25 Burst results for "Doctoral Fellow"

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:48 min | 4 months ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"School shootings are raising anxiety and panic in U.S. children by Maya Chung. The May 24th mass shooting in a Yuval di Texas elementary school in which a gunman killed 19 young children and two teachers was the third deadliest school shooting in U.S. history, but it was also just the latest of an increasingly common type of U.S. tragedy. One that experts say is saddling American school children, even the youngest with rising levels of anxiety and other mental health problems. Even when children aren't directly involved in school shootings, they are deeply affected by them and often experience anxiety and depression as a result, says Kira rime a post doctoral fellow at the Columbia University mailman school of public health. These events are extremely high profile and their portrayed hugely in the media, says rhyme. They also happen with alarming frequency in 2022 so far there have already been 27 school shootings in which someone was injured or killed, according to education week's school shooting tracker. In a study published in 2021 in jama, rhyme and other researchers surveyed more than 2011th and 12th graders in Los Angeles, about their fear of shootings and violence at their own or other schools. Researchers followed up with those same students and found that kids who were initially more concerned were more likely to meet the criteria for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. 6 months later, suggesting that kids internalize these fears which can then manifest as diagnosable mental health issues. Rimes says. While the researchers didn't find an overall association between concern about school violence and the development of depression, they did when they looked specifically at black children. The root issue is this concern and fear that this could also happen at your school or another school. Rhymes says they are large numbers and unfortunately, that's kind of in line with what I would have expected before even looking at the data. Children of all ages are at risk for developing these types of symptoms after shootings, but research shows that younger children are even more likely than older ones to develop symptoms like anxiety and PTSD as a result. Says doctor aradhana Bella sood, a Professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Virginia Commonwealth university..

Maya Chung Yuval di Texas elementary scho U.S. Kira rime Columbia University mailman sc depression jama panic disorder anxiety disorder Rimes Los Angeles Rhymes aradhana Bella sood PTSD anxiety Virginia Commonwealth universi
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Throughline

"This is the time steam chip and railroads and new kinds of armaments and other kinds of technologies. The printing press. What does the slum have to say about l. It was the beginning of an experiment and experiment to create an islamic nation fit for the twentieth century. Mammo tarzi ana laekan and queens. Suraya all agreed that the path forward was through a kind of muslim modernism which i went to find as the desire to engage the challenges of modernity howard define but from within slavic and framework my without jettisoning their religious and cultural traditions. That make slim. They propose things like abolishing slavery making polygamy illegal burqas optional outlawing bride prices and improving divorce laws to make them more equal for women. Women's rights were really central to the state building project partially because women around the region at this time were central to a lot of the modernizing projects. Not just around the region in the west. The nineteen twenties s were also a time when women were pushing boundaries. Women in the us got the right to vote in nineteen twenty and have gone. No one was more vocal and pushing for the rights of women in queens seraya that our nation from the outset needs only men to servants this remarkable woman educated and she spoke publicly. Her words were printed in the newspapers of afghanistan throughout the nineteen twenty s. Women should all take report as women did in the early years of our nation and islam. She looked at the the sort of women around the prophet. Like aisha the profits wife who had given her legal opinion on on things and said well. If i could give early. The opinion on things and women can be judges and islamic courts from their examples. Be must learn that semes- all contribute to our development of our nation and that disconnect be done without being equipped but knowledge which was a pretty bold move at the time bold because the majority of women in podcastone then. We're still very much confined to the home and subordinate to the men. In their lives in queens. Seraya was arguing that it was time for women to have a say in how islamic sources were interpreted if we look at the sources and not at the way the sources had been misunderstood by all of these men. We see that women do a lot of rights within the islamic tradition by the way. This is historian. Matia hanoun. I'm currently a post doc. Doctoral fellow at georgetown university beyond the courts queen sarah and her husband alaskan were also changing social norms for women at one public event. I'm gonna laekan announced. That quote slammed not require women to cover their bodies or where any special kind of fail then. Queen suraya removed her veil and the wives of the other political followed suit in pictures. She could almost pass for a flapper on the streets of new york city. The short hair do the glamorous dresses and a no nonsense expression despite all that this is how one british paper described queen suraya. It is difficult to realize that this charming lady has according to our standards virtually a prisoner all her life. She lived in the strictest seclusion in kabul the narrative about her that was sort of perpetuated in the in. The european news was that she was a prisoner until she traveled west. And i think you know it's amazing that those narratives were so prevalent even then above all queen. Suraya made her life mission to educate girls across coniston from the cities to the countryside. She was named the country's minister of education and built the country's first girls school in kabul. You've probably noticed that a lot of the story of independence has been centered around kabul. It was the focal point of everything. During this era and where the political elite of this newly independent afganistan were based so kabul was kinda a bubble and if queen suraya wanted to reach women throughout afghanistan. She faced some serious hurdles and that was partly because different parts of the society viewed the issue differently in the nineteen twenties centered around. Not whether women should be educated but where and under whose authority so more conservative opponents thought they should be educated in the home under the domain of the family or of the community And not of the of course women themselves also had different views on all these issues. I think this is why. It's always so difficult to talk about women as not only difficult but dangerous to talk about women in monolithic terms. However you look at it there was a clear divide for me in the country between those who like the old way of doing things and those who want to change under the nation state umbrella people needed to reach some sort of consensus on things. But the ideas of the political elite weren't resonating in many places beyond kabul impart. That was because the country was so ethnically and culturally diverse. A positive thing from most of its history but now a complicated maze to navigate especially because of the way the country was laid out. You know there's a lot of talk now about To america's there's actually multiple america's right and there's always been. Where am i going with this. You apply the same complexity you may say contradictions but i think complexities a better applies to london. We've been may be misleading. The audience by working at afghanistan through major urban locations honest on his preponderantly rural place where agriculture is by far the dominant. You know kind of productive activity not just agriculture but also minerals that were a to be simple traveling around the world and therefore returning prophets home prophets. That weren't filtering back down to the countryside. What if you only had the taxes and the conscription but you don't get the paved roads at schools and you only the receiving end and fairness that is the experience of a lot of offense outside of kabul One thing i always say is like the women in kabul.

Suraya queens Mammo tarzi ana laekan kabul queen suraya Seraya Matia hanoun laekan Queen suraya afghanistan aisha howard georgetown university america sarah new york city london
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"When you're going into the home making home visit your in their environment and with the telehealth allows you both to somehow kind of be in your own environments which is very very interesting dynamic but last question for you is. What is one thing that medical professionals can start doing today to improve the quality of healthcare. One thing i notice with medical professionals in particular is sometimes they want to jump right to the meat and potatoes of situation. You know only working a lot with kids with you. Know on oncology and sometimes. I'm you know chat pediatric leukemia. Very treatable there's a ninety eight percent You know success rate and survival rate and i sometimes think medical professionals jump right to that like get cancer but they're also going to be fine. It's going to be okay whereas you psychology you always talk about the importance of like validate people's emotions and so i always think it's important to just know that the healthcare systems restrict right now the pandemic but even just taking a moment and sitting with a patient or validating their distress. And it's really hard to know that you're gonna have to go through all this or you know it's really distressful circumstance or your heart must have just fallen out of your chest last couple of days when you see your baby. Get all these tests So i just like to think of that kind of pause and really Having patient centered care. Always be the center of your actions is something that we have. Psychologists always try and evoke and we know that there are many providers who do them. But that's just one thing that i've really recognize that sometimes it's always about the outcomes as opposed to the moment just taking the moment to deal with those emotions with people get to deal with the emotions and to basically to meet people where they are instead of pushing to where they're going to be.

leukemia cancer
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"Practitioner will see the patient and then our social workers will see them and i'll see them do a psychosocial screening with them and then We kind of meet as a team after each patient and in between and we might say they need more education dark classes or hey they could really benefit from some counseling to help them facilitate here. It's and i really think that team approach is something that i really valued and i really find it in the specialty clinics not only capacities and systems in place to support our youth but everyone just started has routine and a role and we know what has worked before with similar patients. Obviously we tailor care to make sure that it meets the individual needs of the patient and family. But that's just it's ivory seen rare quality healthcare in the specialty clinics. Everyone's involved wonderful quick definition for me. You said a dark class. Yeah it's a. it's a diabetes reeducation class so it would just be. Sometimes you know. The american diabetes association for that example recommends like annual or biannual education for families. Even if they've been thriving is important. You know as kids age maybe go back and like oh. You're ready to go through puberty. How's that going to affect your blood sugar. Your diet and everything so on dart is just a re education is something that i do as he entered psychologist is no education. No problem we. We swim in the sea of alphabet soup and i just was trying to make sure that i understood what we're what we're talking about out. What do you wish people understood about your role in healthcare. yeah That's a really good question. i don't want to lean on the old ads. People think psychology is talking about your feelings but that really is a component. One thing that. I really always try to emphasize that. I'm a behavioral health provider during my graduate training. And even some of my outpatient cases you know i do a lot of parent management trading. And you know psychology. You know shifting behaviors or i always say to parents. You shifting your kids. Behavior is not necessarily hard but the consistency is hard changing a habit. It's hard having them their ability to catch themselves with. They're talking to their kids. The way directing their kids to engage in some medical treatment is really difficult. So i sometimes think there are. Some professionals are disciplined. You might say. Oh you know psychologists here there is going to try and make them feel better. Whereas like i look at it as a behavioral health provider when i can do to make it easier for you back. Specialty clinic example. I always say to all my patience. you know. i'm here to see if we can talk about one behavior tonight. That's one thing that we can tweak and twist and make it that it's easier for you and you have less distress over managing your illness than i'm doing my job. That's sort of what. I like to think of in case so i think what i'm hearing you say is that a lot of people have the mistake and understanding that it's just about feelings and what you're talking about is not necessarily feelings. You're talking about actual behaviors which makes a whole lot of sense and is very helpful. I think i might know the answer to this..

american diabetes association diabetes
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"In psychology. We talk about the absence of Depression the absence of anxiety does not necessarily be. We're happy so i like to think about just because you're not obese doesn't mean that you're thriving physically or just because you take your insulin. You know three times a day. You still get away with your a. One cs that seven range that your doctors and endocrinologist one doesn't mean you're thriving so i i really try and instill health promotion and health promoting behaviors on particularly in the population. I work with which is no pediatrics. So much two or three years old up twenty one or twenty two years old okay. i'm then and then am. I going to say one last thing last piece i think about retirement health quality healthcare ism feasability and acceptability. So i know sometimes you know. Medical providers and psychologists a like we might make recommendations that aren't acceptable. The patients aren't realistic. And you know coming from a research background in graduate school. That that feasibility peace and is this something. That's going to work when they leave the hostile something that i also think is a real part of quality. Healthcare should be considered and also really helps you that multidisciplinary approach to look at some of those social determinants and things that might really impact the care and subsequent health of our patients. Okay so i love what you're saying there. And i guess i was. I interrupted almost interrupted. You because i was so excited. My the one thing that you're talking about is the just because certain things are absence doesn't mean that other things are present. Okay my analogy on this. Is you've heard the expression about happy wife. happy life. i and i actually don't believe that that's true. And i think this goes right into your point. Okay and the fact that just because your wife is happy doesn't mean that you are going to be happy however the congress is true which is unhappy wife unhappy life so if your wife is not happy then it's going to be very difficult for you to be having her happiness doesn't necessarily guarantee that you're going to be happy it it puts you in an arena where it is much more likely much more probable. It works through that way. So i know that you have a fiancee. Take that as advice for the road out you. You've given me an example already but can you think of any other examples of quality healthcare. Yeah what are the things. I really i really love about. My job is my work. And i do this as resident at the university of miami and then now at johns hopkins. I really like specialty plymouth. Work and the reason i love specialty clinic work is because you going to address a lot of times. In my case it was children with cystic fibrosis. And then with type one and type two diabetes and you re they get the whole gamut. I know the appointments might along sometimes for patients and that sort of acceptability feasability thing. They're always trying to address. But i really love when everything just flows so smoothly for example. You know tomorrow's tuesday morning. I'll walk in the diabetes clinic nurse..

Depression congress university of miami johns hopkins plymouth cystic fibrosis diabetes
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"Welcome back to perspectives on healthcare. My perspective today comes from nicholas. Smith now. I have to tell you that when you're starting a podcast. The first thing that you do is you go. Shake the tree of friends and family and nicholas. When i shook the tree nicholas fell out of it which was fantastic. He is he is a friend of his. His mom is a friend of mine..

nicholas Smith
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"Ai in business podcast. This is our third and last episode in a short three part series over the last three weeks on ai and the future of defense. We had steve blank on the program. Two weeks ago famed. Silicon valley innovator with Some rich military experience and a real mover and shaker in terms of changing defense culture mike brown the actual director of the dia iu proper and today we have the technical director artificial intelligence machine learning at the defense innovation unit. And that is none. Other than jared donman jared holds a phd in mechanical engineering and was a post doctoral fellow and computer science at stanford university before making his move to become technical director of ai. For the d. i you a little bit over a year ago. At the time of this recording and in this episode we focused less on the international dynamics of kind of building ai predominance between the west and china and we focus more on the range of use cases that are present when it comes to the broad topic of in this case homeland security and defense. Broadly as well. We chris and cross between the two jared opens. Our is a bit too. Just how many different kinds of ai. Projects the department of homeland security and the dod and up working on everything from mundane paper processing to healthcare related applications. And almost everything in between. There's so much to cover in the public sector that ends up under the h. s. And the dod. And jared gives us a nice lay of the land of those different kinds of applications. I think when people think defense they think ai for guiding missiles when it's really not like that at all there are smart phd's who leave excellent schools finest schools in the world And work in the public sector and don't end up working missiles for the bulk of their time. They work on a variety of other things that end up helping with homeland security. That might seem more mundane but also seem pretty interesting. There's some interesting niche. Use cases that jared covers that i think will be surprising for some folks who are thinking about ai indefens- or a in homeland security also talk a bit about jarrett's career path going from top university and into the public sector and what public sector folks might do to be able to recruit more smart folks like him. So if you're interested in ai in defense or if you're just interested in a wider array of ai use case understanding. I hope that this interview will be helpful for you so without further. Do this jared gunman. You're on the ai and business podcast. So jared.

dia iu jared donman jared steve blank ai mike brown dod Silicon valley stanford university department of homeland securit china chris ai indefens west jarrett
Anti-Racist Science Education

Short Wave

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Anti-Racist Science Education

"All right today in the show. We're unsmiling what's not working in science education around representation and racism and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists esther kunle yes so thanks to esther. We went looking for k. Through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection of science and racial justice at all grade levels. And i want to start with. Let me see a fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education. And outreach vanderbilt okay. She's a black scientist. Helping out in science classrooms in tennessee. Among fifth graders at this one particular school she is a total rockstar to walk into a classroom. And they'll be like dr. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone you know know autographs thing. We lit up each others world. Our saying that let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth. Grade science classrooms like a real life. Miss frizzle okay. I'm not kidding. You she wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued. They run up to her on our like number my wife just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay she'll talk about how wrong. The tuskegee study was which is win. Scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment. Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protests. And they're speaking out and they're not having it they're not gonna they're not going to allow us to continue to destroy her and her point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and that curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take up an interest in science. I love it and if we can't do that then we are gonna lose on. And i think it's hard were minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the prisoners doing the science so that already kind of puts up a block of well. That's just what the old white main with crazy hairdo and so another thing. Let me see a does is named drop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about astrophysicist. Did eisler medical physicist hadean ecole green astronauts. Joseph akaba and jeanette epps. She designed paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history right. It's also helping. Students see themselves as scientists and for gretchen craig. Turner the next teacher. I want to introduce you to this. Level of engagement becomes even more important as students get older and start to get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah to be critical of it. Oh yeah that was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either. I don't remember a lot of writing or Opinions being part of science in fact it was very much i believe taught. The opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a

Esther Kunle Esther Tennessee Syphilis Joseph Akaba Jeanette Epps Gretchen Craig Turner
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Sprinkled with Hope

Sprinkled with Hope

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Sprinkled with Hope

"He came to me specifically for that he was graduating from school. He had reached out to the career center at his school and was getting no wear and i told i was like well. Yeah i've had blake pharmacy students up from all over the. Us trying to ask me how to become a post doctoral fellow so just to take you back a tad. I actually started my pharmaceutical industry as a postdoctoral fellow with one of the most competitive battleship programs and the oldest fellowship program in the nation. And when i'm talking about competitive people were tripping up in front like as they were getting to the interview in front of large groups of people. Competitive life is folks like would literally have meltdowns if they enter it was. It was that intense. So i would get calls from you know. Black children indian as everybody across margaret. How do we get to where you are. And one of the things that helped me even passed. The interview was a seemingly. Innocuous mentor relationship with a gentleman at proctor and gamble and the first thing. He said margaret. Now your strengths. If you don't know your strength margaret. You're not going to do it so i did that. I learned the art of the interview from him. And i never left me so i i enjoy listening to my okay. That's a good story. Now here's how you set it up so that your interviewer will as strength for you. And that's that's how the pivot consulting group started. We'd literally just wanted to help. People of color increase their higher -able status like and we realized that a lot of people don't get hired because not because they're not qualified but because they don't have to talk about all the good stuff that they've done. It's like you're not bragging you're telling the truth right right and It was in that that i realized i was like wow. I'm missing the whole boat. I can help you get the job. Getting the job is quite different from staying on the job. There are a number of life experiences that we all had regardless of our race that inform how we choose to show up and sometimes we show up in a way that causes us to take things personally when they weren't necessarily mitt to be personal. Oh my gosh. I'm only doing half justice or even quarter justice by giving you interview skills. How you do one thing is how you do everything. So how do i help you do everything with a spirit of excellence or with a level of confidence that allows you to feel it. Yes i'm i'm i'm getting my view. And that's what said okay. Margaret workload is some coach training. I could tell stories all day. That's great for you. I can take your.

margaret doctoral fellow postdoctoral fellow mitt
Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

Short Wave

09:25 min | 2 years ago

Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

"All right today in the show were unscrewing what's not working in science education around representation and racism, and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists Esther Kunle yes. Thanks to Esther we went looking for K., through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection, of Science, and racial justice at all grade levels I want to start with. Let me see fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education and outreach at Vanderbilt. Okay. She's a black scientist. Out in science classrooms Tennessee in among fifth graders. At this one particular school, she is a total rockstar. So walk into a classroom and they'll be like. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone autographs today. We lit up each others world. Our say, let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth grade. Science classrooms like a real life. Miss Frizzle I'm not kidding you. She wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued they run up to our like remind wife we've. Just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom, let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay. She'll talk about how wrong the Tuskegee study was, which is winning scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup. Scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protest and they're speaking out on, they're not having it. They're not. They're not going to allow us to continue to destroy their and our point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and That curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take an interest in science I love, and if we can't do that, then we are GonNa lose them and I think it's hard for minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the Christmas doing the science. So that already unemployed simple block of well, that's just what the old white man with the crazy hairdo. and. So another thing let me see Ya does is namedrop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about a physicist did Eisler medical physicists had he and Ecole, green astronauts, Joseph Akaba, and genetic APPs. She designed a paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history, right? It's also helping students see themselves as scientists and for Gretchen Craig. Turner. The next teacher I, want to introduce you to. This level of engagement becomes even more important students get older and start to you know get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah. You know to be critical of it. Oh. Yeah. That was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either I don't remember a lot of writing or opinions being a part of science. In fact, it was very much I believe taught the opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a right answer Gretchen teaches. At Burlington Edison High. School. In Washington state she is white and her classroom to be as inclusive as possible and to reflect the diversity of the student body and in her first year of teaching a biotech class. This was back in two thousand, ten in English teacher gave her a copy of the book. The immortal life of Henrietta lacks was like you should teach the steer students. Yeah. So the history of the Hilo Cell Line Yep. So Henrietta, lacks cancer cells were used for years by scientists without her family's knowledge cells that. One. Of the most important cell lines in medical research, her case raises so many questions about patients, rights. Yep questions raised in this book. So Gretchen got a bunch of hardcover books for her class and we read it and. It shaped how I teach in tremendous ways because the students responded to it. So strongly, you know they were excited maybe not at first I still get a lot of Turner. This isn't an English class, right but but they got into it. So into it, it is a six week unit the book in a Science Class. STUDENTS DO SELL labs while they're reading and they journal to. Okay so they're jotting down notes on different themes like medical apartheid informed consent lab science, and at the end they write a big paper and also oftentimes in class, there will be students who who's own families have experienced medical apartheid in the. Effects of that and I think some of the students and see themselves in the story of the lacks family. The conversations become really personal and probing not. You know necessarily what you'd expect in science class but exactly what Gretchen is hoping for well I, think what you know many young people ultimately want from their teachers is to be seen into be heard. And so if the science curriculum. if they feel seen and heard through that curriculum, they're more invested. So when her students learn about genetic testing, Gretchen includes a film about the innocence project and they're a group that uses DNA testing to exonerate those who've been wrongfully imprisoned. And Gretchen has her students, write poetry and songs as kind of oaths to those wrongfully convicted my blood, my skin, my hair, all held the key to my freedom DNA. My eyes glazed over desperate for relief with a pain. I now understood my hand reaches for I. Don't Know How often you're around teenagers. But the. Teenagers of this just tremendous sense of justice and what is right you know, and so those conversations are often very passionate for students But it's also the world that they live in. Wow I mean kwong, there's so many things in here. That are so powerful in and I know there's a lot of science teacher who listened to shortwave who might want to incorporate racial justice in history into their teaching too I mean, where do they look well Gretchen and let me see a- had the same advice which is at teachers should fill in the gaps in their own racial understanding I learn about the history of science or their field, and that's exactly what the last teacher I spoke with is doing. Vigia satiety is a college professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and looking critically at her own field statistics has been hard painful work. You know I honestly I just feel like I'm I missed something that was really important to learn about my discipline and I'm I'm a little bit mad at myself for not being curious on my own to figure out the origins of things and she has been startled to realize the full extent to which modern statistics draws upon the work of you. Genesis Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ronald Fisher. Some of the most foundational tools and stem like the normal distribution curve were applied to support their racist and eugenicist theories tools that we. Use today, but we don't really stop to think about the people who created them and why they created them. So the is trying to stop to teach yourself where these came from, but to not rush the process with some slapdash curriculum, she wants to incorporate these historical into her classes with care I want to give it the space deserves and of course, and not not to feel like this awkward add on that people can optionally engage in in a way that centers the students Vigie like all the teachers I spoke with designs, her classes by asking herself who's being left behind with this material, and how can I bring them along? That's what can be gained from. And anti-racist science education I think all of us in our minds have been in or heard of course where the professor says look to the laugh looked the right. One of you won't be here at the end of this time or you know something horrible this should not ever be uttered in a classroom. I say look to your left to your right like I. Want you all to stay. I want you all the love my field as much as I. Love my field because there's so many interesting things you could do with it and we really could use your wonderful mind and our discipline. We could use your perspective and the things that you bring. So basically to change science, we have to change how we teach science. To fix the lab gotta fix the classroom.

Gretchen Craig Science Class Henrietta Esther Kunle Turner Vanderbilt Doctoral Fellow Scientist Tennessee Hilo Burlington Edison High Tuskegee Professor Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ro Washington Physicist Ecole
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"What type of host cells human cells can this virus even get into and replicated obviously lung cells because it's a, it's the respiratory tract infection. By you know clinically, they've also seen gastrointestinal sequoia and other clinical fines. So becomes really important to understand you know what are the different cell types human cell types that the virus can either enter into. Replicate in and spread from, and then how do those cells respond to? They have a pro inflammatory response because body gun contributes to symptoms that we see clinically. Can the virus get into immune cells because as we know from HIV viruses that can get into and potentially kill immune cells has huge implications for the immune response immune system. So. We're really interested in you know not just what cell types but how did those cells respond? How does the virus counter respond? And you know from that, you know we can. We can help come up with some good model systems. So is there a good lung model system? Is there a good got model system? So then and if we can get the model systems working, then we can work with colleagues who are very good at drug development for drug development is not our expertise, but we have colleagues that are fantastic strength. But they need to be able to test their drugs or the combination of drugs in a model system. So that's where the collaboration on ensued. What. Model System does your lab axiom play. I know arrange as a specialist in a bat and understanding viruses in bats what kind of model system do work within the LOB. We've been working with a lung system lung cells were just starting to We have a new post doctoral fellow in the lab that has expertise in got in making organized three D culture systems. So again, that better recapitulate, you know what happens these three the organized systems better recapitulate what happens in a in an Oregon in an individual. So we're setting up a number even with human cells of wargin weighed system. And and we are interested in in bath for you know for a for a different reason. But we it's thought that this virus evolved initially from. And we know that that can harbor a whole variety of viruses and they don't get sick. But yet they're very similar test with her immune system so we want to understand. What are those subtle differences and? Basically, what do bats know that we don't know and how and once we understand what those small changes are how can we then use our modern technologies? To to really recreate the outcomes of those changes so that you know we can use the same trick..

respiratory tract doctoral fellow Oregon
Costly refined coal subsidy is failing to achieve air pollution goals

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Costly refined coal subsidy is failing to achieve air pollution goals

"Every year, the US government provides about a billion dollars in tax credits to companies that produce what's known as refined coal. It's chemically treated coal that when burned supposedly admits less than the pollution that can harm human health but there's a problem companies qualify for the tax credit using lab tests, which could differ dramatically from what's actually happening in the field at the power plants where the coal is burned. Brian pressed is a post doctoral fellow at a research nonprofit called resources for the future he studied the actual air pollution emitted when companies burn refined coal we look at actual field missions you know what's happening at the power plant and we're finding that the emission reductions fall far short of what the tax law says that they should be getting. What's more he says, the tax credit can make it profitable for. Some older power plants to keep burning coal for longer. So it may actually increase carbon pollution and worsen global warming. He says, it's a timely issue because the tax credit is set to expire at the end of twenty twenty one and is a immediate policy question about whether we're going to renew this or whether we should take the funds that would be used for this subsidy, and perhaps he's for a better purpose.

Brian United States Doctoral Fellow
Alaska's Salmon are Shrinking

60-Second Science

02:53 min | 2 years ago

Alaska's Salmon are Shrinking

"Year salmon come home to Alaska's frigid rivers to mate, lay their eggs and die. The. State Salmon runs are some of the biggest in the world but over the past few decades, those big salmon runs have featured ever smaller. Salmon. Talk to people up there has been fishing for a long time and they're definitely able to tell you that we just don't see those really large old salmon used to see Christa a post doctoral fellow at the University of Alaska Fairbanks oaken colleagues at the University of California Santa Cruz, and elsewhere analyzed records of fish size. Going back to the nineteen fifties they included data on some twelve point, five, million, salmon, each of which had. To be measured by someone from the Alaska Department of fish and game, and there's no question about it. Salmon have shrunk sockeye salmon today are two point one percent shorter than their ancestors chum salmon are two point four percent shorter and Coho or three point three percent shorter Chinook or king salmon showed the greatest declines at eight percent. That's an average difference of more than two inches in length. The study is in the journal Nature Communications. The researchers haven't nailed down the exact reasons behind this trend, but they're analysis suggests that climate change and competition with wild and hatchery raised salmon, both play a role. They also discovered that much of the change in body size is due to fish returning from the ocean at a younger age now than in the past. Oak, says fish could be returning earlier because they're reaching maturity faster for some reason or because the ocean has become a riskier place for older salmon to survive what could be happening is the That otherwise would have returned large old. Just making. Whatever the cause this size shift has massive ramifications for people and the Environment Oak and her team calculated that catching smaller fish may have already slashed the value of Alaska's Commercial Salmon Fisheries by twenty one percent. It's also likely reduced the food available to subsistence fishers, many of whom reliance stores of salmon to get them through the long harsh winter by as much as twenty six percent. On the ecological side, the researchers estimated that smaller fish sixteen percent fewer eggs, which could depress salmon populations in the future and the Salmon Bring Twenty eight percent fewer nutrients into the watersheds were they spun according to the study after they breed and die kirk actually fertilize. Freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems with these marine derived nutrients that are really important and that used by all kinds of animals like bears and songbirds even taking up into trees with no single factor to blame for shrinking salmon there's no fix says, but there are still plenty of fish in the sea they're just smaller than they used to be.

Alaska Alaska Department Of Fish University Of Alaska Fairbanks University Of California Santa Doctoral Fellow Environment Oak Nature Communications Christa Chinook OAK Kirk Younger Age
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"80,137 acres at 19% containment at last check support for Casey. You comes from Del Monte assisted living dedicated to supporting the senior community through the fires, offering nightly or weekly contracts for respite care or for evacuees are those affected by smoke. More a day 313752206 and from work bench of Santa Cruz, based on locally owned architecture and construction firm services include the design build of 80 use modern single family homes and multi family residential developments. Workbench bill dot com Let's get to work together. Taking a look at the K C U Community calendar. The Lick Observatory will host a living room lecture on Monday, August 31st beginning at 4 P.m.. Dr Emily Martin N S. F. Post doctoral fellow at the University of Santa Cruz, and you see chancellor's fellow will provide an in depth and fact Phil discussion on the oversight and work she is providing on several essential observatory projects. Registration information is available on our website A Casey you dot org's Just click on the community calendar link. It's 5 20. Support for NPR comes from this station and from the little market offering artisan made goods and home decor with a commitment to fair trade, a nonprofit founded by women to empower female artisans and marginalized communities around the world. More at the little market dot com. And from the Public Welfare Foundation, committed to advancing a transformative approach to justice that is community led, restorative and racially just Learn more at public welfare dot org's From NPR news..

Understanding the COVID-19 Data Quality Problem with Sherri Rose

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:10 min | 2 years ago

Understanding the COVID-19 Data Quality Problem with Sherri Rose

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me. It is great to have a chance to chat with you. I'm looking forward to digging into your background and your research and The things you're doing related to cove it to help out there you know. Let's start at the beginning. How did you become interested in machine learning and in the intersection of that and Healthcare I always was very interested in science and mathematics and physics and I didn't really have a good sense of how you could use that to solve problems when I was going to college and it was during college that I was exposed to this summer. Program called the Summer Institute for training in biostatistics and it really sounded like what I was interested in which was bringing quantitative reasoning thinking to problems in health and public health and I realized very quickly that I needed more than my bachelor's degree in statistics in order to really solve a lot of those problems and I didn't actually get any training in machine. Learning in my bachelor's degree I graduated in two thousand five and the curriculum definitely did not include it at that point and so when I went to graduate school at UC Berkeley in biostatistics. That's where I saw. The the benefit of having really general frameworks in which solve problems. And that's when I started working on non parametric machine learning and having these kind of big picture ways to attack big problems in population health and that was for me. That's been both machine learning in non parametric models for prediction but also causal inference and the driver for me was really the ability to use these flexible tools to solve problems in in healthcare in medicine it must have been helpful having that. Undergrad in stats. It's it's been very helpful. Actually I actually started as a mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Major. And I did not feel very invigorated by the coursework there and I very room and I also was a little frustrated that I was often the only woman in the classes and it just it. There was a lot of reasons why didn't feel like the right fit for me. I ended up taking my second semester in college. Statistics course and I immediately saw how statistics could be used for solving lots of different problems and Engineering Ken as well but for me. The statistics was really how I saw bringing all my interests together. You mentioned non parametric machine learning. What is that? And how does that relate to Both the broader field as well as the healthcare field. If somebody talk about non parametric I mean it. In the very broad statistical sense a non parametric model is a larger model space. Where we're making many fewer assumptions and whereas with parametric models more standard parametric models. We might be making strict assumptions about the functional form the underlying unknown functional form of the data with non parametric. I WanNa really have a large model space. I have a much better opportunity to uncover the truth with my machine learning estimator so many like you're not assuming a normal distribution which has a couple of parameters and a standard deviation it could be anything definitely not definitely not that would be a limiting gumption in your work. Yeah absolutely and most of the data that I work with does not conform to those types of strict assumptions. Talk a little bit more about the scope of your research interests and where you apply machine learning. It sounds like you are interested. Both in the of the systematic issues the healthcare system with the relationships between the providers and the payers as well as clinical issues absolutely so in health services research were really interested in the whole broad scope of the healthcare system that includes cost quality access to providers and services and also health outcomes following care so that clinical piece comes into the health outcomes following care and some of the major areas that I've worked in intersect with the health spending aspects the financing aspects like mental health and Telemedicine and cardiovascular treatments. All of these things intersect within the system that relies on you know the the cost the quality the access to providers. So it's a really having a research program that encompasses both pieces of that can allow you to ask and answer questions in more integrated ways. It's difficult but I find that you if you understand those underlying systems and try and bring them into your work when you're looking at clinical work It can help you inform better answers and when you are looking at those kinds of questions are you primarily trying to understand or influence great questions so a lot of the work that I do. We're trying to understand some kind of phenomena in the system but influence yes in the sense that we're trying to inform policy so understanding the comparative effectiveness of multiple. Different types of treatments. I I would like to understand which treatments have better health outcomes but if we find a particular treatment has a very bad outcomes we want to inform policy to the FDA or to the relevant stakeholder in order to potentially have that treatment removed from market and we're talking towards the end of April Many of us have been some form of another of locked down due to co VID. Did you mentioned that? Your dog may start barking. He may He may my neighbor. Just I think my neighbor is finished cutting the grass. Now you know this. Is You know the Times but it sounds. Like your work intersects with Cova. Did as well. Can you talk about that intersection a little bit? Absolutely a large focus of my work because I'm so integrated in starting with the substantive problem in bringing either existing machine learning tools or developing new machine learning tools to answer those questions. It really there has to be the strong grounding data and the virus pandemic has really eliminated for a lot of people how much we need to care about data. And I I I mean we have misclassification. We have Missing nece in the types of data that we're collecting for Virus both for cases and mortality counts. And these are things that are very very common and most of the electronic health data that we use in the healthcare system where a lot of my work has focused on dealing with some of these types of issues. I mean we use billing claims we use Clinical Records Registry data an on and on and these data types were not designed for research. And so we need to be really aware of the issues in these types of of data and some of the newer forms of data like wearable implantable technology. That people have been very excited about measuring physical activity were now using the current virus pandemic of smartphone location data to try and understand how people are Social distancing with potentially with contact tracing and then digital types of data like Google search trends and twitter data which has been used for different types of research questions in the past now. Google is developing and has released this location. History website. Where they're showing out. Know how we can understand social distancing and so a lot of the data related work that. I've been focused on very relevant to the pandemic understanding our data sources and trying to bring rigorous flexible methods to them specifically. I had been working the last two years with my now former post-doctoral fellow an infectious disease expert myemma gender. Who's now faculty at Boston? Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. We had been looking at news media data. Cdc Data Electronic Health data. To understand the generalize ability of these data sources for both infectious disease and chronic disease. And now this become a very relevant the virus pandemic we had one of the conditions we've been studying was was flu like illnesses and understanding what electronic health data sources like billing claims an electronic health records what we can really understand from these data sources and we've seen people many people now start modeling making projections about cases and a death. Count's what we're going to start seeing next. Once people start. Having access to different types of electronic health resources is trying to use this data understand. You know to predict outcomes maybe to predict clinical courses were trying to causal inference which is even more difficult And it's very important that people understand the limitations of these data sources and so that's one of the things that we're working on and hopefully the the first paper from that work will be able to release in the next coming weeks but this is this is something that's relevant for the virus pandemic but has been a problem going back. Decades is using data. That people don't understand and that's been a at the forefront of my work is really making sure especially with the theme of one of the themes of this podcast machine learning a lot of people get very excited about machine learning and they throw a tool at data without understanding the data. And we're now in the midst of something where it's really crucial. That people do not do

Data Electronic Health Google Uc Berkeley Summer Institute Aerospace Engineering Major KEN Times Boston Cova FDA Twitter Children's Hospital Harvard Medical School
How Long Can the Coronavirus Last on Surfaces?

BrainStuff

07:20 min | 2 years ago

How Long Can the Coronavirus Last on Surfaces?

"Let's talk about how long viruses can live on surfaces because between all those door handles credit card keypads and even our own cell phones we interact with so many services daily. I mean even if you don't hand your phone over to everyone you meet. You probably put down on say a table that other people have touched. And that's a fact of life but some of what we colloquially called germs that is viruses bacteria and other microbes that can cause infections and our bodies. Some germs can survive on surfaces outside of our bodies long enough to spread from one person to another. There's unfortunately no hard and fast rule for how long viruses in general can live on surfaces part of the uncertainties because viruses are diverse and have variety of surface survival rates the type of surface and environmental temperature and humidity. All come into play too so which surfaces are safe to touch. And how often do we need to disinfect? Them but wait. Let's back up a step what are viruses and are they even alive in the first place things that we generally considered to be living have more or less standalone ability to eat grow and reproduce a single cell. Bacteria or fungi. Or even sell from your body can do all those things because they contain the genetic instructions to do so plus the enzymes to carry out those instructions but viruses. Don't they have the genetic instructions DNA or RNA? But they don't have the right enzymes to create the chemical reactions necessary for reproduction. Instead viruses need a host cell which can be bacteria fungi or a plant or animal including a human a virus will attack a host cell and released its genetic instructions which hijacked the host cell's enzymes to make new viruses. That's good for the virus but generally bad for the host without a host cell virus can't survive long term however it does have a short window of time during which it can stay functional in hopes of infecting a new host and attaching to a host cell. Outside of a host viruses can either stay intact and remain infectious or they can degrade to the point that they're merely identifiable which means that you'll still be able to identify them from their genetic material but they won't be capable of seeking out an attacking host cells at the point that a virus on a surface is only identifiable. It won't be able to cause harm. The length of time that viruses can remain infectious on surfaces varies greatly there are baseline differences between viruses for example Rhino viruses. The viruses that are mostly responsible for the common cold will last for less than an hour on surfaces others such as norovirus which is a virus that can cause vomiting and diarrhea can last for weeks. Which is why. Norovirus can easily spread both through infected people and through contaminated foods and surfaces. There are several types of corona viruses. Most cause mild symptoms and are responsible along with rhinovirus is for the common cold but three types are known for causing more serious diseases. Moore's SARS and cove nineteen and because the corona virus that causes cove in nineteen is novel. The research into how long it can last on surfaces is new and ongoing a study published online on March Thirteenth of two thousand twenty by researchers at the National Institutes of health the US Centers for Disease Control and prevention and multiple universities compared the novel corona virus with the Corona virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome. Or SARS this is the most closely related. Human Corona virus to cove in nineteen and was responsible for the two thousand three epidemic. This study which has not been peer reviewed as of this recording found that the two viruses have similar viability in the environment which is to say not a whole whole lot. Something between rhinovirus and norovirus. The study determined that novel Corona Virus Can remain infectious for up to three days on stainless steel and plastic surfaces but survival on other surfaces was lower just one day on cardboard and four hours on copper and it was lowest at all in the air just up to three hours but keep in mind. Numbers are the maximum for the viability of the virus viruses. Start to degrade pretty immediately. When they're not an host the longer they're in the air or on a surface exponentially fewer of them will remain infectious. And if your immune system is working okay a lot of individual viruses need to get into your body either via your bucase membranes like your eyes nose mouth or via cuts in your skin in order for you to get infected. That's why direct person to person contact stilled easiest way for Corona virus to spread. And why everyone's telling you to wash your hands before touching your face. It's also why we don't have more precise numbers for how long corona virus or any virus for that matter. No matter how long they've been studied can last on surfaces. We spoke by email with Dr Alicia. Cray post doctoral fellow in epidemiology at emory university she said generally survival of pathogens on FEMME LIGHTS. Which are objects or materials likely to carry? Infection is determined by inoculating a surface with a known quantity virus and then sampling at various time intervals to determine the amount recovered. Scientists uses information to estimate a decay curve for the pathogen on the particular surface which can be extrapolated to longer time intervals the NIH and CDC team that studied surface variation for corona virus is still researching. They're looking into corona virus viability from snot versus phlegm versus poop as well as in varying environmental conditions because although viruses have differing baseline rates of survival on surfaces additional factors affect their ability to endure outside of a host like temperature humidity and properties of the surface itself. Cray said in general viruses survived longest at lower temperatures higher humidity and on non porous surfaces like stainless steel. However some viruses do well at low humidity. There have been a lot of theories about whether corona virus will lessen during warmer months because dry cold air like in the winter tends to provide favorable conditions for flu transmission. But we simply don't know yet. Dr Anthony Fosse Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explained during the March Thirteenth Twenty twenty CNN facebook global corona virus. Townhall that when considering the viability of a virus on various substances it's probably measured in a couple of hours while he recommends wiping down surfaces like doorknobs and cell phone screens. When you can. He cautioned against worrying about things like money and mail and the end despite the differences in viability on surfaces among pathogens fo- MITES and contexts. The number one recommendation for preventing the spread of viruses is standard. If you've touched a shared surface wash your hands before you touch your face or any part of your body that might have a cut or other skin abrasion. The human skin is great. If keeping out cold and flu viruses a thanks to its PH porous nature. They survived for only about twenty minutes on our hands.

Norovirus Sars Cray Us Centers For Disease Control National Institute Of Allergy FLU Vomiting National Institutes Of Health Dr Alicia Moore NIH Emory University CNN Dr Anthony Fosse Respiratory Syndrome Doctoral Fellow Director
Jake Goldenfein on Google Scholar

Good Code

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Jake Goldenfein on Google Scholar

"Our guest today is Jack Golden Fine. He's a post doctoral fellow slow at the digital life initiative and he's originally from Melbourne Australia. He's research looks law in Computational Society including including the impact of platforms on user behavior. He's most recent piece of research. Looks at Google scholar. A relatively new free web search engine that indexes scholarly work in which has quickly become central to academic life just like other Google services have in other disciplines. I sat down with him just before the holidays and I began by asking him to explain what Google scholar is for the non scholars among us. And why it's become so important Horton. In recent years Google Scola emerged in two thousand and full when it was first launched it was just an academic search. Such engines are just like Google that ordinary such engine accepted return. Scholarly results how it defines something as scholarly has always been a little a bit vague. And maybe we'll talk more about why the Vagary of that is a bit problematic but the idea was it would return results that were relevant for scholars. Looking King Faculty make work since then. It's had a few more features added that perhaps beyond set actually more important or have had a bigger effect on the academic field in two thousand and six you able to stop saying citation counts associated with particular scholarly documents and then three years later. Two two thousand eleven google Google scholar launched sort of citation platform and what they did was give each racer. A profile like scholar profile filed outlined oleo publications and the citation counts of those publications calculations of academic quality or the quality of eraser. Sure premised on the amount of citations their publications getting over particular number of us. Silly amount the number of times other researchers will quote from your research search in their own research. Exactly it's the number of times that An article a document that you ride is referred to by other researches. It's pretty new right. You said it it started in two thousand and four so less than I mean a little over ten years. How how big is it now in the field? It do every researchers look at it when they're working on a new topic or so I would say. Almost every researcher would be familiar with it when Dougal scholars such sort of emerged on the sane librarians. This who Training young racers will always telling them be very wary of this because we sort of don't understand how it works as well as we understand. How other academic search search engines wet? It's also interesting. Because most academic search engines are quite disciplinary specific and they all they return results to a particular the corpus or repertoire of journals whereas Google scholar is disciplined agnostic a returns results across disciplines irritations results from academic journals but also other kinds of publications and whereas in traditional academic search engines. You have quite a lot of control over. What what you're searching for in Google scholar you have relatively limited control you can you can constrain the dates? But that's kind of more or less it. So it's always occupied had a bit of a funny position in research toolkit but it's increasingly a used because we're getting a lot more sort of disciplinary environments where people are interested in finding out information outside of their discipline and so google scholar becomes sort of fest port of coal in that kind of instance. But the thing that we're finding is maybe the big use of Google scholar is it's it's citation counting function it's bibliometric function on because what Google Scuola represents his really the easiest way to say. How many citations a particular research has received how come like what? Where did you get those metrics before? and and why were they less easy to find. People who are metrics have been around for a long time in the fifties those information scientists named using Garfield field. Who developed this process of citation analysis? Way You could effectively automate the organization. That is the indexing of scholarly work Iraq by its references so libraries with struggling with how to organize exploding amount of scientific and scholarly literature. And they will. Also you're thinking about how to to use computers to do that. The problem with during that is the sort of need to figure out a way to define the subject matter of of a publication in a way that a computer can understand and Eugene Garfield came up with a really clever way of doing that which is to look at references. Organiz it by the references rather than the actual actual content. This idea was really successful. It was really useful research tool but it also became clear quite early on that counting. Citations could give you a really Sort of rough guide to the quality of work because it gave you a measure of its reception in the field. It didn't tell you how people were trading but a told you people were rating in had some some sort of visibility. So through the sixties and seventies this eventually turned into a commercial product and in the nineties that was purchased by Thomson Reuters Webb of science over the last couple of decades has been probably the primary tool to get metric information but it's number one. The product was General Impact Factor in journal impact factor measured the number of citations to articles in particular journal. Over set a number of years. This citation analysis was used primarily for evaluating the quality of channels rather than the quality of individual researches now individual researchers started added to organize their own sort of scholarly prestige around the prestigious journal. Yeah so if you publish a nature medicine for example for a doctor it's not the same mm-hmm as in a local journal. That might be great but less has left citations nationally. Exactly so what we see during the seventies eighties nineties his citation starting to do lots of interesting things. We started to see journals effectively set their price according to the number of citations that were getting individual scholars. Who now were in this more competitive scully? Well because you know in the second half of the twentieth century the number of scholars in Christ raced dramatically along with massive increases in funding to. There's a lot more research is. There's a lot more research. Things are getting more competitive. The Prestige of your journal Becomes go away to sort of define your position in a market

Google Jack Golden Doctoral Fellow Computational Society Garfield Field Eugene Garfield Melbourne Australia Horton Researcher Scola Iraq Scully Nature Medicine Dougal Thomson Reuters Webb
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

"Wasted millions paying for parking garage cleaning that never happened according to new audits metros office of inspector general finds gold lapel pins worth more than eighty thousand dollars were simply sitting in a cabinet and mentor has no idea what other things it has on hand needs have disappeared or running away in garages metro extended a contractor's deal even after warnings they've left human feces and other messes and some contractors came to work for just five minutes of an eight hour shift the audit finds metro waste it least two million dollars plus had to spend over a million more on emergency clean ups and ongoing power washing it reinforces other audit findings of mattress failures to oversee contractors and matter headquarters makes math Nunes meanwhile the Mexico City Subway system is dealing with its own problem of vast amounts of urination the so somehow urine is penetrating and corroding mechanisms inside the escalators that Kerry writers up from underground stations in fact a list published today on Tuesday cited as one of the top five causes of escalator breakdowns there a system manager says riders appear to be urinating on escalators at off peak hours Indian lightly used Dacians admitting quote even though it seems hard to believe ten forty two a national TV series about to showcase a local researcher on the cutting edge of science show features everyone from zoologist to engineers astronauts in codebreakers double features amazing selection of women within system such transportation Jones a post doctoral fellow in the center for nor science research at children's national she studies child brain development to understand certain diseases and how they manifest by understanding DNA and proteins that are involved as a woman of color Jones is serious about being a mentor and role model all is to not only influence but to show young girls that you could be in these positions to mission unstoppable episode featuring Jones airs Saturday on CBS at eleven AM Kristy king WTOP news changing tax codes in Maryland could generate two billion dollars by the end of this decade and a coalition of state unions and progressive Democrats say that's one way that the state can pay for educational reform there are a number of ways to raise the revenues needed for sweeping education reform according to a group of Maryland lawmakers like delegate Julie Pulak of its car and she says the bill sponsored by progressive Democrats will close loopholes that allow large multi state corporations to avoid paying their fair share and these bills will add collectively generate about three hundred and forty million dollars a year other bills would change the state tax code by restructuring tax rates the goal is to generate as much as two billion dollars by twenty thirty in order to help cover the cost of education reform plans outlined in the Kerr when commission recommendations Kate Ryan WTOP news just ahead here on sports capitals fans need some new hats tonight a big night for Alex over its units ten forty four register today for the twenty twenty Pacific operational science and technology conference for March ninth to the thirteenth in Honolulu Hawaii joined leaders from industry government and academia to examine the importance of partnership presence and military readiness to the peace and stability of the Indo.

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

"Metro bus ride is finally over workers at the cinder bad road bus garage in Lorton have been striking for nearly three months that's strike affected thousands of riders on more than a dozen bus routes mainly in Fairfax county today the bus union ratified an agreement letting workers go back to work tomorrow full bus service there won't be restored until early next week the United States and Russia are collaborating on arms control senior US and Russian diplomats met in Vienna Austria today for the latest session of their strategic security dialogue they discussed the size of nuclear stockpiles the threat of an arms race and the United States desire to include China in future arms control agreements and national TV series is about to showcase a local researcher on the cutting edge of science the show features everyone from zoologists two engineers astronauts and even codebreakers double features of amazing selection of women within system such as litigation Jones a post doctoral fellow in the center for nor science research at children's national she studies child brain development to understand certain diseases and how they manifest by understanding DNA and proteins that are involved as a woman of color Jones is serious about being a mentor and role model all is to not only influence but to show young girls that you could be in these positions to mission unstoppable episode featuring Jones airs Saturday on CBS at eleven AM Kristy king WTOP news construction crews are restoring a historic plantation awful Georgetown road in Rockville the turning it into a museum for abolitionist Josiah Henson whose autobiography inspired Harriet Beecher Stowe's uncle Tom's cabin Katie rector of the Montgomery parks foundation tells our news partners at NBC for the museum will highlight Henson's life from slavery to escaping to Canada will have a number of exhibits will have a clearer inside of a global life sciences as well Henson's life had a major impact on attitudes toward African Americans and slavery in the United States coming up and money news.

Kristy king doctoral fellow Canada NBC Montgomery parks foundation Katie rector Tom Harriet Beecher Stowe Josiah Henson Rockville Lorton CBS Jones researcher China Vienna Austria Russia United States
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

"A last minute demand to hold to jury selection and move his rape trial out of New York City they claim the intense media coverage has turned the case into a media and entertainment circus twenty four year old model Gigi Hadid was dismissed from the jury pool today as jurors were chosen for the case so far five jurors have been selected from about a hundred forty five potentials who were invited back for additional questioning have you heard about the TV series mission unstoppable its goal is to get girls interested in science and math I never really had a role model that showed me what a scientist looks like that looks like me the taste of chances after her first research project in college she was hooked and I was like I needed to be in a lab somewhere because of those experiences Jones is a post doctoral fellow in the center for neuroscience research at children's national and she mentors regularly one project kids love it is making lava lamps it teaches so many things you you're showing how water and oil do not mix and it's relatable because the main ingredient is oil water food coloring in Alka seltzer the mission unstoppable episode featuring Jones airs Saturday on CBS at eleven AM Kristy king WTOP news we'll talk about that new trade deal between the US Mexico and Canada after traffic and weather three thirty six I'm sure you've noticed winter is officially here yeah it's cold outside hi there W. T. O. P.'s John of the water here this time of year staying in is the place to be and with **** you'll have everything you need from next level TV internet packages and smart home.

New York City scientist Jones doctoral fellow Alka seltzer CBS US Mexico W. T. O. P. rape Gigi Hadid Kristy king Canada
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on WTOP

"Zoologist to engineers astronauts and even code breaker features of amazing selection of women within stem such transportation Jones a post doctoral fellow in the center for nor science research at children's national she studies child brain development to understand certain diseases and how they manifest by understanding DNA and proteins that are involved as a woman of color Jones is serious about being a mentor and role model all is to not only influence but to show young girls that you could be in these positions to mission unstoppable episode featuring Jones airs Saturday on CBS at eleven AM Kristy king WTOP news story we've been following since just a bit earlier this afternoon the FBI has arrested three men suspected of being members of a neo **** hate group authorities say they had lots of weapons and talked about traveling to that program rally in Richmond on Monday in anticipation of a possible race war The New York Times reports the men include a formal reservist in the Canadian Army one of the suspects is from Elkton Maryland the other one from Denton on the eastern shore they were taken into custody earlier today as part of a long running investigation into the group called the base just yesterday Virginia's governor Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency and announced a temporary ban on weapons on the grounds of the state capitol ahead of this rally we've got your forecast coming up and then the Senate approves a new north American trade deal it's two thirty seven a pass on all the same we have different perspectives on the best way forward but on issues that matter I'm a change we're more alike than we think.

Jones doctoral fellow CBS FBI Richmond The New York Times reservist Canadian Army Maryland Denton Virginia Ralph Northam Senate Kristy king
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"In terms of number of times people can donate all that is recommended nothing is required Dr Linda con is a post doctoral fellow in the department of pediatrics at the New York University school of medicine she studied assisted reproductive technologies we don't know much to be honest because these women are not followed these women provide eggs and in some states the records of their donations are supposed to be capped it is a state by state regulation and some states and not necessarily cap so there's really no way of tracing them there's no record of this and the woman medical record because his family having this done at a clinic that's not her normal place which you receive got caught you care and if we don't have enough the uniform electronic medical record system in this country those records that she donated may not be linked so there's really no way to trace these when I'm and there's no requirement that they be followed up in any systematic way there's not even a registry the centers for disease control and prevention started collecting data about donors only a couple of years ago but a lot of it is just the basics like height weight and age but a donor's health it's not investigated very much at all according to Dr Richard Paulson professor of reproductive medicine at the university of southern California and president of the American society of reproductive medicine egg donors by definition have to be young healthy women so their screen in the sense that we choose people who are already young and healthy so once you say that the further medical screening that is required beyond that is not really that expensive to a recipient couple the most important statistic about an egg donor may be her SAT score after windy chaff can professor of public health in obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University says it's a big business with no incentive to slow down there are many women and couples who are paying very large sums of money and getting donor egg is one which really we should call seller X. because they're not donations they are commodities for sale beginning eggs from somebody else is it important component of the process so there is every inducements to proceed full speed ahead the going rate for a donation is five to ten thousand dollars for a process that takes less than a month the woman will first have her cycle artificially stopped this will basically be put into artificial menopause including all the wonderful symptoms of menopause one might expect potential effects could include hot flashes vaginal dryness mood swings etcetera and then once a cycle stopped it gets we started by daily injections of stimulation drugs and as her over you're being stimulated she is being monitored by a transvaginal ultrasound to see how her ovaries are responding and.

Dr Linda con doctoral fellow professor Columbia University menopause New York University school of Dr Richard Paulson university of southern Califor president American society of reproducti professor of public health vaginal dryness ten thousand dollars
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hello everybody and welcome the cuts mean business on live radio host just McAdams thank you so much for joining me it's great to be back you're looking for a way to log in on a little bit of a hiatus and crazy busy and speaking of busy I just returned from global pet expo richer interview were not familiar is the biggest trade show impaired industry so I got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff all the latest and greatest in the pet industry and I was also involved my company put joy in a really cool process it was the pet care innovation prize which is put on by Purina active capital cultivation capital and they started out with a group of couple hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists in when I was down there in global Pat we got to go through a whole peace process and has a lot of fun and my guest today were one of the fire this man's neck contest with us and they were the founders of a company called animal Byram animal biome is really cool it's an innovative company that helps but is in layman's terms and let them explain a little better but improves the got healthy animals through Jack level data diagnostic tools in their pure remedies so the two founders of their with me today haven't really impressive backgrounds and I want to read you the bios the first is Holly gains and Holly isn't microbial ecologist and she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University she got a master's from scripts and institution of oceanography just got a PhD from UC Davis so Thanh of educational background she was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating animal farm she studied microbes in dogs and cats if you see Davis school veterinary medicine and the UC Davis. center and her co founder Cory Goodman is a data scientist who studied biology at the university of Montana also got a PhD and postdoc at UC Berkeley and she did that in evolutionary biology.

McAdams Pat Holly George Washington University UC Davis doctoral fellow UC Berkeley UC Davis. center co founder Cory Goodman scientist Purina Thanh Davis school university of Montana
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"You so much for joining me it's great to be back for what is rumored to log in on a little bit of a hiatus and crazy busy and speaking of busy I just returned from global pet expo which your interview were not familiar is the biggest trade show impaired industry so I got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff all the latest and greatest in the pet industry and I was also involved my company Popejoy in a really cool process it was the pet care innovation prize which is put on by Purina active capital cultivation capital and they started out with a group of couple hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists in when I was down there in global Pat we got to go through a whole peace process and has a lot of fun and my guest today were one of the fire produced runs in that contest with us and they were the founders of a company called animal Byram animal biome is really cool it's an innovative company that helps but is in layman's terms and let them explain a little better but improves the got healthy animals through Jack level data diagnostic tools in their pure remedies so the two founders of their with me today haven't really impressive backgrounds and I want to read you the bios the first is Holly unions and Holly isn't microbial ecologist and she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University she got a master's from scripts and institution of oceanography just got a PhD from UC Davis so Thanh of educational background she was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley. reading animal farm she studied microbes in dogs and cats if you see Davis school veterinary medicine and the UC Davis genome center and her co founder Cory Goodman is a data scientist who studied biology at the university of Montana also got a PhD and postdoc at UC Berkeley and she did that in evolutionary biology and did the insight data science fellowship so inexpressive couple of.

co founder university of Montana Davis school Berkeley. Thanh Purina UC Berkeley scientist Cory Goodman Popejoy UC Davis genome center doctoral fellow UC Davis George Washington University Holly Pat
Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

60-Second Science

01:27 min | 4 years ago

Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky Lou planet to is a critically acclaimed two thousand seventeen BBC documentary series about the world's oceans hosted by the great, David Attenborough. And it's now available on Netflix, which presents a unique opportunity. Shark researcher David Shiffman a post doctoral fellow at Simon Fraser university in Vancouver explains. This Sunday Monday and Tuesday, join us for synchronized viewing where everyone no matter where you are presses play on Netflix at the same time and follow along on Twitter with hash tag, blue planet chat as a team of ocean. Science and conservation experts watch the show some of us like me for the first time and provide our own running commentary where also happy to answer any questions that anyone has about ocean science or conservation issues as the series progresses. The live tweeting commences with the first episode of. Blue planet to at six PM eastern time on Sunday. December sixteenth followed by episodes, two and three four and five. Start at eight PM eastern on Monday six and seven beginning. Eight PM eastern on Tuesday for the full schedule. Go to hashtag blue planet chat on Twitter. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Twitter Netflix David Attenborough David Shiffman PM Simon Fraser University Doctoral Fellow BBC Vancouver Researcher Sixty Seconds