25 Burst results for "Doctoral Fellow"

Anti-Racist Science Education

Short Wave

03:39 min | 5 months ago

Anti-Racist Science Education

"All right today in the show. We're unsmiling what's not working in science education around representation and racism and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists esther kunle yes so thanks to esther. We went looking for k. Through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection of science and racial justice at all grade levels. And i want to start with. Let me see a fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education. And outreach vanderbilt okay. She's a black scientist. Helping out in science classrooms in tennessee. Among fifth graders at this one particular school she is a total rockstar to walk into a classroom. And they'll be like dr. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone you know know autographs thing. We lit up each others world. Our saying that let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth. Grade science classrooms like a real life. Miss frizzle okay. I'm not kidding. You she wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued. They run up to her on our like number my wife just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay she'll talk about how wrong. The tuskegee study was which is win. Scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment. Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protests. And they're speaking out and they're not having it they're not gonna they're not going to allow us to continue to destroy her and her point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and that curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take up an interest in science. I love it and if we can't do that then we are gonna lose on. And i think it's hard were minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the prisoners doing the science so that already kind of puts up a block of well. That's just what the old white main with crazy hairdo and so another thing. Let me see a does is named drop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about astrophysicist. Did eisler medical physicist hadean ecole green astronauts. Joseph akaba and jeanette epps. She designed paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history right. It's also helping. Students see themselves as scientists and for gretchen craig. Turner the next teacher. I want to introduce you to this. Level of engagement becomes even more important as students get older and start to get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah to be critical of it. Oh yeah that was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either. I don't remember a lot of writing or Opinions being part of science in fact it was very much i believe taught. The opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a

Esther Kunle Esther Tennessee Syphilis Joseph Akaba Jeanette Epps Gretchen Craig Turner
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"The researchers used a machine learning algorithm. That was originally developed to analyze distant galaxies to probe the mysterious phenomenon occurring deep within our own planet according to paper published on Thursday in science but that was Thursday. Any moons ago in June. So I guess this isn't this isn't that old. One of these enormous anomalies located deep under the I should have looked up how to say this marquesses. I'll just go with marquesses under the Marquess islands. has never been detected before while another structure beneath Hawaii was found to be much larger than previously estimated. Scientists led by Kim a seismologist and post doctoral fellow at the University of Maryland Fed seismic grams captured from hundreds of earthquakes that occurred between nineteen, ninety, two, thousand, and eighteen into an algorithm called sequencer. While seismological studies tend to focus on relatively small data sets of regional earthquake activity sequencer, aloud Kim and his colleagues to analyze seven thousand measurements earthquakes each with the magnitude of at least six point five that shook the subterranean world under the Pacific. Ocean. Within the past three decades. This study is very special because for the first time, we get to systematically look at such a large data set that actually covers more or less the entire Pacific basin Kim said in a call. Though scientists have previously mapped out structures deep inside the earth this study. Presents a rare opportunity to bring everything in together and try to explain it in a global context he noted. Earthquakes create seismic waves that traveled to Earth's interior where they become scattered and distorted by structures deep inside our planet. These warped patterns are captured in seismic grams, which are recordings of wave activity inside earth enabling seismologist to capture rare glimpses of earth inaccessible underworld. Maybe it is accessible though don't know. The team of focused on seismic grams produced by shear waves s waves. That travel along the boundary between Earth's color and the lower portion of the mantle that borders it. These waves are the slower secondary waves that follow the initial tremors made earthquakes which are called primary waves or p waves, and they generally produce clearer signals. We normally like to use s ways because they are larger in amplitude and the data is more or less clean because there is less wave traffic said Kim. In particular, the team looked for the shear waves diffraction along the core mantle boundary. Because it detracts along that surface. It is a great place to look for these tiny structures on top of the core Mantle Boundary Kim noted. When the shear waves hit these structures, they produce a type of echo like signature known as a post cursor. These echoes indicate the presence of anomalies deep inside. Earth called ultra low velocity zones or you lvs's which are dense patches on the cooler mental boundary..

Kim Marquess islands. doctoral fellow University of Maryland tremors Hawaii
Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

Short Wave

09:25 min | 10 months ago

Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

"All right today in the show were unscrewing what's not working in science education around representation and racism, and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists Esther Kunle yes. Thanks to Esther we went looking for K., through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection, of Science, and racial justice at all grade levels I want to start with. Let me see fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education and outreach at Vanderbilt. Okay. She's a black scientist. Out in science classrooms Tennessee in among fifth graders. At this one particular school, she is a total rockstar. So walk into a classroom and they'll be like. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone autographs today. We lit up each others world. Our say, let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth grade. Science classrooms like a real life. Miss Frizzle I'm not kidding you. She wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued they run up to our like remind wife we've. Just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom, let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay. She'll talk about how wrong the Tuskegee study was, which is winning scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup. Scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protest and they're speaking out on, they're not having it. They're not. They're not going to allow us to continue to destroy their and our point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and That curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take an interest in science I love, and if we can't do that, then we are GonNa lose them and I think it's hard for minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the Christmas doing the science. So that already unemployed simple block of well, that's just what the old white man with the crazy hairdo. and. So another thing let me see Ya does is namedrop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about a physicist did Eisler medical physicists had he and Ecole, green astronauts, Joseph Akaba, and genetic APPs. She designed a paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history, right? It's also helping students see themselves as scientists and for Gretchen Craig. Turner. The next teacher I, want to introduce you to. This level of engagement becomes even more important students get older and start to you know get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah. You know to be critical of it. Oh. Yeah. That was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either I don't remember a lot of writing or opinions being a part of science. In fact, it was very much I believe taught the opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a right answer Gretchen teaches. At Burlington Edison High. School. In Washington state she is white and her classroom to be as inclusive as possible and to reflect the diversity of the student body and in her first year of teaching a biotech class. This was back in two thousand, ten in English teacher gave her a copy of the book. The immortal life of Henrietta lacks was like you should teach the steer students. Yeah. So the history of the Hilo Cell Line Yep. So Henrietta, lacks cancer cells were used for years by scientists without her family's knowledge cells that. One. Of the most important cell lines in medical research, her case raises so many questions about patients, rights. Yep questions raised in this book. So Gretchen got a bunch of hardcover books for her class and we read it and. It shaped how I teach in tremendous ways because the students responded to it. So strongly, you know they were excited maybe not at first I still get a lot of Turner. This isn't an English class, right but but they got into it. So into it, it is a six week unit the book in a Science Class. STUDENTS DO SELL labs while they're reading and they journal to. Okay so they're jotting down notes on different themes like medical apartheid informed consent lab science, and at the end they write a big paper and also oftentimes in class, there will be students who who's own families have experienced medical apartheid in the. Effects of that and I think some of the students and see themselves in the story of the lacks family. The conversations become really personal and probing not. You know necessarily what you'd expect in science class but exactly what Gretchen is hoping for well I, think what you know many young people ultimately want from their teachers is to be seen into be heard. And so if the science curriculum. if they feel seen and heard through that curriculum, they're more invested. So when her students learn about genetic testing, Gretchen includes a film about the innocence project and they're a group that uses DNA testing to exonerate those who've been wrongfully imprisoned. And Gretchen has her students, write poetry and songs as kind of oaths to those wrongfully convicted my blood, my skin, my hair, all held the key to my freedom DNA. My eyes glazed over desperate for relief with a pain. I now understood my hand reaches for I. Don't Know How often you're around teenagers. But the. Teenagers of this just tremendous sense of justice and what is right you know, and so those conversations are often very passionate for students But it's also the world that they live in. Wow I mean kwong, there's so many things in here. That are so powerful in and I know there's a lot of science teacher who listened to shortwave who might want to incorporate racial justice in history into their teaching too I mean, where do they look well Gretchen and let me see a- had the same advice which is at teachers should fill in the gaps in their own racial understanding I learn about the history of science or their field, and that's exactly what the last teacher I spoke with is doing. Vigia satiety is a college professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and looking critically at her own field statistics has been hard painful work. You know I honestly I just feel like I'm I missed something that was really important to learn about my discipline and I'm I'm a little bit mad at myself for not being curious on my own to figure out the origins of things and she has been startled to realize the full extent to which modern statistics draws upon the work of you. Genesis Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ronald Fisher. Some of the most foundational tools and stem like the normal distribution curve were applied to support their racist and eugenicist theories tools that we. Use today, but we don't really stop to think about the people who created them and why they created them. So the is trying to stop to teach yourself where these came from, but to not rush the process with some slapdash curriculum, she wants to incorporate these historical into her classes with care I want to give it the space deserves and of course, and not not to feel like this awkward add on that people can optionally engage in in a way that centers the students Vigie like all the teachers I spoke with designs, her classes by asking herself who's being left behind with this material, and how can I bring them along? That's what can be gained from. And anti-racist science education I think all of us in our minds have been in or heard of course where the professor says look to the laugh looked the right. One of you won't be here at the end of this time or you know something horrible this should not ever be uttered in a classroom. I say look to your left to your right like I. Want you all to stay. I want you all the love my field as much as I. Love my field because there's so many interesting things you could do with it and we really could use your wonderful mind and our discipline. We could use your perspective and the things that you bring. So basically to change science, we have to change how we teach science. To fix the lab gotta fix the classroom.

Gretchen Craig Science Class Henrietta Esther Kunle Turner Vanderbilt Doctoral Fellow Scientist Tennessee Hilo Burlington Edison High Tuskegee Professor Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ro Washington Physicist Ecole
Costly refined coal subsidy is failing to achieve air pollution goals

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 11 months ago

Costly refined coal subsidy is failing to achieve air pollution goals

"Every year, the US government provides about a billion dollars in tax credits to companies that produce what's known as refined coal. It's chemically treated coal that when burned supposedly admits less than the pollution that can harm human health but there's a problem companies qualify for the tax credit using lab tests, which could differ dramatically from what's actually happening in the field at the power plants where the coal is burned. Brian pressed is a post doctoral fellow at a research nonprofit called resources for the future he studied the actual air pollution emitted when companies burn refined coal we look at actual field missions you know what's happening at the power plant and we're finding that the emission reductions fall far short of what the tax law says that they should be getting. What's more he says, the tax credit can make it profitable for. Some older power plants to keep burning coal for longer. So it may actually increase carbon pollution and worsen global warming. He says, it's a timely issue because the tax credit is set to expire at the end of twenty twenty one and is a immediate policy question about whether we're going to renew this or whether we should take the funds that would be used for this subsidy, and perhaps he's for a better purpose.

Brian United States Doctoral Fellow
Alaska's Salmon are Shrinking

60-Second Science

02:53 min | 11 months ago

Alaska's Salmon are Shrinking

"Year salmon come home to Alaska's frigid rivers to mate, lay their eggs and die. The. State Salmon runs are some of the biggest in the world but over the past few decades, those big salmon runs have featured ever smaller. Salmon. Talk to people up there has been fishing for a long time and they're definitely able to tell you that we just don't see those really large old salmon used to see Christa a post doctoral fellow at the University of Alaska Fairbanks oaken colleagues at the University of California Santa Cruz, and elsewhere analyzed records of fish size. Going back to the nineteen fifties they included data on some twelve point, five, million, salmon, each of which had. To be measured by someone from the Alaska Department of fish and game, and there's no question about it. Salmon have shrunk sockeye salmon today are two point one percent shorter than their ancestors chum salmon are two point four percent shorter and Coho or three point three percent shorter Chinook or king salmon showed the greatest declines at eight percent. That's an average difference of more than two inches in length. The study is in the journal Nature Communications. The researchers haven't nailed down the exact reasons behind this trend, but they're analysis suggests that climate change and competition with wild and hatchery raised salmon, both play a role. They also discovered that much of the change in body size is due to fish returning from the ocean at a younger age now than in the past. Oak, says fish could be returning earlier because they're reaching maturity faster for some reason or because the ocean has become a riskier place for older salmon to survive what could be happening is the That otherwise would have returned large old. Just making. Whatever the cause this size shift has massive ramifications for people and the Environment Oak and her team calculated that catching smaller fish may have already slashed the value of Alaska's Commercial Salmon Fisheries by twenty one percent. It's also likely reduced the food available to subsistence fishers, many of whom reliance stores of salmon to get them through the long harsh winter by as much as twenty six percent. On the ecological side, the researchers estimated that smaller fish sixteen percent fewer eggs, which could depress salmon populations in the future and the Salmon Bring Twenty eight percent fewer nutrients into the watersheds were they spun according to the study after they breed and die kirk actually fertilize. Freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems with these marine derived nutrients that are really important and that used by all kinds of animals like bears and songbirds even taking up into trees with no single factor to blame for shrinking salmon there's no fix says, but there are still plenty of fish in the sea they're just smaller than they used to be.

Alaska Alaska Department Of Fish University Of Alaska Fairbanks University Of California Santa Doctoral Fellow Environment Oak Nature Communications Christa Chinook OAK Kirk Younger Age
Understanding the COVID-19 Data Quality Problem with Sherri Rose

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Understanding the COVID-19 Data Quality Problem with Sherri Rose

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me. It is great to have a chance to chat with you. I'm looking forward to digging into your background and your research and The things you're doing related to cove it to help out there you know. Let's start at the beginning. How did you become interested in machine learning and in the intersection of that and Healthcare I always was very interested in science and mathematics and physics and I didn't really have a good sense of how you could use that to solve problems when I was going to college and it was during college that I was exposed to this summer. Program called the Summer Institute for training in biostatistics and it really sounded like what I was interested in which was bringing quantitative reasoning thinking to problems in health and public health and I realized very quickly that I needed more than my bachelor's degree in statistics in order to really solve a lot of those problems and I didn't actually get any training in machine. Learning in my bachelor's degree I graduated in two thousand five and the curriculum definitely did not include it at that point and so when I went to graduate school at UC Berkeley in biostatistics. That's where I saw. The the benefit of having really general frameworks in which solve problems. And that's when I started working on non parametric machine learning and having these kind of big picture ways to attack big problems in population health and that was for me. That's been both machine learning in non parametric models for prediction but also causal inference and the driver for me was really the ability to use these flexible tools to solve problems in in healthcare in medicine it must have been helpful having that. Undergrad in stats. It's it's been very helpful. Actually I actually started as a mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Major. And I did not feel very invigorated by the coursework there and I very room and I also was a little frustrated that I was often the only woman in the classes and it just it. There was a lot of reasons why didn't feel like the right fit for me. I ended up taking my second semester in college. Statistics course and I immediately saw how statistics could be used for solving lots of different problems and Engineering Ken as well but for me. The statistics was really how I saw bringing all my interests together. You mentioned non parametric machine learning. What is that? And how does that relate to Both the broader field as well as the healthcare field. If somebody talk about non parametric I mean it. In the very broad statistical sense a non parametric model is a larger model space. Where we're making many fewer assumptions and whereas with parametric models more standard parametric models. We might be making strict assumptions about the functional form the underlying unknown functional form of the data with non parametric. I WanNa really have a large model space. I have a much better opportunity to uncover the truth with my machine learning estimator so many like you're not assuming a normal distribution which has a couple of parameters and a standard deviation it could be anything definitely not definitely not that would be a limiting gumption in your work. Yeah absolutely and most of the data that I work with does not conform to those types of strict assumptions. Talk a little bit more about the scope of your research interests and where you apply machine learning. It sounds like you are interested. Both in the of the systematic issues the healthcare system with the relationships between the providers and the payers as well as clinical issues absolutely so in health services research were really interested in the whole broad scope of the healthcare system that includes cost quality access to providers and services and also health outcomes following care so that clinical piece comes into the health outcomes following care and some of the major areas that I've worked in intersect with the health spending aspects the financing aspects like mental health and Telemedicine and cardiovascular treatments. All of these things intersect within the system that relies on you know the the cost the quality the access to providers. So it's a really having a research program that encompasses both pieces of that can allow you to ask and answer questions in more integrated ways. It's difficult but I find that you if you understand those underlying systems and try and bring them into your work when you're looking at clinical work It can help you inform better answers and when you are looking at those kinds of questions are you primarily trying to understand or influence great questions so a lot of the work that I do. We're trying to understand some kind of phenomena in the system but influence yes in the sense that we're trying to inform policy so understanding the comparative effectiveness of multiple. Different types of treatments. I I would like to understand which treatments have better health outcomes but if we find a particular treatment has a very bad outcomes we want to inform policy to the FDA or to the relevant stakeholder in order to potentially have that treatment removed from market and we're talking towards the end of April Many of us have been some form of another of locked down due to co VID. Did you mentioned that? Your dog may start barking. He may He may my neighbor. Just I think my neighbor is finished cutting the grass. Now you know this. Is You know the Times but it sounds. Like your work intersects with Cova. Did as well. Can you talk about that intersection a little bit? Absolutely a large focus of my work because I'm so integrated in starting with the substantive problem in bringing either existing machine learning tools or developing new machine learning tools to answer those questions. It really there has to be the strong grounding data and the virus pandemic has really eliminated for a lot of people how much we need to care about data. And I I I mean we have misclassification. We have Missing nece in the types of data that we're collecting for Virus both for cases and mortality counts. And these are things that are very very common and most of the electronic health data that we use in the healthcare system where a lot of my work has focused on dealing with some of these types of issues. I mean we use billing claims we use Clinical Records Registry data an on and on and these data types were not designed for research. And so we need to be really aware of the issues in these types of of data and some of the newer forms of data like wearable implantable technology. That people have been very excited about measuring physical activity were now using the current virus pandemic of smartphone location data to try and understand how people are Social distancing with potentially with contact tracing and then digital types of data like Google search trends and twitter data which has been used for different types of research questions in the past now. Google is developing and has released this location. History website. Where they're showing out. Know how we can understand social distancing and so a lot of the data related work that. I've been focused on very relevant to the pandemic understanding our data sources and trying to bring rigorous flexible methods to them specifically. I had been working the last two years with my now former post-doctoral fellow an infectious disease expert myemma gender. Who's now faculty at Boston? Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. We had been looking at news media data. Cdc Data Electronic Health data. To understand the generalize ability of these data sources for both infectious disease and chronic disease. And now this become a very relevant the virus pandemic we had one of the conditions we've been studying was was flu like illnesses and understanding what electronic health data sources like billing claims an electronic health records what we can really understand from these data sources and we've seen people many people now start modeling making projections about cases and a death. Count's what we're going to start seeing next. Once people start. Having access to different types of electronic health resources is trying to use this data understand. You know to predict outcomes maybe to predict clinical courses were trying to causal inference which is even more difficult And it's very important that people understand the limitations of these data sources and so that's one of the things that we're working on and hopefully the the first paper from that work will be able to release in the next coming weeks but this is this is something that's relevant for the virus pandemic but has been a problem going back. Decades is using data. That people don't understand and that's been a at the forefront of my work is really making sure especially with the theme of one of the themes of this podcast machine learning a lot of people get very excited about machine learning and they throw a tool at data without understanding the data. And we're now in the midst of something where it's really crucial. That people do not do

Data Electronic Health Google Uc Berkeley Summer Institute Aerospace Engineering Major KEN Times Boston Cova FDA Twitter Children's Hospital Harvard Medical School
How Long Can the Coronavirus Last on Surfaces?

BrainStuff

07:20 min | 1 year ago

How Long Can the Coronavirus Last on Surfaces?

"Let's talk about how long viruses can live on surfaces because between all those door handles credit card keypads and even our own cell phones we interact with so many services daily. I mean even if you don't hand your phone over to everyone you meet. You probably put down on say a table that other people have touched. And that's a fact of life but some of what we colloquially called germs that is viruses bacteria and other microbes that can cause infections and our bodies. Some germs can survive on surfaces outside of our bodies long enough to spread from one person to another. There's unfortunately no hard and fast rule for how long viruses in general can live on surfaces part of the uncertainties because viruses are diverse and have variety of surface survival rates the type of surface and environmental temperature and humidity. All come into play too so which surfaces are safe to touch. And how often do we need to disinfect? Them but wait. Let's back up a step what are viruses and are they even alive in the first place things that we generally considered to be living have more or less standalone ability to eat grow and reproduce a single cell. Bacteria or fungi. Or even sell from your body can do all those things because they contain the genetic instructions to do so plus the enzymes to carry out those instructions but viruses. Don't they have the genetic instructions DNA or RNA? But they don't have the right enzymes to create the chemical reactions necessary for reproduction. Instead viruses need a host cell which can be bacteria fungi or a plant or animal including a human a virus will attack a host cell and released its genetic instructions which hijacked the host cell's enzymes to make new viruses. That's good for the virus but generally bad for the host without a host cell virus can't survive long term however it does have a short window of time during which it can stay functional in hopes of infecting a new host and attaching to a host cell. Outside of a host viruses can either stay intact and remain infectious or they can degrade to the point that they're merely identifiable which means that you'll still be able to identify them from their genetic material but they won't be capable of seeking out an attacking host cells at the point that a virus on a surface is only identifiable. It won't be able to cause harm. The length of time that viruses can remain infectious on surfaces varies greatly there are baseline differences between viruses for example Rhino viruses. The viruses that are mostly responsible for the common cold will last for less than an hour on surfaces others such as norovirus which is a virus that can cause vomiting and diarrhea can last for weeks. Which is why. Norovirus can easily spread both through infected people and through contaminated foods and surfaces. There are several types of corona viruses. Most cause mild symptoms and are responsible along with rhinovirus is for the common cold but three types are known for causing more serious diseases. Moore's SARS and cove nineteen and because the corona virus that causes cove in nineteen is novel. The research into how long it can last on surfaces is new and ongoing a study published online on March Thirteenth of two thousand twenty by researchers at the National Institutes of health the US Centers for Disease Control and prevention and multiple universities compared the novel corona virus with the Corona virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome. Or SARS this is the most closely related. Human Corona virus to cove in nineteen and was responsible for the two thousand three epidemic. This study which has not been peer reviewed as of this recording found that the two viruses have similar viability in the environment which is to say not a whole whole lot. Something between rhinovirus and norovirus. The study determined that novel Corona Virus Can remain infectious for up to three days on stainless steel and plastic surfaces but survival on other surfaces was lower just one day on cardboard and four hours on copper and it was lowest at all in the air just up to three hours but keep in mind. Numbers are the maximum for the viability of the virus viruses. Start to degrade pretty immediately. When they're not an host the longer they're in the air or on a surface exponentially fewer of them will remain infectious. And if your immune system is working okay a lot of individual viruses need to get into your body either via your bucase membranes like your eyes nose mouth or via cuts in your skin in order for you to get infected. That's why direct person to person contact stilled easiest way for Corona virus to spread. And why everyone's telling you to wash your hands before touching your face. It's also why we don't have more precise numbers for how long corona virus or any virus for that matter. No matter how long they've been studied can last on surfaces. We spoke by email with Dr Alicia. Cray post doctoral fellow in epidemiology at emory university she said generally survival of pathogens on FEMME LIGHTS. Which are objects or materials likely to carry? Infection is determined by inoculating a surface with a known quantity virus and then sampling at various time intervals to determine the amount recovered. Scientists uses information to estimate a decay curve for the pathogen on the particular surface which can be extrapolated to longer time intervals the NIH and CDC team that studied surface variation for corona virus is still researching. They're looking into corona virus viability from snot versus phlegm versus poop as well as in varying environmental conditions because although viruses have differing baseline rates of survival on surfaces additional factors affect their ability to endure outside of a host like temperature humidity and properties of the surface itself. Cray said in general viruses survived longest at lower temperatures higher humidity and on non porous surfaces like stainless steel. However some viruses do well at low humidity. There have been a lot of theories about whether corona virus will lessen during warmer months because dry cold air like in the winter tends to provide favorable conditions for flu transmission. But we simply don't know yet. Dr Anthony Fosse Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explained during the March Thirteenth Twenty twenty CNN facebook global corona virus. Townhall that when considering the viability of a virus on various substances it's probably measured in a couple of hours while he recommends wiping down surfaces like doorknobs and cell phone screens. When you can. He cautioned against worrying about things like money and mail and the end despite the differences in viability on surfaces among pathogens fo- MITES and contexts. The number one recommendation for preventing the spread of viruses is standard. If you've touched a shared surface wash your hands before you touch your face or any part of your body that might have a cut or other skin abrasion. The human skin is great. If keeping out cold and flu viruses a thanks to its PH porous nature. They survived for only about twenty minutes on our hands.

Norovirus Sars Cray Us Centers For Disease Control National Institute Of Allergy FLU Vomiting National Institutes Of Health Dr Alicia Moore NIH Emory University CNN Dr Anthony Fosse Respiratory Syndrome Doctoral Fellow Director
Jake Goldenfein on Google Scholar

Good Code

06:48 min | 1 year ago

Jake Goldenfein on Google Scholar

"Our guest today is Jack Golden Fine. He's a post doctoral fellow slow at the digital life initiative and he's originally from Melbourne Australia. He's research looks law in Computational Society including including the impact of platforms on user behavior. He's most recent piece of research. Looks at Google scholar. A relatively new free web search engine that indexes scholarly work in which has quickly become central to academic life just like other Google services have in other disciplines. I sat down with him just before the holidays and I began by asking him to explain what Google scholar is for the non scholars among us. And why it's become so important Horton. In recent years Google Scola emerged in two thousand and full when it was first launched it was just an academic search. Such engines are just like Google that ordinary such engine accepted return. Scholarly results how it defines something as scholarly has always been a little a bit vague. And maybe we'll talk more about why the Vagary of that is a bit problematic but the idea was it would return results that were relevant for scholars. Looking King Faculty make work since then. It's had a few more features added that perhaps beyond set actually more important or have had a bigger effect on the academic field in two thousand and six you able to stop saying citation counts associated with particular scholarly documents and then three years later. Two two thousand eleven google Google scholar launched sort of citation platform and what they did was give each racer. A profile like scholar profile filed outlined oleo publications and the citation counts of those publications calculations of academic quality or the quality of eraser. Sure premised on the amount of citations their publications getting over particular number of us. Silly amount the number of times other researchers will quote from your research search in their own research. Exactly it's the number of times that An article a document that you ride is referred to by other researches. It's pretty new right. You said it it started in two thousand and four so less than I mean a little over ten years. How how big is it now in the field? It do every researchers look at it when they're working on a new topic or so I would say. Almost every researcher would be familiar with it when Dougal scholars such sort of emerged on the sane librarians. This who Training young racers will always telling them be very wary of this because we sort of don't understand how it works as well as we understand. How other academic search search engines wet? It's also interesting. Because most academic search engines are quite disciplinary specific and they all they return results to a particular the corpus or repertoire of journals whereas Google scholar is disciplined agnostic a returns results across disciplines irritations results from academic journals but also other kinds of publications and whereas in traditional academic search engines. You have quite a lot of control over. What what you're searching for in Google scholar you have relatively limited control you can you can constrain the dates? But that's kind of more or less it. So it's always occupied had a bit of a funny position in research toolkit but it's increasingly a used because we're getting a lot more sort of disciplinary environments where people are interested in finding out information outside of their discipline and so google scholar becomes sort of fest port of coal in that kind of instance. But the thing that we're finding is maybe the big use of Google scholar is it's it's citation counting function it's bibliometric function on because what Google Scuola represents his really the easiest way to say. How many citations a particular research has received how come like what? Where did you get those metrics before? and and why were they less easy to find. People who are metrics have been around for a long time in the fifties those information scientists named using Garfield field. Who developed this process of citation analysis? Way You could effectively automate the organization. That is the indexing of scholarly work Iraq by its references so libraries with struggling with how to organize exploding amount of scientific and scholarly literature. And they will. Also you're thinking about how to to use computers to do that. The problem with during that is the sort of need to figure out a way to define the subject matter of of a publication in a way that a computer can understand and Eugene Garfield came up with a really clever way of doing that which is to look at references. Organiz it by the references rather than the actual actual content. This idea was really successful. It was really useful research tool but it also became clear quite early on that counting. Citations could give you a really Sort of rough guide to the quality of work because it gave you a measure of its reception in the field. It didn't tell you how people were trading but a told you people were rating in had some some sort of visibility. So through the sixties and seventies this eventually turned into a commercial product and in the nineties that was purchased by Thomson Reuters Webb of science over the last couple of decades has been probably the primary tool to get metric information but it's number one. The product was General Impact Factor in journal impact factor measured the number of citations to articles in particular journal. Over set a number of years. This citation analysis was used primarily for evaluating the quality of channels rather than the quality of individual researches now individual researchers started added to organize their own sort of scholarly prestige around the prestigious journal. Yeah so if you publish a nature medicine for example for a doctor it's not the same mm-hmm as in a local journal. That might be great but less has left citations nationally. Exactly so what we see during the seventies eighties nineties his citation starting to do lots of interesting things. We started to see journals effectively set their price according to the number of citations that were getting individual scholars. Who now were in this more competitive scully? Well because you know in the second half of the twentieth century the number of scholars in Christ raced dramatically along with massive increases in funding to. There's a lot more research is. There's a lot more research. Things are getting more competitive. The Prestige of your journal Becomes go away to sort of define your position in a market

Google Jack Golden Doctoral Fellow Computational Society Garfield Field Eugene Garfield Melbourne Australia Horton Researcher Scola Iraq Scully Nature Medicine Dougal Thomson Reuters Webb
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"But would you mind starting out by telling us a little bit about yourself? Sure. Yes. So I studied psychology is an undergraduate though was also very interested in philosophy. And then went to graduate school in experimental psychology at university of Illinois in graduate school. I was mostly interested in studying how people learn new skills and habits than when I finished my in nineteen ninety five I've moved to Stanford to become a post doctoral fellow there that was right around the time that functional MRI which is the brain imaging techniques that I write about in the book was sort of becoming a prominent it'd been. Invented around nineteen ninety two. And so only a few centers were doing at Stanford was one of them, and I didn't actually go there with the intention of doing functional Mariah research, but I kind of got sucked into it. And so ended up spending four years there as opposed dog since then moved on and had several faculty positions. I was Harvard Medical School minute UCLA, and then at university of Texas and about five years ago, moved back to Stanford my interest in neuro science researcher, primarily around how it is that we make decisions and choices and particularly how we exert control over those choices consort grew out of my interest in habits because habits are so hard to control some of the work that we're doing is really trying to understand your what's the nature of self control. What are the brain systems that are involved in different aspects of self control? And then we also have some sort of basic science interest in what we call brain connectivity. Basically, how different parts of the brain communicate with one another in people what we can learn about that from brain. Imaging and how that connectivity changes over time. My lab also has a number people working on tools and methods to help people improve their nurses research..

Stanford Harvard Medical School university of Illinois doctoral fellow Mariah UCLA university of Texas researcher five years four years
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"So now, yes. How do you? How does one do this for a living? Like who who'd employs you? So right now. Yeah, I work for the government of Canada a post doctoral fellow which is a way of saying that I'm kind of a late stage. Intern is the last way to do it. So I'm qualified to be a research. Scientists and qualified to do the science that I do, but I don't have my own lab. I don't have my own space yet to work out of. So I still work with mentors who have that lab space who have a little bit more expertise than me and more experience working in the field. So they're still teaching me things, but it's usually in a different manner. So now, they're teaching me how to get funding teaching me how to manage the lab how to manage students because you have to train PHD students master students and people they're gonna be the next generation of scientists. So a lot of my training now is not necessarily just about learning. You know, how these contaminants behave in bears it's about how to manage lab. And how to how to be more effective scientists too. So. We also a lot of the lot of the work is done through the government in Canada. And that's why we are able to do a lot of the things we do because we prioritize it funding for a lot of Alaskan research, for example. Now, there is some money from from the US government. But a lot of it comes from different sources. So the academics universities there, get the my themselves. And then they team with us often. And we do research over in Alaska and the same thing can happens in Russia because sometimes we can get money to do research over there to compare with ours. Even though it's not our country. So again, there's a lot of. I don't know. I guess a lot of disproportionate work that goes on. But it's okay because we're really trying to again cover off the much as we can. And and and you know, do much work with the end not just for interest. But again for the people live up there too. And you mentioned start the show that I've been trying to get on. And you were told me off the air that you'd switch jobs. So you working for a new employer? You'll have a new assignment or what's it looking like? Yeah. So right now, again, I'm a front line kind of research. Again, we get like polar bear fat Liber muscles ampoules. We process them in the lab a measure a lot of contaminants in the myla measure also measured things they tell me about what that polar bears eating. I can I can track back. The age again, the diet of the animal, and then relate that the contaminant concentrations on a day-to-day basis. So we're gonna write papers I participated what we call the primary literature. That's like again, you're rewriting scientific journal articles that are going out there with the first reports data. So we find a new contaminant and a polar bear we read about it. And it becomes a journal article. The new job is more of a will be more of an overseeing kind of -sition where I'm still heavily involved in a lot of the research in the Arctic. But thought he really management job is still being environmental science job. But it's would mean that I'm working with all different researchers studying everything from fish in plankton. All the way up to pull the bears across the entire Canadian Arctic in helping them coordinate their work with communities they work in. And then making sure that data is put into the databases where we can use it for bigger kind of approaches the problems, so knowing for example, like the one contaminant is building up in one small food chain around the Hudson vein blueberries is interesting, but we also want to know what the bigger picture of all the polar bears in candidate. Is this new job kinda give me an opportunity to explore those bigger picture questions? But I will no longer be in the frontline scientists again like processing that liver sampler that fat sample in the lab. So yeah, it's a really cool opportunity. And it just so happens that again certain positions of opened up at the right time..

Canada Intern doctoral fellow Alaska US Arctic scientific journal Russia
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin young. It's here and now how do death babies? Learn the thinking has always been infants overcompensate for their lack of hearing skills with increased visual skills. But that may not be true. A new study from the Ohio State University finds that deaf babies take longer to process visual stimuli than hearing babies and it happens early. Dr Clermont, ROY is a post doctoral fellow of auto Laron. Golly. Gee, that's the study of ear nose in throat at the Ohio State university's Wexner medical center. She's also the co author of the study, Dr monroy, welcome. Thank you. This isn't a negative finding this is just a new and different finding what is the finding. So what we found is that young infants in the first year of life who are deaf take longer to habituate to visual stimuli has no auditory component at all. It takes them longer to process and encode information. That's. Purely visual. Yeah. So you did what you had babies looking at a screen at images. Yeah. So we had a little baby sitting on their parents lap, and they would look at a novel objects. So just an animated completely made up thing that looked something kind of like, and then when babies get bored with something when they've looked at it long enough that they've encoded everything there is to encode they will look away we then will get their attention back and show them the same again, and we continue to do this until their rate of decline in how long they're willing to look reaches a certain threshold in the not amount of time is what we call the habituation criterion. Right. And you found that deaf. Infants were looking longer could it be that they're just more curious that's one possibility that's actually part of an ongoing debate. And we did take a close look at the data and see whether it could be the case. But all of our our analyses all converge in showing. They really seem to be taking longer most likely because they're processing this information more. Slowly, do I understand that children with hearing loss? They will learn simple words cat, five far sooner than abstract words. Go things like that. But does that even out over time? So that's complicated. For deaf babies. They're kind of trajectory of language development is very different. And it also really depends on so many factors fun. How long the period of deafness before they got some kind of access to sound like from a hearing aid or cookware implant, and what kind of input that they get from their parents and from the environment. That's one of the challenges is understanding all of that variability, and how that has implications for how they're going to learn. And when what else would you say to parents mean, I'll give infants time with things, but how else would they or doctors or teachers use what you've learned? I think that this particular research study really opens up more questions than it necessarily answers. So I it's kind of a starting point where we found this this new evidence showing differences in cognitive development from early infancy was something that you know, we didn't know before. And so what are the underlying mechanisms driving those differences? And what does that mean for future research? That's Dr Clermont, ROY co author of a recent study on deaf children in their ability to learn she's also a post doctoral fellow of auto Laron Galeotti study of ear nose and throat at the Ohio State University.

doctoral fellow Ohio State University Robin young Dr monroy ROY co Wexner medical center
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Ologies

"PS we now have blackshirts available science Goths. And thank you to everyone who subscribes rates and leaves a review, which you know, I read I read them creep in this week's fresh review is from number one coup. Stan who says this is the science podcast, my soul. His craved since birth. They say it's an intoxicating blend of funny and mind-bending Lee strange ten out of ten would recommend to any person Eldredge being mythological creature gaping board of existential horror all of the above right here. Okay. Feeling -nology? It comes from the Latin for cat feeless. And I started to go down this whole rabbit hole. Toll catacomb, I'm sorry. Whether or not Felicity like, feeless and happiness and feline shared an analogy. And from what I found they don't at all. But I did have a galaxy brain moment realizing that Felix the cat is because of feline like a done ever got that also pocket knowledge for your next bar trivia slaughter a group of cats can be referred to as cloudier or better yet a glaring. So I hope that helps you somewhere in your life. But it's taken me seventy episodes to cover feeling -nology because I just wanted to get the best person for the job. Boy. Howdy. Did I she? She is a post doctoral fellow in animal behaviour in the school of veterinary medicine in the university of California Davis studying kittens, Neo Natal, tiny kittens, and she got her bachelor's in psychology. And then she got a PHD at Cal Berkeley in animal, cognition, and she's co-authored various papers, for example, cat play a review of its development functions and future research considerations, and beyond bossy, feline, status aggression. So she's also the co author alongside animal planet's, my cat from hell host Jackson galaxy of the book, total cat, Mojo the ultimate guide to life with your cat woman wrote the book on cats, and if you deconstruct her last name phonetically, it sounds like of the cat in Spanish, I mean, come on. Okay. So I went to her home outside of Davis, California over the holidays petted, her cat first off, and then we chatted about cata toots litter boxes how to keep your BFF. From sitting on your face at three in the morning. Cats on.

doctoral fellow Davis Stan university of California Davis Cal Berkeley California Felicity Eldredge Felix Neo Natal Lee Jackson
Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

60-Second Science

01:27 min | 2 years ago

Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky Lou planet to is a critically acclaimed two thousand seventeen BBC documentary series about the world's oceans hosted by the great, David Attenborough. And it's now available on Netflix, which presents a unique opportunity. Shark researcher David Shiffman a post doctoral fellow at Simon Fraser university in Vancouver explains. This Sunday Monday and Tuesday, join us for synchronized viewing where everyone no matter where you are presses play on Netflix at the same time and follow along on Twitter with hash tag, blue planet chat as a team of ocean. Science and conservation experts watch the show some of us like me for the first time and provide our own running commentary where also happy to answer any questions that anyone has about ocean science or conservation issues as the series progresses. The live tweeting commences with the first episode of. Blue planet to at six PM eastern time on Sunday. December sixteenth followed by episodes, two and three four and five. Start at eight PM eastern on Monday six and seven beginning. Eight PM eastern on Tuesday for the full schedule. Go to hashtag blue planet chat on Twitter. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Twitter Netflix David Attenborough David Shiffman PM Simon Fraser University Doctoral Fellow BBC Vancouver Researcher Sixty Seconds
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"To pets mean business on live radio and hosting mcadams. Thank you so much for joining me. It's great to be back. You're like it's been way too long on a little bit of a hiatus and crazy, busy and speaking busy. I just returned from global paddock's, bro. Which any of you were not familiar is the biggest trade show in the pet industry. So you got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff all latest and greatest in the pet industry. And I was also involved in my company puck joy in a really cool process. It was the pet care innovation prize, which is put on by Purina, active, capital and cultivation capital. And they started out with group of a couple hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists, and when I was down there and global pet. We got to go through a whole pitch process and has a lot of fun and my guest today. We're one of the five percents in that contest with us, and they were the founders. Of a company called animal bio animal. Biomass is really cool. It's an innovative company that helps put this in layman's terms, and let them expert a little better, but improves the gut health for animals through genetic level, data diagnostic, tools and therapeutic remedies. So that you found with me today have really impressive backgrounds, and I wanna read you their bios. The first is Holly GAN's and Holly is microbial ecologist. And she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University. She's got a masters from scripts and institution of oceanography just got a PHD from UC Davis so ton of educational background. She was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating animal by and she studied microbes in dogs and cats UC Davis school veterinary medicine and the UC Davis genome center, and her co founder car Goodman is a data. Scientist who studied biology at the university of Montana also got a PHD and post doc at UC Berkeley. And she did that. Biology and.

UC Berkeley UC Davis genome center UC Davis school UC Davis doctoral fellow Holly GAN Purina university of Montana George Washington University Goodman Scientist co founder
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hello, everybody. And welcome. The pets mean business on live radio host mcadams. Thank you so much for joining me. Excuse me back. You're like it's been way too long been on a little bit of a hiatus and crazy, busy and speaking of busy. I just returned from global pedic's, bro. Which were not familiar is the biggest trade industry. So he got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff all latest and greatest in the pattern stry and was also involved who my company puck joy in a really cool process. It was the pet care innovation prize, which is put on by Purina, active, capital and cultivation capital. And they started out with group of a couple of hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists, and when it was down there and global pet we've got to go through a whole pitch process and has a lot of fun and my guest today. We're one of the five participants in the contest with us, and they were the founders of companies. Called animal bio bio is really cool. It's an innovative company that helps put this in layman's terms, and let them expert a little better, but improves the gut health of animals through genetic level, data diagnostic, tools and therapeutic remedies. So the two pounders with me today have really impressive backgrounds, and I wanna reconsider bios. So the first is Holly Guineans and Holly is microbial ecologist. And she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University. She's got a masters from scripts and institution of oceanography just got a PHD from UC Davis so ton of educational background. She was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating animal by she studied microbes in dogs and cats at UC Davis school veterinary medicine and the UC Davis genome center, and her co founder car Goodman is a data. Scientist who studied biology of the university of Montana also got a PHD and post doc at UC Berkeley. And she did that. In evolutionary biology and did the insight data.

UC Berkeley UC Davis genome center doctoral fellow UC Davis school mcadams UC Davis Holly Guineans Purina university of Montana George Washington University Goodman Scientist pedic co founder
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Speaking of busy. I just returned from global paddock's, bow which any of you were not familiar is the biggest trade show in the pet industry. So we got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff all latest and greatest in the pet industry. And I was also involved who my company puck joy in a really cool process. It was the pet care innovation prize, which is put on by Purina, active, capital and cultivation capital. And they started out with grip of a couple of hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists, and when it was down there and global pet. We got to go through a whole pitch process and has a lot of fun and my guest today. We're one of the five participants in that contest with us. And they were the founders of a company called animal bio bio is really cool. It's an innovative company that helps put this in layman's terms, and let them a little better, but improves the gut health of animals through genetic level, data diagnostic, tools and. Therapeutic remedies. So that you with me today have really impressive backgrounds, and I want to read you their bios. So the first is Holly GAN's and Holly is microbial ecologist. And she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University. She's got a masters from scripts and institution of oceanography just got a PHD from UC Davis so ton of educational background. She was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley. Prior to creating animal biology studied microbes in dogs and cats at UC Davis school veterinary medicine and the UC Davis genome center, and her co founder car Goodman is a data. Scientist who studied biology at university of Montana. Also got a PHD and post doc at UC Berkeley. And she did that in evolutionary biology and did the.

UC Berkeley Holly GAN UC Davis genome center UC Davis UC Davis school doctoral fellow Purina George Washington University Scientist university of Montana Goodman co founder
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"NGO strength, jollies custody census is found in Central America including Wata. Malla. Humans are incidental hosts that can become infected by consuming intermediate or transport hosts, such as snails slugs freshwater crabs or shrimp. Unveiling the RN a world, a clinical implications of basic research article by Judy Lieberman from Boston children's hospital, the twenty eighteen Lasker coche, lend special achievement award in medical science, announced September. Eleventh recognizes Joan Steitz, who has made pioneering contributions to the understanding of RNA biology and as a woman scientist has led the way as a role model and strong advocate for removing the barriers to welcoming and advancing women and minorities into the scientific community states began her scientific training when there were few women scientists not long after the discovery of the central dogma of molecular biology. The central dogma posits that DNA provides the coating information for genes which are trying. -scribed into messenger, Aren ace that are then translated by rival films into proteins as a post doctoral fellow and young faculty member Steitz identified. The messenger Aren a sequences that ripe assumes recognized to begin translation and found that the recognition of the start site relies on base pairing between sequence constraints sections of DNA located close to the start code on and a complementary sequence in the Rivasseau Aren a Steitz played a key role in uncovering many functions of small non coding RNA's as well as the key steps needed to process their primary transcripts into functioning components of the RNA machinery. She also uncovered the role of small non coding Aren as in promoting viral. Lifecycles the insights of Steitz pioneering. Studies that revealed the small Aren a world and how it functions are just now beginning to be translated into new classes of therapeutics..

Joan Steitz RNA biology Central America Steitz Wata Judy Lieberman Lasker doctoral fellow Boston scientist faculty member
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Live radio host Adams. Thank you so much for joining me. Excuse me back. You're like it's been way too long been on a little bit of a hiatus and crazy, busy and speaking of busy. I just returned from Lomo pedic's, bro. Which any of? You were not familiar is the biggest trade show in the pet industry. So he got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff all the way to some greatest in the pet industry. And it was also involved in my company pup joy in a really cool process. It was the pet care innovation prize, which is put on by Purina, active, capital and cultivation capital. And they started out with group of a couple of hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists, and when I was down there in global pet. We got to go through a whole pitch process and has a lot of fun and my guest today. We're one of the five participants in the contest with us. And they were the founders of company called animal bio animal. Biomass is really cool. It's an innovative company that helps put this in layman's terms, and let them explain it a little better, but improves the gut health of animals through genetic level. Data diagnostic, tools and therapeutic remedies. So the two founders of their too with me today have really impressive backgrounds, and I want to read you their bios. The first is Holly Ganz and Holly is microbial ecologist. And she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University. She's got a master's from scripts and institution of oceanography just got a PHD from UC Davis so ton of educational background. She was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating animal by she studied microbes in dogs and cats at UC Davis school that medicine and the UC Davis genome center, and her co founder car Goodman is a data. Scientist who studied biology at the university of Montana. Also got a PHD and post doc at UC Berkeley. And she.

UC Berkeley UC Davis genome center UC Davis school UC Davis Adams doctoral fellow Holly Ganz Purina university of Montana George Washington University Goodman Scientist co founder
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Mean business on live radio host testing. Mcadams thank you so much for joining. Me it's great to be back to Hong been on a little bit of a hiatus and crazy busy and speaking of, busy I just returned from global pedic's. Bro which any of you were not familiar is the biggest trade show in the pet. Industry so I got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff always greatest in the pet industry and also involved in my company puck, joy and a really cool. Process it was the pet care innovation, prize which is put on by Purina active capital and cultivation. Capital and they started out with grip of a couple hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five. Finalists and when it was down there and global, pet we got to go through a whole pitch process and has a lot of fun and my guest, today we're one of the five participants in that contest with, us and they are the founders of company called animal. Bio animal biomass is really. Cool it's an Innovative company that helps in layman's terms and let them explain it a little better, but improves the gut, health of animals through genetic level, data. Diagnostic tools and therapeutic remedies so the two of their to with me today have really. Impressive backgrounds and I want to read you their bios the first is Holly and Holly microbial ecologist and she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington, University she's got a masters. From scripts in institution of oceanography just, got a PHD from UC Davis so ton of educational background. She was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating animal by studied microbes in. Dogs and cats at UC Davis school veterinary medicine, and the UC Davis genome center and her co founder car Goodman is a data scientist who studied biology, at the university of Montana also got a PHD and post, doc at UC Berkeley and she did that in biology. And did the insight data. Science fellowship So impressive couple of guests so we'll. Be.

UC Berkeley UC Davis UC Davis school UC Davis genome center Holly Mcadams doctoral fellow Purina Hong university of Montana Goodman scientist George Washington co founder
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hello everybody welcome the pets mean business. On live radio host mcadams thank you so much for joining me It's great to be back through long been, on. A little bit of a hiatus and crazy busy speaking of busy are just. Returned from global pedic's bro which interview were not familiar is the biggest trade show in the pet industry so you got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff. Always ingredients in the pet industry and, was also involved who I company Popejoy and a really cool. Process it was the pet care innovation prize which is put on by Purina actor capital and cultivation capital. And they started out with a group of a, couple hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists and when it was down there in global pet, we got to go through a whole pitch process and has, a lot of fun and my guest today we're one. Of the five participants in. The contest with us and they were the founders of company called animal bio animal biomass is really, cool it's an innovative company that helps put this. In, layman's terms. And let them explain a little better but improves. The gut health animals through genetic level Data diagnostic tools and therapeutic remedies so that. You with me today have really impressive backgrounds and I wanna read jitter, bios so the first is Holly fans and Holly microbial ecologist and she's got a undergraduate degree from George. Washington University she's got a masters from, scripts in institution of oceanography just got a PHD from UC. Davis so ton of educational background she was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating. Animal by she studied microbes in dogs and cats, UC Davis school veterinary medicine and the UC Davis genome center and her co founder car Goodman is a, data scientist who studied biology at the university of Montana also, got a PHD and post doc at UC Berkeley and. She did that in evolutionary. Biology and did the insight data science fellowship so impressive couple of guests so we'll be right back, to chat with in Holly right after these messages.

UC Berkeley UC Davis genome center UC Davis school doctoral fellow Holly UC Popejoy university of Montana Davis Washington University Goodman scientist co founder
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Shoot by that point this was in the late nineteen seventies okay it was and yeah so it was but it was very unique group of people who were studying very curious disorders that other people hadn't made much headway with and we were we were taking sort of novel approaches so it was a bit for a young student it was a bit like being in a candy shop i mean we got to work on these amazing disorders with amazing people and and patients and we were just really exploring the early days when i came back to that work a few years later i wanted to work in alzheimer's disease i joined i went back to the nimh as a post doctoral fellow and had an opportunity to join a group of people who were really we were really kind of inventing things as we went along to try to work out what was going on in the brains of these people and this was the early days of a brain imaging and and what we would now call experimental pharmacology and trying to use drugs as probes to try to understand what what was working and wasn't working in the brain and i think we made a lot of headway it's it's changed a lot a lot of the drugs maybe some of the ones that you worked on things that were designed for alzheimer's or specific diseases are now being at least considered as cognitive enhancing agents in healthy brains does that scare the heck out of you are you happy to see that it well it doesn't scare me i think that we have yet to really establish that drugs can enhance normal human performance cognitive performance one of the things that i've studied over the years is ways to impair people's performance and then look at how that changes.

doctoral fellow alzheimer alzheimer's disease
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"In the country and we could we could also say including the minnesota the second one is historical drivers like redlining from nineteen thirty to nineteen gi bill of nineteen forty four contribute to sort of like wealth suppression for black americans the third lesson is the country will not make headway on clothes in the wealth gaps until we start to debunk the myth once we puncture these mess i think we can start to focus on a real solutions that might be able to help close the gap okay and my my fourth fourth lesson i think take away from it i think solutions you know for closing the gaps do exist and i know we're gonna we're gonna talk about those later in the show but there's a there's a lesson here that however folk folks in solely on just changing the behavior african americans will will not work what can work would be to greatly build up and protect the wealth of of black yes so tell us a little bit just in like about one or two minutes a little bit about your background like you're a native of minneapolis okay yep yep i grew up grew up in north minneapolis went to school and saint paul in new york and now i'm i'm a post doctoral fellow at an applied economics at cornell university and so i mean my my experience in minnesota definitely shaped this is my my my ability to want to my appetite for one until offer scholarship as a way to in improve understanding and and solution helps shape solutions on some of the some of the biggest issues that we face in in the country and particularly in areas of household financial status and asset asset accumulation well being a native of minneapolis you're probably aware minnesota in general we're almost at the bottom of the list in terms of almost every disparity category were almost the worst or second worse you know whatever category if we look at homeownership if we look at you know test scores if we look at any number of things here in minnesota for some reason which seems very surprising because you know i'm a native of south carolina and you know basically i came here and you know work in a corporation like so many black transplants and it's the culture is very different it's very different here than what's in the south.

minnesota minneapolis new york doctoral fellow cornell university south carolina two minutes
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Science Friday

"That's possible as he's rise beaches we'll have to move landward with a waterline however we aren't sure which beaches will be inherent inherently capable of that migration and furthermore existing infrastructure could brooke block the migration of the beach depending on how coastlines are managed so nourishment are one way of attempting to maintain beaches in the face of seal rise so tell us what what you need to study at what we better need to understand about this whole practice yeah nourishment they're still really under studied in terms of the sandoval lucien their ability to mitigate flooding erosion under varying conditions and their influence on water tables and ecosystems no we believe that as these projects are implemented it only makes sense to monitor them to try and learn as we go with the hope that we can provide information to help coaster coastal communities better prepare for their future thank you for taking time to be with us today thanks so much ramming ca post doctoral fellow at the scripts oceanographic institute at that that's at uc san diego after the break how to construct a message to intelligent beings elsewhere in the universe if they exist and whether sending focused advertisements have our location is even a good idea do we want them to know let we're here you know what what could happen afraid now he's ethical considering the risks we'll talk about it after the break talking to he t stay with us we'll be right back support for this science friday podcast comes from draper draper prides itself on its ability to leverage decades of engineering experience in positioning navigation and timing microsystems biomedical solutions and beyond to deliver innovative solutions to complex problems whether it's putting a man on the moon or developing lifesaving diagnostic tools amazing things are possible when you combine the expertise of engineers biologists developers physicists and astronauts to take on the world's biggest challenges learn more at draper dot com.

sandoval doctoral fellow draper draper scripts oceanographic institut san diego
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on Science Friday

"Because every story has a flip side now beach sand go to the beach you know it comes and it goes it's literally washed away by tides and win sometimes faster than the waves can pilot backup so it is common for coastal engineers to try to replace the lost sand with sand scraped from offshore elsewhere where though sand gets deposited it's a process cold nourishment but does a work study appearing in the journal coastal engineering asked this very question looking at four beaches in california and while the researchers found that beach nourishment has helped keep some california beaches sand filled in the face of some challenging times there are some downsides to bunny look is a post doctoral fellow at the scripts oceanographic institute at uc san diego will come to science friday i had to be here thanks for having me your welcome so what are we learning you for sure about the benefits of adding sand to beaches yeah we'll the story just changes depending on what nourishment you're looking at but the few that we studied here in southern california there were some that were built with larger than native sand grains and those maintained relatively wide beaches for many years even during a big wave el nino winter so they they helped protect the the back beach from rozhin erosion and flooding from wave overtopping and promoted tourism so it really depends on the size of the sand grain was crucial yes we compared that behavior to nourishment that was built with sand with native grain sizes which washed off shore in one moderate storm months after it was placed that said the that sand was stored in a large offshore bar and some of it return to the beach the following summer but if you're trying to make the beach wider than the coarser grains were more successful in some sense when we talk about nourishing i love that phrase nourishing beach.

coastal engineering california doctoral fellow san diego
"doctoral fellow" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"doctoral fellow" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Cartels all the corrupt government officials and the police can't even get police anymore because they're all if you're if you're a good person you joined the police you end up debt there's a piece out from the i think this was the frederick news post as an associated press piece originally i think far more us teens than previously thought ardour transgender or identify themselves using other nontraditional gender terms with many rejecting the idea that girl and boy are the only options new research suggests where do you think they get that idea just came to him forty or do you think they all television navy all are school school school lectures gender neutral policies that are cancelling dances i can tell you growing up in glastonbury connecticut i'd never heard of transgender never heard of it at all never once heard of it never knew anybody who thought they were transgender and now all these years later we're told that everything's everything's normal everything's a same no difference there's not two genders and dan the culture reinforces that idea the kids then get it in their minds and so uh young young man who was creative or you know likes you know likes design has suddenly a will maybe i'm transgender i don't know if that happens or not but i think it's really interesting that we have reporting that indicates that more young people are describing themselves as non gender conforming divers gender identities are more prevalent than people would expect said the lead author of the study a university of minnesota post doctoral fellow who studies transgender health that's a really narrow field of study yeah okay the study looked at students and ninth and eleven th grade an estimated that nearly three percent are transgender or gender nonconforming meaning they don't always self identify as the sex they were assigned at birth that includes kids who referred to themselves using neutral pronouns like them instead of he or she where.

connecticut doctoral fellow frederick news glastonbury minnesota three percent