35 Burst results for "Doing Research Studies"

How Do We Capture Stem Cells? Dr. Vincent Giampapa Explains

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:58 min | Last month

How Do We Capture Stem Cells? Dr. Vincent Giampapa Explains

"Let's take this and break it down a little bit. I mean, in looking at the, you know, all the aspects of what you just talked about, you know, starting at 20, 50, some, you know, we have people at different places. Let's explain that process. What does that mean if I was sitting here today and I came to you and said, you know, doctor J pop, I want to talk about my stem cell and capture those. What does capturing mean? What does it entail? That kind of stuff. So, first of all, let me explain what the situation is here in the U.S. and frankly in most countries globally. So in most countries, you can collect store stem cells as in the U.S.. We can collect them, store them for future use. We can't give them to back to you. Okay, so under very limited circumstances. For instance, if you have cancer, if you are part of a research study in a major university, then you could use your cells. Frankly, most people even store the cord blood of their children can't really use those unless there's a very limited potential application for those cells. So excuse me. So the secret here is if we can collect and store them, why can't we use them? And so we'll get into that and maybe in a few minutes. But the secret here is today, we can collect your cells and store them. And there's a certain medications we give for three days prior to a collection, which releases billions and billions of stem cells of all three types into your body. That actually really is the first treatment people get when they go to collect because that release a billions of cells is a regenerative treatment. Those cells will start to repair damage and your blood vessels boost your immune function. And decrease the inflammation we're all fraught with as we get

U.S. Cancer
Dr. Pierre Kory and Dr. Chris Martenson on Ivermectin and a Potential Cover-Up

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:14 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Pierre Kory and Dr. Chris Martenson on Ivermectin and a Potential Cover-Up

"We now know from a document from project veritas that major Joe Murphy and the darpa document page four wrote that Ivermectin works throughout all phases of the illness because it both inhibits viral replication and modulates the immune response, things that you've been talking about. This document was hidden in a secret folder. Does that make either of you think that they've known that Ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine works this entire time from the top levels and are we witnessing a cover up? Well, we know that hydroxychloroquine is actually in an NIH paper around original SAAR. So classic SARS comes out in 2002 and three. By 2005, there was a paper out from NIH researchers saying hydroxychloroquine is an effective potent inhibitor of this, at least in an in vitro setting and also a mouse model, I believe. So they knew that. They knew that early on. And if you look at the so I call the, you know, this repurposed drug war. So this PR campaign on Ivermectin, the war and I have met in 2021. If, you know, the fact that they waged that war in 2020 through these fraudulent research studies fraudulent papers mentions the YouTube you could talk about. That can be explained by the fact infectious best explained by the fact they knew it

Joe Murphy Darpa NIH Sars Youtube
Astrophysicist Hugh Ross Describes When He Learned of 'The Fine-Tuned Argument'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:15 min | 7 months ago

Astrophysicist Hugh Ross Describes When He Learned of 'The Fine-Tuned Argument'

"Program. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show, Hugh Ross, great to see you. Good to see you, too. Thank you. Well, I mentioned in the beginning of the book that it really was you who got me thinking about things, for example, like the fine tuned universe. I had literally never heard about that until about 1990 when I read your book, maybe it was fingerprint of God. I can't remember which book it was. But I was astonished to read this, having never heard about it. And over the decades, I have been quietly amassing more and more evidence as it piles up as science draws us closer and closer to the idea it's obvious and intelligence created the universe there's no way this just happened. When did you in your career first notice these things or become acquainted with the fine tuned argument? It probably goes back to my teenage years. I mean, I started getting serious, but astronomy, when I was 7 years of age and wait a minute. That's no teenager. That's a very early, you're probably the world's youngest teenager, you're smart. You probably achieved teenage dumb at age 7. Okay, so at age 7, what happened in your life to get you thinking about this stuff? Well, I was looking up at the stars and wanted to know why they were hot and my parents said go to the library. And that started me on reading four or 5 books on astronomy and physics per week. And during my teenage years, I actually launched a research study in astronomy with my telescope, looking at newborn stars and different gaseous nebulae. I wound up winning the British Columbia science fair, went on to the Canadian science fair and then I decided, hey, I'm going to continue that. I've been fascinated with astronomy ever since. But I've got struck by the fine tuning, probably beginning at about each 15 is when I realized wow. Now hang on, when you say the British Columbia science fair. How old were you when you won the British Columbia science fair? I was 17.

Eric Metaxas Hugh Ross British Columbia
"doing research studies" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

depression geico insurance geiko national headquarters diabetes Barr zayed Dr bard senate illinois Untung lhasa shara chuck laura
Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 8 months ago

Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

Depression Geico Insurance Geiko National Headquarters Barr Diabetes
"doing research studies" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:52 min | 8 months ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"The possibility that foods might affect depression and perhaps in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as a bit of an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet the cafeteria and a weekly flights for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at weight changes and to see how people diabetes might. We saw something else and that was depression.

Diabetes Has Surged Among US Youth, Decades-Long Study Finds

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Diabetes Has Surged Among US Youth, Decades-Long Study Finds

"On the rise among the nation's youth. A new study shows that Type one and type two diabetes have surged in those under 20. NPR's Ping Hong reports Over the past two decades, more and more young people have been diagnosed with diabetes. It's a chronic condition where the amount of sugar in the bloodstream is too high and can lead to serious health problems like heart and kidney disease. In the Under 20 age group, Type one diabetes has increased by 45% since 2000 and one Take two diabetes, which is linked to obesity has nearly doubled in that time, with the greatest increases seen in black and Hispanic youth. The reasons for the rise and diabetes are not totally clear, but could be related to rising rates of childhood obesity and exposure to environmental chemicals. The results published in JAMA, come from a long term research study funded by the CDC and the National Institutes of

Diabetes NPR Kidney Disease Obesity CDC National Institutes Of
"doing research studies" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:47 min | 11 months ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Let's say maybe just outlined that process and not only why we have ethics demonstrated but what that actually looks like for someone on the frontlines doing research. Yes as a researcher. You typically have a research team and you're gonna work together to put together. A study protocol that clicks. All the boxes on the science side but also making things. It's easiest possible for christmas. You're trying to dig burden. You're trying to make things relatively simple. So they hopeful actually complete everything and won't be lost a follow up you're also trying to incentivize them in some way but not cause undue incentivisation. Raise your offering large amounts of money. Then people might consent even if they don't think it safe vulnerable population where that money would be really particularly enticing so you have to balance all of those things together and you try. Put this protocol together to the best of your ability. And then you send it off to your institutional reward and a whole team of people review it there and a lot of times. They're gonna come back with questions or comments or suggested changes to improve it. And the ira be really focuses a lot on the ethical side of things. They are there to protect the participants as well as the researchers And they may not understand the science behind it. That's definitely the responsibility of the research team to to communicate the science and why they've chosen to design a study in the way that they've chosen so there is this whole gatekeeper aspect You don't get to research anymore. Historically we would start doing research studies you know. Sixty years ago. There was no board to review it. frankly audience. We did the research ourselves because we're handy And we're not doing that anymore. Because not only is it not ethical. But it's not really great science. Either right we needed. We needed a diverse pool of people to get a better.

"doing research studies" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Quantity of free information and knowledge pertinent to the study of crime and control and he is here to share some information on the study of crime and control with us. Hello josh hello. Thank you for having me on a happy to have you so i take it that most of your work is not directly related to baseball unfortunately but tell us a little bit about what it does concern what your interests are. What kind of work you do and what you study and then we will get into how that potentially relates to baseball in this case. yeah unfortunately baseball very rarely comes up In criminology but i am a primarily a qualitative researcher doing research studying graffiti graffiti writers and graffiti culture. So you know. I look to do interviews and use that as my primary source data. I find it helps to really make sure that what we think. The numbers are saying. It actually says that by talking to the people who are actually doing but I am going to be teaching a criminological theory class in the fall and as i was prepping for the class i could not help but notice some real similarities between the idea of deterrence theory. And how the mlb is trying to go about getting rid of stuff. Yeah i can imagine there are some overlaps there. I'm curious why graffiti. What drew you to that. And and what insights have you come up with. Their later is really a hotbed. Everybody thinks new york and la but atlanta's a really thriving graffiti as well street art scene and in particular. I used to drive everyday to to campus and would drive under a bridge where This one particular writer. Bain had written and just overpass and you know you drive by enough time sitting here going. How on earth. Why on earth and then you start to dig in your me the most fascinating things. Just you're putting your name on a crime whether you think it should or shouldn't be it's vandalism and in the city of atlanta it only takes five hundred dollars of property damage to be felony. And so if you're putting your name on every instance of vandalism than if somebody was inclined it does not take too much to connect the dots in terms of your previous work in so i've always been fascinated as to why why people are are willing to put themselves out there. And what motivates them. Yeah i can understand why that would be of interest to you so you actually emailed us partly prompted by discussion that we had recently about streakers and about the idea that streakers get banned from ballparks stadiums. And how do you actually enforce those bands and it's tough to do their some ways. You can do it but it's not perfect but the insight that you shared with us that it's not necessarily just about catching them again or preventing them from coming to the park but it's about the deterrence value of banning them and the threat of what would happen if they did get caught again so i guess if you could share any thoughts on that and then sort of segue into how that relates to the issue that we're talking about now with substances because deterrence is a big consideration there too. Yeah absolutely and the the beauty of it is. I think in the simplicity. The marta the mass transit subway system and everything here in atlanta is notorious for quote unquote banning writers. For being too loud. You know doing any number of things that are against their the the policies and no matter. What a lot of people will still hop right back on. And there's no real interest in marta to actually waste the time energy and resources to ask everybody. Hey what's your name. Are you on this banned list but It does a very good job of making sure that those writers are on their best behavior. Because if something happens again where they need to you know you are pulled over or if you're stopped by marta police than they when they run your name it'll pop up and it's essentially a two strikes you're out and kinda gets at this idea of deterrence theory which is how can we take a negative behavior. And what can we do to make sure that you don't do it again. And all that comes Real briefly from this idea of rational choice theory An idea in economics as well as criminology and the ideas that whenever we make any sort of decision we perform a cost benefit analysis. We're not pulling out spreadsheets and calculators and the slide rule trying to calculate every last thing and a lot of times these decisions are made with incomplete information and not in particularly the best frame of mind but we weigh the good and the bad and especially decide what is going to bring us the most pleasure at least in that moment. He said that the idea of punishment is to kill to that. Cost benefit analysis and make the cost higher and essentially tried to increase the risks and minimize the potential rewards around since the eighteenth century with jeremy bentham and it just attempts to get at human behavior with deteriorates theory. More specifically the ideas is one of two. It's either gonna be the general deterrence. Which is we're going to make an example out of this one person so that no one else even thinks about breaking the rules or it can be individual deterrence. We are going to punish you so much that you will never ever considered doing this again within that there's three very important key elements in the idea of certainty swiftest in severity and it basically punishment Needs to be certain. If there's any chance that i'm not caught in not punished. And why not. If i can get away with it right in terms of swiftness Punishment needs to be as close to immediate as possible for it to get the fall. Deterrent effect And then severity needs to hurt enough for me to change my behavior in the theater so for applying this to the.

josh five hundred dollars new york eighteenth century jeremy bentham Bain one person earth two strikes three very important key eleme atlanta two one marta
A Mindset to Make New Habits Stick

Mindset for Life

02:19 min | 1 year ago

A Mindset to Make New Habits Stick

"Have you ever wanted to make a change in your life. Maybe you want to start being a lot more cooperative with your co workers. Maybe you'd like to be a little more agreeable at home. Perhaps you'd like to be a better listener or lose weight or started an exercise routine. Why is it that we start these habits. And they don't last very long pretty soon. We're suffering setback after setback. And we start to feel like we can never make a real permanent change. Today's episode is for you this episode. We're going to talk about what it takes to have a mindset for making new habits stick and it's all about this the idea of a fresh start. We have rituals routines these things center around new beginnings and the possibilities that come with them. Think about it. It's as if life moves in cycles. Each one bringing the idea of a fresh start. We think we have a clean slate. The chance to try again and we are born again with new opportunities. we can renew improve and redefine ourselves. Do any of these seem like new beginnings. You might have experienced the new year. People celebrate the old ring in the new with parties resolutions and goals the beginning of school year or academic semester. We buy new clothes. Perhaps a new pair of shoes. Maybe we even get a new haircut with pictures of children ready to go to school on the first day of school. It's a milestone and a landmark day secular and religious holidays. Have you ever celebrated something like easter the fourth of july or christmas. Any holiday that specialty. You may somehow signify time to make a change. Monday morning for some of us. Monday morning is when we're going to start that new diet on if we blow it on monday we'll start again next week in a research. Study new beginnings also come from personal life events. they've listed that these might be developmental. Milestones life transitions first experiences or even repeated significant things like anniversaries and birthdays. Perhaps you can think of a birthday that you recently had. That was important to you. Here are some of these landmark events that come from stones transitions and life experiences moving to a new town living somewhere new making new friends going to a new school a new job a new church congregation a new grocery store etc. How about getting married. If that isn't one of the biggest milestones. There is in life graduating from high school getting a college degree and graduating from college.

"doing research studies" Discussed on The Mental Health and Wealth Show

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on The Mental Health and Wealth Show

"And so in the spreadsheet i put all these different scholarships ranging from two hundred dollars to some of them like twenty k. On just put them all in their track. Their deadlines in everything and every week applying scholarships every week without fail until. I was able to get enough. That i needed even when i started. I still needed a little bit more money. so throughout the college years that i've had so far i've been doing a lot of side hustles in part time jobs including working at the financial literacy center at my university I've been a note taker for different classes on campus. Like i'll take nice. Yeah like i did that and then like public speaking and then also another way that you can make money is through doing research studies so i would like sign up for all. These research studies Usually they were just like they'd ask you a series of questions or send you a quiz about like your health habits or something. So that was another way that i was like making money while i was also going to school fulltime. So that's kind of how i have been able to accomplish. This goal of graduating debt free. That is so amazing. I love that you were so determined to get a ton of scholarships and it just sounds like you may getting scholarship your fulltime job. And you're definitely still working to offset the costs. That aren't met by scholarships and it's so funny that you've mentioned doing research studies because i actually remember being at nyu and participating in one of the medical studies. Because i was like. Oh it's like thirty dollars an hour or something or seventy. I forget what it was but is going to be a multi series studying. I was like oh my gosh. This is amazing and like the first study it was something to do with psychology and vision and memories. And i headed like watch this thing and something about me is that i am very sensitive and get motion sickness very easily and basically i was like oh i feel nauseous and basically that disqualified from the rest of the study..

two hundred dollars seventy thirty dollars an hour first study twenty k. one series of questions
"doing research studies" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"Think there is something to the cycle. But i think with a little bit with the temperature changing and habitat creation. I yeah we do have it. But i think a lot of it has to do with like i said these winters were having springs. Were having and how that affects the birds you know. We're blessed up here with having a great habitat. So i think our cycle kind of not as deep as some places because we do have the habitat. I'm there with you. The cycles documented. You can see it on paper but it's a spring study and i've always kind of been or at least more recently. I've been of the belief that i mean a really good spring. Can you might not know where you're at in the cycle because the spring the hatching conditions you get good crop of young birds. I mean that's what you see in the would you don't see this spring drumming counselor in the woods. No we're seeing. We're seeing big healthy strong birds. This time of year that had a good winner and made it through also. I think that's probably a better. It's a little bit more accurate. Maybe than drumming counts and again the cycles of reality. But like i said there's so many other variables now and then he can throw the the whole 'nother topic of west nile on it and and especially at eastern on. That's a big concern. That i talked to one hundred dollars. Isa's was you. What are you guys doing for. West nile like well. Yes there but we got we have better habitat than you guys. So i think we can. The animals can adjust and darwin. Better than you guys out there now. Variables there are. Yeah and that's probably the probably the point to put on all that. There's a lot of variables in it. But what's coming up at pine ridge spring summer fall. What do we got for answering. We are doing woodcock. Minnesota is doing their annual woodcock. Banding clinic this. You were having two weekends for people that have already gone through the course of uncertified. We're doing a refresher that's experienced band experienced bander so we can obviously the biggest thing about banning his making sure our dogs or study and finished and broke. And so we do that in may here. We put him through some tasks and kind of re regroup everybody refresh everybody and then the following weekend may fourteen fifteen sixteen. I think right around in there too is when we have new people coming in to go through the process of of of testing their dogs getting certified they have to spend time with a certified mentor for the first year again. Make sure their dog is proven. Make sure that they can handle the chicks and learn. Learn that way. So it's a really. It's fun it's a fun time you know. We've we've got an experience list of banners this year or every year. That like i said are available to do. Research studies for a lot of research grants. Yeah i think there was one That debbie participated in last couple of years. Out of duluth okay. We've helped she was. Yeah some of our other people with some you know putting the radio collars on we did. Did some a couple. Years ago at the japanese film crew. That's right. oh that was fun. Did you see some stuff that came out of that so video. It's pretty amazing. They got some pretty cool. They've got a full sky. Dance on camera. Okay just of need. According ship. And and i think there's a link on the website to that. I'm going to jot that down because it's pretty neat. It isn't japanese. There are no subtitle. I do know what was shown to about ten million japanese people on their public television station in japan interesting. It's a little cartoon little cartoonish in their earl. The pearl johnson makes a really appearance and so he looks like a movie. He's a movie star in japan. But there's some cool video to it and they really nice job. They got some really cool. Never seen before stuff. So i was kind of neat excellent And then we're talking about doing some bird-watching here with abc. And kevin shepherd who i think has been on your podcast and then we've gone before we before we go to that i want on the woodcock banding. That's a clinic. you have. Limited space is at fill at full. We've got a couple of spaces open. What's really interesting. We've gotta gotta gotta kid from illinois coming up who's a phd grad student Some people from illinois. We've had people from all over the country to come to experience it. It's really geared to give people that experience but to if you've got a good steady danish dog and wanna give back a little bit of some of the science. This is a great way to do that. We've got some great mentors That banded in the cities and it's when city south minneapolis Up and down. So yeah just let us give me a call or whatever we can see. We got for ability because it is limited it's really a one to one ratio student to mentor type program. But it's super hands on. And and i can't stress enough that you know it's really not about the person it's about the dog. Yeah i think you went through it a couple of years. I saw steady. We have to have the dog. Because you know this hand can do anything and everything to protect those eggs and chicks. So you know it's it's really a dog very few dogs we have. I mean i can't even tell you we wash out a lot of dogs. I mean people might have great dogs but you gotta go through this to be studied to be a band so give us a coffee interested. Okay you need no prior experience to do that weekend but you you have to have a dog i mean you you can't you wouldn't do it. Otherwise right. I mean you wouldn't do it. We've got people that just they're interested woodcock and it's going to come hang off for the weekend and learn got it we have had you have to have a pointing dog. I think were you here. And we had the border collie show up. I don't think so now. He had somebody that was. I don't know what but we got the border collie point a pigeon for about a second and a half and i had to break news. Break the news that it wouldn't work out but you gotta have a point pointing to actually do the woodcock banning the way that this is done but if you were if you were just interested in all of it didn't have a dog don't hesitate literally love woodcock and the people that are mentoring program. Love this goofy little bird. And that's why we spend a lotta time doing it so if you just want to come up learn hang out. Pineridge see the sky in. We've every year every year. We have three or four sky. Dancing bird sears. Take part in that Sit by the fire and slop false stories and then go out and banned. I mean yeah. If you don't have. I've got a lab after Bring in but we can't use them for banning but we can. You can definitely go out and experience with somebody that knows what they're doing right cool and you can check out some guns here too well while they're here which we're going to talk about all right so moving on to summer so june we have rules and aimed. I think they call the naveh deal new handlers new handler clinic. We did a test with with nabbed last year. Natural ability and ut tests and that went over well and feb or august. So we're gonna do a rule clinic up here so go to the minnesota chapter. Now they got all the dates on that. I don't know. I think they got some open spots July think there's a wedding if anybody wants to crash wedding crashers. She can do that and then august. We're doing then. We have the ut and natural ability tests with nabbed again. We got some judges. I think coming from all over the country for that. That's kind of. It's good for me to see some german dogs. Run i get you get kinda.

kevin shepherd japan august last year July feb one hundred dollars first year june about ten million minnesota illinois two weekends this year south minneapolis last couple of years pearl johnson clinic Isa West nile
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 1 year ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Why 'Nothing' Matters in Nutrition Research

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Why 'Nothing' Matters in Nutrition Research

"I want to talk about why nothing matters. Most nutrition research studies are designed to see what will happen if we change something. What happens to muscle synthesis if we add more protein to the diet what happens to cholesterol levels. If we increased vitamin e intake. What happens to blood sugar levels if we decrease carbohydrate intake or what happens to our immune function if we add more vitamin d. Well sometimes of course we run these experiments and nothing happens and we often refer to that as eight null result. Now it's easy to see that as a failed experiment but actually it's not joining me today to talk about. No results is greg lopez. Greg is lead scientific editor at examine dot com where he and his team collect assess and summarize a staggering amount of nutrition research. Welcome back to the podcast greg. Thanks for having me back greg. I find the work that you do at examine dot com extraordinarily helpful. And it's one of my go-to resources and not long ago. I noticed that you added a new section to the nutrition examination. Research digest affectionately known to us as nerd and this section is dedicated to reporting no results or research. Wear nothing happens. Why did you feel that. This was important to shine a light on. Well i think the first reason to shine a light on it is just to bring more attention to null results. More generally a lot of people and a lot of buzz on social media and stuff in the world of nutrition focuses on what is happening what people are seeing What affects are and what we wanna do is just kind of bring attention to the idea that null results are out there and also we wanted to help people more subtly learn how to interpret these because they are a bit. Tricky are nerd. Knowles are a just basics. Point summaries of null results but we have a final bullet point that asks how null the result was and that's where some of our interpretation comes in and by repeating that and having readers repeatedly read it. We hope that people will shuttle the over time learn how to interpret study results. More broadly in numbers more specifically better as they read more plus. There's the idea that at the end of the day. People are turning to us in order to find out what works and what doesn't and if there are strung null results which sometimes there are and sometimes they're not then people can rule out things that they want to introduce into their lives so that they don't waste their time and money on ineffective nutrition and supplementation. Well that's right. I mean we do tend to get more excited when we see that there is an effect. But it's just as important to know what doesn't work as it is to know what does work you mentioned the value that this might have for consumers who are trying to decide. Should i do this. Should i not do this. But i would think that also for researchers it would be important to look around for what research might have been done and what no results might have come forward So that they can focus their attention a little bit more effectively. Exactly it's a big deal for a few reasons for researchers as well. One of the big problems is that when you have a whole bunch of small studies like you see nutrition and supplementation you may get quote unquote normal results. Because they're tiny and can't seem medium to small size effects but a few all all these results together in a away call the meta analysis. You can actually kind of treat it as one big pool of people and then you get to see more subtle effects more clearly but there's a problem in that if only positive results are published. Then you're getting a biased snapshot of what the literature is actually saying so meta analytic conclusions. Can't be as relied upon if they're strong publication bias. Plus there's a lot of interesting hypotheses that are being tested in nutrition supplementation and ruling out. Those hypothesis can actually push basic research and translational research forward of it. So ruling out ideas is how science works. If you already knew what the result was going to be. Then you wouldn't need to do the experiment.

Greg Lopez Greg Knowles
Your smartwatch could detect COVID

Talking Tech

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Your smartwatch could detect COVID

"Your apple watch or your fit bit or samsung galaxy. Watch or other wearable device and tracker could eventually signal whether you've been infected with covid nineteen or other illnesses such as the flu. Most of the research studies underway suggests that a few days before a person would test positive for the coronavirus their heart rate or activity level. Changes enough to suggest your about to do so. Now you probably know this most of our listeners. Probably know this but where will just the apple watch and samsung galaxy. Smartwatch fitbit and other devices already collect information such as heart oxygen data as well asleep and activity levels so researchers at mount sinai hospital in new york and at stanford university's healthcare innovation lab. And there's more places like the scripps research translation institute in la hoya california and in the universities like university of washington purdue are all at various stages of research looking into this and fitbit is actually also working with the department of defense. The department of veteran affairs at nasa on covid nineteen detection. So there's a lot of interest here but the findings aren't foolproof. Because could be false positives and things like that. But at stanford eighty one percent of the thirty two patients who became infected with covid nineteen had changes in heart rates. Time spent sleeping and daily steps that they've taken the researchers wrote in a publication. They put out in a journal called nature biomedical engineering now. Most of the covid nineteen patients there about sixty three percent had changes that could have led to early detection before the onset of symptoms. They found researcher. N- probably not ever going to be able to tell you definitively that you will develop covid nineteen based on the variations in your heartbeat. Or how much sleep you got. How much activity level you've had and how that's changed. However if there's a way to give you a heads up to get a test and perhaps quarantine that could potentially prevent the spread of covid nineteen or other illnesses to other people including your family friends and coworkers so this research is ongoing to the studies are looking for more participants. The links are in my story on ticked usa today dot com. And this is a topic. I'm sure we'll be covering in the weeks and months

Samsung Scripps Research Translation I Universities Like University O Department Of Veteran Affairs Apple Stanford University Mount Sinai Hospital La Hoya FLU Department Of Defense Nasa New York California USA
Failure Is Inevitable, And Necessary

Building Psychological Strength

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Failure Is Inevitable, And Necessary

"When i was a kid i used to downhill ski fairly often. I loved it and one particular winter. I decided to go out to my local ski hill quite a bit in an attempt to improve to get better one day i was out there and i skied all morning and when i went in for lunch one of the ski instructors who i just knew worked at that place was in the chalet and i mentioned that for all the times. I was getting out there this winter. I didn't think that i was progressing very much. And he asked me a question that still rings in my ear to this day over twenty years later he asked. How many times did you fall today. And i replied. And i was actually pretty smug and proud of myself. I said why didn't fall today. And he replied. That is why you're not getting any better. You're only doing runs and skiing in a way. That is already comfortable to you. That's not how you grow improve. You grow and improve by trying. New runs harder runs by skiing faster or on moguls or on more narrow runs you get better by putting yourself in new situations situations where you most certainly will fall a lot. That's how you get better. You fall a lot now. Let's all take a moment of silence for that probably freshman in college and his profound wisdom. You only grow when you fall a lot now. I can't think of many other life experiences. That require more personal growth than entrepreneurship launching a new product or new service into the market. It takes grit and resilience and strength and bravery and even if there are competitors in your market who have already have some history who've done the thing that you're going to do that product or service offering and that business is still likely new to you even if you're an expert at creating your product or delivering your service. You're likely not an expert at all with the surrounding skills. You need in order to make your businesses success. Things like sales and marketing communication positioning culture creation hiring entrepreneurs in the early years play so many roles in their businesses and most of those roles are new. And here's the thing if you're an entrepreneur or your go-getter in your professional field you've likely learned time and time again throughout your life. That failure is bad. It means that you did something wrong. You miss something important. Failure is bad and therefore you are bad so you cross those two things right the inevitability of failure and the negative relationship that most of us have with it and it is a recipe for friction and pain and suffering in business. Now what this means is that we need to get better and redefine our relationship with failure. We need to get better at failing. To how the heck do we do that. There was some clues in a research. Study published in two thousand sixteen in the journal of entrepreneurship theory and practice and these researchers looked at the factors that facilitate business success after a failure. How cool is that right. This is research that people are doing and they identified two factors. So i want to go through them. I they identified that people who have something called an intuitive cognitive style are better to go are better able to grow after failure. People with an intuitive cognitive style are people who are able to process murky ambiguous and complex information into insight and knowledge and direction that can inform future opportunities and future growth. So basically what that boils down to is. We're more likely to learn and grow after the inevitable failure that we're going to experience as entrepreneurs if we intentionally work to process the situation and dry out insight from it now. Let's take a minute to just review what we typically do when we fail. We avoid thinking about it. We wanted to just move on. And we don't wanna have to relive the experience of the failure that we just had researched found that it's actually the opposite thing that helps us grow from failure. If we can process through the information about the failure and draw out insight and knowledge we can move in a better direction in the future and seek out more opportunities for us to succeed. That's awesome.

Skiing Journal Of Entrepreneurship Th
"doing research studies" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"Podcast and friends statement nominee to be taking up seven. Podcast awesome ken. How're you doing. Why were you late. what happened. Oh you know i was busy working. Does he work in doing research studying research. What were you researching. You know. I was doing research for comedy. Let's see how lonzo okay showers writing. And i just got caught up in the next thing. You know like a man have a podcast against you. So i'm sorry. I just sometimes when the creativity takes over you gotta ride it out. You know your your cats just on. My cat has thing for him. Yeah she also yes. Type five there there there. You go good girls. well whatever anyway. I thought it was because you were trying to pick out your wardrobe. I thought oh no no. You'll pick out something else. And you're like should i go kind of black or silver chain. Like batman like batman doesn't really have a hard time picking out his wardrobe off a bunch of black sheer. Well how are you on wonderful night..

lonzo ken seven five
The Many Benefits of Participating in Research

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:08 min | 1 year ago

The Many Benefits of Participating in Research

"Our guest today again is peter. Mb he's the president of the regan streep institute and he's going to be here today to talk to us about all in. And i can't wait to hear what that's about. But before even that peter if you could just give our listeners reminder of what. The reconstruction institute is considering the president of it. You should be best able to answer that. Sure happy to do it. And it's great to be with you again So the regan. Streep institute is an applied research institute in indianapolis indiana. That's a affiliated with and a support organization to indiana university and the indiana university school of medicine. We've been around for about fifty years and we do research and innovation in the areas of biomedical informatics. Health services research in aging research with the intent of really improving health and health care through innovation primarily in the areas. I've described that relate to how we better use technology data information science and improve the practice of healthcare in order to improve the lives of people everywhere. So what is all in. Yeah so all in is is an initiative that started with the indiana clinical translational science institute or see. Tsi which has the goal of really engaging with the residents of indiana to improve their understanding of health issues so health literacy. We often call it to better understand the role of research in Improving our ability to take care of people to make discoveries to improve healthcare and to give people the opportunity if they volunteer to be a part of research studies and so we do that. A number of different ways through this initiative call in. Is this something that it's an issue. Do people not have a good sense of health. And what's going on and had to be involved. i mean. certainly. There's some people who have a very good understanding of health issues and and certainly their own health but there's a lot of folks who you know may not understand a lot about the health and also the The rapidly developing science behind. What we think of as modern day medicine and healthcare and so as part of the indiana see. Tsi we work across the state to improve how we can take better care of people through research through discovery and part of that involves a we believe very strongly engaging with the popular engaging with people and making sure that they are not just a. We do not want to think of people who participate in research as so-called research subjects that you know that's not really the goal. The goal is to have participants. The goal is to have people who volunteer. Who understand what it is that we are studying and And then volunteer to be a part of those research studies and there are several reasons for that number one the more engagement. We have the science that results from that will actually be applicable to our population. Right so the more people from indiana from our communities that represent the diverse communities here across the state the more of them that are engaged the more likely the results are going to benefit them in their communities. And we think that generally speaking the impact of that is not only going to be felt by the kinds of therapies and resources that we bring to help people get better when they get sick but also just generally having a better understanding of health issues. will probably result in a healthier population. And that's an area where indiana traditionally hasn't done very well so we want to improve that. So how do you get people more involved. How do you get them linked in so. There's a number of different ways we've gone about. This one is that we've got these days of course websites and apps and other solutions where people can engage so for instance in the all in for health dot info website. People can go and read about health issues. They can learn more about the kinds of studies that are going on across our universities and our academic health centers across the state. They can volunteer to participate in those studies so we have a volunteer registry. Where at this point. As of last month we have over thirty thousand hoosiers that have signed up to be a part of the registry and that's pretty substantial in addition to that we broadcast information in different ways. Sometimes we do things like this with podcasts. Sometimes we do advertising and other kinds of activities all with the goal of trying to get people in our state to understand the important medical research. That's happening understand the kinds of discoveries that are being made to help them in their families and then giving them opportunities to connect so what happens when someone registers. What's the next step. so they register. They will get confirmation that they've registered and then there Depending on what they've agreed to they'll start to get information about health issues so we send out periodically newsletters and other kinds of information from a lot of the science. That's being done here across our different university partners at indiana university and purdue and notre dame and otherwise across our health system partners so they'll get that information and in addition they'll get notified and have the opportunity to see information about research studies as well when they become available and that can happen again in various ways that we can reach out to people so good example recently was giving people the opportunity to sign up for studies around covert as an example.

Indiana Regan Streep Institute Streep Institute Indiana Clinical Translational Peter Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Regan TSI Indianapolis Purdue
Vegans and other non–meat eaters are more likely to suffer broken bones, Oxford University research shows

The KFBK Morning News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Vegans and other non–meat eaters are more likely to suffer broken bones, Oxford University research shows

"And Oxford University research study shows vegans and other non meat eaters more likely to suffer broken bones. They have to be more aware of calcium, right? It is indeed, you know, Lucinda. That's exactly what it is. A lack of calcium, iron and vitamin B 12 could mean a rise in popularity of veganism causes some bone health

Oxford University Lucinda
"doing research studies" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Mispronounce. It has a pure river was worked on, uh, not only by the Russians that it was being worked on in India. It was already an implied food drug. On underground system here, and they were also its time and may still working on chloroquine. I drafted chloroquine, which range anti malarial drugs, they seem to be the forerunners. The There was another thing they aired. I think it was yesterday on AstraZeneca that there they are now making progress and they're producing the While for the vaccine, so I personally I mean, we've heard it said that we expect something imminently, probably before the end of this year. There's no guarantees, of course, but I think it's highly possible even Probable. That will have something and we are also. Yeah, Go ahead. We already know that President Trump has the virus He was treated at Reed Medical, hey, was given two shots of the steroid. And he was given the room disappear and it shortened his time dramatically. And, you know, he's an elderly individuals. That means please fairly healthy beforehand. Um, that being said, we need to have that type of treatment available to everybody my opinion well and also let me just interject and say that such a talking about anti flu and anti viral drugs, let's not forget about anti flu, antiviral nutrients and some of the common sense in expensive, non patented things We could do like a high dose of vitamin D, Uh, therapy has been shown to be comparable to Tomo vaccines. As far as you know, the FDA is only gonna be record. Hearing a 50% efficacy for any vaccine that comes out so some of the vitamin these studies and then saying can vitamin C and other nutrients have found. You condone cut. I think I did research study or are aired one last hour 64% reduction, according to Dr Ross and and infections from, you know, just from being relatively Deficient and or, you know, moderately deficient in vitamin D. And and so if you correct that, or given extra dose to individuals or patients that could possibly, you know, be similar to protection. That vaccine would give you And yet everybody is is holding their breath for. You know the vaccine that's gonna be 100% effective. I mean, people think that Vaccines and drugs are you know the cure all and they're gonna have full efficacy. And that's not the case at all. I mean, you know, that's why people have to take different drugs for the same disease because not at all, not one drug treats of all people. I mean, everybody reacts differently and two different agreements. And so you know, I just wanted to go into vitamin D three. Anything that I've read Some of those studies and some of the studies will be covered in that and you can get some boost your immune system. Things that combines some of those On another one, but it I haven't talked to that. I've been reading up on studies if B 12 That's right. And you know, the diesel do tend to boost the immune system. Uh, they're over the counter. Uh, they're taking a B 12 taking the three. I mean, he's vitamin D deficiency is usually associated with the winter months. The dark month. So the that's why a lot of primary care physicians finding their patients. When they're tested in the spring. They have a vitamin D deficiency. That's true and a lot of times. People just go and put it into their natural vitamins. Yeah, sure. Sorry. Sorry to interrupt. We only have one minute left. So I want to ask you about one of your chapters and you have 20 chapters. So we just touched a barely describes the service the toilet paper chapter. Let's end with that. No, no pun intended, But what's in with toilet paper champion? Tell us about that. The place is a lot of the things I'm doing. It's amazing how many friends family and neighbors come over to ask me, you know, how do I deal with this thing? Oh, yeah, It's kind of equally distributed. What I did was I started out by asking patients to particularly the Children, too..

vitamin D deficiency Trump chloroquine India FDA President Reed Medical
How To Use Facebook Ads To Build An Email List For Lead Generation | Ep.3

The Knowledge Catalyst

13:14 min | 1 year ago

How To Use Facebook Ads To Build An Email List For Lead Generation | Ep.3

"Did you know one of the most valuable assets in your business is undervalued and most likely underutilized. If you're like most businesses you spend a great deal of your time and resources generating leads for your business. People who download your content or participate in free trials don't was become paying customers however during the engagement process. You collect valuable information such as an email address in this episode. We will discuss. How making capturing email addresses should be part of your lead generation strategy. Welcome to the knowledge catalyst in business. We know that how you manage your knowledge. Assets is the final competitive frontier for small business enterprises in the marketplace. You can follow a leader but knowledge and innovation can never be copied and duplicated. We are the only podcast that is focused on helping small business. Owners grow their revenue by closing the knowledge and technology gap in this show. We uncover a hidden knowledge insights. Small business owners can use to build stronger. Customer relationships create better products and increase profitability. I'm dr orlando skelton. your chief. Knowledge catalyst if you're looking for new tools techniques and strategies stay tuned and invest in your success. Hello and welcome to the knowledge catalyst in this episode. We will talk about building an email list with paid facebook ads. Facebook is an excellent traffic source with over two billion engaged uses. You may ask what is unique about facebook well. One reason is the ability to target your audience by demographics. Location interests and behaviors one of the most valuable assets. You can have is an email list. Email lists represent loyal customers. Who have engaged with your company. Perhaps they have purchased from you. Participated in a trial are downloaded somerville content. We will show you precisely how to set up the lead. Funneling wordpress capture leads in combination with your email. Automation provider discuss why using the facebook pixel is essential and how to create a facebook ad building an email list from facebook advertising. It is not that difficult once. You have an understanding of the process as we go through the steps. I encourage you to take notes. So follow along pausing. The show is needed before we begin. We assume you already have a business accounting a familiar with creating ads on facebook to start. We need to do two things first. We need to define an audience and second. We need to create an ad that will appeal to audience targeting. The right people with your ads is the key to success. Now if you haven't already chosen your audience so you don't know who your ideal customer is. You have several options. I you can use customer personas. Essentially a persona is detailed picture of your perfect customer. Typically this information is found by analyzing customer base. However for this exercise we want to build a targeted email list so we need to segment our master customer list. Accordingly accustomed persona includes demographic information such as age occupation income as well as interests location motivations lifestyle and more personas can be very detailed should only be created to the level of detail. That is practical. You can catch a customer specific information in many ways through surveys feedback one on one interviews keyword research and social media services like twitter using their audience analytics tool another good source of information is the us. Census bureau the primary objective of using customer. Personas is to turn incite interaction to summarize the customer persona approach a focus on or prospects spend their time in this case we are focusing on facebook uses be speak their language meaning tap into their interests motivations frustrations when creating your ads and see create personas specific content always create content. That will appeal to your audience for the best results. Once you have this information you simply define your coal audience in facebook. Also keep an eye on the size of your audience. Ideally it should be more than two hundred fifty thousand people. The second method is to use facebook lookalike audience feature to use this approach. Simply upload your segmented customer list facebook will create unique audience of their users who share the same or similar characteristics as your customers now that we have our audience the next step is to create a pay dot campaign on facebook however before we run our ads. We need to install the facebook pixel on our website. The facebook pixel is the connection between your ads on your website. This is extremely important to create the pixel go to the events manager. Select facebook pixel then. Click connect then. You're going to name your pixel in your website. Url the final step is to manually at the pixel to your website or use a third party integration partner or app you may ask why the pixel is needed the pixel shows you all the actions being taken by visitors on your website capture page or landing page generated from your facebook ad in other words the pixel tells you your at with successful the characteristics of the audience the interacted with your ad and the specific content that resulted in the desired action or conversion. Now that we have the pixel installed. Let's go back into the ads manager and set up a campaign that is optimized for conversions. The actual mechanics of setting up on facebook beyond the scope of this episode. However you need to consider your ad frequency budget the objective of the ad placement. Make sure you're allocating enough money and time for facebook to optimize your ad. Also keep in mind. This is a dynamic processor. Expect to experiment with your ads and audience until you get the desired results tracking. Your results is very important. As you may teach change as a quick recap we defined audience. We created an ad and we installed the pixel on our website. The next step is to build a lead capture page. We will use the term capture page for our discussion but it can also be a website landing page or what some refer to as squeeze page the lead catcher pages where prospects will be motivated to into their email address. Ideally the offer is something of value to your perspective customer. It should be mentioned in or related to your facebook ads. So take a little time to brainstorm you. Add copy at this point. Some business owners tried to monetize the lead immediately but generally is not a good idea. Why the simple on series that you have not established a relationship. Various research studies indicate. You should have seven to ten value. Added interactions with prospect. Before you try to sell your product or service if you're too aggressive you risk having your prospective customers opt out of your email list. At which point. You have lost an opportunity as well as wasted part of your marketing budget. There are several paid and free services that provide lead capture page templates such as lead pages may locked-in and optimize press. There are also several wordpress plug ins available for discussion. We are going to assume you using wordpress if you're not familiar with lead capture pages. Here is a quick overview of how they work the prospect lands on your lead capture page from a traffic source which in our case it is facebook. You have the option of setting several automatic trigger that can launch a pop up after clicking on a button a predefined number of seconds after they arrive at your website or before the user leaves a particular page on your website and more the wants the prospect enter their email addressing the submit or join button to things happen i they will see what is commonly called the thank. You page will message. This page will have additional information such as the next steps they should perform linked to the giveaway or an upsell offer. It's really up to you. How aggressive you want to be at this point second. The mail address is added to a list. You set up in wordpress or you can integrate the plug in with your email list manager or customer relationship management software. It is usually a good idea to have an email sent immediately from you. email list. Altera responded to the prospect to confirm their email addresses a best practice for example before giving access to the giveaway or freebie you can inform visitors on the. Thank you page that you will send the giveaway to the email. Address centered on the capture. Page here the goal is to ensure you have a deliverable e mail address. See as mentioned earlier. The thank you page can also have an upsell to make a purchase. A well-crafted upsell has the advantage of generating immediate income to offset your advertising expenses. It is your choice to decide that this first interaction. if the goal is to capture the email address try to make a sale or both pay close attention to your conversion rates and adjust your approach accordingly now back to building our capture page. I we need to give prospective customers something they want or need in return for their email address. Remember our progression. We specified an audience. Now we are going to design a capture page. For this tutorial we will use a free wordpress plugin cooled male opt in to build our capture page. Because it's easy to use. After the plug in is installed inactivated follow these steps go to the integration tap and select your email list vendor unauthorized. The connection maalot supports all the major email lists providers such is a weber. Mail chimp sending blue get response convert kit and many more often campaign tab and create a new campaign once they're selected theme and customize it with your offer again the objective is to motivate prospective customers to exchange their email address for the value of providing the last step in creating. Your campaign is to integrate with your email list provider in the integrations tap. Select the email list provider. You set up in step one and select the list where you want lead to be added a quick note here. You must have your email list provider in the email list for this campaign configured before this step remember to save an activate your campaign when finished. Go to the setting tab and navigate to the email campaign tab and philly no contact information location information is required to meet the can spam regulations. Here is a summary of how the process works. A prospect sees your add on facebook. Make sure it contains contains a call to action the prospect place on the ad and is redirected to the catcher page. The prospect enters an email address and receives instructions informing them to confirm their email address on the thank you page simultaneously. The prospects email address is entered into the list. He set up with your email list provider a short time later your prospect will receive an email central magically for more email lists provider asking the prospective customer to confirm their email address. Once the email addresses confirmed the perspective customer will receive a confirmation email with instructions on how to attain the item of value. The item of value can be any book report discount coupon free trial etc. Creativity is the only thing that limits your imagination. The prospect is now on your mailing list presumably in your sales funnel to purchase your product or service the last item to consider as using a tracking tool google analytics. Cpv live pro. Click magic or another tracking tool of your choice. The goal with any advertising campaign to optimize or reduce your cost lead or in this case the cost per email address captured as a best practice. You should create multiple variations of your ad and test them. The process of creating multiple ads and testing them side by side is called. Ap testing here is a brief overview of how it works. Let's say you created to office offer an offer be for example offer could have a red button and offer b has an orange button. Everything else between the two ads is the same next. You send fifty percent of the traffic to offer a fifty percent to offer be. You should also set the total number of visits office. Say five hundred wants. The total number of visitors is reached. The experiment is over. The author with the highest conversion rate is the winner. Then you would send one hundred percent of the traffic to the winning offer. However in many cases you repeat the process to see if you can increase your conversion rate meaning. A lower cost lead. That is it now you have to do is start running your facebook ads. And the rest is on autopilot. It is now up to you to implement the learning disgusting this episode. Be sure to listen to our next episode on how to move prospects three or sales funnel if you're interested in learning more about customer personas or ab testing visit us at the knowledge. Catalyst dot com. We appreciate you joining us for another episode of knowledge. Catalyst don't forget like and subscribe to this podcast be sure to visit us at the knowledge. Catalyst dot com for more information about this episode and access to our training programs to receive a copy of a show notes. Email us at show notes at the knowledge catalyst dot com and include the name of the episode. Thank you for listening and until next. Show keep investing in your success.

Facebook Small Business Entrepreneur Podcast How To Education Social Media Dr Orlando Skelton Altera Twitter United States Google
Washington, DC-area drivers with advanced-tech cars sought for paid study

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Washington, DC-area drivers with advanced-tech cars sought for paid study

"Do you have advanced technology in your car? If you do, you might be able to make at least $50 a month for taking part in a transportation research study. The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute is looking for Northern Virginia and D. C area drivers Miguel Perez of Virginia Tech. Because the cars must be suitably equipped. We're looking for cars that have advanced technologies. In particular those technologies that provide lane keeping assistance or adaptive cruise control. The researchers will add some instrumentation to the vehicle and all the driver has to do is drive. We're really just looking for general behaviors. See how people are using these systems out in the real world. Interested drivers should contact the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. About its advanced driver Assistant system

Virginia Tech Transportation I Virginia Tech Northern Virginia Driver Assistant System Miguel Perez
The Heart of the Matter with Dr. Hafiza Khan

The WoMed

05:37 min | 1 year ago

The Heart of the Matter with Dr. Hafiza Khan

"All Right Dr Khan thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. Welcome to the woman I've actually been wanting to have you on here for a while now Oh thank you for inviting me truly. I'd been following you for a while from the woman account but I feel like I really started taking in more of your post like win Kovic hit. All of us have become a little bit more inwardly thinking yes route. Ourselves in our house will yeah. Yeah. It's been amazing and you'd have a really incredible way of delivering information that I feel like even a non medical person could digest it but like you explain it in a way that it makes it so easy. Well I'm the only doctor in my family. Really. I at. So always have to explain everything to everybody my mom my sister has been in their words. So I, my husband's not a physician either so. So I'm used to explaining things to. So I always think how they explain this to my mother and my sister. They would be able to grasp it. So God so And also. You know I think that I love to teach. So I always wonder why people follow me because I'm not exactly sure has with the code you know most of what I do is cardiology related on meet related but you know I have been reading. So a Lotta Times something I'm like, Oh my God this is so interesting I have to tell everybody I love that. So the. Air Purifier. I Call I people need to know this are people need to so anything that thing with the heart is everything affects the heart rape stress air quality, Kovac, so really because. I kinda tie almost anything in because you know it will always have a downstream effect to the heart. That's really true. That's really true. Well I think it's such a gift that you have and I feel like if I ever were in need of your services, I would really want you to be my doctor in that because the just the way you presented I mean you're taking the time and you're reading all these different studies, which honestly makes my head hurt like trying to like analyze and take in different like research studies but the way you present it, it's like Oh my God. Okay. That makes sense in. You've just become a very trusted source for me of information. So you know part of the challenges. You know the instagram format is visual right? So I myself an experimental so there has to be a pitcher right rail. That's why I have the you know like a board or something 'cause now I need to be able to find my own post all where is fish oil post? Right yeah. Yeah. But then I, it's Kinda creative. How do I get the the main parts of the data? Visually interesting way that succinct. 'cause you use only the caption I don't know about you but like sometimes my is just cross like reading that. Yeah option Oh. Yeah. So The caption is the attention grabber. I've been playing around with a like a slide deck. It's almost like a slide show yet Some things I need to say, so it needs to be a chalk talk. Has after dry or and it's just me and my iphone. So. So part of it is is. It's create. It's creative for me right has I have what I want to say, how can I do it in a visually interesting way? Also to be succinct. 'cause you know doctors go on and on and on and lectures can be like on and on and on right yeah. Yeah How do you get a key point? Get it across in an interesting way people like Aha I got. Yes. I felt that way after your I mean you you broke down the hydroxy clear Quinn steady and like you're like your chalk talk, you know you're nearly everything I was like Oh my God I want to learn from you every day. Yeah. So that's the thing. So it's fun for me because I have to pivot to different formats right depending on what I WANNA do Whether it's the easy thing for me to do an inspirational pokes grab insure of my family, right something inspirational I'm done in like fifteen minutes, right? Right. But to an educational pulsed. I would already do the reading. So I'm already rigged article and I think, Oh, this is really interesting. Then breaking it apart, figuring out how to deliver what a cute little emoji. Duo Voice. So that's the fun. That's the creative and fun part to make. Take a while. So. Yeah, I know. It's part of the brain that I don't normally use when I teach follows you know for that during a dry board lecture with the facts, right? Right. So this involves visual creativity, which is for me using the other part of my brain which. Is Fun and interesting to

Dr Khan Rape Kovac Quinn
Processed Meat: How Much Is too Much?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

03:15 min | 1 year ago

Processed Meat: How Much Is too Much?

"Today we're talking about cross to meet. What exactly do we consider to be processed meats? What are the concerns with them? How much is too much you know virtually all of the healthy eating guidelines everything from the dietary guidelines for Americans to the recommendations put out by the World Health Organization the American Cancer Society, and the American heart. Association. They all include some sort of recommendation to limit your intake of cross meet. But there's a lot of confusion about what counts as processed meat. I mean Ham Bacon Pepperoni and hotdogs those are generally included in that category. But what about uncured bacon or hot dogs that have no nitrites added what about the sliced Turkey or roast beef from the Deli counter are they processed and what exactly is it about processed meat that makes it a potential problem? Is it just about the nitrites is sodium saturated fat all of the above. I think there's also some understandable confusion about what exactly it means to limit your consumption is one serving a week too much one serving a month is any amount safe? Kathleen Zalman is a registered. Dietitian who other things served for many years as the director of nutrition for the Website Web md she recently wrote a white paper for the North American. Meat Institute addressing some of these questions and concerns about processed meats, and then she sat down with me later to discuss this further. So I, what exactly is the definition of a processed meat? As Kathleen explains in her white paper minimally processed meat is the correct term for raw uncooked meat products that have been minimally altered such as grinding or cutting to create familiar cuts like strip steaks or pork chops. No additives or preservatives are used. It's simply processed from the whole animal into edible portions. You see in the grocery store and then she goes on to say further processed is the term used for meat and poultry that has been transformed through salting curing fermentation, smoking cooking battering breading, or the addition of ingredients to enhance flavor or improve preservation and safety examples include hotdogs, Ham sausages, corned beef lunch, meat, Bacon or beef Jerky as well as canned meat and meat based preparations. So you see the problem here, most of us would not call a piece of raw chicken or pork processed meat but in the meat industry, these are considered processed meats for that matter I think most of us would not put a can of tuna into the same category as hot dogs or corned beef, and yet in the meat industry these are all further processed meats. The way processed meat is defined in research studies is also fuzzy and very inconsistent, but it does a line more with the meat industry's definition of further processed. But nomenclature, aside, it's important to note that processing serves some useful functions such as inhibiting the growth of dangerous pathogens, increasing food safety and extending shelf life.

Kathleen Zalman Meat Institute American Cancer Society World Health Organization Director
BlackRocks Larry Fink; Johnson & Johnsons Vaccine Study

Squawk Pod

13:12 min | 1 year ago

BlackRocks Larry Fink; Johnson & Johnsons Vaccine Study

"Johnson and Johnson is temporarily paused. It's cove nineteen vaccine clinical trials due to an unexplained illness in a study participant the development first reported by stat news notes that the study is not under a clinical hold that's the more serious hold and it's not immediately apparent whether the volunteer received the actual treatment. Or a placebo. That would be key difference J. J. says adverse events. Events like illnesses aren't expected part of clinical studies but if they do find out, yeah, it was the placebo. Well then. It goes without saying. Apparently. It's not always immediately available for that but I read through that a lot because it it seems to me like you'd be able to figure out pretty quickly it to shutting down your entire thing if this was somebody who got the placebo. That's why it's called the blind, a double blind study or whatever you want people knowing who? Didn't. I guess somebody knows I hope so or else you get. Jeez. Yeah. Wow maybe. Striking, about this, this is now the second one of these that we've had AstraZeneca's you know put a hold of briefly internationally on their efforts but by the way that effort I believe is not ongoing right now in the United States. So if for example, there was a hold on the Astra Zeneca project in the United States and they separate hold now on the Johnson and Johnson one minute. It's not this is not a whole. Holistic. Pause. Right. A pause, but there was a I the point I was trying to make was there was a pause if you WANNA use the word pause and hold I know there now there's a distinction between the two, but there was also a pause on the Astra Zeneca program in the United States if they're also pause on the Johnson and Johnson Program in the United. States then you're then you're now down to Pfizer and Madonna as the most promising. The only other two that are even ongoing when you think about the time line for when these things become available, it could become more challenged. I I would. I would wait until. You know. That's not like you to find the negative part of it, but I mean I. Came back. It's not I hadn't realized I. Don't know if you want. I not. Not a spinal thing like the other one I understand that. Thousands of people in all these trials and you're talking about two cases that you don't even know we're going to result in Holt. So it made push it out to ask what if the dates maybe bad possibly, what possible what have you imagined that would have you imagined that the Astra Zeneca program would be running everywhere else in the in the world except the United States right now I I haven't thought realized that tried to mad and haven't tried Ed Needs is this means it's going to be the Astra Zeneca program to become available here at the United States in any kind of similar time. That's the point. For more on the news from Johnson and Johnson. Let's bring in Dr Zeke Emanuel. He of course, the former White House health policy advisor under President Obama he's now vice provost of global initiatives at the university, of Pennsylvania, and he's currently an informal adviser to the Joe Biden campaign and the Covid nineteen and Vaccine Recommendations. By the way he just co authored a research letter for the Journal of the American Medical Association comparing us, covert fatalities to those of some larger OECD countries to talk about that in just a moment. But Dr Manual let's start with this news from J. and J. Does this concern you? Well, any time? There's a serious adverse event it has to concern you but I think as. J. F. O. explained. You know you have to let the process evolve you have to actually examine carefully what the? Situation is the adverse event is related to the vaccine or placebo. Related to something else a pre existing condition, and so those are exactly the kind of questions at. Researchers will look at and try to uncover in the next few hours. And then we'll find out more. If it's in the you know arm with of the vaccine it does raise serious questions because you only have a few thousand people in the study like this one adverse event is serious especially when you're considering a vaccine that you're going to roll out to tens, hundreds of millions of people maybe even billions of people. So you know. That's the that's the ultimate concern, and this is actually standard process. For every research study you get a serious adverse event, you investigate it, it happens all the time. It's just the world's not always watching. So closely to see what the developers are excited worth pointing out that the the CFO of Johnson and Johnson also pointed out, they don't know any of these answers because they have turned it all over to independent investigators, and that is what kind of beefs up the credibility issues around those. The CFO himself has no idea even though this was thirty six hours ago whether this was in a placebo patients someone who actually received the vaccine will continue. That they've been carefully collaborating with the NIH on this trial and you know that I also think should give the American public. Some reassurance at this is going to be done thoroughly and to the highest scientific standards might detrimental. Let's talk about that paper that you wrote. You found that the United States did have higher death rates from Cova. I think the big question is was that something that was taking place very early on in the pandemic and that has improved since then and what have you found? Tell us a little bit about your study. So what we did is to take the United States mortality from it. Compare it to eighteen. Countries a high income countries like Japan and Australia Canada and Jeremy and also the countries that were hit very hard at the start Italy Spain, France and other. European countries. And we looked at the whole period and compared to most countries We actually the United States has done poorly even if you include the early phase but if you exclude the early phase March and April when every many countries were overwhelmed especially places like Italy and Spain. And you exclude them and then look say may after countries have experienced, got their arms around how to manage this of virus. I turns out the United States at extraordinarily bad even compared to places like Italy a we had from. May Tenth. To today roughly ninety thousand more deaths and we should have had we followed Italy scores ninety thousand Americans who died needlessly. As I have pointed out before Italy didn't have anything special or different in terms of Treatment Vaccines Diagnostics compared to the United States, what they have is better public health. Implementation of the public health measures, and that actually is a could could have saved tens of thousands of lives in the United States. and. We can see that when we compare our experience to those of other countries. What are you talking about in terms of reactions? You mean people wearing masks, you mean contact tracing do you mean testing that's put out? How much this you think falls on the healthcare system. As a fault and how much of it rely falls on public policy reaction to it. How much falls on just citizens following the rules well. It's all of it, but it's mainly the public health response in public policy. It really is implementing those public health measures, countrywide with fidelity. And then slowly reopening. So you do have to have social distancing you do have to have a trying not to go indoors. You do have to have having crowds less than twenty. You do have to have wearing face masks doing hand hygiene and focusing your testing and contact tracing capacity first of all, building it up, which we never did successfully in this country, and then focusing it on hot spots because we know this virus breaks out. A super spreading events it's not the usual person to person to person you know eighty to ninety percent of people will not pass this to anyone. Ten percent to twenty percent of people 'cause eighty percent of the infection. So you have to be able to identify them and quickly suppressed that we never built up that capacity the federal government under president trump punted it to the states and then states did very different. Things had Florida right now as rapidly opened up restaurants and many other things and a lot of us are expecting super spreading situations in Florida. We've seen. Places that kind of ignored? This up and down the Midwest saying Oh it's not here. Now having very high rates of cases we've had thirty one states that are going up and not down which is a very worrisome situation going into the fall and we're going to move inside. It's going to much easier to pass this virus along. And a lot of us are seriously worried about the consequences hazy I'm trying to do whether that was apples to apple. So when in May in the United. States. We got we got a later start right in Europe and by May they're already seeing. Progress over in Europe did you adjust I'm not sure whether you adjusted for that because we were right at the height. Close to it in May still and and they were on the downside in. Europe is. Standardized that in a way or wrong on that or or because we were going to have a lot more. A lot more deaths in in May than they would because they they were they got it a lot earlier there. Then I have a follow up question to. That is a super sophisticated question and you're one hundred percent, right we started a week or two later than European countries like Italy France But if you make that adjustment, it makes a slight difference not. Difference Yeah. So it's not it's not. Our peak was in May and their peak was in the end of March early April. In fact, our peak was earlier in April. and. By, by May tenth, we should have gotten our arms around and then also in our paper, we look at June seven and subsequently, and even if you look at June seven, we have tens of thousands of more debts that other countries like again the Netherlands France Spain. Italy. So we've done poorly, and by the way our data collection goes through mid September. So we've done poorly even with the August blip because of the. Spring summer vacations in many European countries where we know people like Silvio Berlusconi in Italy partied and ignored all the recommendations and got cove it So we have done badly even after even if you include the fact that we got this about a week or two later compared to other countries that was a very good question typically on the high level statisticians or clinical researchers ask that kind of. I don't with. Feeling so good about myself. All of a sudden the problems we've had here the number of cases the number of that's a number of hospitalizations was not inevitable. It was a result of bad public health measures being implemented or not implemented as the case may be and you can see this repeatedly states seeming seeming to learn nothing like Florida rushing to open up restaurants bars when we should be slowly slowly be opening. Detrimental very quickly. It I guess we do have time for one more question how how much of an impact do you think a Americans healthiness versus other countries have how do we rate just in terms of underlying co morbidity is that might be there well, it's a mixed bag for one thing our population skews younger than most European countries, they have a much older population more people over sixty five. And we know that older people tend to die from this disease unfortunately we have more co morbidity in terms of diabetes in terms of obesity, but they have more Komo British in terms of lung problems because they have higher smoking rates in the United States Net Nan. It probably comes out in the wash but we're going to have to do some more. Rigorous Studies of the CO morbidity situation and the age distribution of the population. But I don't think it's GonNa be tens of thousands of deaths. It might be a few thousand maybe even ten thousand but the overwhelming response effect that about half of our deaths or unnecessary that's not gonNA come out because of small differences in co morbidity between our countries and their country. Zeke thank you very much for your time. It's really great talking to you. Thank you very sophisticated questions this morning.

United States Johnson Astrazeneca Italy Europe J. J. Florida Dr Zeke Emanuel Obesity President Trump NIH Journal Of The American Medica Midwest CFO Holt Pfizer Apple Silvio Berlusconi Italy France
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
"doing research studies" Discussed on Get Real or Die Trying with Amadon DellErba

Get Real or Die Trying with Amadon DellErba

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Get Real or Die Trying with Amadon DellErba

"So when your house is on fire your personal house in your souls on fire. You don't just let it burn. Just. As if physical house was on fire, you'd be out there with the hose trying to put it out and to save those material items to say that edifice. We need to have that same type of thinking in the spiritual and that's consciousness. That's the separation while. My Spiritual House, is on fire I'm burning how do I put out the flames one of my going to lose these decisions and how do I gain them back so to speak you can gain back your virtues and feelings of righteousness and the signs of ascending to a higher spiritual level and coming into a higher spiritual maturity is the study of cause and effect and cause. And effect is the primary one of those nine primary elements of signs cause-and-effect and that's a huge huge lesson and spirituality and a lot of great spiritual teachers and Masters teach about causing effect, and it's also the study of laws of attraction and just isn't science wants a formulas discovered and tested improve and it is used over and over again it's not abandoned. It is the formula. And I strongly feel that in life there are spiritual formulas that are like that. And we discover them, but we discard them to easily we forget them and those formulas had to be practiced and you have to have the discipline to remember them and then execute those spiritual formulas in life. There absolutes that can guide our spiritual growth day in and day out. And so in many ways, he's absolutes and formulas, and I'm talking about are much simpler than the scientific formulas actually but simple doesn't mean easy very, very difficult. To A to execute spiritual formulas are difficult to come by and but once you discover them and you need to. Practice them you know. And How do you store the spiritual formulas consistently in your heart and your mind? How do you live by them? You know science it's data you have written out and it says, you add this you do that you'd lower to this heat. This happened, Blah. Blah. Blah. How do you retain those spiritual formulas and really you know find those that work for you and then operate by them. I feel there are too many false spiritual teachings going around the world where people are claiming that as easy and that's the first thing you need to realize. There's nothing easy about spiritual ascension. It's very, very difficult. It takes tremendous commitment and study spiritual ascension is very hard for me. Personally is there's someone out there says it's easy. I loved the know what you're doing, but you're probably A great scientists spent hours and hours doing research. Studying data. Literally there in search of answers and equations, and the pursuit to discover how things work. That's what it's all about to discover how things work. But a great spiritualist can also spend same amount of hours and time and years really moment to moment in pursuit of discovering how to operate his the most descended loving and humble carrying soul. The same nasty must be applied. Great. Scientists prides themselves on great intellectual knowledge and all that they've discovered. But a great spiritualist is humble. And He realizes that they don't really know much and they seek wisdom rather than knowledge knowledge is important, but it must be combined with the wisdom. The ranch book has a lot to say about science and the fusion of Science and religion. Spirituality tremendous amount and I want to read a couple of things from the ranch book. One. Quote here. True Science is engaged in the age long contest between truth and air will at fights for deliverance from the Bondage of distraction. The slavery of mathematics. And the relative blindness of mechanic materialism. Development of the state.

"doing research studies" Discussed on Ponderings from the Perch

Ponderings from the Perch

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Ponderings from the Perch

"So tell people what's going on next with no research institute insights where we're headed first of all I think I, Hope Gannett's worsening and wrote that down we need to steal. Wicked Challenge. We could go back and listen to. Awesome. Stuff up. We're borrowing it. So yes. actually that's the kind of interesting story at while because it screwed insights, we really pivoted from being a consumer insights driven company doing research studies and fieldwork, and all that stuff to really changing the mission of the company, which is now about helping decision makers make those big Harry decisions. Now that's fueled by customer insights and Voice of the customer work but really the emphasis is on, do you have a really hard decision to make that very crucial to your brand? Let us scoot screw out and help you make that decision. So I think that approach If you forgive the scooting terms is full speed ahead. These days. Because there's more and more of the decisions that brands need to make and as I mentioned earlier, this is kind of my usual refrain is that things are speeding up right and so you need to be able to move efficiently effectively and be able to make a series of decisions in real time, and so that's what we on the insight side are doing with our friends is really tackling those challenges along the way and again, same same refrain doing you know shorter smaller more. more. Frequent. Sessions so that those businesses decisions can be made in real time along the way and I actually think that's a pretty big shift for the future, right. So big huge research projects that are exploratory and men are validated, and then you're sent away with your campaign for the next few years. Me Personally at my companies, we're seeing much much more kind of rapid fire ongoing iterative. Decisions. Being made by companies until we're tried to, you know we're trying to keep up..

Hope Gannett Harry
"doing research studies" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Vics 28.2 to Paul. Yeah, absolutely come in. What's driving a lot of this market action here is, you know expectations that somebody's big pharmaceutical companies are making some progress on the vaccine front to get a sense of kind of what's going on on the vaccine front. Plus kind of what the CDC here in the U. S is trying to do in terms of anybody's. We're pleased to welcome Bloomberg law. Health Care Reporter share Stein So sure itjust kind of starting off a little bit. The news today driving the markets here looks like Momo Darrin is having some Some success here. AstraZeneca's well, I saw some research out that they may be having some success. What's the What's the thinking here as it relates the vaccines? Yeah, I mean, you saw yesterday, Madonna put out data on their phase one trials of their vaccine, and it shows that the vaccine produces antibodies that really important to protecting people. I don't know how long and bodies last. Yet that's going to be an important point for scientists to figure out the vaccine will work long term for protecting the population. But this is the first step in getting To a coded vaccine. So it's interesting here. I think, you know, weigh all want to get to a vaccine. Sure, I think it's kind of obviously what the markets looking for. It's what the world is looking for. Quite frankly, but in the interim Some work to be done as it relates to Scientists understanding kind of what antibodies people may have had. Who had the virus where we on that, in terms of what the CDC here in the U. S is looking at Yeah, he has been partnering with blood donation organizations like the Red Cross and something called the Bitter Land Research Institute. On the DL and has been doing a smaller scale study of how many people have antibodies in their blood, who are donating blood initially started out with six metropolitan areas. And they announced earlier. This was going to be spending that all 50 states that's going huge. It's going to help us understand. How many people have actually already had this virus studies come out of places like Santa Clara in Los Angeles and new state, But one state or one county doesn't really provide a good picture of how people especially in the studies. I've been in places that have had the virus a lot. Sure. Glad you bring this up because it comes down to sample size. Oxford, Moderna, whatever you know, the other 472 people trying to find this miracle vaccine. That's great. How big is the final sample size? But before vet Bill tries it, I mean, How many people are tested before we have it available to us? You mean for vaccine? Yeah. Yeah, they're saying that each each face three try, which is the final stage of a vaccine trial is gonna have about 30,000 people in each candidate. That's a pretty large trial on I need to see how people respond to it and quickly so they're looking at doing a fairly large sample size is too better. T produces factor to get better results Get it faster. All right, so share. So you know the CDC here? I mean, I think the question for a lot of folks is OK. Maybe I've had it if I've had it. What? My antibodies. Really mean. Is this me that I don't get it again? Like some of the other. Diseases that we've all grown up with, or is it just means I don't get it for another three months or six months. Is that something? The CDC is trying to get a handle on here? Do we know that? Yeah, Scientists are doing research study. I think in last few months that said that the antibody only last two or three months, but that's one study. You need obviously have a lot more research before we determine how long antibodies they're going to last. That's a really important question that the CDC and other researchers are trying to address because if antibodies don't protect you for a long period of time, that's going toe that's going to change how they address vaccine how they address possible therapies. Yeah, that's that's exactly. That's a key point here. And hopefully the good folks down at the CDC in Atlanta be ableto. Give us some good information there. Share Stein. Thank you so much for joining us. Here is a Bloomberg law Health Care reporter. And Tom, I think you know what we think about vaccines and treatments. You can't escape it is you look the future's action today. That's a big, big driver of investor sentiment here, and we see that this morning we sit in different tranches we had earlier with Madonna and then with the Oxford Estrogenic unused a second charge, but I think what's so important here? Paul's okay vaccines, and that's the big leap. But all the other news is constructive, essentially as well, including Goldman Sachs. I think we need to review that quickly here. Goldman Sachs. You know, very plain language delivered on their core business. They really did. And you know you You saw the numbers yesterday. J. P. Morgan and City that they're trading desk, you know, really drove the day here. And then he boy, you can certainly extract like that out as the market has. Goldman Sachs. We saw those numbers confirmed today. You know that even goes to a Morgan Stanley that we're going to hear from and s O the trading desk on Wall Street, A really driving the bus right here, and it's good to see a CZ. Net interest income, you know, become remains challenging, but again, the trading desk for really delivering, and I'm sure that traders are all saying Hey, Remember me your end when this happens, you know, because I'm here keeping everything going. Fish is up 42 Dow futures up 493. The Vixen, a big stick 1.21 points. 28 31 Now they're news in New York City. Michael.

CDC Goldman Sachs Share Stein reporter Madonna Paul AstraZeneca Momo Darrin Vics New York City Morgan Stanley Red Cross Bill Bitter Land Research Institute Health Care Michael Santa Clara Los Angeles
"doing research studies" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

12:08 min | 2 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"All achieve that optimum well being that we're all looking for but with the covert nineteen pandemic all right shaken up our world will be at and in many ways and not just in a physical way for the medical professionals dealing with this directly but with with it and and the two hundred thousand plus patients who are confined to a half I respect the code nineteen pandemic is shaking our world in many ways and not just in a physical way for the medical professionals who dealing directly with it and the two hundred thousand plus patients so far who are confirmed to have the virus now it's also affecting the mental health of almost everyone else in the country especially the eighty percent of us who were being told that stay home and that situation unfortunately does not look like it's going to end anytime soon so to give us some guidance on how to handle this ongoing challenge we're pleased now to be joined on the phone from her home in fair oaks lean pants line she's a marriage and family therapist in over twenty years experience she's also a clinical counselor and a registered nurse and I'm very very gifted therapists that we've been lucky enough to have on the show other times when we've been dealing with challenges so Alain thanks so much for joining us today well thank you for having me this is a really important topic for everyone out there now so how are you personally dealing with a pandemic US well I'm thank goodness I'm keeping myself really busy I'm I am staying in touch with family and friends using face time and some social media so that helps a lot but just being isolated stuff and just myself and my little dog so thank goodness I have my little dog having a little very compact and helps a lot too what's your dog's name Lucy Lucy Lucy Hassall Lucy thank you well that's good so we're staying into an obviously we're doing the show from home today so I kind of get used to new technology and not being in the studio and and hopefully this this is just give us more tricks in our our our little tool kit of of what we know how to do I I'm I'm telling you I think that's for is forcing us all to learn new ways to be right now oh absolutely that's I'm saying that all the way around even with even with people that aren't dealing with significant mental health issues they're still trying to accommodate and adapt to all of the changes and there are a lot of those that are trying to make sense out of all this technology to to make that happen that is so true so so let's talk about that you know I think that probably for some people out there that are are are quarantine right now they might be feeling some anxiety and depression let's talk about those people first and then we'll get answered people that were already dealing with depression before this happened well what I'm what I'm seeing and what I'm hearing is obviously a lot of anxiety people have a lot of fears of getting infected it's really increased since we've been staying warned hearing more on the news about more illness testing more a lot of more people are dying is becoming more real and staying home it's really it's hitting home I think initially people weren't really sure about what was going on that seems to be minimized a lot but it's really hitting home so the anxiety and the anxiety of people sorting things trying to get resources there's a lot of Eleni I'm sharing I'm hearing from a lot of clients are now home with their partners and their children twenty four seven and it's really difficult to manage that and to keep kids entertained working from home there's a lot that people are juggling if they have the luxury of being able to work from home there's so many job losses in financial losses to that's going on the stress is really really incredible and social connections also initiate your that's true and I think you know for some people they are not already using a lot of social media so that sits right you're a big you know leave us some of the older people exactly just trying to figure that out and knowing how to do that brings more anxiety and frustration absolutely so what are some of the things of I mean I know you mentioned you know St staying socially connected are there any other suggestions you might have for people that yes yes absolutely I think a lot of people they're waking and sleeping and eating habits are changing if they can maintain a routine as much as possible that keeps them you don't at least having that semblance of stability where they know exactly when they're getting up when you're going to sleep if they can find some fun projects to do things that they can do around the house maybe things that they wanted to do but couldn't do because they didn't have the time art projects I know myself I kind of wanted TV programs a lot of binge watching which actually was fun I really enjoyed that if they can focus on their physical health we're worried about our physical health but if they're just eating and healthy if they can make sure they keep a decent sleep schedule they get enough sleep if they can hi fi try to find ways to exercise at home I know we can't get to the gym I just signed up for a gym membership and can't do that but if you can do some other things at home take some walks even in the backyard you some do some polite he's used videos even meditation mindfulness that helps and remember please don't take any adult or a leave ibuprofen networks not present those things are they say not to take those but stay connected why do they always too because they're both anti inflammatories it's supposed to increase the virus ability to attach to the long sells and it makes it worse so you don't want to take ibuprofen or necklace and you want to be able to just you can take extra strength Tylenol so just remember that good to have a really good tips yet not everybody knows that but they've shown that that that most of the people that died had either Advil or leave in their system what they want to make sure that you don't do that so again staying connected to others through Facebook facetime Skype the phone be creative in your connection and and disconnect from news and negative information you know don't get overloaded the more people are listening they're just getting flooded with that it's increasing anxiety helplessness powerlessness and vulnerability again being creative with your family your kids camp in the backyard at picnics in the backyard you can find creative ways to play with the kids at home happy hours when videos a lot of my girlfriend's going Hey you wanna beat you for happy hour so if you can do that and watch their levels of frustration and irritability this is becoming a big issue at home things that you used to have privacy you have down time a long time you're not getting it people are terrible frustrated now and of course they take it out on their loved ones and people that are nearby and watch your use of alcohol tobacco and drugs to cope that also seems to be on the rise it's a common coping mechanism that watch that and if you're really really having a difficult time with anxiety you know PTSD by Charis trauma what you're seeing and hearing contact a mental health professional all the counselors and therapists that I know are doing telehealth right now I am too so you can contact someone and at least talk to them online or through the video something so they can get get the help and the resources you need if you're just joining us I'm really working hard and I'm Judy Brooks and we're speaking with Helene van Sant Klein of about what we can do right now to sort of us who are anxiety and and possible depression yes okay cells and I just want to mention to you that CNN did a poll and the pole was that they said thirty seven percent of the people that have been sequestered to quarantine right now is that this is affected their mental health that's a significant number of people so and that twenty one percent though which I thought was this was interesting have used social media or video and to stay in contact with other people which is a good thing because that will help tremendously we need to talk about what's going on yes we do and we don't know how long this is going to last so I think we also need to be prepared her parents for it to be longer than we might think and not have expectations about when it's going to be over I'm absolutely and that contributes to our frustration or confusion to we just really don't know we got one story and then it changes and it shifts and we're sort of in limbo and it's a tough place to be emotionally I mean you mentioned PTSD is that going to be increasingly in our future as a result of what's going on now well I think I think it is because you know Roy even watching things on TV we're being bombarded with yes and I know a lot of people are very messages from people who have friends and relatives that have come down with Kobe nineteen or people that have passed away you know they couldn't hold them they couldn't connect with them so that just that the anxiety and the fear of the infection I think it's really going to create a problem and they've also done research studies that where they have a research that after the sars epidemic there was between ten and twenty nine percent of the population that was quarantine suffered from PTSD so that gives you some indication it's kind of a precursor of what we could be looking at yes we could be in I remember already dealing with a society that have a lot of anxiety right right going into this exactly and so you know when you were starting to talk about people that may be already had mental health issues and now are being quarantined it is creating more of a problem for those individuals so what can aren't you know what can our listeners do if they know somebody they have someone in your family that that has been dealing with mental health issues and and now is alone and isolated what I mean other than the things that we just mentioned is there anything else that you would suggest well I would stay in contact with them for sure make sure that if they have been diagnosed with a mental health issue that they're still in contact with your doctors or with their therapist if they don't drop that off that they they are staying in contact because it will increase some other issues some other problems make sure that they have their their resources available that they have food available the things that you can do for them but just to be encouraging and stay in contact it really does contribute to depression and anxiety if we're socially isolating absolutely that's for sure I just cared about loved really helps show that always helps Helene how can people get a hold of you or find out more about your work what what where can they reach you well my my website is Helene van Sant Klein dot com which is a big it's a big long but if they can just if they wanted to contact leave the text message or contact me my phone number is nine one six three four two zero three eight zero that's how lean van Sant Klein and that's.

"doing research studies" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

09:04 min | 2 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on The Zest

"About your life. You divide your life between Saint Petersburg and Saint Petersburg Florida and you said you sail the the Mediterranean half the time. Tell me about that will to research this book. I committed to spending almost a year sailing around the Mediterranean and going from PORT TO PORT EATING AT LITTLE MON PA cafes and shopping in all the markets and buying food and and and researching why I do people in the Mediterranean lives along. Why do they have such better health? Wire the you know at eighty five and ninety still vibrant and out shopping every day and I it was you know I was. You can't do it from Saint Petersburg Florida as much as a and and I have to admit it was pretty darn appealing to to go to Europe and sail on sail boat from Port to port for basically almost a year. See a living on your sale living on Heftier here at home and then for for the last couple of years for this book half the year on the boat. How'd you get to be such a good sailor? I grew up sailing. I raised competitively as a kid and I had the job for a little bit in college. Summer as a sailboat captain in France. And so you have written. This book called the Mediterranean method. Your complete plan to Harness Ernest power of the healthiest diet on the planet. So we've been hearing about the Mediterranean Diet for long time now. What made you decide that you wanted to write another book about it? Well you're right. I mean since the nineteen fifties with Keys and then you know the in the nineteen nineties there was St St Leonhard study that came out and that really changed my career as a physician in the early one thousand nine hundred ninety s when the first time ever for every twelve people. Oh you had followed the American. Instead of the American Heart Association Diet the Mediterranean Diet You could prevent one heart attack and stroke for every I mean that was like the as is powerful has taken an aspirin more powerful than taking statin cholesterol meds. That kind of helped change. My career is the Mediterranean Diet and he came out saying that that was that good for your heart and then just in the last couple of years. There's been another very large Mediterranean Diet premed out of Spain once again showing if if you follow a low fat diet versus if you're randomized to a Mediterranean diet where we add more olive oil and more nuts you reduce the rate of heart attacks and strokes. They also showed that you had less diabetes less cancer on you're less likely to have memory loss and even your cognitive function improved so I mean we should make it clear. You've written a book with recipes but you are a medical doctor. I started in family medicine but I've been publishing with the American Heart Association and Doing Research Studies since the early one thousand nine hundred fellow right. How hard tell me? I've been how to promote heart health. How to prevent heart disease has been a big part of my background? And I'm you know with the Department of Family Medicine here at USF the The twist that you have in your book is that your. You've got a little bit low carb because when I think of Mediterranean also and I think if Italy I'm being a lot of pasta slot of bread dipped in oil pizza bread. You know French bread those solidify myths. That isn't how people eat every day like in Italy you know. Why talion so much slimmer than us? Yet they pasta him more often than we do. Yes Oh we're on. We're on the verge of reaching the fifty percent obesity rate within the next ten years in the. US towns are much lower than that that they have as an appetizer. A little tiny portion on salad plate and then they have the main course with with vegetables beings protein so when we pasta. It's this huge platter. So we've kind of lost our portion control is it's like the never ending. I always feel we're GONNA get a big bowl of pasta. I'm eat and eat any en eat and I haven't made a dent in so they do give us big ball so in Mediterranean method. You'd be eating three read afford to five bytes pasta if you had pasta and then you'd go on and have the rest of your dinner okay. So you're twist then as you call it is low glycemic to explain what low glycemic blow They've done analyses. Really look at when you eat food. How much does your blood sugar jump after eating of serving food food? That's glycemic load glycemic load blood sugar rise from a serving of food and they've compared all these different foods and they've been able to analyze it and they realize lies that some foods have a lot higher Jump in blood sugar level than others like bread inch table. Sugar are almost the same exact score. Does that mean they have the same effect on. Your Oregon's is on your body eating bread and eating table. Sugar is really the same thing I mean texture texture wise from our perspective. They taste different but they have the same biological impact. Your Body looks at it. And the number one cause for both heart disease and for memory loss and diabetes and aging for that matter is blood sugar control so we really don't want to so it's not cholesterol like we've been thought for years but we realized blood sugars the number one cause for all of these case. So why aren't you outing. The Kito Genyk Diet which which is no carbs and it's because it's nutrient deficient you're GonNa get old before your time it's a short you know the Keno Diet is a great way to lose weight quickly clearly but unfortunately you oftentimes usually gain it all back so you feel like this is a more moderate term or effect. I wouldn't say moderate. This is more reflective when they've looked at one year weight loss studies. A Mediterranean diet was asked. Is the Paleo low. CARB KETO diets for one year ear weight loss. Okay so we've been talking about what not to eat not to eat the bread and the sugar and big big portions of Pasta but a Mediterranean food is delicious. So what are you touting in this book what are the. What are the recipes Promoting well. Let's look at. What's the heart of the Mediterranean? Eating plan you know. We're talking about cuisine. That comes from Spain. France Italy Greece Turkey Northern Africa. And then you know even extends beyond on that to Portugal and other places where there's influence so we're talking vegetable fruit beans nuts olive oils predominant minute cooking oil that we lots of herbs and spices far more than we use especially garlic and Italian herbs and French herbs and things of that sort red wine with a meal red wine in moderation not really much other forms of alcohol a little bit of dairy some poultry. There's this probably mostly sleep free range poultry in contrast to coming from you know factory farm There's not a lot. What do they not have? They don't have preservatives. They don't have have much red meat. They do have whole grains but the when they've done analyses and they looked at the Mediterranean diet grains provided the least benefit of all the components opponents of the Mediterranean Diet. And if you follow do the combination of Mediterranean foods and low glycemic you get. That's the the Best Combo for reducing memory loss for reducing heart disease for extending longevity. So what's your favorite recipe in here. There's only now I want to say. This is not really a cookbook. You explain what the Mediterranean method is. You explain that it's good for your heart. It's good for your memory Utah. You break break down a lot of of methods of how to keep the Mediterranean Diet and then at the back there are fifty fifty recipes. My favorite recipes are in here. So you're asking. What is my favorite child? That's a tough one But no I would maybe the Pie. Because it's I've changed should I can't with the low glycemic version of it so instead of Pie in Europe is usually a- too big a portion of rice and we do it in the US. It's even of course a bigger portion Shanab rice ear so I tried cauliflower rice and it was delicious it cut the cooking time in half so it was quicker to prepare less time. I am Equally delicious and I. I love that recipe because it's so Mediterranean seafood with herbs and spices. The Way Hey it's prepared it's like is simple good quality ingredients put it together and it tastes fantastic. And it's really good for you so I know you are are talking about eating a lot more seafood Which in Florida? We shouldn't be that hard for.

Mediterranean heart disease American Heart Association Europe US Spain Saint Petersburg Florida Saint Petersburg Italy St St Leonhard Ernest France Italy Greece Turkey Nor PA France Oregon aspirin Portugal Doing Research Studies Utah
"doing research studies" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Don't be confused called the Tucson sector but to sun sectors basically human into Mexico. yeah that is a dentist to song right so we have the entire interview. in a video up on Facebook so you can see it for yourself and we do get into a little bit deeper into things we didn't have all the time to play back at you can see that the entire thing. and you can check that out on our Facebook page. and how about that hi cast. yeah you're my son on. that I can help you with I wish I knew is so one of the things that you hear talk about it's called you be our I. N. and you would be excuse even hear me now yes that you'd be excused if you didn't maybe automatically when I see you be I owe like what how so you'll be I sounds like a. disease or yeah you've got you be I would don't worry though there's a pill for it me cause death so really I stand for universal basic income in and there's a guy running for president that you probably don't know as well injury gang I think he's a businessman right is a he's is back rise on what a guy but he has a. his campaign is basically based on you know you everybody has to have like a shtick in his schtick is that. every single person in the United States would get a thousand dollars a month from the government I like him already yeah what a surprise free money does that for people please like that wouldn't get you excited I would not vote for somebody that gives me a thousand dollars a month I have principles of right below are fiscally conservative and I continue to uphold my principles but. Stockton California and so for the bay area decided to experiment with this now you can say good or bad they didn't use government money for this exactly privately funded they want to do research study they gave five hundred dollars a month. two hundred and twenty five people. that were all fell into a category that we would describe as need be in some way shape or form okay the game five hundred Bucks a month for a year and a half and try to figure out well how are you.

Facebook Tucson Stockton California United States president Mexico. thousand dollars five hundred dollars
"doing research studies" Discussed on THE HAPPY WORKAHOLIC PODCAST

THE HAPPY WORKAHOLIC PODCAST

14:43 min | 3 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on THE HAPPY WORKAHOLIC PODCAST

"Mental health diagnoses and neuropathic acted chronic pain with my mind because I know that this was something that was going on and interestingly enough. It's not even though it is only gaining and gaining national attention in the first studies early to thousands and <hes> their patients that have been received academy empty agents are over twenty years for a or treatment of mental house at Chronic I paint and then in the last probably five years really gained momentum star wants a clinic started opening all major education institutions in the country air doing research studies and so I started looking for a clinic for friend in the closest clinic was approximately three hundred miles away for us and <hes> there is nothing an a three hundred mile radius so where I live and thought well this is something I could offer our community because it's very valid treatment option. It's out of the box and were getting amazing results and so that's doing the heavy work and open my clinic in November of two thousand seventeen so we're heading towards ears open congratulations that absolutely amazing and I love that you just took charge in May have been for something that you're so passionate about. I have a question it so if somebody is on medication for anxiety or depression and they're coming off hills you get weaned off the pills and then transfer over to the ketamine do have need to get weaned off of what you're on in order to make the transition to the ketamine question no you don't have to I have lots of patients on anywhere from one to seven different right APP psychiatric related medication. I don't know how many more with stacked catcher but Austin one minute Houston causes helps this but it causes this desirable silence at so. Can you added this day then. It costs no side effects in the next thing. You know you're happen exactly I I was on. I think five literally because of that and I always wasted like I'm on a pill because of a pill I actually had a psychologist that I started seeing it was her job to explain how they work together. In the benefits together of like upping adults in lowering another so that I would have the true Sri benefit of like actually being able to sleep at night or you know not having panic attacks but I like that I love that you just mentioned that because it's so true and I don't think people realize that when you have them combined the the powerful benefits they have or why they need <unk> why need to be on so many right what comes as they are on saw any medications they will start to be treatment was being able to come down on medications. All antidepressants and food stabilisers with the exception of one are completely finds tate concurrently with Kennedy and then the drug grouping of bins Diana's so that's brace like Santa Claus does medications often. Many of my patients are on those as well wanting to come ought to be down the problem with the ASCII is that sometimes thanks academy thought as effective so it's not a problem Inoke interact in a poor gonNA make us deal badder her costume cutback reaction but academy spinoff work as well so I usually try to make sense that are on asking so at least take the lowest dose they can't you know I don't ask them to come off. As it's your duty then you need it and try to take it. Maybe the day yu-shan or eighty hours right prior to try to space dot US must folks but I've got a autopay sense that were on try dosing out of the four day. Oh my God come off of their Bentos by supplementing was Kebbi. That's amazing amazing and for any impatient listening. Please make sure you do your research. When you start getting off these meds because speaking from experience I was on thirteen medications and I doc December and I'm still having crazy withdrawals in July stabilizer I liked but extol which also known as Lamotrigine they are very very arts? Come off harder than narcotics narcotics. Get all the arrived as far as how you got to go to detox. Yes you do have to not talks on narcotics so on ask certain antidepressant off saying as far as Vegas Tux I saw tiny should be guided by decision Qualified Medical Kreider. Don't just try to do it without guards. I was told I come up all of my medications and I made the choice to do it a lot quicker than I may be should have which I definitely do not recommend and I had the worst detoxing but also because I was coming up so much at once but I had vertigo I was getting vertigo really really bad and that's a side effects from certain medications I was on because I was coming up so many at once I started getting Vertigo and then just a couple of months while no it was about a month ago I went to my an t for the Vertigo and he put me on three meds so I was on one of the strongest antibiotics on the markets five times a day mixed with a water pill to help train my ear as well as steroids which absolutely hate and I said okay well. If this concoctions GONNA kill this vertigo than let's do it so for three weeks three solid weeks. I was on those strong pills as a concoction to fix the problem from other pills. I'm like again on pills because I was on pose and now luckily I'm back to just my vitamins but still like I've never been so tired like people don't realize and this is why it's so important to ask questions when you see doctors because if I didn't ask for a psychologist or somebody to explain explain all the drugs that was on I was doing it myself but not everybody has that capability or ability to do that but you need to always be speaking with the medical professional because it's their job in their well-versed in all of the side effects and what happens if you do up. A dose by just five milligrams like you're ruining your insides and you don't even know that happening until something shows up and then you're like all my God. That's because up my does. We'll don't up here so when you start ketamine gene doesn't go by. Maybe now a lot of people notice that are listening but when you're on certain I._B.. Drugs it goes by your weight and when I was doing my chemo it would go. My dose was by my weight but it would also be a slower her plush so through the I._V.. So when you start Kademi do always is isn't by way and then also does every patient start at the same dose per person I so it's definitely dinos by weight back in for treating so I've been held it starts at a certain dose thing and it's milligrams per kilogram on their weight and if you're being treated for pain it's not only hired dosing but it's longer infusion so mental health confusions are all about an hour long <hes> and then a chronic pain and Susan as two to four hours law and the main reason for being augurs because dosage so much higher to be able to tolerate it any space but yes someone comes in the prosecution. We started a certain dose and extended a Syringe in its run on an I._D.. Pump over a slow slow infusion on the cop over an hour and each subsequent abusive the justice does album tolerated previous infusion just adjusted society now do when you're at the clinic end Santa's a patient. I meant that clinic and I'm getting my does do. I feel anything while I'm there or do I feel anything when a leave and how long does that treatment stay for like what would be my schedule. I would come in every two weeks. How Long Nisa Regimen for that treatment plan for mental health? The the current recommended owner call for that is six fusions. Those infusions happen about over on a suit is really your enough time so it's real intensive upfront 'cause in Asian nouns on itself. It's coupon of science and against the best affects most long lasting effects is better do several us together there and so that you know each patient is a little different parties. I work with federal and says some patients could do every other day. Patience needs to do to to in a row three days off due to in row at kind of what works their schedule and their support system so the whole life has just against occasions over about two and a half you know two to three as far ars which he'll Tau Kennedy in isn't Associates Amana steady so we're trying to achieve level to sociation and that will stimulate for everybody people they ill by their swatting <hes> kind of moving water for some patients. It's <hes> you know like looking down enter hand on chair and you can see her head pure an ruby when it almost feels like get attached to your body as your Decem skating it's not attached to you some patients very vivid colorful array of visuals on their eyes or close catrine. You're not you're not a completely asleep when you're always onto my questions or let me know that you're nauseous. Stomach calls badly altered state of mind. You can't drive after the right author stick of the treatment someone it within the next you know fifteen minutes patients are usually like everything is like is he appears to because I can tell the study comeback so but Italian being discharged from here you may give bit dizzy or kind of off or sleepy or feeling cut worn out but you're still have some facts confusing are out of body guess so after the six after the two weeks what the regimen usually I am I I always scheduled for patients. were a single goal <unk> a month later and then talk at that point in time. <hes> is you're doing well. You WanNA shout. Do Your next booster several months dumber road or so you want on Straw the schedule once a month for a little while it has really dependent on a patient's diagnosis patients will really complex compound a diagnosis of once a month as part of their treatment plant. They are doing it either in place over in addition to their key says so there are some patients in essentially on a sufficient reach out when they start sliding backwards trouble. That's amazing that it works out well when you is something that some insurance is actually cover so at this point in time. There has not been kind of consistency with insurance coverage largely because it's not F._D._A.. Approved us it's awesome will use of the drug now with that. There is a drug drug. Just came out in March was F._D._A.. Approved in IT'S A it's sister drug academy called SPRO motto or as Kennedy and is a nasal spray and say one one of the fancy drug companies signed that they wanted to fix the bank of this drug. That's generic academies generic up so they split it off like science split off of county. Maybe that I use received Chutney. They made a new unquote new drug out of it and it's an a nasal.

Tau Kennedy ketamine Vertigo Austin Houston Kebbi Lamotrigine Kreider Santa Susan Decem tate Diana Amana two weeks fifteen minutes eighty hours twenty years
"doing research studies" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"That your father and I try to stay on top of all the cutting edge stuff the PC arm is doing as far as food as medicine he tells a little bit about PCR and then what you're doing as far as nutrition for disease prevention disease reversal you bet what personal thank you for for including this important topic I founded the physicians committee back in nineteen eighty five I was just a residency I've done my residency here T. W. and I got to feeling that in medicine we don't do too much to prevent illness now we're we're we're not so bad what's the heart attack has occurred yeah right right well how to how to do treatments at that point but my thought was we ought to do something to stop it from happening in the first place that means throwing out the cigarettes I have a healthier diet all those kinds of things that were not so sexy but much more powerful so I set up the physicians committee to try to advocate for that especially healthy eating as tango has gone on we've just exploded we have now thousands of thousands of physician members and and many more lay members who want to join us we do research studies where we bring in people that have diabetes for years we change their diets and try to make it improve or even go away which we didn't think was possible but now we know we know is we have lots of resources we do well we're very busy trying to change medicines practice I think I saw you guys were doing a study about rheumatoid arthritis with diet I'm I'm just fascinated at how many different diseases can really be traced back to diet and how many can be improved by diet that's I think exactly the issue we had thought well a healthy diet will help me lose weight or it will help with maybe a heart attack or maybe you know the obvious things but there's so many other diseases out there that diet it seems a fax exactly rheumatoid arthritis attack we're doing a study right now and if anybody listings to this wants to join our study would love to have you this is people who have been diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis they're miserable the joints hurt their staff and what we're testing is a healthy diet that is it simply a limits the foods that are common triggers for arthritis to see how well it works and so far it's been just a fascinating study but other things too like migraine headaches you wouldn't think that has anything to is what you ate right right right that can be a very very important thing we brought a law student into one of our recent studies show just migraines that word every single week getting hit and by the way my grain it's not a tension headache that goes away and forty five minutes it's a sledge hammer last all night long she couldn't study she can do anything finally went on a diet change and when I said I change I mean throughout all the animal products no meat no dairy no eggs particular the dairy very come a trigger effectively cured of her my great and she I sorry not too long which said that this has changed my life and yet how many doctors and how many clinics are not using this will how many are telling exactly the opposite it's unfortunate because I actually have a friend who has fibroids and you would think that her doctor were totally off the dairy because is in Derry known to grow these kind of things and she's like oh I thought during help that I've been eating tons of dairy I thought that would help you touch as if they think really.

forty five minutes
"doing research studies" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"doing research studies" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Biggest concern, you know? Don't want to put it next to the where the dog can get at it. You know, you gotta protect that thing with your life. No question about it. So I mean, I I assume it's it's not easy. These days. Ryan did stay anonymous. I mean, there's certain things you can do in the social media world. Most states do require you to come out and say who you are my policies. I didn't see what Wisconsin's rules regarding that here in Illinois. You have to identify yourself who you are. And they do that for the reason not just to make it scary for the person who wins because you know, everyone's going to be coming out of the woodwork to contact. I just verify that. Yes. There is indeed a winner this as a real person, we're not just taking the money and running with it. So a lot of states do require you to do that the the the cash lump sum, by the way for this seven hundred sixty eight million dollars four hundred seventy seven million dollars that that allows you to take the money up front. So you get popped by a bus. You know, at least. You've got the money in hand for your family to share afterwards. But you know, if you take it out and expanded over the twenty nine years, you know, obviously anything could happen during that time. Brian burrow, ABC news. With us. See I've always questioned that whole deal of making you identify yourself. Because frankly, you're putting yourself in endanger. Yeah. Yeah. You are. And that's always the concern you want just kind of fade away, right with your mind. Is to exist by now, you can still do that. But now hire security guards to protect you at all times. But, you know, the sad thing about this is if you really wanna do it's anybody who's done research. Studies lottery winners is unfortunately, people who get a lot of money at one time don't necessarily know how to spend it in wind up right back where they started again after several years because so many people reach out, and so many people contact them everyone that we've talked to as far as and financial experts say I get everything in order, and basically you stored away in an account, and he kinda limit yourself as to what you can access. So you can save that for future generations because unfortunately, you drop that much money into someone's Bank account, and man, oh, man. You know, you you go to town on that stuff. Have to you'd have to like put some get a obviously a great financial advisor. And put some things that you're not eligible to get it for like five years, and then ten years, and then twenty you know, what I'm saying? Yeah. Yeah. Like that guy in West Virginia had the hundred grand stolen out of his car in a suitcase in a bar. Remember that guy? Would you heard the opposite extreme now? There was a guy owns the guy that happened. That's a lot of one dollar Bill. Right. Or had to be leaning upwards. So we don't add. So we'll find out when we find out. Exactly. And then, you know, it's interesting because people in new Berlin where the ticket was purchased at a speedway gas station. Some of them believe they know who the person is. So it may not be too too much August, we don't know. I mean, it's right along the interstate system. Simon isn't someone who just stopped off for gas and continued on their way. Or is it someone local some of the local people think that it is someone who lives in the neighborhood. So we'll say no way, man. How do they know this? Well, you know, neighbors talk. That being said if neighbors are talking you better protect that ticket even more. All right. Ryan. Thanks so much. Thanks, Ron take care. There's Ryan burrow ABC news. I seriously thought about this a lot and the I mean the thing the initial initially one at the first thing I would do is I call all my friends and loved ones, and I'd say there's a plane leaving in forty eight hours don't pack anything don't just get on the plane. We're gonna buy stuff when we get there rent like an amazing house. And then you can just kind of I think that'd be and just show up at the airport and go let's go there. Right. Right. And just pay it right there. I I think I would I would love I want to do that one day, regardless just Chopin airport me, and my wife and say, let's try that one that one dudes dad or the day with the drunk shopping thing, and he got drunk and bought everybody at cruise. It's like to watch. Fourteen.

Ryan Brian burrow Wisconsin Berlin ABC Illinois West Virginia advisor Chopin Simon Ron four hundred seventy seven mil seven hundred sixty eight mill forty eight hours twenty nine years five years one dollar