20 Burst results for "Dolores Huerta"

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

03:59 min | 9 months ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"Trains women.

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

08:08 min | 9 months ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"American democracy tens of millions of people including more than half the number who voted in two thousand sixteen have already cast their ballots on this show. We're bringing you a black female doctor in michigan. Who questioned an officer not wearing a mask. She talks us through how she dealt with that. And the deeper questions. It brought up for her workers rights icon dolores huerta. She talks about what she's still doing for society at the age of ninety and how she makes time for adventure an errand hanes of the nineteenth our goto on all things political. She waited hours to vote in philadelphia and she wants to know why that should make everyone mad. But first let's talk about our courts just forty days. After the death of justice ruth bader ginsburg a new supreme court. Justice was appointed to fill her seat with a fifty two to forty eight vote. Senate republicans confirmed amy coney barrett in a single term president. Donald trump has appointed three of the nine judges that sit on the supreme court and the trump administration has appointed roughly a quarter of federal judges on the bench. Alexis mcgill johnson. President planned parenthood action fund. She's had the political battle over the courts front of mind. Thanks for joining us. Alexis thank you so much for having me fry. So let's just keep it real. You know we have a a newly confirmed supreme court justice she has not said what she is definitively going to do but seems unlikely to be a big champion of reproductive rights. Do you and your colleagues at planned. Parenthood feel the despair that a lot of other people are feeling. Are you feeling inspired to action. Or what's going on i. I would say that the majority of americans still believe that rose should be the land. We're talking seventy seven percent of americans and what we have in justice. Barrett now is the culmination of a series of power. Grabs based on. Rules changes from senator mcconnell and the trump administration to rush through a supreme court nominee. That is quite contrary to where most american set and so where we sit is certainly very concerned. There are about seventeen cases. That are in the pipeline. They're literally one step away from the supreme court that could create further burdens or limit access to abortion if not outright overturn roe and so we are obviously incredibly concerned but even more concerned that we're in a situation in our democracy where the rules of the game have shifted away from the majority of the people and that's actually just dangerous in a democracy so you're the president and ceo of planned. Parenthood federation of america in the planned parenthood action fund and in the action fund. Hat one of the things that that organization that part of your larger organization has been doing is waiting for appointment of federal judges. And so get a little deeper into this whole question of how you interact with the whole process of who becomes a federal judge and of course then how that affects policy. Yeah well i mean over the last four years what we've seen is An expedition of the number of judges that between senator mcconnell and president trump. they've confirmed over two hundred and fifteen incredibly conservative judges to lifetime appointments on the federal bench. And you know these judges that will sit at the circuit. Court of appeals court. These ten of them have been considered completely unqualified by the american bar association. One judge at least has been very vocal in similar language to judge just as barrett around. Ibf feeling that that is an unnatural process. And i think that you know the where we engage we. We continue to support the the research to help our senate colleagues understand what is at stake as they are doing their confirmation process. The reality is they've been very successful in shifting. The rules change so that we used to be able to filibuster bad judges the now Senator mcconnell changer will so various simple majority Which is what they held over the last few years that has allowed them to rush through the number of appointments that they've made and that's you know again it's harmful to democracy. It's harmful to into how he should be governing and that's really Bottom line with its daycare. What would you see. Differences between say trump's second term and a biden first term since so much has already happened in the appointment of federal judges and with the supreme court let in Vice president biden senator harris. We know we have champions of Sexual reproductive freedom. We know that they will be committed to everything from repealing hide to identifying ways legislatively to support legislation that can help us codify roe federally and i think those are the opportunities that we have. The biden administration also has a ton of work to. Do you know the aca on the line at next month. Literally a Almost a Just a few short weeks from now. And so the other things that help us ensure reproductive freedom and access to gender equality can also be stripped away if the as ruled unconstitutional. Things like having our birth control covered under the aca ensuring that gender discrimination doesn't happen we don't pay more for healthcare than than men. Those are the sorts of things that i think can be incredibly impactful under a biden administration. That would be exciting. I think under a trump administration were already living the fear right. We're we're living the fear of both Supreme court that now where he's appointed three of nine judges cementing that conservative majority. We are already seeing. We've been forced out of titled ten. The nation's oldest and largest family planning program limiting access to family planning and rural areas in low income communities and our response to it. Is you know to continue to fight to continue to engage our sixteen million supporters and demonstrate. What's at stake. And if we have to do that state by state because that's where the face will turn now into state legislatures and tell us a little bit about what planned parenthood. Does that a lot of people might not know about providing some health services to men and to the lgbt community etc. Absolutely let planned. Parenthood is first and foremost a healthcare provider for and we provide all range of sexual reproductive health. We do a lot of sexual education outreach. And part of that education is also to our to our legislators to ensure that we have robust policies that that ensure that we're building accidents more access to healthcare them less. You know i mean. We have to remember that route a moment today. Where we've just seen the every day is the next highest day of of new cova transmissions over two hundred and twenty-five thousand americans died in this last seven months of the pandemic and the idea that in thirty days the senate could come together and rush through this nomination and not rush through code relief. Bill not rush through cova testing. Bill not focused on the comprehensive policies around healthcare that are potentially bankrupting families a these the kinds of things that as a public healthcare voice. And if we're not out there yelling and screaming about about what's happening healthcare broadly. Then we're not doing our service. Well alexis mcgill johnson. It's been great talking to you. Thank you so much thanks. Very alexis mcgill. Johnson is president of the planned. Parenthood action fund women of color for progress.

supreme court senator mcconnell amy coney barrett Alexis mcgill johnson trump administration biden administration dolores huerta Parenthood federation of ameri president trump ruth bader ginsburg Court of appeals court Senator mcconnell Donald trump biden senator harris Alexis Barrett aca philadelphia michigan
"dolores huerta" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

Happier in Hollywood

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

"Podcast everything happens. Yes Gretchen and I talked to Kate. Episode to seventy three of happier and she had an idea for coping with uncertainty during this time of a global pandemic that really resonated with me. She said that she evaluates the situation every two weeks. So that's the hack evaluate the situation every two weeks and act accordingly and don't worry in between so if you're wondering am I going to go to the grocery store or only get my groceries delivered. Am I going to have socially distance play dates or not all those questions that were all dealing with? Kate thinks about every two weeks looks at all. The information makes choice. And then just doesn't worry about it for two weeks and I love this idea because I find myself. Just like torturing myself over these questions and it's raining right like when. Are you going to go to a restaurant? Yeah exactly and if you don't have to think about it for two weeks you can just release it. Yes and then in two weeks you see. Okay where are we? What are the doctor saying? What are the statistics? And you make choice based on where you are then so that is the hack to worry about where you are every two weeks make decisions accordingly and don't worry about it in between love it and that is it for this episode of Happier in Hollywood for questions or comments. Email US or send US voice memo to happier in Hollywood at G. Mail DOT COM. Thanks.

Kate Gretchen Hollywood US
"dolores huerta" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

15:15 min | 1 year ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"We have a very special episode today as we have the honour of sitting down with legendary Labor leader and civil rights icon Dolores Huerta. We talk about how she organized farm workers in the sixties. How those lessons are applied today in the work that she's continuing to do now at the age of ninety spoiler alert. She's not backing down. Though she is not I'm Steve Pearson and Mariah Craven and this is how we went. Don't wait to be invited. She says step in and on a personal note Dolores was very gracious When I told her I had stolen or slogan Si Se Puede. Yes we cam knowing her. I'm pleased that she let me off easy. Because Dolores does not play poetic you know hearing Dolores where the talk is just such a bomb after the chaos of yet another terrible corona virus Rose Garden press conference this week right. I mean chaos is probably a nice way to put it. You know it was really hateful. Trump continues to show us who he is despite himself. Oh Yeah it had the Mondays Mondays. Presser all of the the trumpian hallmarks of misinformation racism. Sexism pouting the huge. It still didn't hold a candle. I don't think to What he was doing on twitter all weekend he tweeted almost tweeted or re tweeted almost two hundred times and I think someone figured that he was sending on average a tweet. Every lake. Fifteen minutes for the entire weekend dude was fired up. Well you know. I mean mother's days in inspiring time for many of us to get on twitter and and tweet stuff with righteous anger about a crime that he calls Obama Gate when asked to clarify what the crime was. He said it was Obama Gade. Yeah he said he said you know what it is. You all know what the climate says. No no tell you and what he also said in relation to that was it. You'll be seeing more in the coming weeks and and we will be seeing more in the coming weeks from from this. Their their playbook for November is a very very clear right. Now we're seeing it from the tweets about the election and see a twenty five when he's Degrading vote by mail and also denigrating having Polling places open so doesn't like to vote by mail also doesn't like people to be able to vote in person and just putting out blatant lies about that misinformation saying that the election is should be invalidated. These votes should be counted. It was really jarring to hear all that I think what the what the tweets showed us over the weekend. Aside from how deranged trump was is there? Glimpse into the future is that he's GonNa try to meddle in as many elections as possible especially if it seems like Democrats have strong pudding. And he's continuing to use the Department of Justice as a political tool and and bill bars going along with it by you know. Filing the motion to dismiss the charges against Flynn completely unclear why and thousands of former justice department employees have said. Wait a minute wait a minute. Wait a minute. This is not how this is supposed to work at all. But that's not GonNa Stop Them. Bar. Trump's personal fixer masquerading as the People's Attorney General. He manipulated the narrative of the Miller report. He intervened to block congressional oversight You know what we call checks and balances and now dismissed the case against Michael. Flynn this Obama Gate stuff that you were talking about this. We're going to see more of this is Going to be manipulated also by bar hand in hand with the power of the Justice Department to be able to weigh in. It's it's actually really scary and with the added compounding of the Russian interference amplifying. This just like they're already amplifying. These demonstrations infiltrating the demonstrators and these groups. You know it's It's a playbook that the Republicans have used used to last election Last presidential election and It's It's in full effect right now. So Yep so. We gotta stay vigilant Fingers are crossed that the dismissal that the DOJ is recommending for. Flynn doesn't make it all the way through. The courts actually happen speaking of the courts. When has been pretty cool? I don't know have you had a chance to listen in on the Supreme Court arguments. There teleworking right now so you can listen to them online and today. They're hearing arguments about the release of trump's personal tax returns that Congress had subpoenaed and at the administration has been blocking Pretty interesting to listen in. I think this is something that they should continue to do. Even after stay at home orders are lifted. I think the arguments and the questions are really interesting. And it's been kind of nerdy fun to see people. You know making predictions As how I think which way the justices are already people. I can't follow all of it. I'll be honest my casual legal background which comes mostly from watching law and order right. Didn't really quick for listening to these. But it's still interesting stuff. They should start every new case with coca comb or theme just to get people's attention now when sound effect that we did here last week when this was I live streamed was a toilet flushing right right so the questions has anyone cop to that. Do we know which one of the justice I don't even want to know too much detail but yeah as as we all get used to this new method of of interacting with each other. Let's just remember to step away to go to the restroom? Put your phone down before you go in or at least hit. Mute. I'm all for multitasking. Much more efficient. But I don't think people should be leave it in another Supreme Court you know circling back to the press conference is one thing that's been coming up. Repeatedly is the Ahmad Armory case down in Georgia. Which you know. The nation has been watching very closely in the last week only because there is now cell phone footage of what appears to be in a stalking attack and murder That happened in broad daylight on a public street a couple of months ago really horrifying footage and we've seen too many of these fortunately because of the power of social media the power of our activists groups. These guys who were walking around free not prosecuted. All there now been arrested. Justice has more of a chance of being served. We'll see how this all plays out but there was a threat. I don't know if you saw that was going around about all the things that You know white people can do that. Black people can't do basic things like going for jog. You know answering their cell phone Reading a book in the car all the all these things that Young Black Men and women have been shot and killed by police or by so-called vigilantes Doing and It's a powerful reminder but this whole episode and the unfolded very quickly was also powerful reminder of the power that we have as individuals and his activist to shine a light on on these things and actually forced the hand of justice. I mean that's a great point but I also think the other point is you know I. I know what you're talking about like I'm black. Of course I knew all of that stuff you know but what it comes down to is the general public needing to believe black people like I said. This shooting happened a couple of months ago and the only reason the only reason that there is any prosecution in this case is because there wasn't just video of the incident but the video was made public And I grew up in Georgia. I know the feeling of approaching people white people sitting in a pickup truck. I've never had anyone pull a gun on me but there is always a little bit of fear that in certain situations in certain communities that that you and I think that so often the black community as a whole is accused. You hear people talking about playing the race card things have changed and you know all the cliches about Oh we. We had a black president. How bad could things be or whatever but this has been going on for a very long time. It happens so much more regularly than we have video for and the ability of people to shoot a little video on their cell phone has been a huge game changer for us. It doesn't mean that things are happening more or less frequently. It's just that justice might be a little bit more likely to to happen because of it. I mean I always have a hard time talking about this stuff as a white male person of privilege. You mentioned Obama Presidency. I mean the big rap on myself and one of the reasons why I work so hard you know. Since trump has been elected I was one of those You know Super Liberal White Dudes. Who was so thrilled? That Obama was and we had our first black president and was had my blinders on a bit about the state of our country and was looking at the arc of history and the civil rights movement. And where we got to and now we have a black president. And Wow we're really heading towards More quality and you know what I didn't really take in was the full extent of what was still happening as you said not on camera you know not with cell phone footage in the stuff that was still going on and one thing that the trump presidency has really brought to light obviously is these white nationalist who have felt emboldened and have come out. And we've and and for many of us we've been able to see more overtly in ways that people of color have seen their whole lives. You know what still exists? You know beyond having our first African American president and it's it's stark in jarring and it shows how much work we have to do. And how vigilant we have to be when you have an administration and Republicans who are so willing to Push that cast that aside because they want to quote unquote make America great again and go back to a different time It makes our work so much more urgent. I absolutely agree with that but the only thing that I will say. Is You know since. We're talking about Georgia. I'll just add it acing. Something like eighty percent of people in Georgia who've been hospitalized with corona virus or black that's a vastly disproportionate part of the population. This is not only a in the last three and a half years. Things have gotten worse. This is a systemic issue And violence against black people is a systemic issue and these things. The disparities in healthcare and environment in violence have been going on for generations. And so yes. It's urgent that we take action because now we see that there are quite literally deadly consequences for all of these disparities but we need to take action in part because we are all to blame for this. This systemic problem. Yeah coronavirus is a perfect example of how people of color are disproportionately affected by my anything that The comes at us. And you know with our interview with Dolores Huerta. She talks a lot about that. And I mean when we talk about numbers of crony of virus cases and fatalities and everything are we including the asylum seekers and immigrants who are in cages on the border still today in those families and people who are not being allowed access and are in Mexico. I mean you know I don't know what those numbers are. But these are people who are undoubtably Getting sick and are being disproportionately affected by this. And don't have any resources to deal with it. We have a we have a lot of people. that we need to make sure don't get left behind in this pandemic and even further left behind in the pinned and the recovery that Shirley must come after it. Oh y'all I work to here. We do. I'm glad we had that discussion to it's it's you know discussions on racer so hard for fragile little white people like myself but it's You know I'm glad that you share that. It's a difficult conversation for you make. It is for a lot of people and And that's that's one of the first things we need to do is go ahead and have difficult conversations with each other you know and half. We have common goals. We want the same things we ought to be able to talk honestly with each other About so we can work together. You know effectively. So we'll keep having the conversation and encourage other people out there listening to you..

Trump Obama Gade Dolores Huerta Georgia president Flynn Supreme Court twitter Department of Justice Si Se Puede Justice Department DOJ Steve Pearson Mexico Mariah Craven Miller Michael Shirley
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

16:55 min | 1 year ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They say what's happening here and maybe it spread maybe it's the fire in the fireplace but it it engages people in a different place and then I feel like we can have the conversation you're listening to Dolores Huerta and Alice waters in conversation with David Nelson this is city arts and lectures you know I think what you said about to some point nine or dial in our broker dealers are the foundation we have a nine chapters of our foundation and we have a monthly meeting every month the general meeting of course the suspended now but in we have food at every meeting at the end of every meeting we have food so our food legend in our organization is quite large you know like and what she was saying mama Montessori you know of the emotional part of it by the touching and I'm just wondering if maybe that's what organizing is also and because when you're organizing people in the way that we organize it and I have to mention federal senior you know he was from the bay area and he's won the Thomas on organized and someone were organizing we really try to touch people's emotions because of and and the emotion that we're trying to to reach them is to make them understand that they have power and once that they can understand that but the only way that we can make some of them just stand that is it would give them examples of people that look like them now people of low income many of them immigrants that people that look like them have been able to accomplish a great improvements in their communities and once they see that in the capture that then then that the side of the motion and I love what you said about Montessori and a learning by doing and because often times people say well we have to have a a workshop but we have to have a class on leadership well my experience is that people learn leadership by doing like getting out there going to your local public US city councilors school board like we do have an I. ducation program you know having parents go to the school board telling them to confront them and recommend improvements like they do now and when they see that that actually improves are implemented then they get they give them that sense of their power in this sense of leadership and even though many of the people of the organized Mike says on television all the way to the eighth grade you know they never had a chance to go to high school go to college but they do understand that they have the power to make changes in the community and I'm just wondering if there is a connection there with the whole Montessori movement absolutely eight when you were talking I remember that during the Bob Scheer campaign when he is running for Congress on an empty for platform and I would go down to Oakland my cell phone my cell and I would go up and knock on the doors okay people and say yeah I was I wanted to talk to them about both sheer and the anti war movement and it really educated me I had no idea you know who I would confront I was shocked please stand and made me who know who who was living in those houses and the circumstances of never forget that but you need we need to just do it and this is what I did to her so much she is just doing get out there and do just you know I was looking at both of your foundation's website to Laura swear to foundation and the edible schoolyard foundation website and I was noticing how much curriculum is on both and I was thinking in this moment in time when everyone is sheltered when children are home when they're being home schooled when their parents are involved with this I was thinking of both of your sites as such a resource for families and what you buy I tell people to go look for there right now in this no this is uncharted moment the cooking with your children yes something really pretty current because children are so interested in being able to make something simple this thing the cooking an egg in the morning just having that inner experiences being out the stereo doing it by themselves cracking had AA whisking and if you run into scrambled eggs but it's it's the simplest thing and it has a very unique and if they feel empowered to end their slots on our website about different things to cook that we know kids love they're easy to do that are affordable and I think that together I think cooking greens making beans I mean there's certain nourishing of someone else it's just kind of the staple make them at the beginning of the week lasts for a long time Alex what's your website there for the edible schoolyard foundation C. mobile schoolyard dot org well I'll definitely partner up with pals with is a and then the thing a lot of people don't know is that thanks funny with the governor Jerry Brown and continue with governor Gavin Newsom right now every school district in California here's what they get extra money for low income children for foster children in for English learners but as part of them getting that extra money and guess what they have to take recommendations from parents and students okay it's called the local control funding formula and then every year and they have to have a community open forum okay make recommendations and I can see that this is a way that we can get the edible schoolyard in as many many schools as possible so we definitely will promote that on our end and I think that we should promote that you know throughout the state of California could handle so many people I would love to follow your model and then thank you know what with your direction then we can make this happen so like you said before right now we're all children of the can do all this great work right now and so our social media and through the internet and get this information out to everyone so in some respects that we can take advantage as for myself I am so happy I wanted to be totally you know on your site if people if parents wanted to bring the children into your world and the sort of father history in the information and what is there are there resources there for parents and kids right now actually I we aren't and later on today or tomorrow that would be getting on the weapon are and we are going to have a curriculum around the dollar's worth of data the teachers from this account when teachers association they've been working on this curriculum curriculum now for several months and we will be finalizing that and that will be put up and done it it was actually contacting school district right now especially since people are doing this online learning in online teaching to include in that those are the foundation of the curriculum in their teaching and so that you don't I was looking to include the medical schools are just part of our curriculum okay so we do your curriculum in our anthropology cation yeah the opportunity to get the word I think the TiVo is the place of equality that if we have children seated at the table eating together all together every lunch time not standing in line picking up food dumping half of it in the garbage wasting it but sitting down and I said mentioned that school lunch could even be connecting it to the academic curriculum so if you're studying for instance the geography of the Arabian peninsula maybe you're eating the fruit of that place at lunch time having some S. N. a P. to print the right to believe salad and those spicy carrot soup and since you're digesting the cultures of the world as an everyday experience earlier about going up in Stockton and how fortunate I was because the heart of that growing up with all of my different friends who were immigrants from different countries is that I love to eat with chopsticks when I was seven years old and you know we are you know the N. double in all the different foods from all of our different friends of the family from Mexico you know I grew up in New Mexico so their food was a little bit different in our food and it was just but just going up to all these different cultures and so connecting and I feel sorry for people that don't have this experience you know that they don't have friends who didn't grow up with people the firm from different countries because I think that they've been deprived in fact someone asked me once for about our president is that what would you say to president trump and sorry for him because he obviously didn't have the great opportunity that I am in Stockton California growing up with all of my friends you know and he I think he had a great insular world you know he didn't have a lot of friends from from different cultures and and and also maybe never had the opportunity to work in the garden to work in a few of the other and I think that's something that everybody needs and the slow the Alice waters of the world so it is very low but that just opens up everyone and to be able to get make that connection with food which is such an essential essential part of our lives let's see is the basic part of our lives right if we can't eat we can't live and if we can't eat good food then of course we damage our bodies instead of healing of bodies making them healthy it makes me think of the garden that Michelle Obama plant and she planned to stay with children at the White House and that image when around the world and it's also a close people to plant their own car there was a big run on seats after after she planted there currently so I've always thought the that the powers that be and then when they're speaking this language like you're speaking it really influences people to to do it you know themselves and it's even if it's not exactly happening we need to imagine that it could help and make well the baking of the Obamas both of you both Delores worked and Alice waters were given a divorce you were given the medal of honor by president Barack Obama Alice you received the national medal of arts and humanities and a lower S. I'm gonna play a little clip from this extraordinary documentary that's been made about you by Peter Bratt and produced in collaboration with Carlos Santana and Benjamin Bratt from independent lands it was shown on PBS I want to run a clip from that film but first alert us to set it up I wonder if you could explain are you well she said weather I mean it's exactly what you're talking about now where that term came from what it means how it came to be well I think it's a very strong the same because it means that the collective I can and in the collective weekend in Spanish it means both things in English at the save several of these if I can get back my my young son the Ricky Madison he says mom you're not alone I come here and I can answer whether that's going to mean that I can't it also means we can working together I think that's why it's it's a powerful slogan and it actually happened in Arizona and his season again the trouble he was in the middle of the twenty five day water only fast and I was trying to get some of our professionals let the nose to come support Cesar he goes on a lot of fear that has all that and they said doing all you can do that and there's ana in California you can do all those things but in Arizona no se puede no you can't in my response to that list yes we can you know see separately and then that's where it came from so I think he came from the university that first started in Arizona in nineteen seventy two why was Caesar on a twenty five day all water fast what was what led to the fast still he was fasting because they have passed along Arizona that if anybody still went on strike they can go to prison if anybody said woke up like welcome the strike and if anybody said boy kind of tried to boycott anything that they could also go to prison and in the long list of eventually that's all not by the Arizona Supreme Court but at that time they passed that law in season was protesting and actually this class was about a cake in the fear taking the fear out of the heart of the growers so that they wouldn't be afraid of the farm workers in the David S. C. farm workers as as our partners end up not not to focus as well as also purposes first one was for non violence would you do he didn't delay you know and in nineteen sixty eight you know when there is honor in nineteen seventy two I was as I mentioned so the people would not be afraid of each other and then the last one that he did his thirty six day France was against pesticides into it to make our food safe in those we see as we celebrated his birthday yesterday we remember well let's take a moment and let's go to a clip so this is the moment at the ceremony I will add this Dolores received the national medal of honor the same year as Bob Dylan is that right well actually medal of freedom medal of freedom my apologies medal of freedom and Alice he received the medal of arts and humanities the Sameer amongst others as Stephen King out along with a roster of others anyway just to markets in time let's see that clip yeah I was gonna say that actually the other person Toni Morrison we see that when I did Bob Dylan and the granddaughter of great great granddaughter of Juliette low the founder of the.

Dolores Huerta David Nelson
Larry Itliong and the Great Delano Grape Strike

Long Distance

09:16 min | 1 year ago

Larry Itliong and the Great Delano Grape Strike

"Year is nineteen sixty five. The Vietnam War is escalating. I have today ordered. Tha Nam the Air Mobile Division and certain other footage which will raise our fighting strength from seventy five thousand one hundred and twenty five thousand men almost immediately X. is assassinated Jeff Van. The gunfire went off and his hand was up. I remember turned around and the next thing I saw smell come falling back in the jet. Martin Luther King Junior leads a series of civil rights marches in Selma Alabama. They I want to say to the state of Alabama. Just want to say to the people as a matter of and the nations of the world that we are not about turnaround. We own the move. Now yes we on the move and Norway racism the Bannon and in California farmworkers faced with racial discrimination and economic hardship organizing for their rights as workers. And as okay so quick recap on the history of farm workers on the West Coast and specifically California. Immigrants had been exploited as cheap farm labor for years. I Chinese Japanese migrants then Filipino. Nationals arrived in the nineteen twenties. Mexicans became a large part of the farm labor force around time but also just poor folks of all backgrounds looking for work. Black White Brown were exploited. They lived in shabby wooden houses near the fields. They worked for hours under the Sun. Some even lived in former concentration camps which house Japanese Americans during their internment in World War. Two since they first started coming over in the nineteen twenties Filipino. Farmworkers had tried negotiating for better working conditions and wages with their bosses. Usually white guys called growers beheld. Strikes started organizations and unions. They were often met with violence. Or they'd lose their jobs. Gore's were higher other ethnic groups. Instead scabs to their strikes like the immigrants who came before them Filipinos were thought of as hard workers who were obedient easy to control but they were also militant having lived through years of race. Riots shootouts violent. Confrontations with police growers SCABS. It wasn't uncommon for Filipinos to draw knives on the picket line. Larry it Leon came up in this old school. Militant tradition of striking labor organizing and by the nineteen sixties. He was a leader of a union that represented farmworkers call the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee. A Walk which was supported by a larger union the AFL CIO. Larry worked the likes of Mexican American activists. Dolores Huerta and Filipino. American organizers Philip Aracruz. Who called Larry the most powerful Filipino leader in a walk? He had the most experience. I mean he'd been in a lot of strikes you know and he was the head of a walk at the time this. Miriam Powell a journalist and historian who spent almost a decade writing books and articles about another famous Labor leader Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers which we'll get to in a bit in terms of the nuts and bolts like being a Labor leader running a union. Larry was the guy absolutely. That's where story picks back up as a union organizer and leader one of Larry's jobs is to visit farms in the Central Valley to recruit. New members moves his family to Delano. Where he the mostly Filipino. Workers in May nineteen sixty five opportunity knocks in nearby. Coachella valley where there are also Filipino. Workers who need help. Here's Patrick again. As older Larry. Here's some workers did a dollar forty in our Filipinos are getting a dollar twenty five an hour. Now that don't make sense to me. It's time to strike okay so to strike meant. The workers would stop working until their employers. The growers listen to the demands but striking farmworkers wasn't going to be easy they were going against big agricultural business agribusiness. The man agribusiness was the most powerful industry in California at that time. Million Powell again arm workers were really the poorest people who also had no protection all of this sort of existing health safety and labor laws that applied to other professions. Do not apply to farm workers could be fired at will. They be made to work any kinds of hours or no restrictions no health or safety requirements so for them to take on this enormously powerful industry a was a huge talent when the farmworkers decide to go on strike in the Coachella Valley. They don't go to the fields to work. Instead we pick it in demand for better wages. They held up signs march. Saying chant confront the growers. They don't get paid and some workers are even arrested. But in ten days the growers give in the workers get their fifteen cent raise. Let's pick these grapes. After the harvest Larry in the farmer workers head north to the next job the grape fields of Delano. Where they hope to get the same rates but the growers refused to give the farmworkers meeting a community. Space might remember called Filipino Hall. Let's do this. Delano has a thriving Filipino community with lots of farm workers and members of eight walk so they actually establish a Filipino Hall. And at this meeting it is packed. It's mostly Filipinos but there are also some members who aren't the Black Puerto Rican Mexican even white their backgrounds different. But they all have one thing in common. You've suffered enough under the growers and they want real change now. Really neither raised by public actress on this anymore. We are getting any younger. We need better wages and union today. Dude these courses suck breezing my us of here. Larry and the other union leaders here the farm workers but understandably they have concerns if we strike. You might lose your house. You might lose your car. Your family might be on the streets. Hungary. It's going to be tough. Are you sure you want this farm? Workers decide to vote on whether or not they should go on strike back. My name is John Arlington born and raised here in Delano in present day Filipino Hall. I talked to John Arlington. Whose Father Mariano Lila Farmington also known as Bob was a Filipino immigrant and Delano farmworker. He was in Filipino Hall. That Fateful Day my dad and our family were part of a long agriculture workers organizing committee and with Larry. And Leon Philip the Veracruz People Osco and so many others were here in this hall. I'm talking to you now. In September seventh nineteen sixty five where we had a day long second meeting about the strike. And when Larry asked if anyone could make a motion regarding strike my father stood and made the motion to begin the great strike that started in Delano. Bob's made the motion to go on. Strike those in favor of the strike. Stand up and raise your hands high. Okay so what the heck everyone standing up. We're going on a strike you crazy. Bill Pinos Next Day September eighth nineteen sixty five the farmworkers show up at the grape vineyards ready for work according to the documentary Delano Manos by Marissa. Arroyo just like any other day at work. The farmer workers started picking Ripe Grapes on the vines. Then they'd set them down on the ground they move onto the next Bein. Fake Red Grapes. Set them down. Here's a clip from the film with organizer United Farmworkers Vice President. Pete Velasco we pick the ripe grapes and trim it and then move onto the next by under the same thing at moon. Our there are a lot of big grapes under that is when about the thousand five hundred. Pretty Pianos went on strike against the grape growers in

Larry Delano Filipino Hall Agricultural Workers Organizin California Coachella Valley Miriam Powell Alabama Delano Manos Leon Philip Martin Luther King Norway Dolores Huerta Air Mobile Division West Coast Selma Alabama Jeff Van AFL
"dolores huerta" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"All even got snaps out. I think I speak for most of the people in this room when I say we look at you and think wow. This woman is fearless fearless. So tell me about the last time you were afraid I think right now I am afraid for our world world. I mean when we think of global warming and What's happening to our country into our world When again putting and the promise of humanity might see when people think of drilling in the Arctic because there's oil under the ice and when they do that it's is going to greet more global warming is going to make more methane and the plan is going to get hotter? It comes back to the electoral process about electing people. They're going to make sure that we can change. And I don't really know a lot about the green new deal. I know we've heard mentioned but I think part of the green new deal is putting in some dates out there. When can we get away from using fossil fuel for energy? We've already got the technology so again. It's a matter of will. It's a matter ladder of not just thinking about problems. But what can we do to save our planet. And that's when you asked me you know why don't I retire. I can't because we've got to to get the word out there. The people that they've got to get involved when you talk about the electoral process it brings to mind. Alexandra Cossio Cortez. Who is certainly one of the most is prominent Latinas if not the most prominent Latina in politics today? Do you see a connection between the work. She is doing and the enthusiasm she she inspires and the work that you have dedicated your life to. Oh absolutely because I think she got elected by doing a grassroots campaign in not going going to wealthy donors. And that's what we have to do. We have to go back to grassroots. I may not agree with her candidacy. I immediately issues sanders. Actually Supporting Camera Harris Okay. Okay because I think it's time for a woman. Okay women to take power. Winning are often taught not to take credit. I think let s are taught that especially it. has there been a time in this work that you have not been given the credit that you deserved. Oh let me count the Times. No I can name so many many times this happened and actually I think. A lot of women We are Kinda the field that we try to take credit for work that we're being conceited. I think the one word that is important for women to really use the word courage Ridge your courage to stand up for ourselves in this. Oh hard pros to do and you know I did the great boycott. I directed the great boycott on the East Coast on the West Coast To make sure that we got the growers to the bargaining table. I negotiated the contract but the day that they took the picture signing signing the contracts which I had just go she hated and I had just done the boycott to get the girls to the table. I wasn't in the picture. Okay why AW. Because I wasn't even in that frame of mind and I was sitting next to Caesar signed signed the contracts and vice president. You didn't Levy said. Do you mind if I sit there and I got up and gave them my chair really. Yes I did that. And so when you see you. Those very historic picture of the contract means sign. I'm not in that picture. Would you say that was a mistake. That was a very bad mistake and I know sometimes and I have to say this to myself often that when we find it hard to take credit for our work that we have to do it on behalf of women everywhere. You're in this artist about being conceited. But we have to do it for other women in the. I think you've seen that to myself because we're so conditioned and socialize is not to take credit or not to put ourselves out there in front you know and I love that saying a women's places where she wants to be a woman's places where she needs to be and I like to say when you see these big pictures of all of these men banking having meetings with this is the g seven or whoever they are and there are no feminists at that table. You can be sure they're gonNA make the wrong decision okay. They'RE GONNA make the wrong decision because they do. Lot have our intuition. They do not have our voices at the table when we talk about why women don't take credit. Part of it is that there is a penalty that women face when they do take credit. which is that we become less likable? I mean probably would have been manifest if you said No. I'm sitting in the seat and you can't have it sorry. Do you care whether or not other people like you. Can you do the the work you do and care about what other people are thinking of you. Well I think it depends who your enemies are you know. I think that something. The Bible says something like that when you're doing a God's work when you're doing justice work can people curse you criticizing. We have to consider it a blessing. Because you know you're doing the right thing so yeah people do say mean things terrible things but that's okay as long as did you have faith in what you're doing is the right thing. You're trying to help others. Then you have to just ignore what people say about you know and just keep doing the work year said than done. You have eleven children I have to. I can barely keep track of them. So that's my first question. which is how do you keep track of eleven children dron and how because I find this so hard as a mother perhaps the single greatest challenge of being a mother which is how I instill in them these values and these principles with which I have lived my life? Well I think to all mothers a Just bring your children along with you. Whatever you do my kids Kinda grew up in the moment and So it's part of the DNA basically they were on marches and and my son Rick my youngest son. He has really good way of saying this. Those of you that see the documentary. Dolores my son says yeah. My mother abandoned us in the parking lot of a store with a bunch of leaflets that we had a pass out and when people would come up and say you'll Connie's go back to Mexico says we we can't we don't have a ride okay so I grew up in the moment and even though my kids grew up really poor I just have to say. They're very resources will. My oldest son is a doctor. My daughter Angela's and oncology nurse My daughter Juanita became a teacher. Might might sending meals and attorney. And he's he's running for office this series for supervisor my daughter at least me right here. She's actually traveling me right right now. And she's working for our foundation so I mean my kids My Son Business Chef now. He's into real estate. Unfortunately unfortunately but anyway I wanted them all to be organizes but of course they all took their own paths. But they have to do but the thing is that. Bring your children with you. In the you're saying that you can teach them. As a legacy of justice you know because when when active and they grow up and go marches and they feel that energy and that power of people working together for a cause. I think that stays with them to live. What price have you paid for dedicating your life to this work well I? I don't think I paid the price I think my children probably paid a price war. Gazillion we weren't able to get mentioned. You my my mother did for US Glenn Up you know having all of these Wonderful Events and I remember being in Washington. DC once and we're going to about Leeann my daughter when he does it to me. I've never been to a badly before I thought. Oh my gosh you know when I grew up you know. We had the sympathy tickets and we were able to see all this wonderful performances and Mike. Kit didn't have of that. I had the piano lessons et dancing lesson the violin lessons. My children didn't have any of that and I think those are the sacrifices not that I made with the Mike is made and so for you. Nothing you really feel like you've not paid a price for this work. I had a very blessed life. I think I've been very very fortunate. And and Thinking of how many people have been able to organize and empower. I mean that means such an incredible gift to be able to do that and and I would hope that all of us can do the same thing there. Okay go out there and Organiz as many people as you can get them involved and take away that apathy here. Here's my last question which ages as you said. This is a moment in which even you the fearless are afraid and I think it can feel like is very dark times. What do you say to yourself in those moments when you have to organize and mobilize yourself? Well I just saying saying to myself we've got to get out there and do more work you know I like to the The Chilean poet Pablo and he said they can cauliflowers. But they can't hold back this spring and so I like to say that we are the gardeners that we have to sell the seats of justice. Don't in those those seeds of justice that we saw so not there. They will flower in. They will come back and but we're the ones that have to give a big round of applause..

the Times Mike Alexandra Cossio Cortez Arctic courage Ridge DC East Coast Levy Organiz Caesar Pablo Washington Rick Connie
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So there was a rally. I think it was March nineteen sixty eight in a park in Delano at the end of say SARS fast. And there were a good several thousand people there and. Robert Kennedy had flown in to celebrate the end of Chavez's fast. And it was just a week later announced. He was running for the democratic nomination for president he'd become your friend. He was the unions friend. Oh, yes. We we actually knew this Senator before the fast, and he had already done some work for us. Raise money to for one of our clinics, and he had been out. Actually, he was in Delano before. We started the pilgrimage. He been loaded actually a couple of days before to do a hearing, and this, oh, he had already been very fun. Just impact the police tried to stop the pilgrimage, which is ridiculous. They went in. They were actually had when the pilgrimage started. There was a whole line of police in front of the marches incentive. Kennedy had to call the police in essence, what did he think he was doing stuff this pilgrimage? It was ridiculous. But but he had been very close to us. And of course, we all work, very hard. We were doing the campaign for him in Los Angeles. And he's Los Angeles in south central sensuous getting people to vote for Senator Kennedy. So he had been a very good friend from the very beginning by movement, and you were on the stage standing right beside him the night of his winning the California Democratic presidential priming. Of course, that was the unforgettable evening when he was shot. Well, it was it was a huge loss for every put the world have not just for the farmer could move, but for everybody because we know that history in United States would be very different teddy not been assassinated. But we were right in the middle of. The great boycott during that time. And so we just had to keep moving forward and keep working. It was it was a great loss. More from Dolores Huerta, and our other guests when we continue on this special edition of peace talks radio the nonviolent path of Cesar Chavez back in a moment..

Senator Kennedy Cesar Chavez Delano Dolores Huerta Senator United States president California
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There was a rally. I think it was March nineteen sixty eight in a park in Delano at the end of say SARS fast. And there were a good several thousand people there and Robert Kennedy had flown in to celebrate the end of Chavis as fast, and it was just a week later that he announced he was running for the democratic nomination for president he'd become your friend. He was a unions friend. Oh, yes, we were very high. We actually knew Senator before the fast, and he had already done some work for us. He had raise money to for one of our volunteer clinics. And he had been out. Actually, he was in Delano before. We started the pilgrimage. He had been noted actually a couple of days before to do a hearing and this, oh, he had already been very fun. Just impact the police tried to stop the. Pilgrimage which is ridiculous. They went in. They were actually had when the pilgrimage started a whole line of police in front of the of the marches in Senator Kennedy had the college chief of police in essence, what did he think he was doing stuff this pilgrimage? It was ridiculous. But but he had been very close to us. And of course, we work very hard. We were doing the campaign for him in Los Angeles. And he's Los Angeles in south central sensuous getting people to vote for Senator Kennedy. So he had been a very good friend from the very beginning by movement, and you were on stage. Standing right beside him the night of his winning the California Democratic presidential priming. Of course, that was the unforgettable evening when he was shot. Well, it was it was a huge loss for every put the world have not just for the farmer could move for everybody because we know that history in nine hundred states would be very different teddy not been assassinated. But we were right in the middle of the great boycott during that time. And so we just had to keep moving forward and keep working. It was a great loss. More from Dolores Huerta, and our other guests when we continue on the special edition of peace talks radio the nonviolent path of Cesar Chavez back in a moment..

Senator Kennedy Los Angeles Delano Senator Dolores Huerta Chavis Cesar Chavez president California
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:01 min | 3 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are some players and coaches just too big to fail urban Meyer has won one. National title at high state and to Florida they are. Very reluctant to fire of admire so too big a fail to, successful the failed also factor here that's. Next time on here now here now coming up in half an hour to, eleven, o'clock followed by an hour of the takeaway it's a rebroadcast of non voters Welcome to, forum I'm, Michael Krasny one rarely hears about farm workers rights without also hearing about Cesar Chavez legendary efforts to secure them not so for his organizing partner Dolores Huerta whose contributions to, the labor movement are, equally important she co founded. The union that became the United farm. Workers, coordinated nationwide grape and lettuce boycotts and, the documentary Deloris recognizes her work and her activism Deloris was directed by Peter Brandon I spoke with both, of them last year and I asked where to about the origins. Of the great boycott well. Actually I, I like to. Refer to the fact that when we started the the great boycott a Caesar, wanted to boycott potatoes and I told season season when people think of. Potato they think of Idaho they don't think a California so that is. One argument that one well you want a few more than that and a lot. Of people don't realize just how important you were in. Terms of not only the movement but what the results were that, movement and changes that have occurred you're. Talking about an alliance for example With, feminism at, one point you were very much as a Catholic woman opposed to, abortion and there's a lot about the movie in your relationship. With Gloria Steinem. And you came aboard I mean in terms of choice log I took, a lot of thinking because then at the end of the day we have to realize that if a woman cannot control. Her own body she can't control her own life and this is a very important issue, and, I think that abortion needs to be normalized so that the again the Republicans cannot, get. Keep using that as a as a social sticks speak to confused people and I always liked to quote the Mexican, president Benito, Juarez who said respecting other people's lives is peace and so I had eleven children I want people to respect that also want to speak as somebody else who decides to, have any children it's, all I think this is. A right that women need to have. Because, of the cause and your passion for, the cause you gave up a lot as far as family was concerned and your children in fact speak, in the film about going through some a lot of pain a. Lot of her because her, mother was isn't there their mother was out on the picket lines or their mother was organizing or their mother was devoted to la casa that i think my children turn up by my oldest son p the l. is a doctor ease up a family practice doctor my send a meal as an attorney running for congress and the twenty fifth congressional district down there in the central valley and have a daughter who's a teacher donna who's a nurse you know my daughter marilyn lebron's at y._w._c._a. center and my daughter can mail with my executive director graduated from college and so all my kids are very active and you know they're very politically astute and they survived them home but they go up in the moment and we always had a you know daycare for the kids we had him on a sorry the first day care for farmers could children actually in city california so the kids were never alone but they did give up i get spending time but then they also grew up in the movement they were also very devoted to you when you were looted in my introduction to the fact that you were beaten by a police officer i wonder by the way that officer was ever arrested or ever came to justice No he wasn't in fact I was his fifth victim he had beaten up to the women his wife and his mistress and two African American, men before he beat me up and I don't think he ever had any kind of punishment for that you had your spleen removed you're in the hospital for, months, mean you had. Negra broken, ribs and, the thing that was so, moving with your children were there they were I mean with you. Twenty four hours pretty much anywhere let's talk. To Peter Brad who's also with us director of the Laura's again, it's a documentary about the life of activists Dolores Huerta and actually, less time, Peter Brad was here. He's with his brother Benjamin, many, of you know from his all of his television appearances and movie. Work who also wrote and directed, two thousand nine film lemon. Which took place in, the mission district here in San Francisco what a. Joy to work with Dolores Huerta sure is Michael Dolores wetter and Carlos Santana and Sorrento was your money man here he was but my, also work with an incredible team of San Francisco filmmakers and they are by nature I worked, with a phenomenal editor Jessica cognition archive of producer temperature tally and and. My my brother from another. Mother Brian Benson who was a producer and we should mention Carlos, Santana here because he had a lot to do with this and even talked. About being, by the side of his mother and an. Early demonstration and his mother, was afraid and he said mom you have. To, stand up for causes an omission homeboy so he's he's also San Francisco homeboy. And and it was. Actually he who had this, idea to, tell the, story about the lowest he called up and he he he put a stake in the ground he said I'll, financed the found but we have to do this right now, of course when he said that you know we can foresee this was a five year process we can foresee the current political climate so, I feel like Carl's is a very sensitive artistic soul and he he tuned into something in I'm. Just so, glad that arrive right now. Because we we need this. Film right, now and you got a. Lot of voices in here though, I mean you know a, friend, Luis, Valdez plays a very important part and he, actually saw, Delano when the Lord is leading Sheehan Cesar Chavez leading farmworkers area said this is it you know I know this is what my life had at that point dedicated to Louis a questions the, filmmaker too he's considered the. The godfather of, Chicano, theater La Bomba LA Bamba and Zoot suit and like. You said in the film you know, he he was not an easy follower but he saw of close and insys and Sessa and he said he had no, choice, but to follow him did you consider. You know, the the whole argument, about both sides here I mean did you. Wanna get, the growers in there, because there's, one moment for. Example where a woman says it. Sounds like a frankly ignorant woman she. Says all our workers are happy we have no, labor troubles. You know, it's almost ironic and terrible To hear that kind of voice, but there were some. Thoughtful growers there are some reasonable people who felt that Chavez was pushing? Too hard, or whatever do you wanna capture I felt? Like we represented the, opposition wasn't, just growers also politician, there was governor Reagan at the time. You got, that footage of Reagan few. California's senators who who likened. The equated, the boycott effort has blackmail And really try to discredit the unionisation efforts so I mean we I try to use the archival inevitable but. I think, the with the film shot really. Tries to achieve his is. To chronicle the evolution of this incredible American figure there is a moment where growers are referred to as to rich too powerful to racist. And you get the sense that I mean as you move along the trajectory of the, development of the farm workers movement of, just, how impoverished the lives were these people I mean they were living in terrible conditions. They were wage slaves basically and. Then of course later exposed all those pesticides and how entrenched racism is and how. It impacts everything from? Social policy to economic policy and the irony is eight years ago. When Obama was was sitting in the White House you've heard a lot of. People saying we we live in a post racial society and today You have the outright marching in the streets you know with swastikas in in wearing hoods and you see the. Part of, your pile last week and now. The striking down of Dhaka. Again I think race, is informing a lot of these decisions in these policies well here's another clip since you mentioned President Obama from the. Film that I'd like listeners to hear where there's a discussion of the origin of activists, using a phrase which became very of, course, popular and widespread during the Obama administration see Safeway.

Dolores Huerta Sheehan Cesar Chavez San Francisco president California Deloris Carlos Santana Obama governor Reagan Peter Brad Gloria Steinem United farm Meyer Michael Krasny officer Florida producer Idaho La Bomba LA Bamba Safeway
Many oppose new Census citizenship query

To the Best of Our Knowledge

03:07 min | 3 years ago

Many oppose new Census citizenship query

"Their children are being ripped away from them kennedy joined labor activists dolores huerta announcing a twenty four a day hunger strike in support of separated families she says forty one members of the extended kennedy family have agreed to fast for twenty four hours and then pass passed along to other people trump administration meanwhile says it has reunited more than five hundred migrant children with their families and those the location of all of the others who remain in its custody the department of homeland security released a fact sheet last night in the face of criticism at the administration does not have a system in place results from today's elections in turkey expected to begin coming in later today turks voting for a new president register tie up eric von seeking a new fiveyear term impairs peter kenyon reports voters also choosing a new parliament strongest challenges coming from moharram engine candidate for turkey's main secular party air on sounded confident of victory at his final campaign rally engine meanwhile has promised to camp out at turkey these election headquarters to ensure a proper vote count these elections will usher in a new governing system for turkey with the prime minister's job disappearing and executive powers transferring to the president a coalition of four opposition parties is formed in hopes of keeping air to one's ruling ak party from retaining a clear majority in parliament opinion polls not always reliable in turkey generally have air to one in front but not necessarily by a wide enough margin to avoid a second round runoff with ngo peter kenyon npr news assembled ahead of the us census bureau says the agency is expecting some people to skip the controversial new citizens question on forum so the upcoming twenty twenty cents as npr's hansi lo wong reports refusing to answer a census question or giving a false answer intentionally can lead to a fine although the government has rarely enforced policy speaking phoenix arizona to the national association of latino elected and appointed officials the acting director of the census bureau ron jarman explained the agency may not have enough resources to follow up with every household that skips the citizenship question of the questionnaires incomplete or has some odd answers in it we don't follow up on all of those cases but in some cases we will follow up on the bureau he's trying to get access to citizenship information from existing records from us citizenship in immigration services the social security administration and the state department ozzy luang npr news phoenix arizona and you're listening to npr news the vatican has convicted one of its diplomats to the us for viewing and sharing child pornography christopher live say reports this is the first time a papal diplomat has been convicted by vatican court for such crimes that it can tribunal immediately sentence monsignor carlo capella to five years in prison and issued a five thousand euro fine for sending and receiving child pornography during his trial the priests confessed to engaging in one on one chats and the blogging site tumbler while stationed in washington dc the united states had asked the vatican drop capellas diplomatic immunity in order to prosecute him in the us the vatican refused the trial inside the city state walls was seen as a test of the catholic church is transparency amid successive priest sexabuse scandals around the globe pope francis recently apologized for his handling of widespread abuse in chile and spoke of a culture of abuse and cover up for npr news i'm christopher lives say in rome any theo pius health minister says a second person has died after yesterday's explosion at a rally in the capital for the new prime minister abiotic met the health minister posted a tweet today sending his condolences to the victims family into all ethiopians witnesses say a man tried to throw a grenade scores of others were wounded in zimbabwe the source of an explosion at a rally for president emmerson managua remains unclear mnangagwa's gaped on harmed he says he was inches from the blast but that it is not his time symboblic is preparing to hold the country's first elections since the ouster of robert mugabe they are to be held at the end of next month i'm trial snyder npr news from washington.

Kennedy Dolores Huerta Twenty Four Hours Five Years Fiveyear
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KPCC

"I think you see a calmness about him particularly at the end of his life he's doing exactly what he was meant to do and everything you know whether good or horrific has contributed to the politician that he would become you look at a number of social issues that bobby kennedy really cared about i'm gonna talk about children and poverty and this is a clip from marian wright edelman who is a leading advocate for children she founded the children's defense fund and she's talking about kennedy's transformation after he sees poor children robert kennedy was not poor i thought it was going to be listening and learning is also very curious he didn't talk a whole lot but he would ask a lot of questions you know anything about the program no and i was very moved by how he related to children so kennedy was born into money and he jokes in the documentary at one point that he doesn't even need to run for office because he's got so much money lying around how did kennedy come to see people less fortunate than himself and why did he care so much about income disparity in poverty i think there were a number of factors that contributed to his his empathy and i think that empathy was sincere one was certainly his religion he was a very very devout catholic and he took the messages of his church to heart another was how important his politics and service a life of service was important in his family and was dressed in his family but i think one of the most significant was his interactions with people who were concerned about marginalized communities his interactions with harry belafonte with james baldwin with cesar chavez and dolores huerta and those people invited him to come see for himself to come experience what poverty actually was and you know to their credit they invited him and to his credit he accepted one of the things i wanted to get across is that this was a process it was a.

marian wright edelman harry belafonte cesar chavez bobby kennedy james baldwin dolores huerta
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KPCC

"Same conversations we're having now these are conversations we were having back in the sixties and the fifties and i just wanna say one thing too that people in our country do not understand how i country was built and how it's even not with immigrants that are doing all of the heavy work just limping that the movie does show in the nation so there's no appreciation gratitude there there's no recognition and so we've got to go back to our educational systems we've got a teach with the contributions have been people of color of women of labor unions we would have an eight hour day we wouldn't have safety standards we wouldn't have minimum wages if it were not for the labor unions public education we wouldn't have that and so i think the one thing that may come out of all of this is that when we see the ugly face of racism and you know what it is brought us to our society that then everybody's has a say okay it's time that we ended this cancer it's time to ended the demagogically against women you know women are treated like lesser human beings and you know we've got and the hate against you know people are lgbt community and so i think it's a call to arms it's a call to action for all of our society to say everybody we've got to step up and we've got to change i have not our democracy cannot sustain itself we cannot have a democracy if not everyone is treated equally and the people do not participate dolores huerta is the subject of the documentary dolores peter bratt is the film's writer director and producer delores thank you so much.

dolores huerta director dolores peter bratt writer producer eight hour
Jordan Peele makes history as first black writer to win best original screenplay Oscar

02:49 min | 3 years ago

Jordan Peele makes history as first black writer to win best original screenplay Oscar

"Powerful sound of new voices of different voices of our voices joining together in a mighty chorus that is finally saying times up that course supporting women continued when frances mcdormand won best actress for her portrayal as a grieving mother in three billboards outside ebbing missouri if i may be so honored to have all the female nominees in every category stand with me in this room tonight the actor if you do it everybody else will come on the filmmaker but elector mccotter for she left the stage with two words inclusion rider in the press room dormant explain what that means there has always been available to all uh everybody that get that doesn't go she eishin on a film and inclusion writer which means that you can ask for it and or demand at least fifty percent diversity in that not only the casting but also the crew and so the fact that we that i just learned that after thirty five years of being in the film business it's not we're not going back so the whole idea of women trending now no trending african americans trend dane now new trending it changes now it was in a store when for jordan peel the first african american to win best original screenplay he wrote and directed the comedy horror film get out on he dedicated as oscar to all those who allowed him to raises voices of filmmaker back stage he talked about this moment for black filmmakers roma god it's it's a renaissance i almost never became a director because there is such a shortage of role models we have spike we are john singleton we had the people's is we had the hands brothers but they felt like the exception to the rule i'm i'm so proud to be a part of a time the beginning of of a movement where i feel like the best films in every genre are are are being brought to to to me by my fellow black directors the oscars ceremony also honored its members from many cultures from immigrants who won awards such as best actor gary oldman from england to those who presented the awards loop in yanga from kenyan mexico and khamelnov and johnny from pakistan and the show's politics included just about every other movement a performance of a song from the nominated film marshall featured political activist toronto burt from the mi2 movement and he nodded farmworkers founder dolores huerta and others from planned parenthood too standing rock they stood in the spotlight on stage as common route four loss of life.

Frances Mcdormand Missouri Writer Oscar Director Gary Oldman England Mexico Pakistan Marshall Dolores Huerta Jordan John Singleton Toronto Burt Founder Thirty Five Years Fifty Percent
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is marketplace i'm car results zip where there is a phrase you might know yes we can president obama used the during his two thousand eight campaign he stole it actually as he has admitted from the united farmworkers was commonly known though is who actually came up with it not as you might think so chavez deloris worth at cofounded the uaw which of is in 1962 it's her line and there's new documentary out about dolores huerta directed by peter brett carlos santana is the executive producer guys thanks come in the studio welcomed broker thank you have in us how did this when we come to pass see the man sitting mission was yes is your idea how how come because i felt it her story needs to come to light so the other women specifically in man but specifically woman all over the world india africa south america can recognize the value of your inner superpowers you know 442 low women have been reduced to something that is not quite so when quality so much archival footage in this film and a lot of interviews with her kid she had has eleven children he spent a lot of time sitting now the kids and one of them says at one point the movement was her favorite cia became her number one truck came ruin her moonshell air and that sort of hit me i mean the choices she made to serve those who who cancer of themselves as somebody else in the film says had serious and lasting impact on an owner kits they talk about this right you have before making the film a i new a few for children oh digits cali though edged the i'll fight for social justice in one way or another and really care the same fires and mother and i just vote in order to tell the story it had to be a family story in declares as as latinos the families at the centre of life and and i just felt that their voice you know i would add so much dimension and and you do see the sacrifice i do think certain individuals come come to the planning commission and throw yeah that's pretty loose exhibit in its and she's definitely one of those those great souls that came here with the mission chillier no no chose well it's so there's there's a there's a joint interview with.

obama uaw dolores huerta america cia cancer social justice president chavez peter brett carlos santana executive producer
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're gonna pass along let the d mistake here and that they're going to try to split the community to get the dream is all these young people who fought so hard for this action uh then to say okay we're going to support the republican party in 2018 i think 2018 we have the opportunity to bring a wall of congressional democrats to stop the policies of trump retargeting dolores huerta ecofin of united farmworkers president of the delors where to foundation and the subject of a new film by benjamin bratt call the laura switches a documentary about her life is an activist and flows were talking about partisan politics is a moment in the film where you say republicans hate latinos uh this is when there was consideration in arizona about ethnic studies and a lot of hot water for that and there was a lot of nato that was directed against who not only by republicans but you know being too partisan and the like well i mean we can see that it it in and continues to play itself out any guess would that would sessions and trump doing today are they continued getting to have that playbook against the latinos and mexicans in particular but they need the mexican and latinos so don't they in terms of votes so they've been trying to get him an event of corral them for years now well i think they have a very short range fan of mentality and strategy because ultimately in and they should look at what happ i'm here in california with of this when eighty seven in a which really motivated latinos to become citizens into yesterday vote until boat and so we have a beautiful blue state in california and a lot of that is due to our latinos at our voting and as the film points i you had a lot to do with getting people out there are getting the vote letting people registering i mean you became hey if you 25 you were involved in writing legislation you're young woman in the young mother and i mean your whole story is really very captivating but of course one of the major facets who comes ruinous film is a caesar overshadowed everything i mean it was kind of a much eastman this.

republican party president laura arizona nato california blue state eastman dolores huerta benjamin bratt
"dolores huerta" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

Politico's Off Message

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

"The wasn't off message i am i think they're they're today's guest dolores huerta the famous or infamous labour leader for a little after the fact labor day theme here if you're like most people you've heard of cesar chavez but you may not have heard of horta which says something about had the history of the '60s and the labor movement unfolded and how it's been told since she cofounded what became the united farmworkers were shove as in the 1960s led some of the marches and the great boycotts that transformed the farm labour system in california and then across the country she's also the one who came up both cease if way yes we can forty plus years before barack obama adopted as his own landing on the line by happenstance in conversation one night organizing in arizona that like a lotta for story has almost been lost a history though is the focus of a new movie a better life called dc to remember deloris where to was in washington last week i sat down with her to talk about what our view on the current moment is given her history in the labor movement i think the '60s are back was her line and the sense that i got into in the article up on our website at politico dot com do you want to get a sense of who she is and how she's been a presence right in front of you even if you don't realize it take a look at a photo a bobby kennedy's victory speech the investor hotel the night he won the 1968 california primary she's right there at his right and as we talked about she feels a little lingering guilt from that night about not saying more about the feeling the security was a little light.

cesar chavez horta california barack obama arizona deloris washington bobby kennedy dolores huerta
"dolores huerta" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"She really started and led with cesar chavez something that i love about her story is that we really even today base a lot of what we know about labor organizing an and political organizing in general from the united farmworkers i'm today a lot of organizers go through trading at harvard university with marshall ganz shut out to him did you go through that trade i was an f l don't talk about it yes yeah well he talks about it because he actually was a harvard dropout marshall ganz who went to join cesar chavez and dolores huerta during the strike movement and they were so successful because they were able to actually engage the public so they were able to take a an issue related to paying farm workers a basic living wage which is already on the books ride this was like the minimum wage had already been established but they were being skirted that basic human writer that be said workers right um through a few different loopholes and what marshall ganz always points to was the tactics that they engaged actually made it very easy for the average american consumer to understand how they can make a difference and that's one of the basic lessons of organizing his tell me what i can do and why it's significant so people started boycotting nationwide the buying of california grapes in the grocery store that so incredible because it really underscores the importance of storytelling and making people see what what's at stake making them feel it and see it and understand it in their bones not just throwing a bunch of facts and figures about why they shouldn't do this or why they shouldn't do that but really illustrating why like what's at stake here and how they are a part of it and i just think it's so important to note that.

harvard university marshall ganz cesar chavez writer dolores huerta california
"dolores huerta" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"That to be undone right it's just became part of the culture and really shut out to rosie the riveter for launching a million easy feminists halloween costume still true today as joe have you ever benazir have i was real i have yeah it's an easy how many of you all were if you were tag items in bodos i'm sure a lot of y'all were i'd love to see that our instagram um but rose he was a fictional character writes that she was she was sort of a she was a symbol an icon for women entering the workforce like you said into those otherwise traditionally male spaces and what that meant was like the unions that had been present for those male spaces women were also entering sort of industries that had more labor organizing and during this time women became much more involved in the labor rights movement one of those women who we'd like to once again sort of zoom in on um was heavily involved when it came to the national farmworkers association right by his side throughout the entire uh founding of the national farmworkers association was dolores huerta and she ended up becoming a nineteen 65 the first female leader of the united farmworkers who combined forces to launch a very successful national boycott of california grapes because the workers the farm workers who were i'm really picking grapes in california and who were the the labor force behind the entire california grape industry were not being paid would what was a quivalent to the national minimum wage so that was their basic demand and dolores huerta was a huge part of via the massive strike that.

joe california dolores huerta benazir
"dolores huerta" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"dolores huerta" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"The vw officers went up the sylvia lopez after he interrogated the bus drivers he went up soviet lopez twisted her arm and injured her wrist yank her off the street and uh but the rating her in front of her coworkers who he also was yelling at and calling them lanes like but back and others lured to try and fight uh the role workers into becoming agitated a violent so they could be discredited and then the following year or maybe it was 10 years later the aol rv had a big celebration in sacramento and sylvia lopez was invited to go and she went and was going to have a picture taken with governor row and you may have seen the picture of dolores huerta illness when will go on well dolores huerta was trying to block sylvia from meeting the governor as she was physically bumping sylvia lopez away from meeting governor brown until governor brown saw her say wait a minute is that is that the soviet lofa so yeah the the uaw w has been aggressive towards these workers but would you call that an assault though any time you make bodily car tact it is called assault and if you're where i feel it which i i don't want a picture that but if you were an eye opening at buffoni off the floor and buffoni away you can fall down and get hurt really you know a whether you get pushed by somebody with their hands or get thumped with their stomach or whatever a pushes a push and a push is the fall or when you grab somebody's arm and twisted wake them off the street that's assault so sylvia was assaulted twice by the us w and when in the case of marc grossman she went to the aarp and she filed a complaint with them and they would not liver stylish however of course silas offer was.

sylvia lopez assault marc grossman aarp silas vw aol sacramento dolores huerta governor brown uaw 10 years