35 Burst results for "Dodds"

Lucy's Story, the Chimp, the Poet

Science Friction

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Lucy's Story, the Chimp, the Poet

"Today. It's lucy story though. Lucy isn't here. And if she was she would have spoken to you. In screeches squeaks and grunts and pant hoots. Now if you don't know what a parenthood is let me just say it goes a little bit like you all get one thought. I bled shimon radio. Look lucy the deed. Learn to use rudiments of american sign language. Isil as you'll hear she might have gestured to you. In simple single words or occasionally she put them into pairs and triplets like like luck kind of poetry and writing poetry. Since i was a kid. I think i write when we first poems in e three and had a primary school teacher who told me that it was okay and i thought oh the lead to write poetry. So i did. What was the pace of poetry about in grade three. It's not it was about walking through the bush and listening to kookaburras. And i rhymed the word bush with short i said walking through the bush listening to the store and i thought it was very profound. Doesn't hold up today. That you gotta start somewhere. Benjamin dodds powered by not primary schoolteacher by day and science. Fan boy big time. His latest book of verse is called airplane back banana blanket and it's inspired by one of the most curious social experiments of the twentieth century. On the tesha mitchell. And this is the story of a team called lucy. It's one from our archive one. That listeners really loved and warning. There are some sexual references in this program with starting in non sixty four when little. Lucy is just two days old cradling in her mob

Shimon Bush Lucy Benjamin Dodds Tesha Mitchell
Why Would Jaguars Sign Tim Tebow?

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:05 min | Last month

Why Would Jaguars Sign Tim Tebow?

"We are back final hour. It's been a fun show. We appreciate you being here. A lot of conversation with my Mike smith earlier. We also talked to dennis dodd. Another conversation predictably has been tim. Tebow we've given you a lot of reaction on that in the mike cannon bom from espn former gm jets dolphins. He's been here a couple of times. He had this to say earlier today. On keyshawn jay will and zubin about understanding the signing. I don't like it. I just don't see the upside in this move. He's thirty four years old. He would be a backup. I just don't know of thirty four year old players that can come in and be back place special teams and you're taking away a roster spot from hopefully a young developmental player that could grow with a young nucleus obviously led by trevor lawrence. And to me this is probably through the lens of urban. Meyer saying a decade. And a half ago tim tiba was the most competitive guy i've ever been around and he can help set the culture. If i was in that building what i would be pushing back saying coach. That may be true but in the nfl as you well know. Players needs to be led by players. They believed can take them to where they wanna go and as a backup tight end. I just don't think tim tebow would have that same credibility as he wants dave when he was the starting quarterback in florida. He also questioned whether tibo could even makes a team. I just don't see how he makes the team or urban and he's a really good coach he he's been historically great college but i just don't know he has to earn a spot and he's given a spot. That's gonna cause a big problem because players weren't have a chance to win and again to me just putting on my lens of a general manager and roster construction if you're not a starter in the nfl with only forty six players dressing you have to play special teams so my question. is tim. tibor thirty four years old going to cover cover kicks that remains to be seen. Now if he doesn't earn it does a totally different discussion. But i don't think you could sign him and say hey. He definitely has a spot on this team.

Dennis Dodd Mike Cannon Keyshawn Jay Zubin Trevor Lawrence Tim Tiba Mike Smith Tebow Espn Dolphins TIM Tibo GM Meyer NFL Tim Tebow Dave Florida Tibor
Satellite Images Show Huge Russian Military Buildup in the Arctic

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Satellite Images Show Huge Russian Military Buildup in the Arctic

"Recent weeks have seen a significant build up of russian forces along its border with ukraine within the last day the threat has become even less physically with one. Russian officials suggesting that those troops crossed the border to defend russian sympathizing separatists in ukraine's eastern donbass region. The united states is now said to be considering sending warships into the black sea. This is not necessarily a huge deal the. Us navy seals the black sea pretty regularly so long as turkey admits them through. The dodd nells straight. However in this instance it would surely be interpreted as a hefty hint in moscow's direction on join with more on all this by mark galliotti senior associate fellow at the royal united services institute and author most recently of a short history of russia. Markle start with the big question. Do we know what. Russia's intentions towards ukraine actually are right. Now we certainly don't and to be perfectly honest. That's how moscow wants to keep it whether there's some major military offensive plan his pie unlikely but the key thing is this is very much about bringing pressure to bear on ukraine and in that respect as far as moscow's concerned the more uncertainty the better.

Ukraine Donbass Mark Galliotti Royal United Services Institut Moscow United States Navy Turkey Markle
The History of Drum Lessons with Mike Johnston

Drum History

09:30 min | 4 months ago

The History of Drum Lessons with Mike Johnston

"Mike. Let's jump in and Yeah why don't you go ahead and teach us about the history of drum lessons men. It's it's one of those things that right when you think about anyone. Acquiring a skill you have to think that as soon as that skill is acquired then that skill is ready to be taught to someone else and so we can assume that in the history of drums dating back to people banging on things that it was taught to other people the rhythms the traditional rhythms. All of that stuff. So i think if we're looking for forms of education and that's what you and i have discussed as in the past about like what a cool topic that would be informs of education. We have to start at in person lessons because that would have been the first way this would have been done in and that would be with any skill and so when you have in-person private drum lessons one on one. I'm passing on information to you in a skill set to you. That has it's own pros and cons. I mean all of these have ups and downs all of these things. it's like. Oh that's the best way to go except for this except for this and i think that that becomes such a cool topic because people like me. That are obsessed with education. We're always trying the best trying to find the best way to pass on that information to someone else. And i gotta say i would assume by the end of this. Podcast will wrap all the way back to the beginning which is in person lessons so i think the first thing that would have happened before published books and obviously before the digital world would be in person private lessons on the instrument. And i think it's probably safe for us to just do this coming from the drums set perspective instead of cavemen hitting random skinned instruments. No i think. I think totally and i think that's You know before that and and a lot of it maybe we can kind of dislike. Assume that a lot of the lessons that would have happened. before kind of our modern in person drum set would have been your were taught via the military Yeah seems like a safe assumption. From what i've learned over the years of doing the show is You know it's you're taught the snare drum for a reason or in other cultures. Maybe you're you know it's it's traditional music and you're playing and like a pub or in you know at a party quote unquote. Maria is. it's you know the function Was a big thing you know. What are you doing this for. It wasn't the modern day of like. Oh i play drums. Because i'd igam. I'm doing this to go along with this. Traditional dance or this traditional ceremony so going from those but if we consider like modern day private drum lessons they wouldn't have been that different even one hundred years ago. You would have had to go to someone's house or a music store and you would have had to sit down and take a one on one private lesson now. The pros the positive side of that is the i think the biggest one is this personalized when someone writes a book. It's not personalized. It's general but if i walk into a room to take a lesson with somebody hopefully as long as they're doing their job right they're going to be creating the education specifically for me and my desires on the instrument so getting personalized instruction is a massive plus the other thing is you have someone in the room watching you mess up. That can correct in the moment. Yes dead of submitting video and then waiting two weeks for someone to get back to you in the moment they can even and i don't mean this in like a whiplash kind of way but they can grab your wrists and turn them over a little bit and i. I still remember being a kid and having my teacher grabbed my hand and turn it over and just that feeling of like some another human being note. Do it like this. That stuck with me forever. Yes oh that is amazing and the other thing that never gets talked about enough but as someone that taught private lessons from the age that i was seventeen and from five and tell seventeen i took them and then i taught from seventeen on the teacher becomes a life councillor to the student because the teacher is the one person that is removed from their social circle. So the student who's going through whatever it is in their life whether they're a kid or adult they have this person they can tell their problems too and that teacher can't spread. The rumours can't yarn into drama. Because i don't know anybody so that's one thing that you know you get out of private lessons as you get a bit of a life coach yes someone in the room to correct you and you get personalized instruction. You're absolutely right. And and i just have a funny thing that happened because i i mean you're obviously on another planet from what i was doing so i taught at sam ash for a while and i taught private and then at another store here and i guess my specialty would be working with really young kids not as much shredding like. Let's go you know. Rip through a bunch of books and stuff. It was like getting kids to really like the drums. And i had a little kid. And you know. I won't name obviously but he They were. The dodd was from country. Where i believe. It was a little stricter on the kids. Um i think that's fair to say but the kid the young five year old would very often just kind of like talk to me and tell me stuff in like you said. It's like a psychiatrist thing almost but one time he said. My dad told me to grow a pair. What does that mean. And i was like. Oh man talk to your mom. I'm not. I'm not getting into that. I don't. I don't want sam ash to come after me but again that is such a normal part of being a private drum instructor is that you're you are the person that they can go to and just say like look i. I have no one else to talk about this stuff. And you know you can also end with the problem is you can't step in and be their parent because they already have parents and you just have to kind of be there for them and listen as much as possible. But i think that's that is one of the few things that i never hear mentioned and i think lake man even so my last private instructor that i was actually in the room with was peter manga dini and that was just such a blessing because he's just a legend in the world of education and i would drive two hours to go have my lessons with them and we would be in his basement and i was in my twenties so i wasn't a kid but i was able to tell him. Hey you know. How i'm touring and i have this record deal. Something doesn't feel right and he was the first person to tell me. Education can be your plan. You just have to choose it. Yeah and to have somebody say that to you when you think like. I don't want to admit that. I don't enjoy the rockstar lifestyle to have somebody believe in me and say look man. You're you're meant for this thing. I don't know where my career would be. If i didn't have an in person life coach at that moment To say those things absolutely he was on the I probably should have sent this to you before. He was on the show From when recording this a couple weeks ago a month or so really. Yeah he did We just talked about career and his life and he talked about you and Told a bunch of embarrassing stories. Awesome beautiful now now. He was super proud of you. Obviously but Yeah that was another suggested Episode by someone but I agree completely where you can like. It's almost like a It's just like someone who's been down the road before and can And can kind of steer you in the right direction. But i think maybe that brings up the point of but a a bad teacher can really affect things negatively as well right so so and you know for the downside of private instruction i think the biggest downside is that you are limited to the people in your local area and we don't all live in san francisco. La atlanta new york. London where there's top level pros. And that's i think why you see the success of books. Eventually later later in the timeline. The success drum clinics drum touring Even online lessons. That's because when it comes to private lessons whoever works at your local store. That's who you get. I mean i know as a kid. I didn't choose my german star five years old. My mom got me drum lessons and whoever the teacher was at the store that was closest to us that was going to be my new life coach and it didn't go well for like the first three teachers. I wasn't clicking with the people. And i had the jazz teacher that told me. The only way to play is like this and it was. You know god doesn't really sit well with me that i'm trying to get better in an art form in. You're telling me that it's the military that there's rules has to be done this way and so i think that can be a bad side of in person lessons. The other thing is that. And this is something you'll know from sam ash and either positive or negative but you are also limited to how much the store or the school supports their lesson program. So you might go to an amazing store that has killer gear but because of where. They chose to have their location. You don't get to take lessons on a drum set you have to take it adds or an electric it and so that's another really bad part about this is like oh man. I signed up for this instrument that supposed to be loud and bombastic. And i've never played one

Sam Ash Peter Manga Dini Mike Maria La Atlanta San Francisco London New York
How solar panels are making Puerto Rico communities more resilient

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 5 months ago

How solar panels are making Puerto Rico communities more resilient

"When hurricane. Maria tore through puerto rico and twenty seventeen. It took out the island's power grid. Eleven months pass before power was fully restored in the meantime some residents went without lights or a waiter refrigerate food at home. I'll a hundred koster dodd. Rodriguez is with the nonprofit. Resilient power puerto rico. She says recovery often took longest in low income communities so her group has installed solar power and battery systems at thirty five community centers in vulnerable areas everything from schools and after school daycare centers to cultural centers. Now these centers do not have to wait for the main power plant and transmission lines to be fixed after a storm and they can help power. The recovering community for example at a farmer led nonprofit in the center of the island. In case there's a blackout than the center. Becomes a hub where community leaders can organized to provide food or have energy to power up medical equipment. Moving to clean distributed. Energy can help. Puerto rico prepare for extreme weather and address inequity at the same time.

Puerto Rico Koster Dodd Hurricane Maria Rodriguez
You Are More Than A Conqueror

Fresh Anointing Show

04:50 min | 5 months ago

You Are More Than A Conqueror

"Today. We want to talk about more than a conqueror. Wow and we look at our lives as we talk about living my best life and there are many times that we get caught up into this journey that we live in in this world and all the the peripheral things and all the semantics and all the different things that come at us and sometimes they can be overwhelming and frustrating For us at times in and a lot of times the devil throws these obstacles in our way and it seems like that he is trying to defeat us. But if we're in kreis. Let me rephrase that i know for a without a shadow of a doubt that he is trying to defeat us. But we have to understand something when we are in christ. Jesus we a more than a conqueror and we have access to the power. And i i get for me this all like i made a note. They're standing at a place of victory rather than looking for victory. Understand that victory has already taken place The jeremiah one in five. Say before i play she among among your mother's womb and new you then he said sanctified you and it is at ordain you now when it comes to be more than a conqueror meaning it. I'm fighting from crisis perspective and not man that means the battle is already been worn. Watch out watts. And so what. I'm doing i'm just a fulfilling why he had already preordained. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah you on target right there. That's now that's a good word. But what about those people that may think of themselves as not being a conqueror. Well they don't themselves as as a conqueror because of so many things and challenges of life and hardships and difficulties. That have come come their way. Paul writes to the romans in rome. He says i would come to you. I pray he's had not only. Did i pray. But i had planned to come even from spain. I was gonna come. But i've been prevented and and that's something when we pray god tells us yes god tells us know some damn dodd tillers way and we talked about david understanding victory in the same light now. Here's david don spanish child. The fastest seven days and seven days. The child that what david did david gets up. go back. Home washes hisself lotions himself and go down to house the law and worship because he realized that god's wheel had been done and therefore will he didn't get the answer that he wounded but he knew that god was still good. Always get to answer that we will but that does not mean that god is good. God has a plan for live. There was an later home. Same david karen who also wind to build the temple. What we wanna do now. Right right right. And and god again tales david. What no but you can participate in the process so daily go out and all the priests and the gate keeble and he lies them up for the war he goes out and get the bang for the building of the temple but no one that he was not going to get to do it because god until live. He had a plan solemn. The do not not a plan. And if got had to deal what he would they've been willing to walk in obedience under the will of god rub into his own. Plays of what we call peace and we gotta play ps of happiness and all kinds of things we got label and we laid out but it may not have i do the will of

Kreis David Don Spanish David Watts David Karen Rome Spain Keeble Paul
'Sex and the City' is coming back -- but it's missing one key character

Donna and Steve

04:25 min | 5 months ago

'Sex and the City' is coming back -- but it's missing one key character

"John. Were you a sex and the city fan are not necessarily but I think I'm going to go back. I watched episodes here and there, but I wasn't like it considered. I I'm not like so ingrained in the culture of sex and the city that I breathe it right, But I am excited that it is coming back. Great news for fans of the show. It's coming to HBO, Max. Sarah Jessica Parker. She put out a tweet that was it was like B roll of New York City, obviously produced by the show, and then it was, you know, her typewriter typing and it said, And just like that, which is famous from her. You know, from her column, she wrote. And so that's gonna be the name of the show. And just like that, so, okay, So this isn't like all the episodes are coming back. This is no. This is a new new content with Carrie, Miranda and Charlotte. Oh, what? I'm in their fifties. Oh, yes. So, um, you know, won't Well, that's that's fun. I really like this idea. 10 episodes half hour long. It's scheduled to begin production in New York late spring. So I think we're going to see it in the fall. I am so excited. Me too. I think I'm going to go back and binge. The six separate six seasons because you know why not? What else? The old episodes an hour long. I think so. Eh? So I like that. These are a little bit shorter. Yes, I couldn't help but wonder where are they now? Yeah, that's what everybody wants to. That's exciting. Well, and Cynthia Nixon. Didn't she run for office in New York? I believe sounds right? Yeah. Um And so Cynthia Nixon's going to be back. Kristin Davis, Sarah Jessica Parker, but no to Kim can could trail right. She won't ever be back. Nobody likes her. Hey, Donna, you know we talked about this morning like, you know Sharon Stone. Somebody asked her if she would be interested in she said Yes. Just like in the interview. I was ever that it sure, And I think she'd be perfect. He's a little older, though she is, but I don't think you can tell that's true. And And then there's the possibility. You know Samantha had breast cancer. In the show at one point character, and, uh, I think that you know if you wanted to I think, do a service to you know women with breast cancer. It would make the story bigger than just you know, and have her pass away from breast cancer. It would make it bigger than Him control as a person because I think that her personality is sort of taken over and all the negativity with it. You could actually do show a real life. You know, women. We deal with losing friends and sisters and mothers to breast cancer, right? And so that would be a real life thing that I think they could, You know, wrap up the story line, but also do something good. Bye. Yeah. The majority of this show I was. I was deaf, too, until The final two seasons. Maybe The girls who lived upstairs from us in college in the apartment above us knew that we had HBO so on Sunday nights they would invade and it was like, okay, we're watching. And so we're like, Well, if we're gonna watch it, just fill us in what's happening here? Well, it's great. I I think I watched it like I watched two seasons and then I forgot to watch another season and I was just kind of pop in and out. Yes, you could kind of do that. I didn't watch that last season, though, and I don't know what happened with neither neither. So maybe I'll just go back and you know to get ready for this season. Wow. Kristin Davis will be nice to see her. Yes, Queen? Yes, it was Mr Big gonna be in this. I don't know. That is a good question. What? He ended up being on the good wife. Oh, yeah. I'm the good one. Yeah, one of my favorite shows ever I didn't finish the last season. The only season I didn't see E No. I'm usually a good finisher. I don't know. Stop it, Dodd! Sorry. Clean it out. Take a walk. Almost. You got 15 years.

Sarah Jessica Parker Cynthia Nixon Breast Cancer Kristin Davis HBO New York Miranda Carrie New York City MAX Sharon Stone Charlotte John Donna KIM Samantha Dodd
Immigrant Detainees Held by ICE Are Going On Hunger Strikes

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:53 min | 6 months ago

Immigrant Detainees Held by ICE Are Going On Hunger Strikes

"Customs Enforcement will soon operate under a new administration. President elect Joe Biden has promised to return to quote sensible enforcement policies. But that change will take time. Right now. In New York and New Jersey activists do not want to wait. They're calling on ice to release undocumented immigrants from jail that's led to clashes with police, hunger strikes and a restraining order from member station W. N. Y C. Matt Katz reports. Right after the election. I start getting calls from immigrants like Carlos Gomez. He was on hunger strike at New Jersey's Bergen County Jail, which has a multi million dollar contract with ice to hold detainees. It's just hard boys just You know you feel easy. It seems like they don't care about immigrant detainees say they're being mistreated, and they're scared of getting the coronavirus, the first covert 19 case an ice detention was reported here. Detainees are demanding immediate release. They say they could be given monitoring bracelets to make sure they show up to immigration hearings. Frederick Body told me he hadn't eaten for nine days. They are human beings right now in the United States just start being treated. Very badly, simply because they don't have a paper that state that they are. US citizens. Gomez body and other immigrant detainees in the country illegally are often held by ice and county jails. Many have lived here for decades and have us citizen spouses and kids. Some were transferred from prison after they finish sentences for crimes. Last month, Rabbis took notice of the hunger strikers and began praying outside the Bergen County jail. Racial justice activists soon joined them. This wasn't something that Bergen County, a wealthy Democratic suburb usually experiences, but the protests are now held almost daily with live music and occasional confrontations with the police. One night earlier this month, officers in riot armor arrested nine activists. Sheriff Anthony Cure It's in appeared before television cameras in the next day and alleged that protesters actually bit two officers. It was not a productive act of political expression. What we saw yesterday was not, in the words of my hero John Lewis. Good trouble. The sheriff is a Democrat who said he opposes President Trump's strict immigration policies. But he argued that detainees are treated well in the county jail. Bergen, another nearby counties. Local officials also defend the lucrative ice contracts. They say these deals help offset property taxes and provide jobs. Puritans department gets $110 a day per immigrant it holds for ice. Next door in Hudson County. Immigrant advocates bombarded zoom meetings of the All Democratic governing board after it voted last month to extend its ice contract. 10 years. You just love that money, right? Love the money. They don't accept money where you're going, though you all make me sick. You know, brothers say you should be ashamed of yourselves. Shame, Shame, shame that was Andrew John Michael Watson and Danielle Harari. Tensions are high throughout the region. Six protesters rallying in Manhattan for ice detainees were injured after a woman drove her car through the crowd. In New Jersey, local officials filed a restraining order against activists. Even as the state senators came out against the contracts. Senator Bob Menendez called them blood money. Local leaders aren't budging. Democratic Hudson official Curry Dodd Rodriguez points out. Some of the detainees did commit crimes, and it isn't safe to release them. Safety for me. My family is priority in 2018 Hudson. Democrats actually voted to stop jelling detainees by 2020. But when Joe Biden won the presidential election, the local Democrats figured ice would no longer be is controversial. They were wrong for NPR news, Matt Katz.

President Elect Joe Biden W. N. Y C. Matt Katz Bergen County Jail Frederick Body New Jersey Bergen County Carlos Gomez Sheriff Anthony Cure President Trump Puritans Department Gomez Democratic Governing Board United States New York John Lewis Andrew John Michael Watson Danielle Harari Hudson County Bergen
Immigrant Detainees Held by ICE Are Going On Hunger Strikes

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:51 min | 6 months ago

Immigrant Detainees Held by ICE Are Going On Hunger Strikes

"And Customs Enforcement will soon operate under a new administration. President elect Joe Biden has promised to return to quote sensible enforcement policies. But that change will take time. Right now in New York and New Jersey activists do not want to wait. They're calling on ice to release undocumented immigrants from jail that's led to clashes with police, hunger strikes and a restraining order from member station W. N. Y C. Matt Katz reports. Right after the election. I start getting calls from immigrants like Carlos Gomez. He was on hunger strike and New Jersey's Bergen County Jail, which has a multi million dollar contract with ice to hold detainees. It's just hard boys just You know you feel d C. It seems like they don't care about immigrant detainees say they're being mistreated, and they're scared of getting the coronavirus, the first covert 19 case an ice detention was reported here. Detainees are demanding immediate release. They say they could be given monitoring bracelets to make sure they show up to immigration hearings. Frederick Body told me he hadn't eaten for nine days. They are hitmen beat right now in the United States that are being treated. Very badly, simply because they don't have a paper that state that they are. US citizens. Gomez body and other immigrant detainees in the country illegally are often held by ice and county jails. Many have lived here for decades and have us citizen spouses and kids. Some were transferred from prison after they finish sentences for crimes. Last month, Rabbis took notice of the hunger strikers and began praying outside the Bergen County jail. Racial justice activists soon joined them. This wasn't something that Bergen County, a wealthy Democratic suburb usually experiences, but the protests are now held almost daily with live music and occasional confrontations with the police. One night earlier this month, officers in riot armor arrested nine activists. Sheriff Anthony Cure It's in, appeared before television cameras in the next day and alleged that protesters actually bit Two officers. It was not a productive act of political expression. What we saw yesterday was not, in the words of my hero John Lewis. Good trouble. The sheriff is a Democrat who said he opposes President Trump's strict immigration policies. But he argued that detainees are treated well in the county jail. Bergen, another nearby counties. Local officials also defend the lucrative ice contracts. They say these deals help offset property taxes and provide jobs. Puritans department gets $110 a day per immigrant it holds for ice next door in Hudson County immigrant advocates bombarded zoom meetings of the All Democratic governing board after it voted last month to extend its ice contract. 10 years. You just love that money, right? Love the money. They don't accept money where you're going, though. You all make me sick. You know what else there is A you should be ashamed of yourselves. Shame, shame, shame that was Andrew John Michael Watson and Danielle Harari. Tensions are high throughout the region. Six protesters rallying in Manhattan for ice detainees were injured after a woman drove her car through the crowd in New Jersey. Local officials filed a restraining order against activists. Even as the state senators came out against the contracts, Senator Bob Menendez called them blood money. Local leaders aren't budging. Democratic Hudson official Curry Dodd. Rodriguez points out. Some of the detainees did commit crimes, and it isn't safe to release them. Safety for me or my family is priority in 2018 Hudson Democrats actually voted to stop jelling detainees by 2020. But when Joe Biden won the presidential election, the local Democrats figured ice would no longer be is controversial. They were wrong

President Elect Joe Biden W. N. Y C. Matt Katz Bergen County Jail Frederick Body New Jersey Bergen County Carlos Gomez Sheriff Anthony Cure President Trump Puritans Department Gomez Democratic Governing Board United States New York John Lewis Andrew John Michael Watson Danielle Harari Hudson County Bergen
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:02 min | 6 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily. Thank you so much. I'm super happy to be here. You've been part of the javascript ecosystem since before. React one out as the most popular front end framework. Did you take any lessons away. From the framework churn on what causes an open source library to succeed over other rivaling technologies. That's a very interesting question. So just for a little bit of background. I joined the java script ecosystem and actually the software developer ecosystem around the time that backbone was kind of the thing that most people were using and then angular jazz started to become thing. So i think. I'd been doing java script for about a year before their started to become the new hotness and then it was another your and a half or so after that react started to become pretty interesting to me and so in experiencing that firsthand. I think that there are a couple of things that kinda helped react win out as it has. Today one of those would be that angular has at least at the time and even still today. There's a huge amount of complexity within that library because it supports so many things whereas react is so much smaller and simpler. It's a smaller slice of the front end world and so conceptually it's it's a fair amount simpler and on top of that it also embraces jeff gripped as the language for the platform upon which your building and i know the angular people listening right now are like no no. You're using java script all the time like typescript and whatever but what i mean by that is the template dsl that you have to learn to use many of the other frameworks. You don't have to learn that to us react effectively and so In fact you are better off with if you know java script well and so that's one thing that really appealed to me personally. When i was making the switch from angular to react when i was switching off of angular i was leaving behind a huge amount of knowledge that i'd accumulated over the years because that was just not transferable at all that helps i think in general and just like as a general principle. React being a simpler solution for building. You is i think the way that the component model came at just the right time angular chess was still all about directives and controllers and stuff like that where react embrace this component model making it really compatible and and like the really nice thing about that component muddle in general as you can have this really complex component. That could be all inside of this black box and it really could be a tight sealed. Blackbox that the outside doesn't need to know anything about and that just makes it easy for you to say you know. This part of the code is super complicated. It could probably be made simpler. It could probably be better but the complexities within that black box. Do not leak outside of it. And so i can still use this thing. It's still useful to my application. But it's not going to impact the simplicity of the rest of my application. So i think yeah combination of that the and then also. We can't discount the issues at the time when angular was moving over to angular two and that was basically a big rewrite for the framework and react. itself is actually undergone. A rewrite ember has undergone a rewrite but the api that's been exposed was consistent for those whereas with angular angular to. It was just so different in every single way. There was no automated tool. You could use to upgrade an entire code base and so i think contributed it big time and for me personally when i was working with angular chess. Starting looking into angular too and i i was actually advising the angular team on some things with how you forms because i was a big maintainers of a form library within gs and giving toxic conferences. Like this is what you have to look forward to. And i just saw that as like this is basically. They could just rename this thing because it is so different from the original and it was gonna be a huge burden like my company wasn't interested in rewriting to angular two and i know many others are still on angular gs and so with the combination of all of those things when it came down to people are like well. I can't stay on inca. Gs i need to move to a different framework to stay on the latest of things and so the transition to angular will be just as complicated or maybe even more complicated than the transition to react. So i guess now. I just evaluate them on on a level playing field and i decided to react fits my mental model better than english to is going to and and also the fact that angular to just took such a long time to come to production. A lot of people had already transfer moved over from angular chastang of their or to react before there was released i did and so i think a lot of reasons that react kind of came out on top and some of those are subjective but i think what is objectives react now is definitely the most popular front end framework for the javascript ecosystem. And do you feel like you're all in on reacted this point. Do you try to keep up with view or spelt or whatever else yeah. I'm definitely all in on on react personally and professionally. But i do try to keep tabs on what's going on in in view and insults and whatever else is coming up next i i think any software engineer who doesn't wanna get left behind with flash or something would find that it's wise to keep abreast of what's going on in the overall community for sure react has been around for six or seven years at this point really popular pro for five years. What are the most notable changes that have come to react since it came out..

chess jeff
"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

"So i don't have to charge so much and people still get an enormous amount of value out of it but then you lose the ability to just ask me questions after each exercise. And so what. I what i've done is Two things We have the casey deep learning clubs which is basically It's like a opportunity for you to join other. People are trying to go through the same curriculum. You are and you go through that curriculum together and you set up a schedule and and you follow that scheduled together and You have a much better learning experience. You can talk with each other answer each other questions. And that's a really important part of the whole learning process is because each other questions you're doing this elaboration Or this teaching aspect of all of this and then on I also have my office hours. That i mentioned earlier. Where twice. A week i'll give an hour of my time to answer people's questions and that's what i tell people to do is just write down the question that you that weren't answered as you're going through this and then you can come and ask me during office hours And no i basically epic react is all the good parts of alive workshop with all the good parts of a self paced course Put into one. And i don't know of anything else in the world that's like this. And it makes me really excited about the positive impact that i'm making on people's ability to learn react and build really awesome applications. It's exciting and You know it's interesting you mentioned The the a workshop would be six hundred dollars in the epic react is worth a lot of money By the way just to be clear. I can't has not paid me at all This was episode. Epic react if it. Let's just do some math all right for a second. Let's imagine that you get one percent better one percent faster. Whatever that metric is your hours are win percent more effective right so if we're if we're talking about one hundred and one percent of your normal output as a result of this of of this work then i let's let's imagine that you put in forty hour weeks like most people in the united states do and you work. What is it Something like forty weeks. It forty five weeks a year. Something like that. So that's eighteen hundred hours or so Per year that you're working and If you were to do the math on that. I'm doing it right now speaker. Just just for fun here Let's see. I think that's going to be eighteen hours worth of of Of improvement in a in a single year. So let's imagine that you're like most contractors or something like one hundred dollars an hour that's eighteen hundred bucks just in the easiest scenario in the first year of value right in again. I'm doing the math. Because i think it's it's the easiest way to wrap your head around how this you know how this plays out in real life in terms of value if you're one percent better as resulted of this. It's eighteen hundred dollars worth of value just like immediately right. Would you agree with that. That kind of rationale. Yeah you know like you you can think about it that way you could also think about it in like zero percents to one hundred percent because It's i mean there are other ways to react. It makes sense but if you can't get a job then you're like it doesn't matter how many hours do you spend like you're not gonna So it really. I think the best way to think about epic react is a lot of people. Try to compare it to you to me course. And that's when they say..

casey united states
"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:06 min | 7 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Is something that you can look back on having learned <hes>. That that shifted your way of thinking or or was kind of a a moment kind of a colossal change perspective shift for you and what was it that caused that moment curfew <hes>. When i started working with react. I had a moment like that before i was working with angular jay s and <hes>. You know templates directives of all controllers. All that and i got really good at it <hes>. I spent plenty of time in the debugger within the angular jazz base. I even contributed to angular jay s. So i was deep into the. I had a podcast. I was a teaching about it <hes>. And angular two was coming around. And i was teaching english to <hes>. Before it was it was released during that two or three years that while. We're waiting for that to happen and <hes>. and then i tried out react and it just blew me away. I was so. I was just floored. At what i could do with react. And the the level of simplicity. Now it wasn't easy <hes>. Simple is not easy. These are different words. Go google it <hes>. simple <hes>. In this context and what it actually means is that it's like the opposite of complex complex where things are <hes> mingled together. This is like j. query spaghetti code. You change one thing over here and something totally different changes or <hes>. Impact something you weren't expecting their leaky abstractions <hes>. React just nailed the component model and that made a big impact on me now. It was another year before. I switched from english to react but from that day i started writing all my angular like i would. So this this is angular one <hes>. Angular jazz and and <hes>. This was before they created the angular dot component thing that you could use <hes>. But i started using directives like components because it that <hes>. Idea of a component model just really rang. True for me can you. Can you expand just just a little bit on on what that means on the component model. How how did that change what you were doing <hes>. With you know with angular what what would be an example of change that would have made in the way that you were writing that coat. Yes so with with angular <hes>. The kind of defacto standard way of doing things was if you wanted to take an element that you are rendering and enhance it with capabilities. You would create a directive that enhances that thing with capabilities and you would apply that to the element you rendering. And then if you want to add another capability that like as generic it's sort of thing then you would make another directive and new to play it and so this element would inherit all of these capabilities from different directives that it was using. The component model is different rather than inheritance. You're talking about composition where you're taking a component that is responsible for a single thing and you just render that one component and if you want to enhance it. Then you're going to share that logic with <hes>. With java script and that ends up working out really nicely in especially now that we have hooks. That's really easy to do. Because you have this logic that you want to share you make a custom hook out of it and now you can compose those different custom hooks together to build these larger components but the idea is that the component is an entirely encapsulated. It's a black box to the outside world and <hes>. The nice thing about that is you can put all of the junkin and terrible code that you want to inside of this blackbox and that the fact that that code is terrible is not going to impact the rest of your application because it all lives within side that black box so <hes>. I mean we could get really technical here. But i don't know if that's what the audience wants <hes>. But it it makes pretty significant impact on the way that you <hes>. structure your applications. You have a component model like react.

How React Changed Kent C. Dodds' Perspective on Coding

Developer Tea

04:06 min | 7 months ago

How React Changed Kent C. Dodds' Perspective on Coding

"Is something that you can look back on having learned That that shifted your way of thinking or or was kind of a a moment kind of a colossal change perspective shift for you and what was it that caused that moment curfew When i started working with react. I had a moment like that before i was working with angular jay s and You know templates directives of all controllers. All that and i got really good at it I spent plenty of time in the debugger within the angular jazz base. I even contributed to angular jay s. So i was deep into the. I had a podcast. I was a teaching about it And angular two was coming around. And i was teaching english to Before it was it was released during that two or three years that while. We're waiting for that to happen and and then i tried out react and it just blew me away. I was so. I was just floored. At what i could do with react. And the the level of simplicity. Now it wasn't easy Simple is not easy. These are different words. Go google it simple In this context and what it actually means is that it's like the opposite of complex complex where things are mingled together. This is like j. query spaghetti code. You change one thing over here and something totally different changes or Impact something you weren't expecting their leaky abstractions React just nailed the component model and that made a big impact on me now. It was another year before. I switched from english to react but from that day i started writing all my angular like i would. So this this is angular one Angular jazz and and This was before they created the angular dot component thing that you could use But i started using directives like components because it that Idea of a component model just really rang. True for me can you. Can you expand just just a little bit on on what that means on the component model. How how did that change what you were doing With you know with angular what what would be an example of change that would have made in the way that you were writing that coat. Yes so with with angular The kind of defacto standard way of doing things was if you wanted to take an element that you are rendering and enhance it with capabilities. You would create a directive that enhances that thing with capabilities and you would apply that to the element you rendering. And then if you want to add another capability that like as generic it's sort of thing then you would make another directive and new to play it and so this element would inherit all of these capabilities from different directives that it was using. The component model is different rather than inheritance. You're talking about composition where you're taking a component that is responsible for a single thing and you just render that one component and if you want to enhance it. Then you're going to share that logic with With java script and that ends up working out really nicely in especially now that we have hooks. That's really easy to do. Because you have this logic that you want to share you make a custom hook out of it and now you can compose those different custom hooks together to build these larger components but the idea is that the component is an entirely encapsulated. It's a black box to the outside world and The nice thing about that is you can put all of the junkin and terrible code that you want to inside of this blackbox and that the fact that that code is terrible is not going to impact the rest of your application because it all lives within side that black box so I mean we could get really technical here. But i don't know if that's what the audience wants But it it makes pretty significant impact on the way that you structure your applications. You have a component model like react.

Jay S Google
Dan's Plan For A Dam

Bedtime Stories With Nennis And Douglas

05:17 min | 7 months ago

Dan's Plan For A Dam

"No story is cole. Don's plod for read rite. A douglas won't of don's favorite places to explore a merry toll. Eames which turns off from the river. Gurgle gloag about half of oil west of horse. Small lana poll and runs. Poss- mr harry's war meal where it pushes against the potholes and turns to big oil and helps growing the core or roll the pay her or spin the thread and then it continues through. Alexy's palmed ends in bobo. Yoke swum maritime stream is fulton because although it starts widened foster enough to power a war to mail a few follow wit eight soon becomes narrow enough to jump over with a rayleigh. Big leap consume lower enough stunned on a hot day or sale baked dixon unprotected their ships and on top of their own manny animals to be found living along the banks water. Voles autres stopes eight hour. Weasel cold wilbur. D watts more there. Pull the soy's if a car where the stream split satan to arrive which you couldn't jump pon to on coal your own kingdom don could spend the whole day play in in maritime stream. Eva notice the sunset sets a but on this particular day. That son had barely risen. Why don got to the stream walls lovely warm day but yesterday that been a rainstorm which men even more water than normal had rushed. I've lumber stock mountain and into the bathroom. Gurgle gloag and even more water than normal had been pushed off to the soil lead into maritime stream at was russian on swirling on bogelund pas. Mr hirees walter mail and even wear it gots lower and narrower it was still surging on spin it around the rocks and flowing happily passed the little spend about an hour finding the big a specs he code and throwing them to say how quickly that they pushed down stream more on more stakes got thrown in solve of done so large they were really branches not stakes until he got bored of throwing and soya date to walk down towards alex says paul and half wave he no taste that's hot begun to form a new poll and all his steaks and broad shays hot clogged off one of the little boots around warm small all off the water couldn't get through this gave done of brainwave gets beld i'd die hey said to himself on gun russia collecting as many pieces of what he could find on the riverbank or in the nearby trays. Babysitters mike dodd muttered to himself as the dragged a huge log over to the stream on pushed it an on going to build a dom back than any beaver ever day spa. How many steaks logs. Hey put into mary stream.

Gurgle Gloag Mr Harry Alexy Eames Mr Hirees Walter Cole Voles DON Wilbur Dixon EVA Shays Alex Mike Dodd Paul Russia Mary Stream
"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:11 min | 7 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

"That's where i start. When i'm thinking about adding tests to a code bases like what part of this code base would be really really bad if it broke and that's where i'm going to start and if you've already feel really confident with your automated test suite that you're covering those use cases then you can move down to the next year of this would be pretty inconvenience I would have to get up in the middle of the night if there was a problem with this or maybe this would be the first thing on how to fix in the morning or whatever You just you really prioritize testing just like you do prioritizing writing any of your software you say i could either right this feature or Or i could write this test For an existing feature which one is more important right now. Well i mean want the feature but Customers also don't want things to break so you you do a risk analysis and then you just make you prioritize things. I actually have a by about that too. So.

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Hey this this particular method. This was really you know on the critical pathway. Don't mess with us unless you really know what you're doing or her Unless you are Certainly covering it. Well what tests so that. So that's an interesting problem to solve I'm interested to know. Also you know if we're talking about testing and We're talking about kind of practical building of suffer. It's very it's it's kind of easy to come up with a project right like you said in in two to'real What did you call it. Tutorial purgatory I it's easy to come up with a kind of a pet project to write for for to'real and it's very clear what the tests should be in you. Can you can see the use cases. It's all on a perfect spreadsheet. That's easy but when it comes to practical problems there's crossover or there's dependencies outside of your project or in. There's there's things that are outside of your control Maybe there's some legacy code you're dealing with. How do you navigate those kinds of problems. You have any kind of mental models for decision making in those areas when things get more complicated than just tutorial coat and this is one of the reasons why it's purgatory is such a problem. Because you don't face unexpected problems often like you. You will sometimes but Everything's really well laid out for you and you typically don't have to make these kinds of decisions So what. I'm thinking about adding test to an existing code base or something. I actually do have a blog post. I think that's that but I basically i i kind of take a survey of the application itself and i think about what use cases are really important that i should not break so i. Maybe it's an ecommerce site. I really want to make sure that checkout button works now you wouldn't be able to You know enter in your credit card and and Do the checkout enter in your home address and everything through the checkout every single time you want to release you know that that could cost a lot if you're like selling boats or something so You will need to set up some tooling around that to make sure you're actually making a purchase of a boat and their strategies that i can teach you on testing gyroscope dot com how to skip that portion So you're not actually buying boats everything but that That's where i start. When i'm thinking about adding tests to code bases like what part of this code base would be really really bad if it broke and that's where i'm going to start and if you've already feel confident with your automated test suite that you're covering those use cases then you can move down to the next year. This would be pretty inconvenience. I would have to get up in the middle of the night if there was a problem with this or maybe this be the first thing i'd have to fix in the morning or whatever You just you really prioritize testing just like you do prioritizing writing any of your software you say i could either right this feature Or i could write this test For an existing feature which one is more important right now. Well i mean customers want the feature but customers also don't want things to break so you you do a risk analysis and then you just make your pre you prioritize things. I actually have a post about that to a huge. Thank you to see dodds for joining me on today's episode and the next episode of developer t. Kent is.

dodds Kent
"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:43 min | 7 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Artificial intelligence and its impact on Software not super well versed in it. But it's a topic that gets me interested in what our future looks like in the next ten years or so Those are a couple of things that i have enjoyed talking about. Yeah i think Actually when when you got your tesla. I think you mentioned it on twitter and it was around the same time that i got. My tesla must have had some pretty similar experiences since then of Of the kind of the process of a acclimating to that kind of Autonomous vehicle is is definitely an experience. Changes you man. Well i do wanna talk about testing. And i wanna talk about it and maybe we can actually frame it in the lens of something like You know looking at tesla right Obviously these we're not talking about testing fronting components necessarily with with tesla. But we can think about you. Know the the importance of attest in terms of its Of its consequence. I certainly hope that we have a lot of tests. That are backing our Our experience when we're turning on The navigation mode on tesla's right because the consequences are huge there. But i'm curious about what you think about this. You know how do you think about coverage and now you have the testing trophy. Something people can have if they're listening to this probably know about. We can talk about that a little bit. But how do you think about the importance of coverage on. Let's say an area of your co base that is you know dealing with trivial things not so important versus areas that are much more important importantly payment pathways in that kind of thing. Yeah so i have a blog post about pretty much any subject. You could ask me about testing i. I have a lot of I've written about this allowed any to write a book. My thoughts on testing coverage Are you framed. Not every line of code matters as much as the next So this line of code has something to do with the settings page For admins only. Okay so maybe that's important You know that they can change their display name or something That we we want them to be able to do that. But then this other line of code over here is what controls you know. The car's ability to turn left. Or you know like that's pretty important line of code The problem with code coverage is that that metric doesn't give you any insight into how important that code is at all it's just a metric so you can have one hundred percent.

tesla twitter
"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"dodds" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Over the next couple of episodes of this show talking to two guests both are totally dedicated to learning and teaching in public about code. Today's guest is kint. See dodds kent has created some of the most important teaching material that i've used for react developers and you can find that at epic react dot dev kant also shares a lot of his knowledge totally free and he also is kind of a lifelong teacher. We're going to talk about kind of the roots of why can't care so much about teaching in today's episode. My name is jonathan cottrell. You're listening to developer. Not in my goal on this show is driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. Let's get straight the first part of my interview with kent see dodds against welcome to developer. T thank you so much for coming on the show thank you. I'm just so pleased to be here. I want to first start out with a huge. Thank you Because the work that you've done has influenced my career heavily gyroscope testing for example. I learned most of what i know about javascript. Testing from you having come from a kind of a ruby on rails background. When i was using just at j. kareem manipulating the back in the day for fun and then realizing wait a second. We built the entire application on the front. End now I wanted to bring testing. But i didn't really understand it fully and you help me understand it so so thank you for that. I'm so glad it's validating to hear that the work that i've put in has helped somebody out. So that's that's good. Well i wanna talk to you about that In today's episode. Because i've heard you talk about this for example on podcasts. I'm michael chance podcast You talk about kind of what you believe. Your best offering is to the world to make it a better place and the way that you talk about it. It made me think that you've really put some thought into this. This wasn't accidental. It seems like you've in my mind. I'm thinking like you went on a retreat and tried to figure out what you wanna do with your life. What are you. How did you arrive at this idea. And to be clear. Know you can use your own words. Explain it but from what i understand. You feel like your Best contribution to the world is to be a teacher I'm interested in how you arrived at that conclusion. Yeah that's Very thoughtful question. I i've always been one to To share what i know. I'm very enthusiastic person..

dodds kent dev kant jonathan cottrell dodds kareem kent michael
How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 7 months ago

How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

"So we'll and the first vibe. Janet hubert made amends during the fresh prince of bel-air reunion which just premiered on. hbo maximum. They both admitted in hard time for them over the years then genuine deep into just how much the feud cost her. When i left the show. I have this new baby and no one. Family disowned me. Hollywood disowned me. What you didn't realize either. That i was going through a lot at home right. You can no no very abusive marriage. You know i have. Children been divorced and second marriage and i can see now the level of pain and the level of struggle. But you know those words calling a black woman. Difficult in hollywood is to kiss of death death in your baskin back. When the president i wanna be is someone who protects you not someone at unleashes dodds. Wow so that was pretty deep. Why do you guys think it took them so long to finally have this heart to heart conversation. I'm actually surprised that didn't happen sooner off camera surprise at all that it didn't happen sooner. You know when you're in a feud with samadi and it's fresh and it hurts and then after a few months after a year five years goes by you. Just have a hard place for that person. You're not mad at them but you just don't wish them well. I think they got so use of that. Feeling of anger towards one another that just became a part of their lives and they probably for a long time. Didn't even realize and god what that feud was even a bout because it had been twenty seven years. Oh i disagree see. I don't think she's forgotten. What that feud is about for one second. I first of all. I started watching this last night and then stopped watching before this part. Of course those excited rundown this morning. This is some serious stuff. I mean obviously watching the fresh prince growing up realizing that and had been switched out with no. I realized that and i don't even remember how old we were. We were young. But i mean for things have gotten as bad as they did will smith and one of his co stars and we kind of nowhere to be this lovable likable hilarious guy. Like i was really surprised and for her to say you know to label the dark skinned black woman. Difficult in hollywood like as somebody that i was working with somebody that i was supposed to be family with has derailed my career for thirty years so little. It's a little too little too late. And i'm a huge will smith fan but once i kind of read what was going on between the two of them. It still isn't actually clear as to why he had such a problem with her. Yeah it's just really isn't too clear to me either. Besides the fact that she was able to work with but people are difficult all the time and the exactly you know it felt like a red table talk situation like taking a note from his wife jada. he's now opening up and having these heart to hearts. But being the will smith that we see and we know when we love now i. I'm surprised he wouldn't have this revelation. Sooner right over the years. I totally give being young. And he midst like your egos in the way you you you kind of. Who's on top of the world. He was really feeling himself. And and there was you know a little chip monir shoulder right and they typically goes away after a little while. I mean he took a long time. I mean they forced. You're i mean not. i don't want to say. They forced her out but they gave her such as she could thank you. They divorced her out by just giving her such a bad deal. I just don't understand. I think i would. I would have a clear to us where to get understanding what happened if i kind of knew what really started all of this but i just feel like this woman's career has really stalled because what what happened. I don't think that that's right but hold on the shoulders of will united because if sounds like the whole team may have thought because i thought yeah just like you know have only beef with will but i think it's like a family like if from this and both of you don't are both of us. Don't stand up or say something you're mad at the whole family because somebody was supposed to have your back. I think what happened. The situation was yes we do know will smith as in light one. The one who's connected but leaders get that way until about five ten years ago in in state like he was. This was a sitcom that was obviously very successful. I think for me to wrap it up in a bow. There's a disconnect as to why the tension was caused in the first place and back to justice point words. It's functional little family. If you guys made in my life difficult every day at seven months pregnant. I don't know how i would go to

Janet Hubert Samadi Smith Hollywood HBO Jada
U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

PRI's The World

06:07 min | 8 months ago

U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

"Vaccine Trials are happening all over the globe today. The UK government announced funding for phase. One of something called a human challenge trial for a corona virus vaccine. The process will require young healthy volunteers to be infected with the virus in an effort to speed up vaccine testing a company called H Vivo and Imperial College London. Have the contract is set up the first part of that process. Here's more from the world's caroline dealer the idea itself sounds wild intentionally infect people with the very virus returning our lives upside down to avoid. People hear about these trials. Many people's immediate reaction is, how could it be ethical but Oxford bioethicist deb Yom row gic says, it's possible if certain conditions are met one of those conditions is that the expected benefits of the research outweigh the risks. In this case, how many infections could we prevent if we developed a vaccine sooner? For example, in a typical clinical trial thousands of people are injected with a test vaccine and sent out into the world to see if they still get infected naturally that's happening now with several corona virus vaccine candidates, but Andrew Catchpole. The, chief scientific officer at H., Vivo the company launching this human challenge trial says that takes time normal traditional trials involve many thousands of subjects take many many months to complete in human challenge trials, which HP VO has been running for decades. A small number of healthy volunteers would be intentionally infected with the coronavirus after getting jabbed with a trial vaccine to see if it works. What happens is because everybody is given the disease, you're able to determine efficacy in a matter of weeks. These types of tiles have been used for centuries and in the recent past have. Sped up the development of typhoid and cholera vaccines. The agreement announced by the UK government today is just for the first step of this contract to manufacture and test Raina the virus to use in trials it still has to be approved by regulators and an ethics panel. If it is between thirty and ninety volunteers could start being injected with just the test virus, not yet any vaccine as soon as the beginning of next year so far nearly three thousand people in the UK have signed up to volunteer for a challenge trial. One of them is allaster frazier ORCA. White indefinite convinced. The Human Josh all has essential to advising Ovalles, scenes, population way more quickly lift on them on opinion the risk is small enough to travel participants that we need to take that risk frazier ORCA put off going to university for a year to work with one day sooner, a nonprofit group advocating for human challenge trials and signing up volunteers. He says the Tom Channel some of the fear of living through a pandemic into something that feels productive grandma custos. My Dodd might catch his out his risk. So kind of on a personal level the. Volunteer volunteers will be paid somewhere around five thousand dollars insurance cover healthcare costs. For any complications they will quarantine in a special nineteen dead unit at the Royal Free, hospital in London for an expected two weeks after virus exposure. Again, Andrew Catch Paul from h Vivo. A first priority was doing these studies is the safety of the volunteers. So for that reason, we go very strict criteria about those who. Will be eligible to participate. Volunteers must be between eighteen and thirty healthy with no pre existing conditions. But there's a more controversial criteria that scientists are wrestling with right now whether to exclude volunteers of color because there is data suggest that there is a potential for increased risk. The UN says Kobe nineteen is disproportionately affecting racial and ethnic minorities around the globe including in Brazil the UK and the US. K. Government figures, black men in England and Wales are more than two and a half times more likely to die of cope in nineteen than white men. Some of that is explained by socioeconomic status in pre existing conditions. But Dhillon David Kumar, a physician and professor at University College London says it's more than that. They're also other underlying causes racism discrimination for example, being an underlying cause which are not easy to count foreign. Announces such as this Dave Qamar said, he's the health impacts of racism and xenophobia. He says, well, it's important to note that raises a social construct, not biological. The effects of racism in tells in ways that can be hard to identify. So you can't hold constant the discrimination someone's face throughout their life. You can't hold constant the environment someone grownup in the levels of air pollution kinds of housing that they've lifting throughout their life. So. There are differences in outcomes amongst racial groups. David Kamar isn't familiar with this specifics of this study proposal, but he says he can understand the reason for picking volunteers who are at the lowest possible risk for getting really sick. Charles cordray chief officer for the Caribbean and African Health Network sees it differently. It's really disappointing people of Color. In clinical trials that's partly due to legacy of racist medical experiments. By white doctors and kwok-wah dray says the idea of excluding people of color from this trial would add to the distrust mistrust and the lack of trust has come about as a result of decades of sometimes how we need to respond so quickly but what is meant is that there's a whole section of people. Fair much. whose voices are not being head HBO is still making a decision about whether and how to include people of Color in the first phase of this trial when they're testing out the safest way to infect people with the actual virus the company hasn't designed protocols yet for the actual vaccine-testing in hopes quickly follows the volunteer criteria for this stage of the study will be finalized and handed over to UK regulators and an ethics panel by

UK Andrew Catchpole Imperial College London Chief Scientific Officer London Kwok-Wah Dray David Kamar Frazier Orca Typhoid Royal Free Caribbean Hp Vo Dodd University College London Tom Channel UN Dave Qamar Dhillon David Kumar
What is happening with the Uighurs in China?

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:09 min | 8 months ago

What is happening with the Uighurs in China?

"In China's northwestern province of Xinjiang the government has locked up more than a million workers a Muslim minority in a vast gulag. The whole province is a surveillance state within a surveillance state. The government claims it's de radicalizing population prone to separatism. People in Xinjiang in your happy life people call for older to restored each in. China of course, is strongly opposed to any torture and prosecutor and discrimination of any avenue. Good people. This is not the case in. Child. The reality is that it's carrying out crimes against humanity. We're going to take a look at how the repression is tearing families apart and preventing leaguers from even having families. We'll speak. With. googlers forced always to look over their shoulders. And will find deeper complexity in the party's ethnic repression on a visit to a tourist town in south western China. Own. The government is persecuting not only adults but hundreds of thousands of children to. Reporting by the Economist has unearthed government documents that show not de Radicalization. It's a campaign to crush the weaker. Islam. Faith to erase their cultural identity to chip away in their minds and in their bloodlines at what makes them weavers. It's difficult to get firsthand accounts of what's happening. Clearly the weaker inching John are unable to speak. But some brave souls have managed to escape and to tell their story. Our China Affairs at its her Gotti Epstein has been speaking to one of them. Presume Daoud and her three children, Fridays? We're probably the most terrifying day of the week. That was the day when officials would question students and schools in. The interrogators were looking for clues about the students lives at home. They wanted to know whether parents prayed or used Islamic greetings or talked to the children about the Prophet Muhammad. If the answers were in satisfactory they could result in a family member being sent to what they call a vocational training centre. or The camps in Xinjiang New Gulag. One Bologna. Bake. As. Miss Dogwood told me her children would be nervous that they would answer. Wrong. And get her sent back to the camps where she spent two months in two thousand eighteen. Kept. A. Terrible. saw. The Donald Families Experience in this regard is is quite common and Chin John. Absolutely. People Focus when talking about the workers on the detention camps but really Xinjiang is an open air prison. For twelve million dollars, their surveillance both low tech and high tech Miss. Dodd Dawood told me of an APP installed on her phone and where afterwards when she. Used traditional Islamic greeting on the phone. She was called minutes later by her. Local police asked her why she did that. Victim get little bug Emerson S Allama. amendment. Get. Across the region, families will be appointed to write and read articles praising Seton King. Others might have to write and read hands to ethnic harmony and some have to praise other policies that the party is imposing on them including the placement of quote unquote Han relatives in their homes and given that much of this has has come out now in how do officials in an Giang justify that that level of surveillance Chinese officials say that they are doing this in the interests of the weaker pupil they say that they are fighting the three evils of terrorism extremism and separatism. They say, they are making Xinjiang's safer and they say they're making the weaker pupil happier. But in reality, the experience of workers in the camps and even outside the camps is one not of training for the workforce but of indoctrination of trying to strip them of their relief, zero city or of any sort of cultural practices which stripe them as efforts to be distinct and separate from China. So what happens to those who were deemed to broken these many tiny rules? Well, leaguers like Ms Dour are placed in the camps Kerr offenses was for. From Pakistan, where her husband is from visiting. Pakistan. A number of years earlier. Accepting money from a foreigner who has a family friend who lived in China and securing an American visa these are all things that police asked her about a four sending her straight off to a detention camp but she's apparent. I mean what happens to the children of Leaguers who are who are detained? Well, this is the problem that the Communist Party itself is having to face up to because they are struggling to deal with the children of the parents of detained in local work documents that we obtained the officials us a chilling tra- -nology to refer to children whose parents are being held by the state. They're called Don Kuhn or single hardship or swung double hardship depending on whether one or both parents. Has Been sent away and what the documents also reveals that they're struggling to keep pace. They want to place these children in boarding schools basically, and so they have spent a tremendous amount of money expanding boarding facilities at schools across sin John just in the last couple of years, and what are these schools like is not like kids version of the Gulag you described for adult that's not too far off I. mean. These schools many of them have high security fencing and that's even true of free kindergartens and they are places where the kids are kept. These are cited even in state propaganda sort of celebrated. But those kids are as young as months old the propaganda describes as being well fed well, cared for happy learning the national language. Chinese. The point of this propagandist to convey the notion that they are helping the. Wiegert children but obviously, the effect is much different. We've seen testimonies from Chinese teachers who volunteer work in these areas that described children in pretty bleak conditions and in terrible emotional states. But what do you mean by diluting the culture on the surface of it? This just looks like oppression does right and suppression, but it's pressure that's really designed to reduce the influence of the weaker people and even their numbers. Their policies supporting confirming ethic marriage trying to encourage weaker girls when the girl enough to marry Han men and their rewards associated with that those included job of flat or even keeping family members out of camp. And then there are other ways that they're literally trying to reduce the growth at least of the wieger population China enforces limits on families is in John. So women are being fitted with you at a much higher rate than the rest of China. Women with three children, which is the limit in rural. Xinjiang. are subjected to sterilization or a great risk of that. Ms Dawood yourself says, she was subjected to sterilization two thousand eighteen. The most abilities maintenance, this hustle bonetti based. So what do you think is going on here? Any seems the goal for the Chinese authorities is more than simply to to break the spirits of the weaker. I would say the situation meets every category of crimes against humanity literally has been defined by the Rome Statute International Criminal, court have forcible transfer population. You have imprisonment the prosecution against the identifiable group have the enforced disappearance of persons. It's a term that's codified international law and I think it's pretty clear and given that how should the world respond what is to be done about this? The most important thing is that governments need act they should offer asylum seekers. Should sanction officials in Xinjiang that are responsible issue banned goods made with forced labor I most important governments should speak up I think the right moment to call for action. You could see maybe China's cloud cracking a little under the weight of these horrific revelations. There are more people standing up to China and fewer standing with him today. There is a sign of hope for human rights and there is a sign of hope for the oppressed we were people in China.

China Xinjiang John China Affairs Pakistan Prosecutor Dodd Dawood Donald Families Experience Miss Dogwood Daoud Chin John Rome Statute International Ms Dawood Communist Party Gotti Epstein Ms Dour Giang Seton King Don Kuhn
RHOC 's Kelly Dodd Marries Fox News' Rick Leventhal

On This Day Entertainment

00:18 sec | 8 months ago

RHOC 's Kelly Dodd Marries Fox News' Rick Leventhal

"Kelly Dodd and well Kelly died, of course from real housewives of Orange County her fiance soon to be husband Fox News is Rick. Leventhal are getting married on ten ten as is Cynthia from the real housewives of Atlanta.

Kelly Dodd Orange County Leventhal Fox News Rick Cynthia Atlanta
Pitfalls to Avoid in Your Leadership with Dr. Chip Dodd

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:06 min | 9 months ago

Pitfalls to Avoid in Your Leadership with Dr. Chip Dodd

"From the Ramsey network, this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, grow themselves teams, and their prophets. I'm your host Daniel Tardy, and today we're talking with chip dodd about what it means to be a fully integrated leader chips in expert in leadership development, he's a coach, an author speaker counselor and a therapist, which means he knows the importance of bringing all of what a leader has to offer their head. They're hard their mind and their emotions into the same conversation so that we can maximize impact as leaders. And it all starts with a clear definition of what it actually means to lead. I think that there is a one troupe primary type of leader and that leader true leader is the point of the spear is actually visionary. and. That person is the one who has something within him or her. That's compelling them to go towards this thing that they have not ever realized, but they're moved from within and that thing is like what they think about all the time. and. So they have a call upon their lives, but it's a call that's from the inside out. It's true leader. So that leader is a person who has a vision. And it's ruled by pushed by a man. And a passion is a willingness to be in pain for whatever it is that this person's headed towards. So it's a willingness to be in pain for something that matters more than pain. So. Leader is a person who has this thing going on inside of them that they can't stop thinking about it's almost almost like tilts towards illness in some ways like obsession. And then that leader. is, someone who says I'm going to go do this and then they put out a call That's where you have full harder participants like I'm going to go do this thing anyone interested anyone feel led to it because if you are come on so the leaders actually listening to something greater than himself or herself, and then the participants are called towards the vision the leader has, but they'll follow the leader towards it. So leader is a person who is going to cast a vision they're going to encourage, exhort teach they're going to challenge. They're going to call forth. They're going to exemplify they're gonNA show. and. So they've got to stay really healthy because people are following their hearts while they're following this vision So the vision that the people that join them are doing it through invitation not fruit just fulfilling a role. It's invited to be part of something bigger than myself. Love the true business. You know I'm thinking about how you're defining that a love it I think of my own leadership journey I was trying to get really good at vision and being a leader because I had the title of leader before I really had that passion and I didn't understand what is the thing I have pain about that I'm willing to suffer that I'm willing to you know this is bigger than. Me and I remember struggling lot and kind of feeling like I was faking it until that passion thing showed up because I had the responsibility and I was told be good at visions on reading books about vision and I'm you know cast vision like you're supposed to the five steps to cast vision if it wasn't coming from my heart? Yes, and you're talking about something that's inside you. That's a passion that you said you'd be willing to be in pain. What is it about the being in pain component of that? If we could we could probably if you sit down with any, what we think of as a a woman who's like she says, I've always wanted to be a mother. So. When she becomes the mother. Then, you you get a great picture of what passion looks like. It's a willingness to be paying for something that matters more than pain. Any time of night I'll get up when I hear the cry out if they're in the street, I, step into it I mean I'll step in front of a bullet. A willingness to be paying for something matters more than paint. So the vision of what she is picturing this child having are becoming is directed by that thing inside of herself that's willing to look stupid. Willing to even have people say things negative about her as a willingness to challenge the processes around her I mean, it's it's allows you to stand up and show herself from the inside out rather than being concerned about the external locus of control. In fact, it's like. A person who is walking in passion they got how life works you be who you made to be, which is like a certain thing. We may talk about then out of being your May to be you do what you're made to do. And, then you'll have what you're made to have in like in really good business money is a by product doing what you're made to do or doing something well, and even if it's widgets I, mean making great widgets that ended up plugging into certain instrument. If the person has a craving for excellence, those are going to be great widgets will what a witches do in live well, they fit into this instrument. But doing it well is being doing and having versus doing having. So you become somebody

Daniel Tardy Ramsey Network Dodd
"Framing a Different World" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"Framing a Different World" Week

"This week's theme comes to us from Liam Dodd and is called framing a different world. Here's why Liam chose this theme. He says. My Name's Leeann Dodd. Theme Cherries is framing a different world. A chose this theme because I think all of us can benefit for hearing from those of unique expertise or experience is able to provide a new ones new perspective on the way we drive society with each other or just very peaceful. And here are the episodes chosen by Liam for the team along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode of the week comes to us from the Ezra Klein show and it's called Contra points on taking the trolls. Seriously it's eighty one minutes long. Here's the description. Youtube is weird. Tomorrow's politics are happening today. Next episode comes from it could happen here and is called the second American civil war. It's forty eight minutes long. Are you worried about the possibility of the second American civil war in episode one of it could happen here Robert Explains why 2016 was the first time he started to seriously worry about. The next episode comes to us from Length Uzi Azam and is called sounds. You can't hear babies, accents and phonemes. It's nine minutes long. Why does it always sound slightly off when someone tries to imitate your accent why do tiny children learning your second language already sound better than you even though you've been learning at longer than they've been alive what does it mean for there to be sounds you can't hear. The next episode comes to us from the dream podcast and his called magnets. How do they work? It's forty one minutes long. Here's the description. The road to wellness is paved with particles and protons. And the last episode of the week comes to us from Fox mulder is a maniac and his called synergy. It's forty nine minutes long. Oh boy it's the one where a cosmic planetary alignment turns agent moulder into a crazed sex offender. Don't miss this episode. Those are the episodes chosen by Liam. For this week's theme framing a different world.

Liam Leeann Dodd Ezra Klein Uzi Azam Youtube Fox Mulder Robert
The Children Of Smithfield

Latino USA

06:11 min | 11 months ago

The Children Of Smithfield

"In. March of Twenty Twenty might amend is was living in Lincoln, Nebraska she was working as an administrator at a public school. And then she got a call from her mom it was about their upcoming vacation she called in and asked me to call in and cancel the flights and see what their options were and I. think that's when it kind of hit me that corona virus was in Nebraska they had planned to visit family in Mexico but they decided with the virus it was a bad idea for her mom to travel. Might as mom had recently lost a kidney to cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy again, this time for lung cancer. It's been about a year and a half since she's been on last the latest treatment and that one seems to work while the spock's in her lung they're not necessarily getting bigger and they're slowly shrinking. But the doctor did say about it's it's a long process slow process and then the family made a decision, my parents both have jobs at a meat packing plant in Nebraska because their mom could be exposed to the corona virus at work they decided that mom should not go back to work. I think I just always worry. About not having her. Her Dad. He returned to the plant for financial reasons but might have was worried if her dad brought the virus home, it could be deadly for her mom. And I started asking him like you know what kind of protection are they giving you? Do you have face masks? He said they're giving us masks and I said, what does the mass look? He said it's like the beard net, but it's a full faced one and so then that's as like that's not gonNA protect you. You're still breathing in air through those holes like that does nothing. For my this was the first red flag and then on April sixteenth the meat packing plant where he worked a place called Smithfield confirmed its first case of Covid nineteen. That's when. My Dad started to. Kind of get scared to get I is kind of like it's not it's not here yet. And so when we heard about those first cases. It was very like it's here. It's real. From footer media, it's leading USA I Medina Hoarser and today the children of Smithfield speak. Throughout the early days of the covid nineteen pandemic, there was a lot of concern about the nations food supply specifically, the meat industry's supply chain. But last spring is cases of the virus surged in meatpacking plants across the country. It became clear that conditions in these plans were often unsafe. And that many of these now deemed is central workers worked speaking up because of their status or fear of retaliation around a fourth of all meatpacking workers are undocumented. and. So instead now it's the adult children and other family members of these meatpacking workers who have started to band together to advocate for their relatives. Might menaces parents work at a plant owned by Smithfield that's one of the largest meatpacking companies in the world. In April she joined with other quote children of Smithfield in the town of Crete Nebraska to begin demanding safer working conditions for their parents and relatives. reporters. Marianne Andrey and Esther. Honi have been reporting and following, Midas? Story Esther. Is going to pick up the story now. Myra is a woman in her late twenties with an athletic build an intense Brown eyes. And she's warm but she wouldn't say she's the social one in her family. I definitely consider myself as shy this whole time we've been in quarantine. I've been okay because I enjoy my time alone at home she says it's her dodd that's always been the extrovert he doesn't like to be quite. he's always talking, but he wants to jump into every conversation super affectionate and he's always like grabbing us and hugging and kissing those in like messing up our hair like that's his thing he wants to. Miss a bar hair and kisses at the same time in her family says always more of the caretaker. She has two younger brothers and she's always looked out for them when my second brother was born. I was babysitting him all summer and so he was a six month old than I was fifteen. I was the one in charge of taking care of him and I think a lot of. My character was built from being the oldest sibling just around the House I. Always was told like you have to be the example for your brothers kind of pave the way as a family always spent a lot of time together partially because they moved around a lot when she was little Mara's parents used to work as migrant farm workers. I was born in Washington stay in my parents picked fruits and other crops like potatoes we would move between Washington state and Idaho back and forth she was in third grade her parents emigrated from Mexico and later became US citizens heard they could get better and more stable work in Nebraska in meatpacking. It we need to move around anymore. But as a little kid, she was nervous about leaving her school where there are lots of other bilingual students. I just remembered in Washington stay they taught me in Spanish and English half day English half-day Spanish and so here I remember like my biggest fear I wasn't sure if I knew English said, do I really know English? Obviously I knew English but it was just not the atmosphere I was used to

Nebraska Smithfield Twenty Twenty Mexico Lung Cancer Washington Lincoln Administrator Crete Nebraska Medina Hoarser Marianne Andrey Mara Myra United States Brown
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Confidence Attest is useless. And that's why I created testing Java scrip- dot Com so I could teach people how to do this effectively with with the tool set. I do this most effectively. That's why I created the testing library for Reacted angrily and view ember and well. Embers technically not. There's not an implementation there but you could make one like puppeteer test cafe Cyprus. I have this testing library so that people can do a better job of just naturally running tests. The way that their software is used reading tests has always bored me to tears and I know that sometimes you have to write tests. Perhaps most times you have to write tests but can you tell me. When can I avoid it? Wind can I- comfortably? Avoid defensively. Avoid writing any tests at all? Yeah that's a great question and you're not alone so many people do not like writing us and it's very reasonable to not like it because it really. It's often difficult to identify how this is helping the bottom liner or help you make helping you make the world a better place. Whatever it is. You're trying to do and so yeah places where you can avoid writing tests. Are Things where you don't care if it breaks so you don't care if you get a call at two. Am in the morning about this thing breaking or even better. You wouldn't get a call at two. Am in the morning because nobody cares so a good example of this. I I was just working on an open source library have today that very few people use and I have no tests on it and like lots of people see me as the Java script testing guy and so gary I knew exactly like I live streaming and I had a bunch of people watching and I knew that some of them were going to be like what that you don't have tests. What's wrong with you and so I just preemptively mentioned like nobody uses this thing or very few people do and the people who do can just use the previous version until I get this fixed if I break anything and it's not going to like bring down their. Ci or anything like that. So I don't really care too much and so if you have some software that you're writing and you you don't really care too much about the impact of of breakage and this could happen even within Within an application it's actually really important a really important distinction to make that like if there's an area of software that it doesn't matter that much if it breaks then that's not your place to be focusing your your time and effort and really testing is no different from any software. The reason that we test or the reason we write software is so that we can avoid doing things manually. That's what software is all about. It's like how do I make this thing that I do manually happen faster? How do I crunch these numbers? Passer how do I analyze the state of faster? Whatever it is that's what softwares for tests are exactly the same. How do I make sure that the Mike changes do not break when I shipped this production? That's what tests are for. And if it's not something that you care much about then there's no reason to automate it so we've got this one page that like six six of our users use the only use it like twice a month. I'm not going to write to us for that. And we don't we don't change that code very much anyway and when it does break they don't mind reach out to US whatever it is. There's so many other ways that I can make the world a better place in my in my day that I'm not gonNA waste my time writing test for that and instead I'm going to build this feature that will improve the experience for my users and so like you. You have to weigh this and just like think about okay. I've got x number of things to do some of those tests and we have this one page that we have so many people using it because it's our checkout flow and when they check out if it doesn't work that is so bad for my business. I'll lose millions of dollars for that checkout button so yes. I am absolutely writing tests for that. Like I'm not getting around it because that's how I can make the world a better place. The best is by making sure I never break that page. And then once you've got those tests and place than you think. Okay what's the next thing I could do to make the world a better place? Well there's this there's this feature that people have been asking me about and I haven't had time to build it that I think that will make the world a better place better than writing tests for the settings page and so that's where like I don't see writing tests as any different from writing software features. It's really okay. I've got this priority of things to do. What's the next thing on my list that will help me make the world a better place better than anything else? And sometimes that's US sometimes that's features. Sometimes that's bugs and sometimes that's going home and playing with your your kids whatever. It is all right last question. It's twenty twenty. What does javascript fatigue mean today? Yes javascript fatigue. I lived through it. I was back in the backbone days before it really ramped up and then angular just came out. And then reacts an ember were going on and and angular two was coming and and then we had the flex wars and they're like thirty different libraries so and then all the tools like web pack versus Browser. Five and then boy parcells. What what is this? And now so we've got all these different tools coming out and testing tools as well. I think that people are are still innovating a lot and you could still build an application pretty well using the tools of five years ago but you can build an application faster and better using the tools of today you just have to acknowledge the fact that the tools of today are still being iterative on an improved. And so yeah. What is Java scrip- Fatigue mean today? I think that we experience it less and the tools like have really solidified pretty well. People have a pretty good understanding of what different tools are are good for what they're not good for and we have even better than that. We have a better road map for new people to follow where we say. Hey if you WanNa get into reacts then you're GONNA use create react up or you can use gatsby or next. Yes and those tools themselves have a really good ecosystem within themselves now of lots of resources and they're just really user friendly. You don't have to make as many decisions and I think that's actually where jazz fatigue comes in play. Most is where people have to make a lot of decisions about things and view is actually very good at this and emperor as well where they don't let you make decisions. They just made them all for you. And you just follow it and ninety percent of the time you're gonna be just fine following those decisions that they've made for you so react especially. I think is prone to decision fatigue or jazz fatigue because the react team is all about making the core library really good and then they leave it to the community to fight over. What's what's best and so we do still have a little bit of that in the react community but I think we're like slowly kind of coming to a consensus on what the best tool for ninety percent of the jobs is or what a good tool for ninety percent of the jobs is and I think we're going to continue to go in that direction. Now we do still have cool new things that are coming out. That people should continue to analyze. Just two years ago I released react. Testing Library. Spelt has been out for a while but it was just like a year ago. That's fell three came out and it's considerably different and and much better so you still want to keep up with what's going on. But I think that we're slowly like we're maturing as a community. We haven't been around for as long as as many of the other communities and there's just so much innovation that's happening in our ecosystem because we're maturing in a day and age with get hub and PM and with these tools that make this kind of open. Collaboration and maybe even premature collaboration possible. So I think that's kind of why and understanding why maybe explains a little bit why that fatigue is slowly tapering off and I think eventually we'll mostly go away can't come on the Congra- talking. Yeah thank you. So much.

US Java Mike Congra parcells gary I
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To take it to a related to to an episode. That we we did recently so. I talked to some somebody from the slack. Front End Team and slack uses a pattern that I hadn't seen before. Maybe this is common in front end. I don't do as much coverage of the Front End World as I should. But they use this pattern. Where if you want to Snapshot Your Slack State so that you can like if I go sit down on my desktop. I work with in slack and then I go and go sit down and another desktop work in slack in order to maintain the same state they snapshot the Reebok Store and put it in a CDN and that way. I can access the state by just downloaded from the CDN and they pushed out to my slack application. So I just use it to I. Guess explore with you. Is it frequent pattern where the REDUC store or whatever state management store you're using is saved to the cloud? And then you. When you reboot the application somewhere else. You load that state. That's an excellent question I don't think that and that's actually a really cool technique. I don't think that I've seen that in wide use but it makes total sense. And it's not something you'd have to use redux to be able to accomplish but I can see redick's could make that a little easier but I have definitely seen that sort of technique used for error monitoring and reporting and if the user experiences airlift snapshot our State Send It to our monitoring service so that we can see what what state the user was in. Yeah I think that and actually because redux makes that a little bit easier. Then that's a pretty good use case for Redux. I would just caution anybody who wants to use redux to be really thoughtful about what what state they put into their redick store and maybe explore a couple other alternatives as well. What are the most common performance issues that you see and react applications? That is a good question. I get questions about performance so often as an instructor pretty much every every workshop that I give regardless of the level of experience of the attendees has something some question about performance. And most of the time. It's kind of this armchair performance where you're sitting back and you look at something. Say I think that's probably slow and when you actually measure it and you're like yeah you're right. It can only do four million operations per second so if you need to do more than that and maybe look at something else. Yes so most of the performance problems that I see and again I mentioned this earlier but the number one solution to performance problems is less code. So you load less code urine. That's code and I think that the the lowest hanging fruit for most people is loading code. I don't think people are coats putting as much as they should. And it's so simple to do especially since we have React Dot Lazy Suspense. And so you can coat split on any component in a way. That's pretty simple. You don't WanNa go overboard but you definitely can be methodical and and surgical about where you're doing coats putting and save yourself quite a few bites that you sent to the user. You certainly don't need your entire application loaded on the log in screen like that. Nobody should be doing that. And in fact I would argue that. You may not even need react on the luggage green but that's a subject for another another time. So that's one half of the the thing the other half is is running less code and I think the number one thing that people try to optimize for when they're talking about running less code is re renders of components. So whenever there's a state change interact application react. Takes the component where that changes occurred and it renders that component which will trigger a cascade effect of all other children of that component will be rendered. Now I actually have a blog post about this. I think it's titled One simple trick to speed up your react apps or something like that. But if you're component receives its children as a prop rather than just rendering its new react elements itself. Then it reacts can actually like pre optimize to say oh. These children couldn't possibly have changed. So I'm not going to bother re those so restructuring the way that you you write your components and actually writing things in this way I would say more idiomatic even though not as many people do it. This way just makes more sense to to write things this way. Rather than having the component render the jess or the react elements that its rendering accepting those as a prop to the component. And saying this is where those should go whatever they are but that that's one optimization that you can make that like it's just a little bit of a restructure another thing that like as part of this whole re render problem. A lot of people just see renders as bad if it didn't need to re render bad thing and so what they'll do is let's take a A scenario that is actually. I see quite frequently. So let's say that we have a component that takes fifty milliseconds to render. That would be a very long render. But we'll just use that as the number if it takes fifty milliseconds to render. That's very slow and so we want to. And then we noticed that it's actually rendering unnecessarily two times so it renders necessarily once and then unnecessary. Well we'll just say unnecessarily one extra time so now it's taking one hundred milliseconds to run when it really should only take fifty so what people do is they'll use optimizations like react memo to say if none of my props changed than I should not render okay. So either the props changed or the context. It was consuming or a couple. Other reason said it would would render react. Just says if none of the props change than I should not render okay. So we've fixed that problem. We can move on with their day now. This thing is not rendering unnecessarily. Its rendering only one time and it's taking fifty milliseconds. Let's look at developer. Be who looks at the problem and says wow it's re rendering twice that's taking one hundred milliseconds. That's a really long time. I wonder if I could that up. And so they optimize the component instead and they make that component. Now render in five milliseconds. Okay so now. It's only taking ten seconds to render twice and we're like. I've got bigger fish to FRY. I'm just going to move on. And so the difference at the end of the day is eventually you're component absolutely has to render like something changed. It does need to render so with developer a their components going to take fifty milliseconds when it renders because it was necessary whereas with developer. Be It's going to take five milliseconds because it was necessary. And so you're you're better off there and then also with developer a to avoid the unnecessary render. They had to wrap it in this react memo thing which adds complexity to the code. Because not only. Do you have to add that complexity which is very very much but if you need to add custom prop checker so forget what? It's called a custom function to determine whether it should update if you do that then you do out quite a bit of complexity but you also have to check. Everywhere that's using that component and ensure that the prophets passing are going to be consistent between renders. And so that has this Sputtering effect where. Maybe that component got those props from somewhere else and so you have to keep on going and memoir is all these these values just because he wanted to make sure that this one component to render a necessarily where if you just went with developer approach and said. Let's let's not care about how often it renders and just speed it up so it doesn't take so long then you don't have that sputtering effect and your episode faster to boot and like eventually it absolutely does need to render so you just want that to be faster anyway so anyway. That's a long way to answer your question but this is something I see a lot. Is People just instantly reach for? How do I reduce the number of times this thing is rendering when they and before you should ask yourself that question? You should ask. How can I make it? So this thing renders faster now. There are some times when it is rendering all the times it needs to or it's going as fast as it possibly can but it still re rendering necessarily and because I'm rendering seven hundred of these things. I need to make sure it's only rendering when necessary. There are those times. And that's when you reach for these optimizations that's why those optimizations exist but reaching them as the first solution often has the spider effect that goes throughout your whole application making it more complex. So that's a problem that I see quite often. You've spent a lot of time studying how to properly test Java script applications. Give me your condensed thesis on how to test jobs reputations. Yeah so the philosophy. I have like a lot of work on on testing with javascript. And and the philosophy that I've come up with over the years is the more your test resemble the way your softwares used the more confidence they can give you. What that means is if you are writing tests that well. Let's take a step back your software if we're talking about react components or back in or anything your software probably has to users it has the end user. That's actually interacting with your application and it has the developer user. That's using your API or a rendering your react components or calling your function. Whatever it is so you have. Those two users are the two cases. Your software needs to continue to support or like as useless right when you start running tests that don't resemble the way that your software is used by those two users. What you're doing is you're inviting a new user that your software needs to support. I call this the test user or the third user and the Test User. The reason that we write tests is to have confidence that our software is going to continue to work. I know some people like to write test for their workflows. And that's awesome. Feel free to do that. But the reasons reason that we commit tests to source control and run them on. Ci is to make sure that our software continues to work as it was designed that it continues to support those two users so once you start writing tests that use your software differently than those two users. Then you've created this third user where you have another point of failure so if you start if you change something that breaks the use case of the test user literally nobody in the world cares except for that test user and so what that means is your test user exists for themselves and they're not paying you any money and you're not making the world any better by supporting the use cases of that test user and so there's no reason to other supporting the use cases of that test user. Now there are some. Sometimes we have to make trade offs. Testing is just up and down trade offs where you have to mock the credit card. You know charging company because you don't have enough of a credit limit or something. I don't want to church credit card every time I check out so you do have to mock some things you have to poke holes in reality. Sometimes you make that trade off but you acknowledge the fact that that is not using your software in the way that it really should be used and you counteract that by you know maybe having smoke tests that test against you know some other service or like stripe I know has their tests service and so you can interact with something like that and it just have one test to make sure that at least this thing works but then the rest of your tests can can operate on a mock but that's that's my whole like condensed philosophy around testing is the closer you can align your test to the way your softwares used by the two users. You actually care about the more confidence it can give you and without giving you..

developer redick Reebok Store REDUC cloud instructor
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"User's code and painting the elements that are are being loaded on the browser and I'd just like to get your perspective for how react and modern javascript simulate the experience of working in a multi threaded environment versus the realities of Java script being single threaded. Yeah well so with concurrent mode because react is a framework it is. It's calling into your code as as the user of react so you these components and you hand those over to react then reacts with call your functions and then when you're functions are done being called react will continue in it and so every single one of your function components react is going to be calling into. And then that function component will return the react elements that it needs to render and because reactors in control of all of this. Then it's able to do these checks to say okay based on how long I've been running right now. I have X. amount of milliseconds left before I need to yield to the browser and so I'm going to go ahead and call this next piece of user code and then when that user code comes back then it does another check and says okay now. I need to go to the browser because I don't have time to call another piece of User Code. I believe and I'm not on the react team and I've tried to read the source code. I understand some of it but there may be some nuances here that I'm missing. But the basic idea is because react is in control of of calling into your functions. It's able to do that kind of management of of calling into or of yielding to the browser. When it's time for the browser to do some work you are a fulltime instructor and I WanNa ask you some about that a little bit more in the future but you spend a lot of time. Interacting with people that are learning Java script and learning react and I think one of the things that confuses people is react state management so this is often a world almost always done around redux. Can you explain some of the common misunderstandings that people have around react? State management? Yeah that's a great question. I think that maybe two years ago we could say that react statement. Application state management was done with Redux or like mostly but in the last few years reductions fallen out of favor quite a bit and I think that it's the defacto standard anymore. There are few reasons for this but I I'd like to talk about why reduction took off so much and I'll preface this by saying I used redux only one time in a production application just enough for me to realize that I didn't like Redux at all and I not redux the technology but redux the I guess what redux encourages developers to do. Which I think is is not good. Won't get into that. So the Redux came at a time that we call the flex wars where facebook came out with this specification. That kind of it was basically a talk in a document that said this is how we manage state in our applications. To avoid certain inconsistency bugs so a ton of different libraries came out. I even built one actually for managing state with in this kind of architecture. Eventually Dan Abramov was scheduled to give a talk at a conference and he wanted to do this. Time travel debugging thing and so he built a little flex implementation. That would allow them to do this kind of based on the Elbe Architecture and the talk went super well and everybody asked him how they can use this project that used to to make that happen and so he he open sourced it and people started using. That's how that's when read X. became super popular but it didn't just become popular because of a talk became popular because it solved the problem. The problem is if we go back to England jazz. We have dependency injection. And that's how we get different services and data around all components. It's just the single namespace that's available everywhere in the application with react. You don't really have that instead with react you. You have this explicit passing of props for one component to another and that actually works out really nicely because with dependency injection. You have all of this This global namespace. That's implicit and you register. Things later and it just can be a bit of a headache. It's kind of like a global namespace on window but with react. You're you're doing this explicit profit passing which is makes it a lot easier to track okay. Where's this thing coming from it? Well it's coming from the parent component. The problem is that when you have a tree that's of sufficient size of like a regular production application. You're going to have some trouble with passing these props down like six different layers of components where you're passing from component a through component ABCD and e where a component is the only thing that actually needs that province obese B and C and D. They don't care anything about it. They're just forwarding it along so then you start moving components around and you had to make sure you're passing the right props. Oh Oh I don't know if I need that prop like maybe I do so. I'll just keep doing it but you don't and so now you have this extra proper doing all this extra work for for no reason we call this prop drilling and it is. It is a bit of a problem. Even though it's it's nice that you can track exactly where things are coming from. It's problematic because it just takes a lot of work to to maintain so and then eventually you do things like spreading all of the props across the these components and that can lead to some problems as well so promptly and can be a bit of a pain and so what what re- reduction did was the integration with react as it used this. Api called context that has been supported in react for a very long time but during that time it had this big warning on it that said this. Api will change. Do not use this. So that freaked everybody out like well. I'm not gonNA use that thing but redux did and so did react router and lots of these like teaming libraries and CSS libraries all use this API. That was eventually going to change and they just said well. I'll deal with it when it changes but right now it solves this problem of getting data from component a all the way down to component e without having to pass it between these other props in the hierarchy. So this context. Api is what redux you used to be able to get your data from the top of the tree down to the bottom of the tree in a way that was really easy and it used these higher order components to make that make that really easy to do and so the the problem that Redick solved wasn't necessarily unit directional data flow and time travel debugging and stuff it was actually just making it easier for developers to get their data to the components they needed without having to go through all these layers of properly. So that's why redux became popular because it was the first real like reasonably simple way to do that without using. Api's that the react team told you not to use so in recent years the context API got some love from the team and they made it official and they made it actually quite nice to us so now you can actually start doing it solving that same original problem without re dykes and in the process. You sidestep all of the issues that you get with Redick's so let me talk about some of those. Really quick reduction in itself is is not necessarily a bad thing. The point is that you want to keep your state as close as possible to where it's being used Because that makes it easier to move components around it makes it easier to delete state. That is no longer in use. It makes it easier because you don't have to open up like thirty files to find the the flow of data in your application. And so the like. In general redick's made it simpler for people because they found that if I needed to share data between two sibling components. I'd have to keep on moving it up and up and up the tree until eventually at the very top of the tree. And so just putting into Reebok's makes it a little bit easier since I don't have to prop Joel all over the place. So the problem is that when people are so used to using read is to manage state in that way they eventually start putting everything into redux and so now you have your form error state in. Reebok's you have every keystroke of the user in these foremen puts going into state you have the is modal open state like happening and rex as well. You have to start name spacing this stuff because it's in this giant redecked store and so this becomes a problem because now when it's when all you have to do is update component. That has a check box that says whether or not it should show a certain message or something. Now you have to open up like three or three or four different files who that are who knows where to manage that simple interaction and not only that when you open those files and start making changes the changes that you make could have completely unknown impacts on the rest of the code base you have to all of a sudden instead of the Nice component model that we love from react where it's just this black box and it doesn't impact anywhere else in my now literally. Every single component has wires connecting it to every other component in the application. And so. That's what I don't like about redux. It's not the technology in itself like if you're being responsible about what you put into the redick store and the state that you put in there actually should be global and does care about the other state. That's in there then. Yes that's reasonable but most literally every redux implementation that I've seen in the wild just puts everything in into rocks and has these problems that I've talked about. So anyway as far as st in general and like how you manage State Today. I actually have a lot of thoughts on this and I'll stop talking here in a second but I think one of the big problems that we have just when we're talking about state in reacts or any Front End System is that we kind of combine allstate all data that can change over time which would just call state into one category when actually there are many different categories of state in our applications. We the stuff that comes from the server. That's actually not state. That's a server cash and it's something that you you can't reliably expect to always be consistent and so we cash it onto the client so we can display that but you actually have no way of really knowing if that's the state of the the server so it's not state it's actually a cash and but we combine that with the application state like are modal is open or the menu is open. Or we've got the user check this check box that's state and that's different from our server cash and so when we combine it all together it makes them both more complicated but if we can logically separate those two then all of a sudden our application state management becomes a lot simpler and this is something that I've been thinking about a lot recently and I'm still kind of working through my thoughts on it. But those are a bunch of words for you to think on.

Redick Reebok facebook Elbe Architecture allstate Dan Abramov England instructor redecked official Joel
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Could you distinguish between what suspense is versus? What concurrent mode is sure so concurrent mode is something that the react team has been researching for an extremely long time and only in the last. I think it was like two years ago when react sixteen was released. That's when concurrent mode or the the code necessary for concurrent mode was added to react to that was a complete rewrite of the react framework to support concurrent mode and it was called reactive fiber that right but announced just react and the idea behind it is performance. The the big secret to to improving performance is less code. So you either load less code or you run less code. But that's how you make any software faster is less code. It may not be less characters you can. That's not what I'm talking about. It's just how how much time is the computer taking to upper or to execute code and so because javascript a single threaded the time that the browsers taking to execute your job script code is time that it can't have to update the browser or the what the user's looking at as the user interacts with Yep so. Let's say that you have an interaction that takes five hundred milliseconds because it's just running so much Java script to make that interaction happen during that five hundred milliseconds users unable to interact with the application at all that is just a really unfortunate scenario especially for users on mobile. They experienced a lot more and so what the team discovered is. Hey like sometimes you can absolutely reduce. How much coach. You're running and like their optimizations. You can make as the developer who's creating application but sometimes you just really have to run all of that code like there's there's a reason that code exists but if you can run some of it now and then some of it later and then the rest of it at another time you just split up that work then you can let the browser take a break from the javascript code and that let the user interact with the APP when the user stun than we jumped back in with that work we were previously working on and so that's what fiber was all about. That's what concurrent motives are. All about is it says. Hey I'm going to react to says I'm going to run all of this code and every now and then I'm going to just check like M. I. Ready or can I continue to run code or donate to yield to the browser and just pause what I'm doing and eventually like sometimes it's like. Oh I finished all my work. I don't need to yield anything but sometimes it needs to yield back to the browser because something it's doing is really heavy and so it will yield to the browser. Let let the user interact with the whatever and then go back into the job script code. Now this happens very very quickly but what the end result is for the user is an APP that feels so much more snappy and there are certain like interactions that the user can do that can jump ahead of the things that react is doing as well so they built this scheduler and that's actually MPM package and they want to build this into the browser so that other frameworks can take advantage of this. And they're actually working with standards committees to make that happen but it allows you to schedule work to say. Hey this is really high priority even if the users interacting with this. We really need to make this Java script happen or you know at this network request it came back. It's not super imperative that we jump ahead of the user typing into this field so go ahead and let them type when they're done then. I'm going to continue to do my work so it's just this really fascinating scheduling capability. That reacts is built into itself. And that's what concurrent motors is. All about is an enabling developers to utilize that scheduling capability. That's now built in to react. And today with the way that reactors shipped you can use concurrent mode with the experimental build of react or you can just use synchronous mode. Or I don't know if that's what they're referring to it as normal no mode and both of these are supported today and eventually I think concurrent mode is going to be the.

developer
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It's harder to coordinate these types of loading experiences so you don't just wind up with twelve loading spinners when the user lands on the page which also will make the user feel like the EPA slower than Than it really is so Suspense the whole idea around. It is just making a synchrony a better experience for the user and a better experience for the developer. Who is trying to Marshal? All of these two to coordinate well together. Could you describe it in more context? How a hook interacts with the suspense mode. Yeah sure so. One thing that I mentioned before I jump into that is that suspense is actually. I supported feature today. And it's been around for over a year and that supports lazy loading of Code so you have this react lazy. Api where you can use dynamic import and so if the user goes to log in screen they just get the code for the log in screen and then when they go to the settings page then we typically you load that code later so it helps with initial page load performance so suspense has been around for To support that use case for over a year and the suspense moment that we're talking about is suspense for data fetching in combination with. What's called concurrent mode in reacts and using those two is what gets you all these extra superpowers. So how suspense interacts with Hooks is actually. They're pretty unrelated to each other. And so you can use suspense with cost components. Just fine. There's there's really nothing about the two of them. The only relation that they have is that you can have a custom hook that is responsible for suspending a component. And the way that works is this is actually. I get the similar response to when people see X. The first time they're like wait. That feels very wrong. But this is how it works today and is probably going to to work that way when it's actually stable but inside of your component when before you return your J. Essex while you're in that render phase you create a promise or you take a promise that's been created already for making this request but that's preferable you don't want to create promises render but you referenced promises that have been created and you say oh. That promise hasn't actually resolved yet so I'm going to throw that promise so it's like throwing an area you say. Throw that promise. And that throw will be caught by reacts and it will say Oh. You threw me a promise. So I'm going to wait until this promise resolves before I tried to re render this component again and so how that interacts with hooks is that you can put that promise. Throwing inside of a hook and that abstraction or that that hookup structuring can hide away the implementation detail of actually throwing a promise. Because nobody actually wants to do that in their components and nobody will. That will all happen. Within abstractions especially like data management libraries or or fetching libraries and stuff and so like as far as the user is concerned the developers concerned. They're looking at this code and they don't see anything in there. That indicates that this is happening. A synchronous Louis which actually makes that code way easier to work with and then the user experiences improved because they're leveraging off the research that the react team has done to create this concurrent mode plus suspense. Api that's kind of they don't really necessarily interacts. But but you can use them together to do some cool things like that. Apache.

Hooks developer EPA Marshal J. Essex
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

12:19 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Much. I'm super happy to be here. You've been part of the Java script ecosystem since before. React one out as the most Popular Front End Framework. Did you take any lessons away? From the Framework Churn on what causes an open source library to succeed over other rivaling technologies? Who that's a very interesting question so just for a little bit of background. I joined the javascript ecosystem in and actually the software developer ecosystem around the time that backbone was kind of the thing that most people are using and then angular jazz started to become a thing. So I think I've been doing Java scrip- for about a year before jess started to become the new hotness and then it was another year and a half or so after that that react started to become pretty interesting to me and so in experiencing that firsthand. I think that there are a couple of things that Kinda helped react win out as it has. Today one of those would be that angular has at least at the time and even still today. There's a huge amount of complexity within that library because it supports so many things whereas react is so much smaller and simpler. It's a smaller slice of the front end world so conceptually it's it's a fair amount simpler and on top of that it also embraces javascript as the language for the platform upon which your building and I know the angular people listening right now are like no no. You're using javascript. All the time like type script and whatever but what I mean by that is the template DSL that you have to learn to use many of the other frameworks. You don't have to learn that to us react effectively and so Like in fact you are better off with Reactive Java scrip- twelve and so that's one thing that really appealed to me personally. When I was making the switch from angular to react when I was switching off of angular I was leaving behind a huge amount of knowledge. That accumulated over the years because that was just not transferable at all that helps. I think in general and just like general principle. React being a simpler solution for building you is I think the way that the component model came at just the right time angular was still all about directives and controllers and stuff like that where react embrace this component model making it really imposible and and like the really nice thing about that component muddle in general as you can have this really complex component. That could be all inside of this black box and it really could be tight sealed. Blackbox that the outside doesn't need to know anything about and that just makes it easy for you to say you know. This part of the code is is super complicated. It could probably be made simpler. It could probably be made better but the complexities within that black box. Do not leak outside of it and so I can still use this thing. It's still useful to my application. But it's not going to impact the simplicity of the rest of my application so I think yeah combination of of that the and then also. We can't discount the issues at the time when Angular Jay was moving over to anger too and that was basically a big rewrite for the framework and react itself is actually undergone. A rewrite emperor has undergone a rewrite but the API that's been exposed was consistent for those whereas with angular jazz to angular two. It was just so different in every single way. There was no automated tool. You could use to upgrade an entire code base and so that I think contributed big time and for me personally when I was working with English and starting looking into angular too and I was actually advising the angular team on on some things with how you do forms because I was big maintainers of a form library with gs and I was giving talks conferences. Like this is what you have to look forward to and I just saw that as like this is basically they could just rename this thing because it is so different from the original and it was going to be a huge burden like my company wasn't interested in rewriting to anger too and I know many others are still on angular gs and so with the combination of all of those things when it came down to it. People are like well. I can't stay on any other. Gs I need to move to a different framework to stay on the latest of of things and so the transition to angular will be just as complicated or maybe even more complicated than the transition to react. So I guess now I just evaluate them on on a level playing field and I decided that react fits my mental model better than angular to is going to and also the fact that any other to just took such a long time to come to production. A lot of people had already transfer moved over from anger. Jester or to react before it's released. I did and so I think yeah a lot of reasons that react kind of came out on top and some of those are subjective but I think what is objective is react now is definitely the most Popular Front end framework for the Java script ecosystem and do not. Do you feel like you're all in on reacted this point or do you try to keep up with view or felt or whatever else. Yeah I'm definitely all in on on react personally and professionally but I do try to keep tabs on what's going on in in view and insults and whatever else is coming up next. I think any software engineer who doesn't want to get left behind with flash or something would find that it's wise to keep abreast of what's going on in the overall community for sure react has been around for. I guess six or seven years at this point really popular probably for five years. What are the most notable changes that have come to react since it came out? Yeah so the Oh as you said it react was released six years ago and there have been some changes to the framework. I think maybe one of the most notable was the change from react dot create class two classes in that change like the just how you create these components that was pretty significant. But the cool thing about that was the. Api itself was so similar that they were able to write an automated tool that would just automatically update of your code not necessarily from Create Class API two classes but to a separate package that you could add and still maintain support for your old components and then right all of your new components as classes which is what the facebook facebook does and actually. That's one thing that I really like about react as much as I'm not a fan of facebook at all either as a company or even a platform for my own personal use. The fact that react is being built to support the needs of a platform like facebook is really awesome because it means that if the react team says hey we need to make this big change we want to move from react dot create class to official classes? Because that's where the web is going. Then they have to consider the fifty thousand or one hundred thousand other components that are built within facebook before they can make a change like that and so they either have to write an automated tool to make that migration really painless and actually at. I believe that facebook. If you're going to make a breaking change you have to be the one responsible for updating the code that you're going to break and so it behooves them to make that as easy as possible and so that anyway. That was one one change that happened. It was really easy to upgrade that and then another change. That is pretty significant is the hooks. Api that was released about a year ago and that allowed us to do pretty much everything that you can do with reactive component using just regular functions and it really kind of changed the way that you think about components and life cycles in a way that makes it harder for bugs to to pop up at least like maybe it takes a little bit more work when you're developing to make sure you get it right but you end up shipping your bikes to production. Which I think is a good thing. And then we're we've got another change coming up pretty soon with how a synchrony works in react and that'll be a pretty senior they can change but all of these changes are totally. Have a really nice migration path or they're totally backward compatible. Facebook still has components that are years and years old written in the very early days of react to. They're still being run on production on the latest version of react today and I don't know of any other framework that that can say that And I just really appreciate that about react react. Has this reason changes. You mentioned cult suspense. Which improves the experience for a synchronous loading explain? How Suspense Works? How much time you have. Yeah so suspense. It's an interesting interesting idea around how allowing the users of react to Q. React in on when it's okay to do Rendering or where when you'd rather wait to render certain things so it's kind of complicated and a little hard to do over audio but there is a really great talk that Dan Abramov gave about two years ago. Gs Iceland That people should take a look at for sure because it explains the use cases in a way that I haven't seen anybody else explain it any better since then the basic idea here or the. The problem that we're trying to solve is that the web is inherently a synchronous. Not only like waiting for buttons to be clicked or the user to do something but also the network when the advocates loaded. We need to make a request the user clicks on this button. And so now we gotta go. Requests more data and we can't show the user can show the user a loading screen but we can actually show them anything useful until that stuff comes back. But then you have all these problems where you have a flash of loading state because maybe we make the request. We show the lowering spinner. And oh one hundred milliseconds later. Two hundred milliseconds later. That request comes back. And so we we render the final version. Well that's what we call a flash of loading state and that makes you feel slower than it actually is and so in that scenario it'd be better to not not respond to the user. All you know they click on it. You just wait one hundred milliseconds and the stuff is back and we'll just render it out. And so then. The outfield slower. It may have taken us a one hundred science to actually respond but it actually feels faster because by the time it responded to it was actually the real data and there are a lot of complexities like that. It's not just for that. But it's in general managing a synchrony from a user experience perspective as well as the code in the developer's perspective is tricky business. And so what? Suspense allows you to do is allows you to create these boundaries around areas of react component tree to say here in this suspense component on down. If any of these components says that it's not ready we that suspending so if any of these components suspends then I don't want you to do anything with the rest of this tree just wait for that component to say that it's ready to go and there's an API for that it's pretty reasonable and then when it's ready to go then we continue to render that part of the component tree and if it takes too long for that to happen let's say it's not one hundred milliseconds but it's like two seconds to get that data then you can provide a fallback to say if this does take a little bit too long then rented this instead. Maybe it's like a skeleton. Ui or something like that that. Try to make it look at least it's partially loaded or something or or show some indication to the user. That work is happening. And then once that Suspending component has received its data than it informs react. Hey I'm ready to render. Reacts will re render that part of the component trie and then the user sees the final results so today's current way that we do. This is by managing all of that state. Inside of our component. We have some loading state. We have air state and all of these different States that we manage. Thanks to hooks like this is actually pretty simple too abstract but at the same time..

facebook Angular Jay jess software developer software engineer Dan Abramov developer official
"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"dodds" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I'm building a new product G two. I is the company that I call on to help me find a developer who can build the first version of my product G two. I is a hiring platform. Run by engineers that matches you with react. React native graph and mobile engineers who you can trust whether you are a new company building. Your first product like me or an established company that wants additional engineering. Help G two. I has the talent that you need to accomplish your goals go to software engineering daily DOT COM SLASH G to I to learn more about g two. I has to offer. We've also done several shows with the people who run G to I guess Greenberg and the rest of his team. These are engineers who know about the react ecosystem about the mobile ecosystem about graph. Q. L. react native. They know their stuff. And they run a great organization in my personal experience g two I has linked up with experienced engineers that can fit my budget and the staff are friendly and easy to work with. They know how product-development works they can help you find the perfect engineer for your stack. And you can go to software engineering daily DOT COM SLASH G to I to learn more about G to I thank you G to being a great supporter of Software Engineering Daily both as listeners and also as people who have contributed code that have helped me out in my projects. So if you want to get some additional help for your engineering projects go to software engineering. Daily DOT COM SLASH G too. Ken Dodd's welcome Software Engineering daily. Thank you so.

"dodds" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"dodds" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"In this episode full stack radio i talked to kent seed dodds about using the render prompt pattern to build a extremely reusable you i components like kent's on auto complete library downshift this is a full stack radio episodes seventy nine iran will to full stack radio episode seventy nine today i'm joined by kent c dodds who is a pretty well known in the react community as sort of a contributor and teacher and sort of community guy aso how's it going again thanks for joining me on the show today that's going great thank you so much for having me i really appreciate it i so i guess for anyone who is not familiar with the yuji mind sort of just briefly introducing yourself in talking a little bit about what you do yeah sure um so i am a software developer in uh utah and i worked for pay pal i i'm um i i was a product engineer now i'm doing more um ruling stuff for helping teams be more productive um i represent people in the dc thirty nine um and that's been a lot of fun and i also like you said i'm a teacher soy a teach on eight i in front at masters um than i do my own workshops and things so lots of fun stuff awesome well on the reason i wanted to have you on the show is because i've been i watched your anc head courses that came out i recently saw especially that the advance to react component patterns course i think it was called and there's lots of like really interesting ideas in there and it kinda led me down looking through like some of the other work done and some other blog post aid written and i stumbled upon them that downshift library that you released under the paper i'll give organization i guess towards the end of the summer and there were similar really interesting ideas and their that were really exciting to me in terms of how you're solving a lot of problems that i think i've been really annoying problems in the sort of javascript uije library reusability space for a long time now so i thought it would be really interesting to sort of chat with you about that project and some of the ideas behind it.

kent iran software developer utah product engineer yuji anc
"dodds" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"dodds" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"In this episode full stack radio i talked to kent seed dodds about using the render prompt pattern to build a extremely reusable you i components like kent's on auto complete library downshift this is a full stack radio episodes seventy nine iran will to full stack radio episode seventy nine today i'm joined by kent c dodds who is a pretty well known in the react community as sort of a contributor and teacher and sort of community guy aso how's it going again thanks for joining me on the show today that's going great thank you so much for having me i really appreciate it i so i guess for anyone who is not familiar with the yuji mind sort of just briefly introducing yourself in talking a little bit about what you do yeah sure um so i am a software developer in uh utah and i worked for pay pal i i'm um i i was a product engineer now i'm doing more um ruling stuff for helping teams be more productive um i represent people in the dc thirty nine um and that's been a lot of fun and i also like you said i'm a teacher soy a teach on eight i in front at masters um than i do my own workshops and things so lots of fun stuff awesome well on the reason i wanted to have you on the show is because i've been i watched your anc head courses that came out i recently saw especially that the advance to react component patterns course i think it was called and there's lots of like really interesting ideas in there and it kinda led me down looking through like some of the other work done and some other blog post aid written and i stumbled upon them that downshift library that you released under the paper i'll give organization i guess towards the end of the summer and there were similar really interesting ideas and their that were really exciting to me in terms of how you're solving a lot of problems that i think i've been really annoying problems in the sort of javascript uije library reusability space for a long time now so i thought it would be really interesting to sort of chat with you about that project and some of the ideas behind it.

kent iran software developer utah product engineer yuji anc
"dodds" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

Monday Morning Podcast

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"dodds" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

"Hey big bowl billy dodds you might this article in rig asked to your reached podcast on companies that fingerprints now it seems like those robotic vacuums are selling maps of the inside of your house so you can get furniture ads you're a a massive aussie fan can't wait to hopefully see see you when i go over to the us in the spring of two thousand eighteen yet things are just changing so frigate rapidly you don't wanna it was really gonna be interesting is when we microchip everybody okay they microchip everybody and now than they put all the cash is no longer any cash what's going to be interesting than is all these fucking you know drug dealers all these fucking i don't know anybody who just didn't trust banks in puerto sack of money in the fucking wall what do you do with that up you know now it's all a needs now that's not even worth a thank you got to show up with all the shipping relate hey man where did you get this money eager eagerly like hey man i earned this money and i already paid taxes on igman negatively like hey man you got to prove that in lake came in fifth i can't hey man will fuck your bag cash what's going on nino jude like my saw the bucket microchips due to is this story you just walk in and you get ready near you get sold nervous on days for we fly.

us billy dodds