as far as that's what i'm told. Yeah so when you decided and yours was toward the end of really like a month of kind of programming and exhibitions and different people. Having a say about the fiftieth anniversary. I mean 'cause. I wanted to make sure like my expression of the of the story. Lafayette dates through my lenses. An artists storyteller my connection through it on on a personal level but also wanted to make sure that that people got other hits of like you know. Some people are more interested in the actual facts. The history of it. I collaborated with many organizations and they they hosted like panels with people who were the women who are part of los siete. We did There's an art exhibition with your under lopez fernando martine a poetry night a bike tour. So there's a bike tour of with with Yep so. I was really excited about that. Because it's very site specific you know and people are just going around bikes and telling this is what happened here and not just where the incident happened but actually would other organizations were inspired from that that incident right so they could. You could visit storefronts and different. Yeah you know maybe activists shops or something all in the mission today and still see them all as like a an echo of what happened back. And and i think people like some people. That's you know. People learn and gather information differently nyc. I think science specific space is really important for people and their Hor headquarters was at you know. Do you remember pulling us. Pizza closed now but that was his headquarters. Okay so that was the place where everybody gathered like to organize plan. They also had like a small restaurant. David sell some food and steph people. That's so crazy. I mean it is it does sound a lot to me like the central park five or something just like this seminal defining miscarriage of justice. You know then obviously have worked out a little differently took a lot longer for central park five but but it's the same. It's that same thing where you know. Sometimes it takes a single moment. You know to get people to i. Guess just realize their collective strength or something. I don't know but the mission you know it's almost like that was the beginning of the organizing but certainly that was not the end of the trouble you know and trouble has come for this neighborhood and so many different ways over the years And it really. It feels like it's here now. But i definitely want to. I don't know. I want to ask you about that stuff. And kind of what What what's happening these days but but know let's talk more about the the actual exhibition in the kind of multimedia thing that you put together. What was your choices and like how you decided to present it and how that came together. Well you know when. I was first working on this project for a very long time. I thought was going to be documentary but i. I just learned that quickly that that was in my actual voice to do documentary of journalist. And i was invited to do storytelling. Anna started doing live storytelling and around the same time had access to all this archival footage and i was really interested. I fell in love with the footage and mike. I don't wanna cut it now. 'cause it's just leave it whole and i have a friend Sam green who's been doing light cinema. Also he just takes it to a bigger but I was really implants about that and thinking like oh well like i can do that. Like it's more I can do that and start experimenting with that kind of worked out. It's interesting i mean. I know you would collaborate with pop up a magazine before and it's got some of that by but without some of that hips tourism. That might be in there. I don't know it's like much more personal than i ain't pop-ups great. I mean yeah. I actually did my first chapter there years ago and i was inspired about how they went with it. Okay and just in. it's also what's great about it. Is you have to be present to see the performance you can watch it later on and stream it. It's an experience that you have to be with other people and and the president. And i really like that about it. Did you do the same thing with your show. Because i saw clips of it on instagram and different things but But you didn't like record it. As a as a solid piece. I recorded a just documented before for documentation and then down the line to maybe apply for grants for other for other projects. But no you had it was. It was all live. It's not meant to be something. Somebody will connect to on their phone or some no. It's meant for their and i. It was just especially here in the mission. Just like oh man like i knew people were gonna show up like the first night just buzz. I was like whoa. You could just academics feel it you know and like that was really nice to see them. There was like People from all kinds of my world like you know the people from the generation of a and then like i do harm reduction works so all the folks from harm reduction were there and then You know sf artists folks like the ot's in also just really nice to have all those combinations of people in in in space and it was great to work with the ban. I think like band. Oh my god. I was just practice. So that was greg Land do the direct the music director and he just picked the best musicians. You know. he's like. Oh i know this guy i know this guy and then And they were great to to work with. Because i've never worked with the band before you know and just to really be able to work people and communicate now. This is the vital. I'm looking for in the neck. Okay we got you and And then just the footage was also another part off element in on like i did live storytelling. The and then you have this archival footage and it's big. It's just so big. It's so much bigger than all of us and i love that part about it because like literally it's projected on the wall and it's just was huge so wonderful. That's exactly how i imagined it. When when you look at that archival footage do you see like do you feel like there's some that's part of your own memory real. I mean you grew up a little bit. After this era you know yeah. I mean i'm just I know that on like stuff. That old footage old graffiti old just like that The texture of things you know but stanford this footage to particularly be just around specifically around. The mission was just wonderful. What did you see like was there one scene or something that just kinda brought you back going through all that. This is one dollars. It's called. I call it the dalai shot so it's from it's black and white and his little bit. It's not like nine hundred sixty nine. I'm going to say nineteen seventy-two. Maybe an it's fun twenty second and mission to twenty-third third and it's just someone learning how to use a camera said sackable licks camera and it's just a day in the life in the mission and it's just like i know when i looked at that footage i was like whoa so then when i share it with the audience i hear the audience especially in san francisco like the like well you know. And that's really lovely experience and then also for folks have been here for a long time to recognize even if it's like that's new. Various people are attached that you know but then folks who just got here they know that st they're like wait. That's where that's where. I feel like it's a way of sharing a space together instead of like the newcomers in the old comers in that tension you know so i think that is so so the footage is a catalyst for for sharing same experience. That's interesting even though it means different things for people see differently. They all kind of have the same like well because they're here now. You know you're here now you maybe you go to the bar. That's i think it's called barred. Four th street bar or something but but you still have experienced that you recognize that space. You know so. I feel that. I'm interested in that with my work to that people you know quote unquote. Newcomers can use it. You see people who've been here for for a while you see them like reminiscent and then you get to witness that but then you also like oh. I know that spot. So in that footage. What's so great about it. Like a lot of the footage that us is just some learning how to use a camera. You know And that was rape oberon. Because then at the time that's the filmmaker rabe runs and he had a small collective commission media archives. Were he he made kick you. D give them equipment because they didn't have people of color producers at the time the got equipment and they started making their own films and i helped him time passes ends up in the been. Your wife is tired about having stuff in storage. So i met him. He was also my brothers accused of he did a lot of youth work in the mission. He woke my brother. My cousins and my job is just to go through the film and kind of organize it for him. And that's how. I found a lot of that footage in keeping that and he was so generous because on my way he goes as somebody interested in looking at that. Can you wait. I wanna premier it. Like i want to show you know. So a lot of the footage that i had a lot of people had not seen it. It's like never been seen. Wow so in. One of my favorite one is just birds. Some shooting birds flying and some tax. And i was surprised how it worked because i have a line that says can we cut to the bird said it cuts to the version. People are like. I really let the bird part like so. That was fun that people were into that listeners. This is an emotional time for many of us the election. The pandemic holidays coming up. It would not surprise you to hear that deep emotions. I like to express them through hot sauce in the before times that might have meant bringing loved ones a suite tied chili sauce from y'all lot or a jar of roadside habanero from the pan but this holiday season in a world without travel i will be expressing all of my cup. Sason feelings through trough. I've been using the sauce on everything from weekend morning. L'aquila's to the hawaii. She gypsum sandwiches. They sell down the street here. Queens and i have found it incredibly well-balanced just enough heat thrill with a bit of gavi sweetener at yes that birthday undertone of truffle trucks. Its name for yourself. Why trump is the biggest hot sauce on instagram. And tiktok get ten percent off site-wide when you use the promo code the trip at trump's dot com that's ten percent off everything including white rough vip box and the trump variety back just in time for the holidays just shop at trump dot com. That's t. r. u. f. f. f as fantastic dot com and use the promo code the trip. It sounds like a lot of your work. And i think i've i've seen that too is like you said kind of a little bit about just blurring the conflict lines right so like the. The things are pretty on edge sometimes in this neighborhood with newcomers as you call them you know like the people who are part of this new economy that is really rough and then the people who've been here forever who've been always on the short end and you know the ability just shoot some birds and just say like life in the mission isn't just about like us versus them. Gentrification street violence or whatever like these hard things that the neighborhood has to deal with like sometimes it's just about some birds. Yeah sundance yeah. There's just moments of like just beauty around and it is a lot of tension. I mean i. I just think about i mean san francisco wealth is just. It's just crazy. Like i think after uber and they make it available to everybody. Yeah like there's like a kind of new millionaires around and that just blows me away like we. We don't have a chance. You know we just right and how many of them are living now in the mission there on the on the outskirts are in some neighborhood that used to be called the mission but is now called something else. Yeah i mean like Yeah like. I really don't have a chance and and i feel like i could get cut up and all that but then i wouldn't made remember los siete for the lot of my work is like at least for the moment. Were hiding this history or this moment of how we knew our neighborhood you know so i'm really interested in that also in the moment of archiving it even in its collectively right now. Because that's all. I really power doing right now. You know right. You can't change the rental market to make it possible for people to stay or you mean the disco people doing good work here like meta guiding throw plaza sixteenth. No those elected the the folks who are really doing a lot of work to making sure that folks can stick around and to how actually contribute to that is making these moments that we remember what it was. You know. maybe what it can be like so you grew up in the mission you were born and raised here but from here and your family had had. Were your parents also from here. There's all salvador. they were from el salvador in. I mean i think you've had some breaks but you've been here or have you been here. The whole time began livni's bay for blink awhile ago but i've been pretty much. Yeah i've been here my whole life. We all make mistakes and for me. I'm like i mean the city s. I felt like damn everybody found out how the secret of san francisco i mean. It's just really a fall. For it. Time i come back home you know like i. I get that same feeling. It's like that. I had that coming in yesterday. It's just like fuck you know. It's like that's why they call it california. It's like it's got this ridiculous blue sky and this is perfect too hot not cold even on my wellbeing. Only this is the perfect temperature here. No this is also by the way why they hate us californians because that is exactly the thought you think. That's what california's are running through their mind. All the time and it is almost like almost confused so good in this air. I'm hella kelly. Yeah like i have not shaving was going to say. Oh yeah now. I was in carrier my partner. Like know i say like i was born and raised here but i think it could see. I'm getting old here right now. Hope i'm able to grow old here you know. Do i would love to grow old here. I mean i think one of the things that i find remarkable in kind of generous about the way that you reach across the aisle with some of the work you know and are not presenting a you know kind of harder front Like if people want to hear your stories and get into it who are newcomers. Like you're you're you're welcoming them into your art. I think that's it's remarkable because you know having known you for i don't know ten fifteen years fifteen years since you started dating kerri or Great photographers and old friend of mine. I've been with you guys and seeing you know from the outside but just like rental instability like like. Can we stay here. Like what's what's happening. I mean you. Guys are both artists in san francisco. It's fucking crazy. It's really intense. Just to maintain a threshold in. I would i would see for myself like a deep bitterness. Maybe i'm just just got a bunch of coal in me. But i would it. Would i had my moments like. Yeah i mean. I get it i get it. You know sometimes like starting thursday nights is not a good time to be out in the mission on the streets because you can get really upset and detrimental and just pissed bike. Because it's all the rich kids your plan and nobody's dropping off me like nobody you know. Everybody's hello tom. Pretty small and like nobody's chipping off me. And i'm just like i can't put my energy to that you know like i feel that i can't put it to that. Might as well use it to something else because no one is no one sees me like. I'm pretty like nolan. Sees me just meaning like you know older here in san francisco. It's a young city. And like i mean i having been there you know now. Work with the been serving the community that is experiencing homelessness and trauma for like more than twenty years. I work with like the of really pours people in san francisco and who everybody collectively can come and agreeing with a lot of times that they're terrible right right. This is deeply despised. yeah nineteen collectively. So i think that. Sometimes i mentioned my my own privilege of the people that i serve and then i was just i work somewhere where people are gonna lane really early in the morning to get a cup of coffee be long as light and then you go to teens. It's the same thing but it's just a different experience. I mean i mean. I love me some teams but i would always just think about that. The comparison of that you know like everybody standing in line for coffee coffee ran like And then Yeah they will stand in line. I feel like that's one thing. I don't like about san francisco. Beauty sending land for all kinds of stuff do it like every income bracket every home leg. That's right you know. I was born and raised here. I was still pay full price brand not waiting in line like he knows just like people love. We didn't in lines like that is true. I i've always. I've always found it hard since you know. We've been through the to hype bubbles here like hard to dis- aggregate from that but like san francisco city where people will see a line and think i need to hop in that lie because something great is about what's going on in that yes and you just think about like that's fucking crazy. How about you have your own day and not like walk round expecting there to be some like new free launch in. You know that my lines. And where i come from the line is either like you to kitchen soup. Kitchen free copy or something are free cheese or something. I mean growing up. Houston land to get your government cheese. Like she's now so that. Yeah that kind of trust me. I was just walking down. Was it twenty ninth mission. And i was like dislike like tool pizza's places. That are really good. And as new pizza place opened up and people are helen line on the pizza jones street. But that's that's not how it works is just like they need to be on the top. But i mean i remember. We used to have living here in the ninety s. When i was in my twenties. I mean we could go. You know every day of the weekend. Like thursday through sunday night just finding ridiculous free parties that were thrown by tech companies are the best man just like open bar and like we never knew what the hell we'd get into like you know you went out thinking you go into a bar somewhere and then like tech company with a ridiculous name thrown open bar party and then we're in sumo suits wrestling like somebody's offered us coke and there's like like partying like easy spending money lake like it was just a flammable. Good and i. I mean i. Is it like that now. Still invited to those anymore. I'm not twenty but my friend at that time also. I had friends that working on how they got jobs. Dot com for the be. Like yo come to this party and it'd be like off the hook. I don't get invited to those parties anymore. We were just crashing them. But i guess it's all you need to have the energy. That's the thing about if we're if we're sitting here growing old customer younger here. I'm like i'm not trying to do all that. But my friend who worked at a dot com on. She paid for me all my friends film she was. She had like a a company card. And i'll go man. I'm trying to do my first film on sixty millimeter ago. Man i gotta get a print goes. We're at she goes just more words And she paid for me and all bunch of friends to get our film sprint through their company all in the name of the company but like oh i'm sure there says she broke us off. You know so. Well yeah and it's funny. It's like you. You have to find those avenues. Because there's no actual i mean it seems like there's very few avenues for the wealth to move in a good direction. I mean and i think that you know the the the thing that i find so just kinda gross about this era of industry is the they have the utopian sayings on some level. But like that's actually not there like the support for anybody who's doing something that's art that's not commercial or that it's like that has maybe real resource needs like i dunno like metal low point in my feelings about what tech is doing like. It's just. I'm sure some folks doing some good stuff. I mean in some terrible stuff. I mean but i'm just not really exposed to it you know and i think like for some young folks coming in san francisco. You know when you're twenty you're naive and just you're not aware of other things around you. At least i know. I wasn't and i think maybe they just don't know what they're doing or what they're contributing to or not you know like maybe there's soul bolivia's i mean you're oblivious at that age for most of us and then you're working in the place that most places where everything's provided for you and your really almost sheltered from what might be going on. I feel like maybe that's how just thinking about Like finding some. I don't know maybe understanding. I'm not sure if it's compassion but like you just don't know you know right so that when they show up here on the party bus on a friday night and it you know like it's just how the old went to the mission to party and yeah i i don't know i mean i don't in their brain you know like i don't know. Yeah well that that that comment about kind of being invisible that kind of resonates with me. You know it's like just feeling invisible too. You know what their plans are what they thought they were getting when they came to san francisco. What they what they see of san francisco But i love the idea that working at the center to american anymore workfront of the place. I still sir. I've so work with the community so working. What's the what's the name of the new place for a study around next the cities contemplating safe injection sites where people can go right and inject And be safe now. Overdose so what i do is i recruit folks to participate in the study who are injector. Who use drugs and inject them To ask him information like what would that look like so you you basically in his at a street like just walking down the street downtown. People people who are probably opening openly inject team in some k. You wanna make twenty bucks twenty dollars. Study either wow. Yeah what's that. I mean it's not i guess in some ways it's not that different because when you were at the resource center that's the same population on some level that you were talking to. It's different. I mean i do see like I do see though. There's so much folks using. Opiates right now. Because i wasn't seen it as much as my other job. But then when i'm doing outrageous like oh well there's a lot of folks. Yeah like it you know. It's not just hype and there's a lot of fenton all out there. A lot of young kids doing that. So so it's kind of It right it reminds me of the beginning of you know needle exchange that harm reduction of like you turn in your needle was to reduce. Hiv and hepatitis was. We're going to win on thirty years for that so A kind of reminds me of that time around Something radical. That may happen in his to have safe injection sites because it will save people's lives where lease if they start to nod off narcan. Yeah it's bride. No it's not it's you. Yeah bright lights or your yen. All the stuff didn't happen on the street you know and that's a trip and also in that same way like back in the era when aids was coming up there was you felt i mean i was too young at the point but i i remember hearing about that sense of just like people people starting to die. You didn't know why. Like on the on the on the edge of a great catastrophe to certainly when you talk about like people injecting fucking crazy gaming neil exchange. There's so many changes everywhere you don't even think about it. We just know they're they're everywhere in. It saves a lot of lives a lot of money. So you're so you're out there downtown. Some in the mission downtown mostly downtown just like reaching out spending your day just talking to people to say. Hey you interested in this in on in the study and a lot of folks are so quick hustle you know and they're one of the nicest people i've ever met like they're young. They're sweethearts just being talked to probably like by someone who's not from there like group also like i mean we're harm rejectionists and hopefully you're not judging we we've project that we're not judging you and that we just want you to be safe you know and we will respond to that really well. I mean we'll all human beings to you know you know when you being you've had like a A rude or you know. Waiter away this also people you know you know when you ain't being treated right so and everybody loves to hate him for folks who are homeless. And then you're in a person who's jugs it's like even more like it's right you're the actual whatever. The modern equivalent of the welfare queen is like you're like suburbia is like you like someone who's panhandling for drugs. A seconds easy for the judge. I mean they're they're so convenient for your judgment and like i. Fortunately i work with folks. And i've done it for so long that most of the we're trying to see through that mean we're just concerned about your health right and you can actually. That's like a legitimate i. Yeah that's the interesting thing about what you were saying with the new comers just like they envision a city that looks a certain way and one of the reasons people hate the homeless and san francisco is they. They make the city not this lake. And there's still space for folks. I mean i mean you probably remember lake mission bay. That's where everybody was at everybody. Had through camps The punk rockers had their squats the squatters would be over there like build abandoned beer places around the spca. Everybody had like a spot you know i mean nobody wanted to live in the mission. People were afraid of the mission so i just feel that there is space for everybody in san francisco. Still small just literally. There is no space for people. You know right mission bay is now just totally redeveloped and this where the warriors removing gear. Ucsf sunday the new kaiser. Yes i feel that there's al- there's always been people who do drugs and they were all. There always will be people who do drugs. But i feel like there was a time where people had just had their spots. You know and you just let people know. But then i think because of the development of san francisco i mean. There's just no space right so so much traffic. Not think we're gonna dig. Is people cities a lot so much traffic. you know. it's like new york out there like in these crazy. I know i've seen that. I've seen that just coming up. I mean i took part from the airport this time. It was like no fucking way one one you know. And that's but that's the same thing is like the city is just full of the seems. And then you know it's easy to blame to kind of. I guess run downhill you know and land on the people who have to do what they have to do out in out in the open. Yeah folks just trying to survive. I mean like It's not pretty. I totally agree with that that it's the work that i'm in in order to serve in. What has that done with your art. I mean you said personally. It gives you perspective to not feel more invisible than them to not feel more than them to see them. Because you know people. I've become invisible that i'm it's such a young city now. I mean you think about it like when you were in san francisco in your twenties. I don't think there were people that you were their audience there. You are the marketing that they want to get. The young people mean i think maybe. Mtv was the first time that and they were still looked so much older than me. So you know. I just think that it's such a youthful even like the menus of like. Why do people like to eat. What are those. Things called their Hush puppy snow They're like potato there like a french fry. But they're square used to get him. Cafeterias your hashbrowns little baby hashbrowns like i forget what to call us such a little kids thing. I'm like oh 'cause it's a twenty year olds die appetite because that's probably what they grew up eating when they were little. So it's still continuing just seeing like very. Hipster is version of the kids menu. All around talent. Yeah like it's like the chicken sandwich with all this kind of stuff on like okay. I'll get a bite but like it's just a or the waffles and like yeah. I think it's a menu for mostly young boys to that they grew up eating. Yeah oh man. I love that. Somebody just do a breakdown of the hipster kid's menu for the young men of biggest tenders chicken something and like Or what's the other one. Oh one time. I was at a donut shop just regular donut shop and i was just watching people ordering who's gonna you know and then all the Young wipe wispy like a. Get the one with the sprinkles. The sprinkles unlike know i'm like i want sprinkles i gotta see what's up with that like but i think it's how to do. Today was a childhood thing. You know like ammo donut hole myself. You know but i was like oh wait. That's probably because they look like they were maybe. They looked like they were told that they're probably twenty something. I'll bet that was a donut. That they like when they were little like that is the thing. Yeah it's probably like a bigger size menu can't take it. You know just like you get old like the system shutdown as we should. I should clarify because we haven't said this. You're not old. You are older. I'm older gap after about my kids. That sailing that is that is definitely true but now it is that thing it's like and that's what they always say especially about women's they get older it just like that feeling of just being made invisible but at the same time gets alike eavesdrop than just here and like and get information and what people talking about so for me is gathering information like Right and you get to To to to bear witness without like them bringing whatever energy to you just there notice what everybody's wearing like gets all the like everybody wears white shoes like white sneakers like white The old school adidas with a little bit of flooding pants like. Oh that's cute. Sc like it's such part of the uniform is the white shoes and you see it coming in. I mean they're working at two and then some of the fashion and that's the thing of the beauty of youths like everything looks good on you know. I remember looking mother fuckers but you know like i do i just check them out like as like gathering information and What are they talking about think. So how does how does that that part in like the work you do downtown. So how does that affect your art. Like what what are you. What do you take out of. That is useful. That makes your art. What it is. I don't know this is related. So the project remember. Los siete got Got got a little bit of press cup. People did articles and it was gonna work in t. l. and Where where recruit people. Ti in leno's this guy is older You know his his his back all bent his. Hey use in the paper. You did that thing about the right on and then later on walking down the street and this woman that i not a long time. She's like y'all v. Got your fulop up in my room in my spotty means a sorrow and a couple of people are the client side. They didn't see the performance. But i could see how just the love that i got from seeing that i was like. That's it that's like people like. How do you know successful. I said when the home is on the street have told me they read something about me and they haven't even seen it. And just the love that i got so i feel like in these mostly all the clients that i worked some of them for many years so i feel like that's how i feel connected. You know like that. That was such. He's not like. I got a lot of love for the for the day but that was a really special to get it from folks on the street like that because they haven't even seen it they just read about it and saw me but you know i i guess they would know. Know what it's about and know what you're about this is this is something that's paying attention to another side of the city and they read it you know they're like i like when you talked about this part like once. Said how. Come you the keith. Herron hat now. The video while a loop ahead and i have to tell them why like alright alright drag because we're like we like to photo put. You should wear your hat. Because i wear a lot of different heads. All right. well let me let me take it from people who are better at interviewing than me. Why did you wear the keith harry hindu. I worked the keith herron. Had it was the radian child because his whole background around that is that no world born as radiant children and that because a lot of the guys of los siete among them. They weren't able to like they had one foot on the street. And the other foot in the movement and like sometimes you lena's little bit to the corners and all that and some of them just weren't able to commit but to the move but got caught up on some of some of the guys got locked up some prison time and that's Disturbing member that there were boys you know. They were young boys at the time. So and i. I like the idea of i think heroin also 'cause just what was happening to a lot of gay men and how they were You know a lot of them was put. Shame on the young gay man so just that we're all born radiant children's so that's why award that that sort of like that that just the default innocence of those men even despite the struggles they had or something do right at one point hopefully we. We're latte ways. So i think that's what i think. That's yeah that's why ward in So yeah. I think that the way that i work with the community and a lot of community members that serve they just had beautiful language sometimes the way they say things on gonna write that down. You don't wanna use that and And it's real. You know people are expressing feeling like oh my try using that line so i am inspired from the community found. I guess rebound truthfulness well in. It's like art can be strikes me that can be like so salip cystic enclosed in its own world and like a lot of you know but this is true i i know probably more directly from writing but just like feeling like you don't like you don't have anything to say like you don't know like like you know you're out of ideas or something but the way that you have stood in the river of some of the toughest parts of humanity for decades in this city like i just think that would be less of a problem for you like you're seeing a lot of stories every day like very intense stories people who are in very different places and you are and that can be the hardest thing to subject yourself to or to to be in the position to experience right. It's just very different walks of life. Yeah just of a monday. That what resilience means he. Now i mean it's Sometimes i'm like. Oh i think i understand what the word resilient is and then i meet somebody in. I hear their story. I'm like whoa. That's a whole other level of six point. Two or whatever like zillions zillions. Richter scale and. I also meet people who from the outside. It's easy to judge. No and then you start talking in like just the history the knowledge and information that people have you know the intelligence intelligent folks. I've ever men are the people that i serve. You wouldn't think that. I don't think that's the first thing you think about. The you know the indeed. Shut down a of folks. They read the paper every single day. That's how they knew about my stories because a lot of folks just that's part of their practices p- reading a newspaper and does a lot of people who don't do that anymore. Right right so you have some like news literacy on the streets that well remember i used to do. I used to fuck with st. Cheat here remembers the homeless newspaper. Which is like yeah. It's like sat out That is a that is a print publication and was doing good work. You know it's just out there as a way to people make money but also the report and the read and like just this really interesting culture of literacy kind of overlapping with like homelessness and homeless advocacy was pretty fascinating. They're still doing. And the folks who are selling that they get to keep the other mother funds to it I get to glean from. Every i mean i feel like i gleaned from different parts of my my world or or people that i'm connected with the to tell my stories instead so let me back up to the to the front and the the one thing that i often like have to catch myself with the san francisco stuff. Is that people really might not know what the mission district is So how would you describe in like a couple sentences. How would you describe the mission valley and always warmer than any other place in san francisco. i'd i would describe that the way the the light falls in here is the way the light falls in. The mission is really beautiful especially today. 'cause it's foggy and then the way the the light goes through the fog. I think that that's really beautiful And i think also people respond to caceres a latino flavor here you know. And i think that it's why people latinos lived in the mission in the early upset. Like maybe fifties probably early sixties just because it was one of the poorest places to live like you know you couldn't get spaces rent out for any people so this is one of the places that people rent spaces and then they made Latinos made it into a very special vibrant place. I mean before that it was like irish and italians And it was also like an industry then like blood like companies who did like industries of huge laundromats you know. For restaurants there is the bakeries kilpatrick mean so there was a lot of like folks that this is where it was working class at one time for like mostly white folks at talent but they got to the suburb suburbs happen. So people got to leave. But it wasn't like what's happening now with latinos where you being pushed out like then at that time you know like the folks that were here that were not you know it was an option to go somewhere else So so it was inbetween. Now you know all the industries also closing and then latinos moving. In at the same time i mean. Is there any sense of pride. Because i totally hear what you're saying about having created what was the one of the poorest neighborhoods in san francisco and then having made something that is really fucking attractive like from you know from federal lethal of like whatever people want to be here come to just check out the lowest park that blows my mind minister different when we were probably kids but or people you know. Have the little maps or books like to go to a lethal. But even before that i mean even like we just had a cardinal and it's just amazing there's just these moments were nothing's changed remain sustain. I mean you still had like especially now. In the summer you're going to have a bunch of lawyers cruising up and down so there was just cinco de mayo and i was working here at the gallery Like a bands plain out here. And it's just like. Oh this tomas me back in the day. So there's these moments were we we just celebrated and in it because it is like back in a day you know i mean most people live. They travel from the east bay. Been father just calm to get ahead of that. But i think that the combination of place in reminiscent and i mean carnival is just like that's the party to be at. You know that's crazy. But that's true because they would as they're getting forced out they're going to live in the far east bay or like other parts but this is still like the spiritual home. This is where you come back. Yeah i mean. This is like all the low riders come back. Probably don't don't live here but they'll they'll to the caravan up and down. Yeah and i think that's very special that's still can exist into occupy space with that right. Yeah occupy public space. Enroll your low rider through pleasanton. It's just got a not feel the same way down there. But i think there's nothing like here you know and they'll take over. I mean not. Just take over the park everywhere. You did a big project on that writer. you were involved in a low rider projects. I did a short film about low rider. History working with archival footage and then carry my partner and brown. Amy we did a low rider. we There's these coffee site story. There's twelve of them and they're like They're these bootlegs era made in the In the late seventies so there were like twelve of them and in front of the cover they would have like a a two-bit as homegirl with. This lady has homeboys his cars. What we did is we re shut each album cover with queer folks like images we each one out and as we called it. Accused sides queered them out like the yet. Mchugh sides is like the flip side of a b side would be cusine right so that was really great. I mean we've got a lot of drama over it. But we were a lot of low riders clubs meaning. Noble it with low riders. Who are who are in the image. Yeah the drama you got was like homophobia homophobia yeah you don't s one thing is like yeah the missions beautiful and latino culture but it's still homophobic as fuck even with that. I'm working i still. I tried to address that with jerry with like you sides. Just yeah just how to like how to navigate both of those things. I'd like represent the old neighborhood and what was good about it but also realize that the old neighborhood would give you a lot of trouble. Yeah i mean well we did get a lot of like They're just trying to say like there's no queers and culture and that's the point we made like every model that we had grew up listening to those records you know rape but what was really important with people who really saw themselves in it so that that was actually like better than the people who didn't believe that the who were homophobic actually the folks who saw themselves in the footage mini in the image and recognize that they were a part of it. That was more important than right. So ten people like hating on the projects. Not worth one just saying like oh shit. That's right. It was jack yet and it was really wonderful Well let's let's let's put it up then in go go find I find more more those kind of beers. I gotta spend more time. Just walking around the neighborhood other is more see. It's not just the light. That's beautiful in this neighborhood. It's the people who will keep porn out. These collectors tall boys all right. Thank you so much for spending the time. I think you that was helpful. And yeah yeah you know yeah thanks for. Thanks for like just giving me the idea to come out and do the mission district in that way because it's just amazing. The ripples like that art can have even if you just people. Just get an idea in the head and you're like shit. Yeah that's that's interesting that's important and then hopefully will keep going down. Yeah alright cheers. Tears last cheers queers. Let's it the trip from roads and kingdoms is hosted by me nathan thornburgh. Emily mironov was our producer on this episode. Taffy milky are consulting producer. Alexa ventricle is our online editor music. Dan the automated episode illustration by daisy shows. Artwork by rodriguez executive producers are me and matt goulding also roots in kingdoms next thursday emiliana. Yana mixes a strong negroni at six in the morning to bring to our conversation. Bless her. She is a chef and the program manager of cuisine a- a social incubator that has helped dozens of low income cooks that have a dream mostly immigrants and african americans helping them open and own businesses on their own. All these conversations. We've been having ultimately come down to financial power autonomy an ownership and nobody's doing more on that front in the bay area then lock casino. We will meet you there.

san francisco fifty year panthers three hundred dollar miyazaki ridi nathan thornburgh twenty years lowell high school gary Charles gary Gary people organi Donna james fernando martine Sam green central park greg Land one dollars sackable licks instagram dolores huerta
Grapes for Change

HISTORY This Week

29:30 min | 11 months ago

Grapes for Change

"History this week. September sixteenth nineteen sixty five I'm Sally Helm. The word had gone out through local deejays on Spanish language radio and through notices in the newspaper of the National Farmworkers Association. On Mexican Independence Day at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. In Delano California. There's GonNa be a big meeting. Something important to discuss. So five hundred farmworkers and families have shown up. There sitting in pews and on balconies waiting to hear whatever there is to hear. Everyone knows that tensions are brewing in California's Central Valley about a week earlier of Filipino farm workers walked off the job. There led by a man named Larry IT Leong and they're protesting bad working conditions and low wages. There are a lot of Filipino American farm workers in Delano and the surrounding towns, but the majority of workers are Mexican and Mexican American. So if the strike is really gonNa work, these groups need to come together. And the striking Filipino workers have asked for support. They've come to the national farmworkers association. A group of mostly Mexican American workers led by Dolores, Huerta and Cesar Chavez. Chavez later said quote. Was Oh God, we're not ready for a strike. There was only about one hundred dollars in the bank to support striking workers, where to and Chavez, and other leaders Gilbert Padilla they've been organizing and preparing, but they thought they had more time. Now they have to make a decision and. quickly. So on September sixteenth. In Our Lady of Guadalupe. Church, they put it to a vote and the workers decide unanimously to strike. With that, a new phase begins in what will become a five year struggle on the farms where much of America's produce is grown. And, that struggle will reach far beyond the farms, two grocery stores in New York City and shipyards in London, and even the battlefront of the war in Vietnam. Today, how did a small group of activists organize a strike? And then expand that strike to a national boycott of grapes. And what can their work teach us about how to build a successful multi-ethnic movement? Thank you to homedepot dot com for supporting this episode of history this week, our producer Julie explored their collections of home decor and will tell us about her homedepot dot com purchases later on. So stick around. On September eleventh to won the world changed, but there were warning signs, it's always easy in hindsight to say a big mistake I'm Jim agreed I'm a reporter in the WNYC news room and I'll be revisiting the evidence to understand why we didn't see it coming I'm troubled even to this day that we miss something blind spot the road to nine eleven a new podcast series from history and WNYC Listen wherever you, get podcasts. Professor Matthew Garcia is an expert on labor movements and Latin history. He now teaches at Dartmouth. And when he was growing up, you would not find a grape in his household I love graves. didn't eat grapes growing up because I grew up as a good Mexican American southern California observing the great boycott. My family are Mexican Americans and my grandparents were farm workers, and so it was very conscious of the boycott. Garcia ended up studying this moment later in life an academic and he eventually did start eating grapes again but he never saw them the same way. Grapes are a strategy for social change and that was impressive to me and I felt like in all the history I learned I hadn't learned exactly how the boycott worked and how Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta and Gilbert Padilla, and all these people that I learned of since made it happen. Chavez and where the and Padilla and others did their work in California's Central Valley much of the country's produce is grown asparagus almonds, walnuts and Avocados citrus growing there, and of course. Grapes. Grapes were really popular and there was expanses large expanses of acres that you could grow on a almost like a plantation type setting many of the workers on these huge farms are Mexican American and they had deep groups in this region. Mexican people had been coming to the American southwest or ill North Bay to them before there was a line separating that area and so it is a kind of native lands in some ways. Farmers knew the land and how to work it. After Mexico's nineteen, ten revolution, many rural farmers were displaced by the tumult. And number of them moved north. They came north because it was familiar to them and they also came north because their labor was of great value to that. Virgin, Nina content they were recruited they were wanted and they really found themselves useful. They found themselves comfortable and so many of them state. By nineteen twenty at least seventy, five percent of farm workers in California were Mexican or Mexican American. Many also stoked the racist idea that these workers were biologically suited to difficult farm labor, which often involved stooping down close to the ground. Is the so-called short handled Ho it created incredible back pain and back problems because you're bent over the handle this short they presumed that Filipinos and Mexicans were biologically predisposed to using those instruments and so there's this way in which racism is built into the kind of technology that is imposed on workers to use in farming. Men Great Depression brought many poor white farmers to California anti Mexican sentiment really grew and between nineteen, twenty, nine and nineteen, thirty, nine, the US government began mass deportations repatriating Mexican Americans to Mexico. Even, though many of the people deported had been born in the united, states had never been to Mexico. But then in the nineteen forties will work to meant that there was a new shortage of labor on farms in California. and. So the Roosevelt Administration started something called the bracero program. It brought guestworkers from Mexico to the United States but these workers would only stay for a short period of time. They could be paid a lot less and that if they became a problem could be shipped back to Mexico this undercut the ability of Mexican Americans to organize unions because the growers could just go to the guest worker by the nineteen fifties and sixties other labor unions are well established across the US organizing miners, an auto workers and others, but farmworkers are a real bind. Labor laws don't protect them. The work is often short term and far-flung so it's hard to get organized. Plus the program means workers have even less bargaining power. But there is a real need for them to band together. Because farm workers are getting paid really badly and living conditions are often terrible shanties and. Structures, there was a lack of running water oftentimes, there is a lack of sanitation, but organizing has proved really tough. Until some new activists come on the scene. One is a man named. Cesar Chavez. CIA had been born in Arizona is family had lost a farm in the nineteen thirties been to the navy. He was a zoot or at one point. Wait what does studer zoo sitter was someone that protected the war by wearing extravagant baggy clothes. This was world, War Two. The government was after everyone to save cloth and some men mostly black and Latino men said, hey, why should we contribute to this effort abroad when you've treated us so unequally at home They wore these baggy suits in protest. So the little bit of a kind of defiance there and a rebellion in him with all those things added up to someone who is very familiar to a Mexican American who's been beaten down and that's lost a lot in their lives. In the nineteen fifties Chavez starts working for a group called the community service organization or CSO that fought for Latin next civil rights. And overtime, he starts to think that they're focusing too much on urban issues. So he told the organization if it was going to achieve the goal of Mexican American empowerment, they had to go where the Mexicans were and they were in agriculture. The CFO is quite sure that that's what it wants to do, and so child has decides to do it on his own. In April nineteen sixty two he moves his family to the small town of Delano California. There he's GonNa live among workers and begin to organize them for better working conditions. Chavez joined in Delano by another activist who had been working with the CFO. Dolores Huerta Delors gave up a watch children and she had her family in Stockton and Dolores left that to come and join Caesar. Was a real force. G., was always talked about especially by her photos by our enemies as fierce as formidable as just a dodge people that she wanted to recruit like she didn't just gently persuade them. She really really twisted their arm. She was kind of the enforcer and played that role throughout the farm worker Movement for Cesar Chavez Chavez really relied on her to get things done sometimes in a in a really kind of rough and tumble way Another important activist at the beginning was a man named Gilbert Padilla. who was affable who was tall and handsome and when he spoke, he was presumed to be Cesar Chavez until they realize Oh, wait Thomas's that short man over there who softspoken tough was known for this more quiet leadership style. In some ways, he was much different from the famous leaders of the sixties like most notably Martin, Luther King who gave famous speeches that people still quote today. Of Cesar. Chavez speeches were in these quiet. Little homes and Delano and throughout the San Joaquin Valley that only a small group of people witnessed and was his charm. The activists set up an organization called the national farmworkers association or NF W. A.. And this was a major part of their strategy, the House meeting. They go door to door to get people together to think about and talk about what's challenging them at this moment in their lives and what they want in their communities. Without the presumption that they were going to pitch anything A solution to them it was as much listening as it was saying, okay. We'll hear some strategies for changing the conditions of your life just kind of getting a sense of what it is that would move them to a little action. The early activism was all about these conversations among groups of people who shared a common interest. One story that always captures what it was like in those early days was the meeting of you'll padilla with Filipinos in Filipino hall most workers in Delano were Mexican or Mexican American but the workforce was diverse and Filipino, Americans made up a large percentage. At Filipino Hall, they cook very specific meals whose ingredients were very hard to find and guilt talks about wanting to forge this alliance with the Filipinos and going to Filipino Hall. Eating fish head soup with the Filipino organizer Larry Wrong. And it was almost like a kind of use the Catholic image of breaking bread while they were sort of breaking bread but it was fish head soup that they were doing it over. And it's kind of beautiful in a sense that it captures the how the movement was reliant on this racial understanding right to bridging of of two different cultures. While we're ta and Chavez and Padilla are working and paying and having house meetings among Mexican farmworkers. Filipino farm workers are also organizing. And of course, he had told us they tended to be more radical on the whole many had come from communist families are communist backgrounds they had migrated throughout the Pacific northwest and down into California. So the Filipinos respected Cesar Chavez, they respected the power in numbers that that Mexicans had but they understood that they were the more radical. On September eighth nineteen, sixty, five, three years after Chavez and wear and the NFL the UA began organizing the Mexican American workers the Filipino workers take decisive action. The Filipinos went out on strike in a much more forceful and aggressive way in a much more committed way forcing Cesar Chavez now to say, okay, am I gonNA join them? Or are we going to stay separate from them? Eight days after the strike begins comes. Mexican. Independence Day. This holiday celebrates not the end of colonial rule in Mexico but the beginning of the struggle against it. and. The National Former Process Association holds a meeting on that day in our lady. Of Fatah Lubeck. Church Chavez gets onstage. And talks about Mexican independence. He. SAYS QUOTE WE Mexicans here in United States are engaged in another struggle for the freedom and dignity which poverty denies us. He calls for nonviolence and says that today they have to make a decision. Will the Mexican workers joined the Filipino workers in the strike that has already begun? The vote is unanimous. Yes. And so the next day Mexican farmworkers begin a strike. They're going to stop picking grapes until they have a contract that will ensure better pay plus things like health and retirement plan. Soon, they go out and picket lines on strike, but they face some difficulties when you're picketing a farm that's many acres long on these rural highways, it has little effect. Right no one knows what's happening. There aren't a lot of people passing by and so unless there's media attention, there is really no public acknowledgement that there is a strike going on and the growers knew this and so they felt like they could outlast the w then they felt like a strike on a farm in the middle of Rural California is not going to succeed. Plus. It's hard for workers to stay out on strike for months on it. Many of the workers were living hand to mouth, and so they really needed to work. So the activists start recruiting volunteers to come join the picket line. Students and ministers who may never have been Delano. The extra support helps, but it's still not that many people. The organizers need another tactic to get national attention focused on this issue. And that's when the boycott came into play the boycott. At this point, the strikers are focusing on one major company that grows grapes the Shenley Corporation. And they decide to enlist other unions to help them boycott Shenley products. They blocked those products from getting loaded onto ships or transported in trucks, but they were boycotting everything that. These growers put grapes into including wine and wine. Is Not really perishable. In fact, it gets better with age. So these boycotts aren't yet having the impact that they could. And meanwhile the strikers are facing pushback not just from the growers but also from law enforcement. The Kern County sheriff is arresting picketers even those who have done nothing. In the spring of Nineteen, sixty six, the country gets wind of all this in a big way when Robert F Kennedy comes to Delano. And it's not just a question of wages. It's a question basic question of for the future as part of his visit Kennedy questions the Kern County. sheriffs. If I have reason to believe that there's going to be a riot started and somebody kills me. That is going to be trouble if you don't stop them this way duty to stop and then you go out and arrest them we absolutely and charge them charge you what are you charge them with? Violate in. Unlawful Assembly. I think that that's the most interesting move. TOLD YOU THAT THEY GONNA? Riot. The men right out in the field that they were talking to if you don't get him out of here. We're going to cut their hearts out. So rather than let them get cut you remove the 'cause. How can you go rest somebody if they haven't violated the law, they're ready to violate all in other words. Could I suggest in the interim period of time the luncheon period of time that the sheriff and the District Attorney read the Constitution of the United. States? This encounter makes good TV. The public is paying more and more attention to the farm workers and around the same time as Kennedy's visit China's and others organize a massive march to the state capital in Sacramento to bring more attention to the cause, the March to Sacramento's. Incredible moment of cultural affirmation particularly for Mexican, Americans and it it kind of undermined for a time Filipino Mexican coalition because it was framed is a pilgrimage with. Catholic overtones with the Virgin Nick Guadalupe at the front with songs to have these cultural symbols in these religious symbols that are familiar to people. Have the effect of pulling new members into the movement? But. The Filipino start to feel like Well, you know we were the ones that started this whole thing and where are we in right? So it's also a moment where the Mexican culture begins to overshadow the multi-ethnicity of the movement. But it is during this March that the strikers win their first major victory. The SHENLEY Corporation agrees to a contract. It is a huge step forward, but the movement is really just getting started after all Shenley is only one company. The workers under an organization now called the United Farm workers turn their attention to a much bigger boycott on grapes. The perishable ones the ones that if they're not loaded onto ships will sit on the docks and rot they felt like okay. Hide to stop grapes in every single place where grapes are sold. We've been stretched too thinly, but we could handle sending armies of boycotters to cities and try to convince people not to buy grapes. So this new strategy, a nationwide boycott. Begins. Hey sleepyhead. Why so sleepy? Oh, it's because your mattress is a bag of potatoes and scrap metal. You should try a nectar mattress with award winning layers of comfort. You can sleep easy knowing you got incredible value mattresses start at just four, hundred, ninety, nine dollars, and you get hundreds of dollars in accessories thrown in as well as three hundred and sixty, five, nine home trial and forever warranty. Go to nectar sleep. Dot Com. So Julie did you get the Home Depot purchases yet? Hey, Sally yes I did and I really like both these items I've gotta sit a blue white and yellow plates which are stunning in person and they seem very durable Mike Contemplate and the long awaited heir fire has exceeded my expectations. There were so many great items to choose from to my style in the kitchen. And make cooking more fun and easy all other presents. Thanks Julie. There is free delivery on select items, forty five dollars or more, and now for a limited time, you get ten percent off the styles you love when you use code history week ten at checkout valid on select items online only find exactly what you're looking for and more at homedepot dot com slash decor. The organizational energy behind this new phase of the boycott is Dolores Huerta here she is in a speech in Sacramento recorded by K. Q. E. D. Division we may. Than usual ways in organizing willing to try new and onions. You. Dolores Huerta was incredibly important here she goes to New York and she figures us all out I. She tries to convince the seafarers union to Blockade Grapes moving from New Jersey to Manhattan, and then what the grape growers do is they file an injunction against the seafarers union said, they're in violation of Taft Hartley they are, of course, in case you're not as familiar as Matthew Garcia is with the Taft Hartley Act it's A. Piece of legislation from the nineteen forties that created all kinds of restrictions on unions. One of them is you can't have a secondary strike basically, you can't rope another union into your streak. Well, Dolores Huerta says, we'RE GONNA take the battle right to the storefront and it was often in the parking lot where people were coming in to Arthur cars and that's where they confront consumers. Probably they have to say is don't buy grapes. Very simple, very easy straightforward appeal. And then the question might come back for why I'm happy. You ask let me tell you what their pay is. Let me tell you how they live. Sometimes their strategy goes beyond the parking lot. They would take balloons filled with helium but also filled with confetti that had w symbols on them, and then they would let them loose inside the market. And when the manager would come in and say you guys get Outta here. Go kick them out and then they pop the balloons and the confetti would come down on the customers throughout the market and they'd have to sweep it up and have you know you FW and Locales and just different ways of. Creating mayhem and mischief. The activists even out up these boycott houses in the cities that they're targeting. They're kind of like flop-houses for the activists so that they had a to rest or even sleep and they became these really important social scenes. That were. Inspirational they were. Probably. A. Conjugal. But. They were also incredibly important places for strategizing. They'd work out you know the narratives and the pitch. The pitch is working after a year of boycotts and these ten cities which were the top great markets in the country they've been able to cut sales by at least thirty, three percent. The growers start to feel the heat they shift to other markets places like Kansas City or Denver. They try, Canada. Even, some grapes across the Atlantic Ocean to London. But You FW aligned activists their help prevent them from being unloaded. The growers do have support from some very prominent people famously Richard Nixon sent grapes to the front line of the Vietnam War. California governor Ronald Reagan eat scrapes at public events in defiance of the boycott. But none of it really matters. The growers really just finally realized they could not outrun the boycott and the boycott had become a global phenomenon and the only way to have this go way as to sit down at the table and Cesar Chavez and unsigned contracts. On July Twenty, ninth nineteen, seventy, nearly five years after the strike began the UAW signs a collective bargaining agreement with the Geomar. Vineyards Corporation and twenty five other growers. This is the first time that farm workers are recognized as having collective bargaining rights that the union can represent them. But more importantly because Geomar. Was the biggest grapegrower in the valley other farmers also agreed to sign contracts soon thereafter. For, all intense purposes grapes were harvested by unionized workers that were represented by the United Farm Workers Union and that had never happened prior to that moment. The Delano grape strike was a watershed moment in labor history. It was also part of a broader civil rights struggle in the late sixties. But matty ARSIA says when he looks back at it. The farmer's movement was a novelist in a good way. They kept the good feeling of intercultural understanding and what could be achieved by. Crossing. Lines, of difference to build a more unified movement than any other movement in America that time. The foundation of the Delano grape strike was that coalition between the Filipino and Mexican farmworkers? As, long as they're together, there's nothing that can defeat that movement and I wish. We had that kind of spirit today but we are a society divided and we run to our corners and week really probably too much strength in one aspect of our character as opposed to ways in which we're stronger by sharing in a kind of diverse. Multi-ethnic Multi-faith Society. Thanks for listening to history this week. For moments throughout history that are also worth watching, check your local TV listings to find out what's on history today. and. If you don't have cable, you can sign up for a one month extended free trial of history volt. Stream full episodes of over two thousand award winning history documentaries and series commercial free on your favorite device. To Start Your free one-month trial visit history vault, dot com forward slash podcast today. This episode was produced by Ben Dickstein history. This week is also produced by McCain, Lynn Julia mcgruder and Meet Valley home. Our editor and sound designer is Chris Yellow and our researcher is Emma. Fredericks. Are Executive producers are Jesse Cats, and Ted? Butler. Don't forget to subscribe rate and review history this week where ever you get your podcasts and we will see you next week. CAST powers. Some of the world's best podcasts. Here's a show we recommend. SECURE CONTAIN FOR ATTACKED There are things go bump in the night. Fantastic things. Horrible things. Redacted things. The SAP archives is an immersive energy fiction against that brings those strange things to life. Tune in every Tuesday on a cast or find us at SAP, ARCHIVES DOT COM? Cash passwords.

Cesar Chavez Chavez California Delano Dolores Huerta Mexico Gilbert Padilla National Farmworkers Associati Our Lady of Guadalupe Church US America Delano California Dolores Larry IT Leong Sally Helm Professor Matthew Garcia Central Valley Shenley Corporation Robert F Kennedy Julie CFO
Democracy Now! 2021-06-28 Monday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | Last month

Democracy Now! 2021-06-28 Monday

"From new york this is democracy now. One of the main witnesses and the extradition case against wikileaks founder. Julian assange has admitted. He made false claims against assange in exchange for immunity from prosecution. We'll speak to assange attorney. John robinson then former presidential candidate and alaska senator. Mike gravel has died at the age of ninety one. He was fiercely opposed to the war and draft and played a seminal role in the release of the pentagon papers spearheading one man push to read the document into the congressional record to get the papers in to the public record. Maybe just hang onto the documents and never do anything about it. Just said violent. Serb pulls back a little bit and he whispers down in my ear. Somebody wants to give you the pentagon papers. Man where is he. He says he's going to call us back so men i get dressed up really back. The office i'm sitting mouth waiting for this call. Long comes as voice. He says senator. Would you read the pentagon papers as part of your filibuster says yes. We'll feature a speech by. Mike prevail laying out the pentagon papers. And why he pushed for their release then legal author adam cohen. On supreme court justice briars legacy defining decision if he decides to retire and he's eighty two years old right now. President biden will be able to fill his see and biden's promised to appoint a black woman as his successor. Did not step down is a very real chance that a republican president later fill the seat and the conservative majority on the court will rise from six to three to seven to two and be able to do even more damage to workers poor people people of color and other vulnerable groups. Our society will also look at major supreme court ruling against the united farm workers. We'll speak with camilla chavez executive director of the dolores huerta foundation the niece a cesar chavez all that and more coming up welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report. I mean me goodman. Iraq's military has condemned us s airstrikes along the iraq syria border as a breach of sovereignty. The pentagon says president biden ordered monday mornings assault on weapon storage facilities and syria and iraq in response to drone attacks by iran backed militia against us troops and personnel in iraq. It's the second time biden has ordered airstrikes in the region in a statement the coordinating committee of the iraqi resistance promised to retaliate adding quote. We will not remain silent over the continued presence of american occupation forces in iraq which goes against the constitution. The parliament's vote and the will of the iraqi people they said the. Us air strikes came less than two weeks after the us. House of representatives voted to repeal the two thousand and two authorization for use of military force which grants sweeping war powers to the president former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin was sentenced to twenty two and a half years in prison for the murder of george. Floyd he's expected to serve just fifteen years of that sentence. His lawyers are also expected to appeal his conviction lawyers for floyd's family and minnesota's attorney general said that while the sentence does not serve justice. It provides some accountability for floyd's mortar. Floyd's family said the sentence was too light but they're looking toward the federal civil rights. Indictment this is his brother. Rodney floyd these right. Here is twenty two years centers. They gave this man a slap on the wrist. We seven life sentences not habit of our life in related news u n high commissioner for human rights. Michelle bachelet is calling on states in north america europe and latin america to take steps to dismantle racism and to quote confront pass legacies and deliver redress unquote as her agency released a report outlining the systemic nature of racism against people of african descent the world health organization is urging even fully vaccinated people to continue wearing masks maintain social distancing and take other precautions as more outbreaks linked to the delta variants spread around the world. Delta is the most thrown of the buttons identified so far has been identified in at least eighty five countries and is spreading rapidly among unboxing populations. Israel's reimposed an indoor mask mandate and other measures amidst a new rise in cases about half of those infected in a recent outbreak linked to the delta variant fully vaccinated meanwhile india's reporting mountain cases of related variant which been dubbed delta plus in bangladesh tens of thousands of migrant workers left the capital dhaka sunday head of strict. Stay at home orders going into effect. This week and australia million people in and around sydney have been ordered to stay home for the next two weeks. After an outbreak of the delta covid nineteen variant indonesia set a new daily record of over twenty one thousand cases sunday authorities say the current surge has brought the health system close to collapse in russia moscow and saint petersburg both set new records for daily death. Tolls this weekend in south africa. President cyril ramaphosa announced new restrictions to deal with its surge along with many other countries on our wanted south. Africa is seeing a massive resurgence of infections. A you will be in place from nine. pm to four am and all non. Essential establishments were needs to close by eight. The sale of alcohol both full on site and offsides. She is prohibited here in the united states. Corona virus cases and daily deaths continue to drop the daily death toll now averages around three hundred nearly all of them among unvaccinated people according to an associated press analysis just zero point one percent of covert hospitalizations in the us and may were due to breakthrough cases vaccinated people and vaccinated people accounted for about point eight percent of cova deaths. President biden has promised to support afghanistan central government even after the us completes its troop withdrawal a september eleventh deadline biden made the promise during talks at the white house. Friday with afghan. President ashraf ghani and abdullah. Abdullah chair of afghanistan's high council for national reconciliation president ghani said after the white house meeting. He still hoped to engage. The taliban and dialogue force is not the way to compel enough on a mission. We still call on to have a ceasefire engage in a political process because of political south settlement is ultimate mechanism of ending award us. Lincoln said the best way of turning tweaking enemies tournament of fred. President connie's visit to washington. Dc came amid stay rapid advance by the taliban into areas formerly held by the afghan government. Roughly doubling the territory under taliban control and just the last two months in florida. The death toll has written into nine people with over one hundred fifty still missing following the collapse of a high rise apartment building and surf side last thursday. A two thousand and eighteen inspection found the building had abundant cracking and sprawling and its foundation with engineers pointing to design flaws and insufficient waterproofing. Npr's reporting surf side official nonetheless told residents one month after the inspection report that the building in very good shape vice president kamala harris visited el paso texas friday for her first trip to the us. Mexico border since taking office harris toured a customs and border protection facility and met with detained refugee children harris cold. For a deep politicisation of immigration policies is advocates continued to condemn her statements earlier. This month during her visit guatemala telling asylum seekers do not come to the united states and labor news more than two thousand healthcare workers and cook county illinois are on strike demanding affordable healthcare and better pay including temporary bonuses for frontline workers and situations made hazardous by the pandemic friday strike by service. Employees international union local seventy three came a day after twelve hundred chicago area. Nurses held a one day strike to demand safe staffing levels and cook county hospitals and clinics. The justice department has filed a federal lawsuit against the state of georgia for a sweeping voter suppression law. Which the suit says discriminates against black voters. This is christine clark. Assistant attorney general for the civil rights division. These legislative actions occurred at a time when the black population in georgia continues to steadily increase and after his historic election. That saw record voter turnout across the state particularly for absentee voting. Which black voters are now. More likely to use than white voters. The georgia law which passed in march adds new voter. Id requirements shortens the window for absentee voting severely limits ballot drop boxes and grants the state power to intervene in elections in democratic counties lawyers for the trump organization must present any final arguments on their clients behalf. No later than today. According to a deadline set by the manhattan district attorney's office the da is to announce criminal charges as early as this week against former president. Trump's business over its financial dealings involving top executive alan so burke meanwhile a former executive vice president for the trump organization told cnn trump quote deserves to go to jail white house. Aides drafted a proclamation. Last june to invoke the insurrection act as then. President trump considered deploying thousands of active duty troops in washington. Dc to suppress the protests that followed the police killing of george floyd. That's according to the new york times which reports trump had to be talked out of the plan to invoke the insurrection. act to call in the military. Millions of people took to the streets around the world. This weekend to celebrate. Lgbtq plus pride in turkey. Police in riot gear came down on protesters. Firing tear. gas and blocking streets were marches. Were taking place. Thousand marched and paris mexico city panama and el salvador's capital san salvador where there were also reports of police harassment during pride celebrations here in new york city. To main events took place new york city. Pride held mostly virtual ceremony for the second year in a row due to the pandemic. The event also banned new york police from participating this year after years of advocacy from black and brown. Lgbtq community members this year also marked the third annual anti-corporate anti police queer liberation march free. And this one is really about the roots of the movement. This is this is why we celebrate and also still remember to be active and invite for our rights that still need to be there were reports of nypd agents attacking and pepper spraying revelers on sunday. Night and other news from new york. Johnson and johnson has agreed to pay a settlement of up to two hundred thirty million dollars over. Its role in fueling the opioid crisis. Attorney general letitia. James of an of new york announced that as part of the deal with new york. J. and j. will no longer manufacture or sell opioids in the us and that the funds from the settlement will go towards prevention treatment and education efforts in new york. The settlement also allows j. and j. to escape a major opioid trial starting this week in long island new york and mike gravel former democratic. Us senator from alaska and two time presidential candidate who read the pentagon papers into the congressional record has died at the age of ninety one gravel ran for the two thousand eight democratic presidential nomination as vocal critic of the us invasion of iraq during a two thousand seven presidential debate gra vel confronted then candidate barack obama about using nuclear weapons. He switched from running as a democratic candidate to a libertarian. One after opposing the military industrial complex and imperialism that he said permeates the democratic party later in the show will air excerpts of mike rebel reading the pentagon papers and nineteen seventy-one and speaking about events leading up to the historic reading and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report. I may goodman. We turn now to a major development in the case of wikileaks founder. Julian assange who the. Us state department is pushing to extradite from. Britain assange faces up to one hundred seventy five years in prison if brought to the united states where he's been indicted for violations of the espionage act related to the publication of classified documents which many say expose. Us war crimes now. One of the main witnesses in that extradition case has come forward to admit he made false claims against assange for exchange in immunity from prosecution. The revelation came in an interview with the convicted icelandic hacker thordarson for a detailed article published by the icelandic biweekly. Stunned it suggests the. Us justice department collaborated with our son to generate the indictment for signs that was submitted to the british courts. Us prosecutors issued a new superseding indictment against assange in june twenty twenty refers to thordarson as a teenager and iceland as nato country. One and says assange encouraged tend to among other things quote. Commit computer intrusion and steal audio recordings of phone conversations between icelandic officials. The stunned an article sites previously unpublished documents and chat logs showing how thordarson falsely presented himself as a prominent wikileaks representative sundin reports. That in fact quote all indications are that thordarson was acting alone without any authorisation let alone urging from anyone inside wikileaks unquote for more. We're joined by jennifer robinson human rights attorney who's been advising julian assange and wikileaks since two thousand ten. She like julian assange australian citizen. She joins us from western australia. Jen welcome back to democracy now. Can you lay out the significance of this latest revelation and what it should mean you feel for joy and assange. This is just the latest revelation of how problematic the united states cases against join assange and in fact baseless of course as you outlined at the introduction the the evidence from florida on that was given to the united states on the basis of the second superseding indictment including allegations of hacking has has now been on his own. Admission demonstrated to obtain fabricated. Not only did he misrepresent. He's to join us onto wikileak's in his association with join assange. He has admitted that he made up. And falsely misrepresented to the united states that there was any association with wikileaks in any association with hacking. So this is just the latest revelation to demonstrate. Why the us case should be dropped We have to begin of course with the free speech. Invocations free speech groups washington post the new york times mainstream media a unanimously against and denounced prosecution as a threat to freedom of speech in the united states but leaving that aside the factual basis for this case has completely fallen apart. And we have been calling for these guys to be dropped for a long time and this is just the latest form of abuse demonstrated in this case. The shows why won't be dropped gen robinson. Why do you believe thordarson came forward. Now he not only granted this exclusive interview to the icelandic paper stunned and but he also turned over never published before chat logs and new documents of his time as a wikileaks volunteer and talk about his actual prominence within the organization or lack of i can only speculate as to why he would choose to come forward now but of course as you know in january. We won the extradition The judge decided to refuse. Julian assange extradition to the united states. Unfortunately not on free speech grounds on humanitarian grounds associated with. He's mental health. The oppressive prison conditions that he would face if returned to the united states. The united states under the trump administration sought to appeal that decision and we are still awaiting a decision from british court. Permission to appeal will be granted pending that decision. Julian remains in prison in the united states. So this is just another indication. We have been calling for this case to be dropped. We have been asking the biden administration to drop the appeal and allowed to return home to his family. And i think this latest revelation will only contribute to that appeal to the biden administration to put into these case so perhaps he was divided by on those grounds. But it's hard to say and then can you talk about Icelandic officials who are now apparently speaking out and Saying that the. Us government is quote trying to use things here in iceland us people in our country to spin web cobweb. That would catch. Julian assange the article also reports. Us government essentially deceived icelandic officials again. Mrs demonstrating the the significant and problematic abuse that we've seen throughout this case. Not only are. We looking at problematic evidence gathering within iceland which icelandic officials have questioned the gals off. Let's look at the other forms of abuse. We've seen in this case as we put the extradition hearing. We now know that. Julian has been unlawfully spied upon his doctors meetings. Unlawfully spied upon ozzy's legal team unlawfully Spied upon he's had legally privileged material seized by the united states government as daniel ellsberg said in his evidence before the extradition core in the uk. This kind of abusive conduct by the united states with sufficient back during the nixon administration to have the entire case against on your ellsberg thrown out for an abuse of process but in twenty twenty one. We are seeing unlawful spying seizure of legally privileged material and now a source which admits that he fabricated evidence and lied to the fbi and the united states about the evidence upon which this indictment is based. This should be more than enough for the united states for the baden administration to put this case to rest. It is gone on far too long. You also have this situation where city thordarson has been convicted of sexual abuse of minors and other crimes including financial fraud in the interview. He admitted to continuing his crime spree while working with the doj and the fbi what's crucial to understand about his involvement with the us government in Trying to get Julian assange extradited here where he faces. One hundred seventy five years person. Will i do think it's significant that the initial indictment for join asandra related only to the publications back in two thousand and two thousand and ten two thousand eleven. The chelsea manning publications. I'm it was a second superseding. Indictment introduced by the trump administration which was based upon thorson's evidence. Now any lawyer and even any light person would be looking at evidence from a convicted felon who had been convicted of forgery fraud and sexual abuse allegations associated with minors. That is a problematic source now. We have him admitting that he lied to the fbi about that evidence. This raises serious concerns about the integrity of this investigation and the integrity of this criminal prosecution and serious questions being asked within the department of justice about this prosecution and the fact that he's continuing at all. So what are demanding. right now trenton. Robinson we have been asking for a very long time for the biden administration and the department of justice. Put an end to this case. Principled free speech grounds and on g process grounds. And this is just the latest evidence to show why this case needs to be dropped. Gen robinson went to thank you for being with us. Human rights attorney who's been advising julian assange and wikileaks since two thousand ten speaking to us from australia. Next up we remember. Former presidential candidate and alaska senator mike gravel. He's died at the age of ninety one. He was seminal in releasing the pentagon papers to the public. Stay with us from the house lost. She is in by a too long. The oil life was own. let them. that's memory by barbra streisand. Streisand held a nine thousand. Nine hundred seventy three fundraiser. For dan ellsberg with yoko ono the beatles john lennon ringo starr and george harrison. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report. I mean he goodman. Mike grefell the former presidential candidate and democratic. Us senator from alaska died this weekend. At the age of ninety one in the seventies he was fiercely opposed to the vietnam war and the draft. He played a seminal role in the release of the pentagon papers. That's the seven thousand pages of top secret documents outlining the secret history of the. Us war in vietnam. The league would end up helping. Take down president. Nixon help end the vietnam war and lead to a major victory for press freedom. All the papers were leaked to the new york. Times and the washington post by dan ellsberg grefell spearheaded a one man push to get the pages of the pentagon papers the congressional record so that would become public record than anyone could read them and publish them. Beacon press went on to do just that publishing seven volumes set of the pentagon papers. Tomorrow june twenty-ninth. I is the fiftieth anniversary of the day. In nineteen seventy-one one gravel. Read the pentagon papers into the record. He cried within seconds and could not continue but when he came out of the session. Someone told him that since she'd started reading them he could have the rest automatically. Put into the record in two thousand seven. I moderated a panel. With senator mike gravel and dan ellsberg and the head of the beacon press robert west talking about how the pentagon papers were made public. But here we're going to nine thousand nine hundred seventy one where. Mike rebel attempted to read the documents into the record. I know of nothing in our history to equal or expensive failure and extent of loss in all aspects of the term people. Human beings being killed as i speak to you tonight killed as a direct result of policy decisions. We as a body have made our arms are being server medalist crashing through human bodies because of a public policy this government. What may respond that. We made such a sacrifice to preserve freedom and liberty in south east. Asian one may respond that we second-place ourselves on the content of asian. So that we will not have to fight a similar war on the shores of america. One can make these arguments only if he has failed to read the pentagon papers. That is terrible truth. A little in the midst of him speaking he broke down crying. Yes that's democratic. Senator mike gravel attempting to read the pentagon papers into the record. The congressional record fifty years ago. He died this weekend at the age of ninety one in two thousand seven. In portland oregon. I moderate an event at the annual conference of the unitarian universalist church in portland oregon commemorating the publication of the pentagon papers by the beacon press. They're publishing house. One of the main speakers was alaska's senator microcell today you bring we bring you his extended remarks as he laid out how he received the pentagon papers from washington post journalist spend back dickey and who in turn had gotten them from pentagon papers whistleblower daniel ellsberg let me just pick up where he left off because it really is a lot of louis nets. And i'll talk fast. But but i want to get all the deals out because i know what you want to know is the inside skinny. You can read the broad lines. But it's what happened to both our lives at the time that dan calls my office. He talks to joe rusting. Who is my administrative assistant. My newspaper assistant. I was down in the senate. Jim getting a massage table. And and of course you can't have staff come into the senate. This is hollowed ground so into the gym. So he's not gonna dory since i've got to see the senator. It's an emergency and he works his way into get ended a massage stall in the masseur pulls back a little bit and he whispers down in my ear. He's somebody wants to give you the pentagon papers. Man where is he. He says he's going to call us back so men i get dressed up really back. The office. I'm sitting in my office. Waiting for this call. Long comes his voice. He says senator. Would you read the pentagon papers as part of your filibuster. I says yes. Please hang up. The reason for that is. I have a background. In intelligence. i was twenty three years old. I was a top secret control officer. I can classify declassify in those twenty three years old. So now here. The papers coming at me. I had a sense of what they were was a history a history and of course i had to read what the times published and so lo and behold dan and i have other conversations tattoos. Our memories are vague. He informed me about something that i didn't know and occasionally i'd done that with him when he was doing his memoirs secrets. We it's been there a couple of days here interpretation what you think we did. Yes well no. That's why we did it that way and what happens. That's human beings. We all have different. Read on some of the details. The long and short of it is he. He called me in a few days and he. He's angry on the phone. Is why the hell heavy have used the papers. Nicest why the hell did you got into me. I don't have my heard any effort. So he goes back to ben big dickey and ben then contact spy office. Well quite candy. I didn't know who ben was but he wanted to get to meet with me so so secretively on the front steps of the capitol behind column in broad daylight during session. So ben is standing there. We're talking about how we're going to move the papers across. And then out comes bob dole. Who is one of my enemies. And but we're on the same committee. And he walks up big dicky and is slipping behind the column so he can't be seen so and so i. I get a door fairly fast and so we get back and had this plan. We're gonna meet someplace out in the country rock creek park and doug as they've been a little more experience in this than you have what we're gonna do. Here's how we're going to transfer the papers you're gonna come at twelve o'clock at night under the marquee of the mayflower hotel in washington dc. At twelve o'clock you park your car there. I will come up with my car. Open your trunk. I ll might trump now pop. The paper said now race off. That's the way we'll do it before. God and country and they won't even know what happened what happens a group of alaska natives walked by our senator and they all want to come up and talk. This tried to peel them away. Well i've gotta run. They got so. I got my car. We did that. We transferred the papers. I sped away by car. Came back in and been and i had a coffee. I took the papers home. Where are you gonna put them. I brought them home. That's the first time. I told my wife at the time. Isis get depending on papers right here. The whole world was looking to and chase him down. Catch them get the. We're going to put him under the bed. We're going to sleep on and that's what we're going to do next morning. I'm dyslexic and so i couldn't read all those papers if it took me a year and so what happened. I started calling staff in. And i said look to come in you. Bring toilet kit. Don't tell your wife what you're doing. You just come into the centers off house and at amendment. The door and i said look. I've got the pentagon papers you come in. You can't leave until i leave. And i won't think ill if you don't come in because there's risk that we don't know anything about and so everyone to the person said senator let me so about four or five people for today's or sleeping on the living room floor and we would go through the papers. The style used in going into it. I was reading my little portion of it. The first parliament which is the most historic and most interesting part but the others. I said whenever you come across the name come and show me the name. I would then read on the context and make a judgment is this should be excised or not when we exercise. We just take a pencil. We took scissors and cut it out. So there'd be no misunderstandings now. I've got to bring the papers from my home to the capitol and so i by two flight bags you notice bowl flight bags without wheels by by two those to honor the papers and so i spend the money. Pack them up with two bags like that and so i'm going to take him to the capital but now i'm concerned so call the vietnam veterans of america. I say look at. I've got a problem. I need somebody to guard my office. And what i want. I want the most disabled veterans you can find and low and behold i trudge into would let my staff touched so i'd trudge in with my two big bags heavy and of course staff is walking wispy and the cops look at why the hell senator carrying two bags and staff is not carrying these bags so we walked down to the end of the hall and there are about six seven soldiers in uniform. You know ponytails badges all over all wheelchairs and they could do wheelies and all they do. They didn't know what a had all these go. get him. senator go get them. I've just about to cry with the with the commitment of these human beings and they guarded the office but they were throwing their bodies at anybody tried to break in. I had two papers. I go to the floor of the senate now. I had made a deal with devon. I had to get. I wanted to read it in the filibuster now. I had a little bit of ego trip going on here. I wanted to break. Thurmond's record in filibustering so in the draft was expire at the end among. So i wanted to get two days about close to forty eight hours. Brick his record now hugging do that. Most people don't know when huey long those guys used to debate what they do. Drink a lot of water right on the floor right on the senate floor the make no mistake about it. But i'm a little more than that. And so what i do is i rid myself up. I go to the doctor's office. I tell them what's going on. Tell them filibuster and so he rings me up with the colostomy bag with little holes down to my ankle and my administrative assistant is going to bleed the colostomy bag then. It gets better than that we go to. I gotta get somebody to chair because you can't control the floor if you don't control the chair so i go to l. in cranston my closest friend allen. I need help. what do you do you buy. I got the pentagon papers. Oh my god mike. You need more than help. You got problems so so he says i should all to risk you have to touch the papers. You just get into chair. By five o'clock we'll turn around and you just stay in that chair. As long as i'm filibustering plan. And so i said now. Go down doctor's office and get a colostomy bag. He does that and of course. I had a rubber mat was very interesting to go into the dynamics of that so low. And behold i come through florida's trudging with these papers. I put them next to my desk. And i was a freshman. So i was way on side and so months muskie had Had come up to me for some committee state committee. He's talking me. Looks down to these two black bags. he says. Michael pentagon papers now look up at him with a blank stare. It was just a joke and his partner. But i'm looking at him here. A nice guy so what i wanted to do. I know i'm going to be talking for a couple of days. So i want to tell the staff of the senate that hey you better call your wife because you're not getting out here shortly and so what i do this. I lay on quorum. Call now if you're familiar with the procedures in the senate call. They have to now stop. They have to start calling the roll. And there's only one other senator in the chamber that was griffin. The democrats had gone to a banquet. The republicans had gone home and sort of to dennis centers in a chamber. So eilly on. Corum call biff unlocks up to me and he says mike. What are you going to just continuing my filibuster on the draft. But i had always done that because mansfield had set up a two. Track your filibuster. For five months. It could only happen because mansfield set it up without anybody seeing his his velvet hand. And so i says you know. He's but wait. What are you doing at night. I said well the drafts about to expire. And i just want to really make a big show. He goes back to his desk. And he's thinking he's thinking then of course. I wait thirty minutes to let the staff notified that they're going to be there the part of the evening and lo and behold i make a unanimous consent to remove the corum call. He objects the minute he did that. I knew i just been harpooned. And all i could think as my mind. Good men don't win. Good men don't win out so angry. He came up to me and he says well. Mike what are you doing. And i started swearing at him. You cannot believe but by that time he knew something was really afoot so he went to republican cloakroom said. Stay away from the senate telling all the republican. I'm sending my troops to go out there and get the democrats to come back from the bank. Well that goes on for about nine thirty ten o'clock and we could not get a quorum. I'm stuck rosty comes other isa's center we're stuck. There's nothing we can do here. So i grabbed r. Turni's think they got a plan b. so he grabbed two bags back to the office again but this time the vietnam vets are out there. They noticed something really serious foot because a lot of media following us and so i go into. What's our playing well senator. It's interesting there's not much hope but we do have one precedent that we could follow. And that's the precedent. Believe it or not the house. Unamerican activities committee for those of you know what that means. He says what they were doing is they would go around the country and they would immediately call a hearing so that they could grab somebody pull them up. Swear man and get them to talk. He says without precedent. What you could do now. Mind you freshman. You're chairman of a committee a subcommittee and of course that committee was the buildings and grounds committee so long behold they say what you could do is you could convene a hearing of this committee and and you'd be still within the umbrage of the senate and so i said fine. Let's do that but we gotta do. Got to have somebody testify so we type up the notice that i'm chairman up calling a hearing slip it under the doors of all these senators. Who are not there that i'm notifying them of the hearing so that that's covered legally and then the peace group calls up a congressman dow from upper new york. He doesn't know what it's about all they tell him on telephone. Senator gravel. need you to come and testify at a very important. Hearing he gets dressed. Fellow gets dressed comes down and we convene. But this time we're upstairs in a one of the senate chambers committee committee room and the whole fouling. So the media. And then congressman. Dad comes up. And i'm sitting there with my two black bags and my staff assist. And the congressman's gaveled the meeting daughter. Congressman. can i help you say you want to testify. Says yes. I'd like to get a federal building in my district. And i say congressman. Let me interrupt you right there. I know you need a federal building in your district. And i'd love to give you a federal building near district but i gotta tell you are broke. We don't have any money to give you a federal building and let me tell you why we're broke because we are squandering all this money in south east asia and let me tell you how he got southeast asia and a whole lot. The papers around to reading gets better than that. I read for an hour now here again. Just like there's no end. God's but i'm reading it now keep my head and slip for about three or four days and so i'm reading and breakout sobbing. It's about twelve o'clock at night. And i am sobbing. I can't control of myself. Here's what was going through my head. A journalist one of the networks next morning. This is a bizarre occurrence tonight. Before grell was very bizarre he cried. And so what. I was sobbing over. I had been to walter reed months or more before to walk around. And i couldn't take i couldn't take it emotionally to look at the wounded and so i can handle macro problems but now micro and so lo and behold I kept saying to myself my god. I love my country. My country is committing immoral acts. Were killing human beings. There's no reason for it. And i'm sobbing and push on dyslexic on reading road. I could follow the words in front of me. So ross says the understatement of year senator. I think you've lost it. So and upkeep sobbing and then he goes back and i try to get a hold of myself and i can and so because his center. Why don't you put it in a record. And then i sobered up media all yes. I got power and the chairman's committee. So i move in asking msn. To put all these papers that i was going to read it to record to put him in a record automatically bang there in the record dirt. That's how it officially got into the record of the united states married obviously the media by that point. They're out there going really so i put the papers back in. We're trudging back to my office. The is following this. We want the papers. We want the papers so he cut a deal with them. Look at we a copy papers because we want to hang onto a set and as we copy and we'll turn to you you set up a and then you go copy and distributors of the world. That's what happened all night long. And that's what made the supreme court decision move which was at eleven or twelve o'clock that very day and what they did is they. They said you could not put on prior straight which what you could do is if you're published you'd be risk and that's what happened. Those that published took the risks. But they weren't prepared to take the risks after that we scoured the country. And this is where the meeting comes in with beacon. We scoured the country. Could not find one major or minor or anybody that would touch the pentagon papers and we had some inkling that maybe mit presswood so with with my staff. Fishburn and one other attorney. We go to boston. The whoever was handling it. And i don't recall the time you said senator got bad news. Mit pressure won't touch it with a ten foot pole. And then i'm just crestfallen like we're gonna check how to get back to wash. He's burkett some good news for you. Beacon press this got the money and they will publish it. In golden stair and bob west downtown in boston waiting for you if you wanna come down and make the deal with them and i said let's go and we had a press conference shortly thereafter and that's when we announced that we're gonna do it. I was a unitarian even before. All this happened in alaska. But i can't tell you. What what i feel for the beacon press for the unitarians and for dan ellsberg dan quoted in legs to say that. When i went into service i was. I was going to be a spy. But i wasn't getting any action so i went into be combat. Infantry platoon leader and on the patch on my shoulder said follow me. Well when. I saw dan do what he did. All i could think of. Here's a guy. That's walking up the hill taking his life in his own hands. And the least. I could do this. All dan ellsberg that's former alaska. Senator and two time presidential candidate mike gravel describing in two thousand seven how we got the thousands of pages at the pentagon papers into the congressional record which allowed them to be made public. Mike rochelle died this weekend. At the age of ninety one to see the whole event i moderated before the unitarian universalist association's general assembly with senator gravel dan ellsberg and robert west publisher beacon press go to democracy now dot org coming up legal scholar at cohen. On supreme court justice briars legacy defining decision. Stay with us living for the city by silvester. This is democracy now. I'm amy goodman as we turn to prize winning author adam cohen who has a new piece in the atlantic headline justice briars legacy defining decision. It examines the growing question of whether the supreme court justice should step down so that he can be replaced. While there's a democratic president and a democratic run senate justice briar is now eighty two years old the oldest member of the high court. Adam cohen is also author of supreme inequality the supreme court's fifty year battle for a more unjust america. Adam welcome back to democracy now. Why don't you lay out what this growing argument is great to be here. Abc who. i'm sure as you mentioned. Our justice prior is eighty two years old. The oldest member of the court of this is a moment. Where if he retires president biden. We'll be able to replace him. The democrats control the senate They can put him much person in place and and prison by sending fact that he would appoint a black woman that would be the first black woman on the supreme court if not retired out. There's a very real danger that the democrats will lose their control of the senate. It's reeser thin. Majority right now literally if something were god forbid to happen to share it ground or pat lahey or any of the democratic senators who are from states with a republican governor who would go to replacement if anything had any of those senators the democrats would lose control of the senate and we know that. Mitch mcconnell just will not confirm any democratic appointments to the court. So if briar doesn't step down now there's a very real chance that republicans will eventually fill that seat and maybe turn a six to three conservative majority. Which has already been terrible into a seven to two conservative. Majority i wanna to quote from dahlia lith- wicks piece in slate headlines. Stop telling justice briar to retire saying quote. not only. is it counterproductive. But it misses the point. Lithuania argues replacing. A liberal justice with another liberal justice and six to three court is important but it's also small if we do or don't want justices to time their own retirements exceedingly political ways. There's a way to fix that. Implementing mandatory retirement ages or eighteen year terms. Adam calling your response. yeah. I'm a great fan of dollars and on this for a couple reasons. One is yes in wouldn't be great to have fundamental reform of the court along the lines. As she mentioned it would be great to have term limits to expand the courts. We could get out of this. Six to three conservative majority which i have to emphasize is not representative of where the american public is. It's far to the right of the general public as we've seen in the last presidential and congressional elections. The problem is that is not going to happen on. The senate right now is so reluctant to do. Even mainstream democratic things like say. Pass a good infrastructure. Bill the senate is just not going to go along with expanding the court or term limits anytime soon so that means democrats to start playing the same game. The republicans have the republicans have been amazingly effective at the kind of small-bore politics of the court that i value mentions like in twenty eighteen justice kennedy step down when he was eighty one year early a year younger than wire and that allowed president trump to fill that seat republicans hand off their seats very effectively ruth ginsburg when she was. I saw the court. There were calls from progressives for her to step down when obama was president when the democrats control the senate she did not step down and her seat has now been filled by president trump with amy coney barrett who could cast the deciding. Vote to overturn roe. V wade so i agree with you. That would be great to have these big reforms but democrats needs to play the small word game too so i want to turn to one of those decisions. That was just made yes. The supreme court's union busting decision last wednesday in which the justices ruled six to three that california. Labor law violates the constitutional rights of property. Owners by giving union organizers access to workers on privately owned farms during their work breaks the ruling strikes down a crucial part of a landmark nine hundred hundred seventy five labor law that was nations. I recognize agricultural workers rights to collective bargaining and grew out of efforts by the united form workers to demand better pay and working conditions for california's agricultural workers. For more addition to adam cohen. we're joined by camilla each other. She is executive director of the dolores huerta foundation. She's also the niece of the legendary farmworker organizer cesar chavez. Thanks so much for joining us. Of course traumas was the united farm workers co founder. And now you continue the legacy with the loris wealth where camilla traumas. Can you respond to the supreme court ruling. Good morning. thank you for having me. I also just wanted to say that. I am also the youngest daughter of the source. So jere question. This ruling is a setback for unions for workers rights. The idea that organizers swarm property after giving notice are taking property is ridiculous and clearly union busting position. A farm company said that union allowed Physical invasion of land without compensation. So we know that when it comes to workers that live on the labor camps. They are living. On private property they're then shuttled to work in company. Vehicles union organizers would have no access to these workers in this case and adam cohen. If you could expand on this and the precedent it sets for workers all over the country their time that you hate to be right but you know in the book that you mentioned that route supreme inequality. i pointed out for the last fifty years. This court has been on a drive to expand rates and to take away rights from workers consumers people of color other disadvantaged groups. That's what this is part of that larger picture and what they used is a very broad expansion of the takings clause saying that that it's taking private property for cal for you to say. That union organizers have right to go on to employers property to organize workers but that's just a crazy expansion of the lie in fact. The government allows inspectors all kinds enter on private property like to food inspections to do inspections of nursery schools. What this means effectively is that. It's very hard for unions to organize folks like the farmer workers. Because it's hard to find him if you don't get to go to their workplace. We saw that in alabama when amazon had trouble reaching workers on the streets on their way to work. This is a real. Blow to union organizing. And we've seen how union membership has been declining precipitously really back since world war. Two a big part of that is decisions like this from the supreme court that really make it impossible for them to organize workers and camilla is back on the specifics of this. The forty five zero california law that allowed unions to organize on private forms. What does this mean also for. how Might affect workers when it comes to covid nineteen vaccinations and other treatment of work of farm workers. Right so we know that. Agriculture workers have experienced a higher risk of exposure throughout the pandemic due to feel than packing facilities working conditions. A lack of preventative education and bp have crowded transportation to and from work sites and live in overcrowded. Housing conditions were steady by the uc merced layer center that showed that workers in california industries warehousing culture food processing meat. Packing bay had a thirty percent increase in this related to covid so we know that they aren't getting information and the resources that they need. And i will say that you know community based organizations have had to step in to provide this information of organizations that we working celeberation with are going to fields. We are providing this information to workers and wondering. Is this going to now denies that access a being able to provide even setting vaccination acquaintance We were the ones that were advocating. That farm workers be put at the top of the list of essential workers with healthcare workers a to be prioritized for vaccination. Thank goodness governor. Mussa did listen to us. A governor newsom also invested millions of dollars for organizations community based grassroots organizations to provide this direct outreach regarding tobin and finally adam cohen as the supreme court term wraps up what are other cases. You're looking at well. There's a lot of damaging stuff that's in the pipeline at the court accepted a case which could be the one that they used to overturn roe. V wade out of mississippi and there hasn't been five votes to do that yet. There may be now. There's also a big harvard. Affirmative action case in which asian american students are challenging. Harvard selection procedures so far to courts upheld harvard's affirmative action plan. But there's a very real chance. That chief justice roberts who does not like race remedies of any kind will use the harvard case probably next year possibly next year to end affirmative action in even private education. And maybe even more broadly. So there's a lot of damage that even a six to three majority is likely to do and expected to take up a transgender case. Possibly there is a transgender case that they couldn't take virginia. That could do a lot of damage there as well. Yeah so again. We're seeing what is six to three quarters can do a seventy two court which would also preserve a conservative majority. For many years maybe decades can do a lot more damage across our society. Well i want to thank you all so much for being with us. Adam cohen writer and author of supreme equality. The supreme court's fifty year battle for more unjust. America will link to your piece in the atlantic justice briars legacy defining decision and wanna thank camilla chavez executive director of the dolores square to foundation daughter of dolores huerta and niece of cesar chavez. That does it for the show. If you'd like to sign up for our daily digest send the word democracy now. One word no space text to six six eight six six democracy now to six eight six. Six democracy now is produced with rene felts my birthday and it goes to nursery Santa carla wills. Tammy were enough gerena. Nador sim out coffey. Marie asked to do john. Hamilton rep karen honeyman student. Adrianna contraire so general manager. Is julie crosby happy fifth birthday. Julie stutter a lee. I'm amy goodman. Please be safe. Thanks so much for joining us.

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SMNTY Classics: Farmer Janes

Stuff Mom Never Told You

47:23 min | 1 year ago

SMNTY Classics: Farmer Janes

"What's up I'm wilfling from thrill us with some amazing podcast news we just launched our very first podcast thrillers best and the rest every you can hear me and my amazingly talented colleagues talk about the best of the best in food drink travel and entertainment from the scariest movie of all time to the best hangover just hearing from them first hand and also a lot of the people I spoke to some of them women actually mostly women love from them and right now we're in the middle of a pretty serious drought in Georgia and most of the South and just to see how it impacts everybody and best while they're doing things around the farms yeah so all of that being said thought we would bring back this don't think anew too many farmer farmers outright like vegetable farmers sure I didn't have much experience with it my school did you I have just spent four days in Dothan Alabama which hilariously randomly is where my mom's from oh so I I used to go there two to three times until I was fourteen or fifteen for holidays and stuff to visit my grandparents my aunts and uncles but this was for a peanut conference classic episode for You on Female Farmers so hope you enjoy welcome to stuff mom never how farmers and specifically women farmers and this is something I learned a lot about at this peanut conference or I could tell you so much yeah I feel like for those of us I don't know did you ever have any experience farming I grew up in L. A. J. Georgia which does have farming so as poultry this is any in Samantha on ever w production of iheartradio's how Stafford doc more be so we had cal farms as well as a lot of chicken farms so not so much like garden gardens we don't have too much of that although I did live they have a four H. Branch did to my elementary school middle school but we also had a big FFA? Yeah Brian Future Farmers of America so a lot of orchards because we are the apple capital of Georgia not the US of Georgia so I did grow up a lot around that but not towards that but for a while we were very separate at least here in America from our food it was just a commodity and you didn't think about all you really cared about aware of where food comes from and the people behind that food and how did it get to where you are an appreciating the labor behind it because and I think we are moving more this episode made me a little bit jealous because I do not have a green thumb no I I am at once Mike peanut butter before you leave by the way I have cases of it I need a gifted us with cases they're very nice but anyway the Gaza were bringing to you today is about okay so it's the same thing and I it's something that I'm really passionate about because as as most of you probably know I do much it costs in I was in that too well on this trip I felt I was really happy to be able to talk with farmers and here alive and this week we're talking about women in agriculture and they were focusing on farming and caroline about peanuts I've learned so much I guess you're not allergic to it oh no better is probably my favorite food is also my dog's favorite food so there you go show on food some food called Saver and the show without me finding out now but being acting of the fact that I have a a brown or black thumb and in denial because I understand that I have in fact killed bamboo before I've killed told you from how stuff works dot com off into the podcast I'm Preston active but on the other hand I am still ever optimistic I purchased a whole bunch of plants now that it's spring and it's warm unlike tropical in Atlanta already I've purchased a bunch of plants to keep it my boyfriend's house because I have no yard and I am convinced that this year kristen and when it comes to women farming though this is a really exciting time to be a woman working the land because women have been far in a for one keeping a plant in a pot alive but to keep entire fields of plants alive is mind boggling to me on a personal level coming as long as men have been farming really but in recent years there's been a lot more attention paid to the role of women in agriculture yeah we've got this thing that is referred to across a whole bunch of sources called the grass ceiling that women are finally cracking additionally has been on women's role on the farm being one of support she's the supporting actress so she's at home at the farmhouse this is the year that I'm going to keep them alive well I'll be rooting for you. I like to be rooting for the plants you as well but but talks about how in the nineteen eighties nineties research on women farmers consistently found those farming families as you talked about reflecting L. She cooking dinner she's paying the bills she's making sure all of the homestead stuff is taken care of while her cowboy farmer husband is out on the tractor the plants Carolina rooting rooting unintentional gardening pun didn't even mean to make that happen off to a good start yeah well I can't imagine l. to become a farmer's wife and Barrett brand wrote about feminism and the idea of the farmer's wife and the relationship between in cooking dinner and all of that good stuff but women do have an incredibly active rich vital role out in the fields as well yeah no longer is the end all be he's kinds of patriarchal power structures men as the land owners rendering women subordinate to them and in a lot of ways even to the land and I thought it was interesting too that the FFA formerly known as future farmers of America didn't even admit girls until nineteen in farming women and Feminism in a paper called on the relationship between feminism and farm women in the journal Agriculture and human values and eighteen sixty nine although as reported on a couple of years ago in USA Today it's now made up a forty four percent women compared to just easy to me that like I get the whole thing about attitudes about women and not thinking that women are cut out for farming I understand that some of those attitudes existed and somehow still do exist but it's crazy to me that in an organization called the future farmers of America they weren't even like maybe we should let little our farming the fields but as we'll get into women have so much more of a role than just that not that there's anything wrong with being at the homestead old paradigm right I should say because as Helen Gunderson who is a farmer in northern Iowa told NPR not too long ago quote girls could grow up to be farmers wives but for a woman to actually consider herself to be a farmer or grow up to be a farmer that wasn't in the script and the grass ceiling or I guess putting a shovel in it yeah we're getting out our lady lawnmowers than downs right that's right but a lot of focus ninety percent women in nine hundred ninety eight so even when it comes to youth and interest in farming we're seeing growing interest among girls but that's girls play well because they would be in the future farmer wives of America Caroline that's where the that's where the girls would belong I suppose under the we've been getting better according to the USDA US farms operated by women nearly tripled over the past three decades from five percent in nineteen seventy eight to fourteen percent by two thousand seven now of course there is an issue of of reporting the USDA's agricultural census only tres men in the pickup trucks men on horseback there were a couple of women here and there but overwhelmingly male farmers yet and talking to USA still respect our farmers and we want to pay tribute to them but on the other hand she says they're missing more than half the population that's been involved with it and so organic farm in Vermont or something a lot of smaller operations are run by women by people of Color and so those are the smaller farms tend to be outside of the mainstream out on the land and she told her like hey you know I really feel like you put more of the focus on the boys maybe is that a thing and he was like Oh yeah yeah that sounds about right so I mean farmer's wife and you can live off the land that way but she said that when she talked to her dad about this like Hey dad you know she years later when she came back and wanted to be a farmer wanted to have more of a role condition was that I read hey outcast maybe oh interesting take today Denise O'Brien who has been farming with her husband for just about forty years in Iowa said that yeah it's great that there's this tribute to agriculture and that we but even since two thousand two when the USDA started including those secondary farm operators there has been a thirty percent jump and women on farms according to the Adcock who's the director of the Women Food and agriculture network now there is a little bit of statistical farmer and it was this very uplifting beautifully shot commercial really celebrating the farmer started counting secondary farm operators including women in two thousand and two in the whole issue there is that a lot of smaller farms you might think of the little alarming ponds by the way it's just gonNa keep happening they were being cultivated for the leader harvest of all her brothers were received all the she told NPR about how when she was a young girl on her family farm her brothers were the ones who are being cultivated I am so sorry for all of these unintentional world happening at such a pace that some are referring to this as the feminization of agriculture yeah a large part of this so-called feminization nobody's denying the women were kind of being shuttled off into a different direction the kitchen but toward the kitchen or the hen house right that they are sort of left behind so to speak and because of how Unintentional this feminization of Agriculture is Oh that's kind of what we want to talk about today in this episode we want to show you that the statutes regarding women in farming are way better than you might expect in the flicked because we also found a post over at the National Sustainable Agriculture Commission which identified a six percent drop in women as principal farm speak or literally literally and that was also exemplified in a super bowl commercial a couple years ago which I remember and a theme was God created so for instance women farmers tend to own less fertile plots of land they tend to own fewer work animals and also just have raiders from two thousand seven two thousand twelve but that was actually in statistical speak that was more of an outlier because in the past few years leaving women behind and so it's not necessarily that more women are setting out to be farmers although that is certainly the case in many areas but it also happens to be the league industrial farm complex have a lot of problems getting that important financial support especially in terms of things like going organic for farmers whether that is someone who is a woman a person of color a queer farmer as we'll get into a little bit later a lot of these people who aren't part of the less education in general so with this growing responsibility that women around the world are now having in terms of the global food supply talking about the global the global farm the global farming industry but I think that exists here too we read plenty of stuff that talks about how a quote unquote minority and as pointed out in the USA Today article on the rise of women in farming almost all of the imagery in that commercial was of men on track particularly in more developing nations of the UN is actually put a lot of focus on providing more resource for women farmers the ball because the land that they have and they're tending and harvesting is very important to feed US exactly I mean that is talked so it's really interesting to see beyond our own backyards how women are paying their own way in agriculture no women farmers that we ran across in our Research Carolina please okay so a lot of this was coming from modern farmer which recently won a national tends to be able to get that USDA funding it's harder for minority farmers sort of wherever you are and can I just call out a few of the international the UN and a lot of other NGOs are saying hey well we need to support them we need to make sure that they are on as equal footing with male farmers as poss- attention from her dad to make sure that they knew how to operate and manage a farm from the business side whereas Little Helen was just me my grow up one day and be is the fact that as societies become more geared toward urban centers men are leaving the homes in the farms and the rural areas at a greater pace Lee basically those those USDA statistic saying hey they're more women running farms what's going on well you know like we touched on earlier the ends bar who harvest seaweed that we probably enjoy in our farmers markets or at our local Sushi restaurant also Augustine Award and I'll tell you what friends after spending a week on the modern farmer website I want to subscribe it's fantastic yes a fantastic resource insys is counting more of those small secondary farm operators a lot of whom are women and most female run farms do tend to be rural Nepalese women who make up a majority of Seoul land owners in Nepal and then there was another post about the Yamagata girl's farm in Japan thousand dollars and this is coming from that same NPR interview with Leigh Adcock the Director of the Women Food and agriculture network and she was saying that there's almost all the trend pieces have been all focused on the rising role of women in agriculture not just in the United States but also around the and one of the things we're looking at his photo essay of women farmers around the world and among them were the seaweed Mama's of Zen in terms of gender and big agribusiness the Tyson foods for instance the the ubiquitous chicken that you might see but then the question becomes why more women especially when we look back in the United States and we see all of these trend pieces reporting on league constitute less than ten percent of senior executives and she's arguing in her article though that it would be only a good thing only a positive thing to get more and more the biggest percentage of that increase in women farmers is women with small acreage is making not a whole lot of money but making some money from agriculture and often where it's this a group of young women who have started up a farm in Japan it's exactly what it sounds like have food operations yeah and she says that when you look at for the biggest multibillion dollar factory farm corporations women cumulative Heison as an example Tyson foods has one woman on its executive team but at the same time for rookie says it's not that surprising to Holler organic you know homegrown more local operations but that our perspective on things like organic food cage free eggs animal cruelty could help benefit the rest of the industry yeah and when it comes to those large factory farms. That's something that we're GonNa talk about a little bit more in our next podcasts women farmers the rise of farmers markets local local farmers markets which is something that we've seen here where we live in Atlanta has been hired really attractive for female producers CSA's working with farm-to-table restaurants the entire slow food movement has been really really attractive to using food or livestock for food and she says that they are really out there they're out there working and they are raising the food that we're eating but she says there not getting into farming to run quarter million dollar combines they're out there raising food and this was something that Sonia for rookie also explored over at the Atlantic interest lies when it comes to farming we're far more interested on average in these smaller more sustainable slower kinds of newer women farmers coming into the fold and there's also just in general more opportunity by virtue for instance of farmland family farms collar and more diverse and many are part of the organic and local food movements most also have annual sales under ten passing this down just to the sons and the daughter can go find something else to do old MacDonald is going to become old MS donald ha ha that's right and in your grocery stores she says that women are scarce when it comes to running those large scale big factory farms and using this week which is all about Dolores Huerta a woman who took on directly some of those big farms out in California but looking back at those not see that many women particularly in the leadership there might be working in the factories but not many women in the leadership agro-business because that's usually not where are particularly in sustainable agriculture because traditionally women have been likelier to control household diets themselves so they may run a big farm and sit on a tractor and have it not be a big deal and so maybe people like Helen Gunderson and her family. It won't be such a thing of like well we're definitely of those organizations executive directors and then there are also the responses of women farmers themselves about what personally motivates them and MS McDonald will have the chance to get in on this because according to USA Today there are about two hundred million plus acres of farmland to have to to pursue this career and lifestyle that isn't necessarily easy and Audra Malkin who is a photographer who created maybe perhaps are more likely to go in the direction of sustainability in organic farming fewer pesticides things like that and when you look globally to we see organizations like Landeza and one percent for women that also focused more on things like land use rights and supporting those women in Agra the ecological example for children creativity exhibiting strength the fact that women are natural feeders cultivators and also a desire to make women on boards on executive teams because she argues that women have a different perspective that yes we tend to want to be part of the small Dan Interested in farming to teach him not only how to grow crops but also how to manage a farm business cook page asking her followers what draws women to farming and so the responses included nurturing a desire to set a in the US that will change hands by twenty twenty seven and there's a real potential for women to end up owning half that land yeah and that's why you're seeing culture who might need more of a leg up in the context of being in a developing country and you've got the issue that we've touched on about women's interest growing in farming about in the second half of the podcast for some women farming is a feminist act as well support for Steph never told you comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home is so much more than a house it's your own little slice of heaven that's why when you find a female farmer project documenting women farmers across the United States posted on her like Fan face cure ever listened to thrill his best and the rest on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts you know basically everywhere anywhere you can find podcasts land changing hands as baby boomers age yeah and just the fact that it will it's going to eventually start to be less weird in the public imagination than women at nonprofits who are focused on sustainable agriculture issues women composed sixty one and a half percent of those employees and sixty percent any more and more women focused groups emerging like women food and agriculture network and a smaller operations like Annie's project that directly serve different so there really does seem to be for a lot of women in farming this connection between themselves as women and how they see themselves in that role and that connection to the earth and to being mothers and also to food production but as we're gonNA talk an exactly what she'd get with rocket mortgage by quicken loans their team of mortgage experts is dedicated to finding a better way which means that their number one goal is to make the home buying process smoother for you quicken loans helped millions of Americans achieve their dream of home ownership and when you're ready to purchase the home of your dreams they can help you to their team cares the perfect place for you and your family getting a mortgage shouldn't get in the way imagine how it feels to have an award winning team buyers side through every step of the mortgage process is awesome it started online at rocket mortgage dot com slash mom steph equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states in L. S. consumer access dot Org number thirty for jd power would information visit JD power dot com about getting you home that's why jd power has ranked quicken loans highest in customer satisfaction for primary mortgage origination nine years in a row and highest in mortgage servicing five years in a row the farmer identities sort of comes first and a lot of cases well it's more about the food as politics rather than the the food coming second to politics and personal politics although they did have their own indie magazines and newsletters like countrywoman heartless systems of oppression like factory farms and sweatshops these oppressive system she writes carried the real prison walls not your kitchen and so it is also lesbianism combined with agriculture some call this a take back the land movement where these women really firmly believed that they need has feminist acts it might not seem obvious they might seem small like they're very unimportant personal acts but she says they oppose an UN we've women can actually grow plants they can farm they can be successful growers this movement and this has been a criticism of many parts of and that is women with a why because these were radical feminists who formed separatist agricultural communities including places like yellow hair the argument that a lot of people make whether it's about farming or something like the new domesticity movement that being a provider being the person who's raising the of which I wish I could still subscribe and while they were successful in demonstrating the fact that Oh look hey women can actually grow well some women not me typically rob fermented sauerkraut locally or direct from a farmer doing all of these things like knitting your own clothes riding your bicycle cooking something simple from scratch she talks about them food raising the livestock knitting those hats. It doesn't have to be an oppressive act what's oppressive a lot of these people argue is participating in a capitalist of depending on those big factory farms it the focus wasn't so much on the actual farming itself which I think is different from a lot of today's farms where was more on the act of separating themselves from men and the traditional system of of being with men depending on men for providing you know system that exploits workers yeah and also many would viably argue poisons land food as well through the use of things like pets purses the definition that we would perhaps be aspiring to as farmers in Parker writes about shopping at a farmers market and buying find that podcast over at stuff mom never told you dot com but we do want to mention briefly the women's land movement of the Nineteen Seventies Merton woman's share as a way to fully liberate themselves from the Patriarchy and again there is a great piece on this second wave feminism this movement was mostly made up of white middle-class radical feminists and it highlights the racial disparity that still livelihood they were like we don't need you were just GonNa we're gonNA take back the land essentially yeah but unlike a lot of farms today I think the focus the ECO feminist movement perhaps you've read about eco feminism and the links between feminism womanhood the traditional definition of that besides in if you Wanna learn more about ECO feminism we've done an entire podcast all about that so we're not going to get into the nuts and bolts of it but you can into erotic eight men from their lives completely whether that sexually or whether that is in like in any way providing for the extent exists within local food and CSA and the farmers market movements. Yeah I mean these a lot of these women who were heart of the Land Movement met in Liberal Arts Colleges for instance you're coming from a privileged position when you in the background of say cushier sort of higher education context separate yourself willfully and pursue this kind of lifestyle which which will direct in modern farmer my new favorite magazine not even joking and it was fascinating to see how they're radical feminism and only contrast actually what we're going to talk about Internet podcast with Dolores Huerta and the Chicano civil rights movement happening in California around the same mm time but when you look at your local CSA today when you go to your local farmers market today there are lots of nations that are being raised about who those farmers markets and that wonderful organic sustainable agriculture is feeding because if you look at lower income areas and areas that might have higher concentrations of people of color they're often in food deserts right they don't things like the organic food movement within the farmers market movement and the rise and farmers market popularity but side note fun fact much access and the food that we're talking about is often more expensive it's usually too expensive for me caroline and it is important to bring up these disparities that exist within it is an example of often the erasure of farmers of color which is what we wanted to talk about as well because black work for CS as though credit is usually attributed to other people yeah we read about that in mother Earth News and we wanted to mention it just because armor makeup just about two percent of the total farming population and when it comes to agriculture and people color and we're talking about the United States no big surprise there has been a lot of structural racism embedded within the industry. Yeah I mean going back even pre slavery just to the days of out and out land theft from native Americans taking their farmland to then slavery to Ski Professor Doctor Booker. T. Watt lease pick your own farms and clientele membership clubs idea in the early nineteen eighties was really what laid the ground alert want to come back and reclaim that land because it's so deeply embedded our country's relationship with people of Color and Agriculture is Oh deeply embedded well it's been something that families have tried to climb out of and so for some people today it would seem regressive civil suits against the USDA for receiving less government funding compared to white farmers so there are still questions of discrimination and then share cropping and then today with these massive agribusinesses end its reliance on immigrant Labor often cheapened exploited immigrant Labor which again we'll get way more into in our next episode but so you can understand then how it's sort of a complicated issue sometimes when people have come to then want to go back and farm and in fact I mean the relationship between farmers of color in the US government is still testy one because many have filed we're white in two thousand twelve and because of the existence of this diversity but at the same time still going back to our also started something called the color of food project to document the lives and the crops of farmers of color around the United States Peter Proportion of women of color operate farms then do white women because if you look back to stats from two thousand twelve fourteen percent of female principal farm operators were the American versus twenty percent of them being Asian and thirty percent were native American compared to thirteen percent of female principal farm operators who and and then when we talk about women farmers of color who we have layers of discrimination upon layers of discrimination yeah but it's interesting though that yeah this was really interesting looking at women who like you said. Kristen fell almost compelled to leave rural areas especially in the south east to leave real areas unknown attractor the Tasha Boas Aka Brown girl farming started blogging about diversity in farming and take on farming and femininity because she says I personally never felt more like a woman then the first time I dug my hands in leave that history that is so the racial aspects intertwined with agriculture to leave that all behind and then how when they got older they realized no elective idea of what a farmer looks like it's old macdonald it's usually an older white gentleman with a pitchfork in a plaid shirt and overalls and little straw hat into the soil and that's a statement that may not align with what society defines as feminine getting our hands dirty riding tractors herding cattle so affirming woman in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans starting a garden to feed that community yeah and if you look Natasha Bowen herself she is a really interesting feminine identity with the land and finding that solidarity while out on the road for the color of food was so important to me and I love that because you really can't argue that did you go back to the land whether it's to whether it's a political statement or whether it's to really just take care of my family or your community like the example of the movement that intersection of providing this kind of healthy sustainable food for these community either way that farming is super traditionally feminine if we go all the way back to hunter gatherers men hunting maybe women gathering and farming or if you go all the way to the other side and say that it's it's totally unexpected it's non traditional work for women well and for a lot of people farming is that are usually not so linked in with their local farmer's markets and she says that women are leading the food justice mystery she says the impact is heavy on every level from farm-to-table when it comes to women in our overall food system from his radical as well a lot of what a Bowen's has discovered and talked about through the color of food project is the food justice actions between identity politics and what is on our plates we also have to talk about lgbt farmers who are another group challenging the status quo of who can be a farmer and what a farmer looks like and this was something that was breath are women they're women farmers especially in the southeast who are seeking more resources basically more kind of like friends in the farm organic farmers but what's interesting about organization while it is certainly not focus solely on women what people within that organization have noticed is that more and more people that they're dealing with movement for farmworkers and she calls out examples like the coalition of Imo Collie workers and Florida Also women like soccer arming business and in addition to farmers of color organizing getting more recognition and really fighting for food justice and seeing those interests to say but talking to other farmers

United States Georgia Dolores Huerta California Land Movement iheartradio Dothan America Color and Agriculture L. A. J. Georgia principal Alabama Samantha Stafford USDA apple H. Branch CSA executive Kristen