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"doctor fritz" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

The Dr. Susan Block Show

08:52 min | Last month

"doctor fritz" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

"Heard that phrase before and if it involves sex or Kink I call it the erotic theater of the mind. A and yes theater can be therapeutic. About a century ago Dr Magnus Hirschfeld purchased Avila. That became his institute in why Marlboro in which was very liberal. Kind of like San Francisco of Germany and it. How's his immense sex library that was later burned by the Nazis? Those film reels you see of Nazis burning books. They're burning sex books and it's from the doctor. Magnus Hirschfeld Library and he provided educational services medical consultations and featured theatrical presentations on various fetishes and fantasies and orientations and they were attended by people his patients as well as students and other faculty and artists like Christopher Isherwood. Who wrote I am a camera which was the basis of cabaret and W H Auden the great British American poet and then there were such venerated theater therapy techniques as psycho drama based on Dr Jacob. Moreno's theater of spontaneity doctor. Fritz Pearls gestalt therapy theatrical union archetypal dramatization Dr Marshall Rosenberg's system of non violent communication. Very Bonobo peace through pleasure and Michelle from Co of course science of sexuality as well as the famous Aristoteles Ian View of theater which is is not just a form of entertainment. It's or it should be a means to understanding the problems in life whether these are sex problems your sex problems or other problems political problems religious problems cultural problems human problems and it's very old theater is therapy really ancient. Greek tragedies and comedies not to mention They're very theatrical Olympics and other athletic contests they were filled with sex and love and romance and fantasy and desire and you can still enjoy all that stuff with Greek mythology that in some ways. It's better than porn at least for the erotic fear of the mind. I mean it's so old you could even say the first human fertility dances were some form of erotic theater therapy and they were certainly immersive theatre because you definitely have audience participation. You don't just have the dancers dancing in the audience just sitting there like this. No the audience is involved at least a call and response kind of way or maybe more maybe an audience member is brought up to be deified and hopefully not sacrificed. But yeah that happened to A little later. So we're going to talk more about all kinds of immersive theatre therapy here on my bedside shot or the corona apocalypse so cuddle up to your computer screen now and immerse yourself and there's sunshine and maybe we could get what we have here. Oh someone said Daddy Susan. I was hoping you understand that. Well he probably means titty. I would think more tatty and since I'm just fooling around with my bra a lot And that sort of thing I would guess he means Titi but maybe he's from I. I don't know Belgium or something. And he says tatty so or he could be typing too fast right. When you're excited you type so right okay. Well Anyway. And so Lord Titi Titi here pity and no nipple because Martha can handle that Tom on live to. Oh someone's on the phone okay so Tom Are you there Tom? Tom Welcome to my bedside shot. What do you WanNa talk with me about? Arctic question. Yes I wanted to know why why man might like to watch his wife other men because the cuckold fetish is one of the most popular common fetishes. There is really I mean I think whenever a man watches regular porn which is between a woman he desires and a man who's got her he's basically being cuckolded and I have this whole theory of the biological nature of it which is the sperm wars theory. Which can it's kind of the the idea that there's another man that sperm from another team that could get into your woman wife girlfriend drives your sperm to come up in your shaft and just it just. It sends a message speaking of the brain. We're talking about the brain as being the most powerful Sexual Oregon so when perceive whether you're correct or not and whether you're jealous or not whether you're happy about it or not. Your brain sends a message to your testicles. That says there's another team on the football field much we gotta make more sperm now right just because just because like you were just because I was on this because you really what I was really turn turn down the words. I didn't feel great about it right. Well that's because our society basically denigrates any form of mixing and matching all be monogamous. You're supposed to be faithful So you feel bad about it and I'm here to tell you that you shouldn't feel bad about it. I'm here to tell you that maybe you shouldn't tell everybody about it. Just because everybody is not going to be as cool as me and understanding and sunshine. But you know you you don't you. Shouldn't you shouldn't shouldn't feel bad about it unless you enjoy feeling bad and a spanking and go ahead and feel bad but you know all things being equal. You really shouldn't feel bad about it because it's incredibly common and lots of guys but don't let your bad feelings. Overtake your good feelings. And if that starts to happen then you really should stop so we acted on it right. Yeah what what if we.

Lord Titi Titi Tom Dr Magnus Hirschfeld Magnus Hirschfeld Library Dr Marshall Rosenberg Marlboro San Francisco Michelle Dr Jacob Christopher Isherwood Avila Olympics Germany Moreno Daddy Susan Arctic Oregon football
"doctor fritz" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:14 min | 2 months ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"It's been one of those days today R. O. Monday look Monday Monday Monday Monday Monday Monday Monday I want you all to join us for our virtual network mixer and all you got to do is sign up now I need you to rush inside out go to the Debbie okay Facebook page the day going to have it up dance you minutes ed yeah I go to the my Facebook page they click the link I'll get just put your name email address I believe in there and you get signed up you'll be given a link so that you can we try to get his own Facebook page so you can just go there but in the meantime we need you to sign up are we going to have several businesses they're going to talk about how the business has been impacted how you can support them in all of that is going to be going on out virtual next network makes six we don't get better at doing needs I will go one last night also marked resumes don't don't don't it was great ludicrous was on TI was all young hero doctor Fritz president Clark Atlanta university topped the seals president of a lot of technical college assisted dnia graduating senior International Studies over at Clark and Eldridge Spelman college we had a gradual graduate but the Marlboro over at George's state and there were a representative from Georgia tech as well hosted by Shania Rucker Chavis records for the catalog to give a big shout out to friends tell hold on a month on a friend or sister from way back from which he was cancel late when I was on the city council fifteen years ago was a phenomenal organized she did a phenomenal job last night and it doesn't look at take a quick break we'll come back for a few minutes it will get straight out the technical issue and of top the line real quick because the movie jumping off the at four forty five five o'clock one up we'll be back don't go to places too much troops with their clothes meant a news Intel's thirteen eighty W. A. okay you want answers.

president Clark Atlanta university Clark Marlboro George representative Intel Debbie Facebook doctor Fritz Eldridge Spelman college Georgia Shania Rucker Chavis
"doctor fritz" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:07 min | 6 months ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Air with Jim Marrs high yeah hello I'm Robert calling from Tennessee yes Sir yeah I want to know what your against out about about degree your last well you just missed that one I just I just said well I've been on the phone calling we just talked about okay his comment was that doctor Greer like Richard Hoagland are but they're both doing good work but they're not getting the proper coverage from the American media that's his comment one dash you one thing are you member when he said that no no he is free and had their house or apartment burned down there a lot of that was overstated doctor Greer yes we you interviewed somebody that was some kind of a jet pilot I did I can't say I can't think of the labor again his name he flew a cyber get yes aha and he said he was threatened yes you do did you ever as doctor Greer about that no well no not other than the fact that doctor Greer said that as far as you know no new nobody had been threatened so that stopped that question cold so I didn't proceed with that west of the Rockies you're on the air with Jim Marrs good morning I can barely hear you there Sir hi art hello a call from beta island the old the Big Island of Hawaii right all right so talking about benevolent or non billable benevolent aliens you know every time we shoot up a rocket were heard may ozone layer so those puppies are coming down here in the store and the heck out of our ozone layer and that's not too benevolent it it will if they are indeed harming the ozone layer we there's no way I don't think they know for certain that just passing through the ozone layer because of that amount of problems it's our jets with their exhaust decisions after fluorocarbons up into the hills on the skills of the problem how far that sounded good keep going all right thank you very much I'll tell you it's of course off into the land of conjecture but if there were others and if they could travel and if they are watching us and if you conclude that much is possible then at the moment we begin to invent atomic energy at the moment we have the ability to launch vehicles off our own planet it seems to me the level of interest would increase our absolutely absolutely in fact let me find this real quick this is gonna boring world certainly blew me away this is and keep in mind this is not an absolute certainty but according to major key hello who as I stated in an research came to have a kind of a grudging admiration for he says that in nineteen forty six a doctor Fritz wiki participated in a secret army ordinance process project to bombard the moon Mars another planet with projectiles launched on V. two rockets in nineteen forty six so the idea was they would place these things on top of the two's fire V. two up as far as we go and then basically like a second stage in this thing on out into space with a warhead on it to create an explosion on the moon or Mars and on Venus other planets in our astronomers then would look at this and from the side of circulation and and density and everything of these explosions they could hopefully learn more about the planet well that's great for the other planets and then a year later all the UFO show up all right Jim did you spend one more hour hang on all right one more.

Robert Tennessee Jim Marrs
"doctor fritz" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Hey skip, what's the first one Mary, the mother of marine really appreciated? The interview with the lady who took whole accosts survivors to Poland. It made great sense to her that they also took young Israeli soldiers agree, Mary. That was a great event. A great idea and Tim an army vet like the comparison of police, and the military he'd never thought of the similarities before, Tim, we sheepdogs do a lot in common don't we? Okay. Now it's time to honor a wonderful vet who's no longer with us. Godfried Arman, Fritz FRA deli was born on June twenty-sixth nineteen seventeen in Wisconsin. At a home that was located above the families cheese factory at eighteen his height and rode the rails to Colorado, Wyoming and California. He worked at two different dairies and she's manufacturing companies Fritz enlisted in the army nineteen thirty nine was assigned to the horse, artillery, a sergeant at the end of his two year. Hitch Fritz shortly thereafter, joined up for the army air corps and officer convinced them to apply for office candidate school. He was commissioned a second Lieutenant in nineteen forty three. Fritz was assigned to three hundred sixty third field. Artillery, battalion in the ninety six hundred division has a Ford observer his unit deployed to the Pacific and was in the fifth wave in the invasion of lay. Then Fritz went in the second wave on Okinawa there. He was shot through the neck by Japanese sniper. He lay on a stretcher on the beach for three days, stable totally paralyzed from the neck down before being placed on a hospital ship. Fritz was admitted to Letterman army hospital San Francisco after seven months he was able to walk again. He was medically. Discharged October nineteen forty five with a hundred percent this ability he's not he Forty-six enrolled in the university of Wisconsin and earned a degree in dairy science. He married. Helen Brad field on September seventeenth nineteen forty nine then moved to Tampico Mexico where we started a dairy business. They had four sons there to lend him, sixty two when the business was federalized returned to the US restarted their lives, Senator. Tonio Texas three of his four sons went into the military with ROTC commissions before soon became a medical doctor Fritz lived, the rich and rewarding life until his death on December twenty second two thousand four Colonel. He really gave a lot to his country didn't he he did. While I can't even imagine some of that. Well, it's military history time skipped lead out, bro. On seventeen June seventeen seventy five British general William how landed his troops on the Charleston peninsula, overlooking Boston, Massachusetts and lead them against breed's hill, a fortified American position, just below Bunker Hill as the British advanced in columns, American, general William Prescott reportedly told his men don't one of you fire until you see the whites of their eyes when the Redcoats where within forty yards the Americans let loose with a lethal barrage of musket fire throwing a British into retreat after reforming his lines, how attacked again with much the same result Prescott men were now low on emulating though. And when how led his men up the hill for a third time they reached the redoubts and engaged the Americans in hand to hand combat the outnumbered Americans were forced to retreat, the.

Fritz Fritz FRA Mary Letterman army hospital San Fr Poland Godfried Arman army air corps William Prescott Tim Bunker Hill Wisconsin university of Wisconsin ROTC Helen Brad Charleston peninsula US Tampico Mexico Tonio Texas Boston Massachusetts
"doctor fritz" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Affect any kind of budgetary restrictions that you've put on does that stretch things at all the department? Time over time becomes clearly becomes an issue and fuel consumption becomes an issue. And in that case, do you have to try to stretch out a little bit more. Do you? Does it affect your daily operations? No. For not not yet. Because as I said month of November and December we're pretty good. We had heart behead any overtime. So January was kind of average. So I think not February we are kind of eating up the at budgeted dollars for November and December. So depending on what happens in March. We may be okay Waukesha department of public works director doctor Fritz body talking with their own twenty about their snow removal operations. I'm sure they're added this morning and will be possibly this weekend is another batch of snow could be headed our way time. Now for news about your money. Here is bred Ellen with the WTMJ, Drake and associates market update. Sponsored by numale medical center. Discover the new walkies number one US stocks rose yesterday after President Trump hinted once again, he may push back. A key trade deadline the Dow Jones industrial average increased eight points with WalMart is one of the best performing stocks in the index the S and P five hundred gained point one five. Sent as the materials sector outperformed and the NASDAQ composite closed point two percent higher as Amazon, and Netflix expose rose. More than one percent. President Trump said yesterday that trade talks with China or going well, both countries have until March to come up with a deal, otherwise additional US tariffs on Chinese products. Could take a fact President Trump did suggest last week Carver he may be willing to push back. The deadline in corporate news shares of WalMart rose more than two percent yesterday. After the company reported better than expected earnings. The retailer also said e commerce sales grew by forty three percent in the previous quarter for Drake and associates. I and Brad L and financial advisor for NewsRadio. WTMJ we all love giving gifts.

President Trump WalMart US Drake President numale medical center Waukesha doctor Fritz department of public Brad L Ellen Carver advisor Amazon director Netflix China two percent
"doctor fritz" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

09:24 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"Dr Eric Fritz, he's the head of veterans for smart power in. Michigan smart power is about the wise. Use of our nation's political and military power welcomed the frontlines of freedom. Doctor Fritz, thank you very much pleasure to be here. I'm actually a member of the veterans for smart power, but not their leader. But I'm very proud to have any number of veterans here that it worked with the US global leadership coalition to bring into play for the work that US global leadership coalition does. All right. Thank you. Eric, eric. I know that you're a veteran. So we just take some time. Tell us about your military service. Twenty years active duty and reserve in the United States navy actually commissioned at the university of Michigan back in the eighties. I deployed for Gulf war one then also deployed twice more post nine eleven of the last time was to eight I deployed attached to the US army's core in Baghdad Iraq for your which was quitting ways. And one's career. I assure you. I got a long number of experiences with countries across the world through the navy. And then as I came back and shifted into the reserves. I also started to get back into academia. So I've done a second bachelor's degree to more masters degrees, and then it will PHD psychology education. So I currently at university of Michigan. But I also devoted a lot of my spare time to volunteer efforts around veterans of the veterans community action team for reaching nine which is a six county Michigan where we try and coordinate. The efforts of everyone who's helping veterans of those counties men a number of other areas. So I try to be very active across the veterans space. But what do you do with all of this spare time that you have Eric? The boys but go get with a page out. It's great. I think really though, it's great. I mean, I think as we learn in in the military that service to others is is really a tremendously powerful thing, but realizing your full potential getting a sense of purpose and living a really happy lives. So I found that once I retired from the military. I really missed that feeling of belonging tribe. And so I've tried to recreate that with several different volunteer groups and also I just find it staying active with veterans and doing things like working with the US Boba leadership coalition there. Smart power just away to other veterans and scrape feeling now veterans for smart power. You know, that's a part of the US leadership coalition start out by telling us about the leadership coalition. Sure, the US global leadership coalition is basically a a large assemblage of individuals who believe strongly that the sort of soft power component of US political involvement is so critically important to both augment and protect us in the military portion of it because it'd be thinking, you know, the military and war is sort of politics by other means the best part, you know, anybody who's in the military will tell you the best part is really that. She did you don't have to if you're really doing your job. You don't go to war. Right. You don't want that? That's the worst case scenario. It's far better to solve those problems diplomatically to get that influence in a political sense coalition building through service through the types of work that the US Chelsea tends to support global leadership coalition basically works together to influence lawmakers to provide them information to advocate on the behalf of the budgets for things. Like USA IT. Basically all these projects where US influence is projected at a non-military way in a very positive way that reflects so well on the nation. It has this sort of outside the sex based on the dollar for dollar much better to have a guy building a bridge that a guy, you know, blowing up a bridge. Absolutely. Well, this marine vet skip Correll in frontlines of freedom. And we're discussing the smart use of power with Eric Fritz? Okay. Well, now, Eric a what does veterans for smart power do? So a loose coalition of veterans that have been selected supervised by US TLC. So we this is sort of a volunteer auxiliary perhaps so veterans who Tilbury strongly about the vision of yours. And so we would assist them pretty much any way that they could come up with for us to be productive. So we will go along on visits to legislators. We will participate in round tables and other events where the mission of USES's, aligns whatever's going on there. So for us to get our voice it and play in a way that helps the vestige of the of the leadership Bush. That's what we do. So it can be anybody for me like a retiree with younger student veterans. We have it'd be at nightmare. Veterans anybody who wants to be involved in that process and contribute their stories. So that they can sort of put the face because if you're talking to a legislator, and there's the US there that there's someone like me, for example, it was actually in Iraq actually, saw some of the effects of kind of the software. Interventions I can speak to that at a very visceral way. And I think that's helpful. So Eric how exactly does that work? You know in a from a practical aspect of someone call you up and say, hey, we need Eric. We need you to go talk to you know, senators so and then. I would get a call from my friends to show honor. Danny there's any number of folks. And they would say, hey, we're going to go visit this legislator or we're going to visit. This person is campaigning to become a Senator, and we want to kind of get on their radar wanna make them aware of these issues, and sort of make sure they have the information that they need if they're ever exciting have to vote on legislation about this. I'm we want them to be aware. So I'm an advocacy kind of thing would participate in that sort of visit. So do you work, you know, at the state level or the national level, are you active in all fifty states? So the US is active across the nation. Absolutely. Obviously do actress some of their strongest working in DC point. That's a that's not anything, that's really might direct oversight. So my my involvement is really just with the local teams in all of my work had so far has been in the state of Michigan avenue that would be that way the future I've met entirely with US-based has representatives and senators or perspective members. Awesome, Eric how? How does it impact? Our interaction with our close allies are are clear enemies the rest of the world. Maybe even the Middle East. All of these countries were if you can have US investment that's showing up in a positive way. Then that can't help it be benefit. I was always struck you know, in Iraq. I was able to get involved with a small volunteer project that it wasn't directly funded by the State Department. But there were individuals who were sort of the Genesis of the idea that we're working in it down. And we were looking at trying to restart boy scouts and girl scouts electrical guys to call today. Wisconsin girl guides have been disestablished in Iraq under Saddam. But now that they were free of him. They wanted to restart this. There was a green zone council downtown Baghdad that was working on this. It'd be tried to help have tried to convoy down there and help them with it. But we got shot at it. And it was very logistically problematic. It was sort of like it was like this is a great effort. It's very doable. But this is about wise. And so then we realized maybe we should try to do something back closer to our basis over the next six to twelve months, we managed to convince that Iraqi special forces general, they gave us a portion of his base, and we were able to create a special area of is sort of an abandoned joke. Smooth it out like a five acre campus, the security wall and living quarters and a little a basketball court. Gym said, you know, we we got back out to create this sort of functioning camp, we were having weekly meetings where we'd have a hundred kits for the local areas or hundred Iraqi us boys and girls were coming in having this wonderful for our meetings with interacting with all of these US and coalition service members, and it was such a wonderful experience of this idea of how it was four hours out of the week could have this outside impact. I think of all those hundreds of children as as the years go forward with whatever anybody tells them about, you know, the war the US or whatever else at least they have all those hours too, though. They had a positive interaction right with sort of the face their America. And I thought that was wonderful. It sounds like you believe in that old adage an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Yeah. Well, that's really is. I mean, that's another way of sort of saying what's being talked about here because the budget for the initiative is such a tiny cracks less than one percent. I think the budget even for everything with the State Department and all these ages still for the actual things that we're really focusing on. It is a fraction of a percent benefit. You get from that is really outsized in terms of the US, and you can look at where we did best instability in different countries in the Middle East of show that you know, there's there's families tried to leave and trying to migrate there's murders and greater stability in those countries. What we when we invest they're? So it's such a good investment. Right. That's the big push. That UCSE makes is basically to make sure that folks come in and say, oh your budget's tight. We're gonna put a squeeze. Cut this unnecessary stuff. So let's just cut this budget and got really realizing that it's it's not that simple. You can cut that. And you're going to pay later. So right. Well, Erick there's more to discuss about the smart use of power, this is marine vet skip Corey Ellen frontlines of freedom troops. It's push up time. I want you to do one hundred and three push ups. That's how many the Colonel.

US Dr Eric Fritz Iraq Michigan Baghdad US army Middle East State Department university of Michigan Senator basketball Boba Correll Tilbury Wisconsin Erick Danny America Corey Ellen
"doctor fritz" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

09:25 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Dr Eric Fritz, he's the head of veterans for smart power in. Michigan smart power is about the wise. Use of our nation's political and military power welcomed the frontlines of freedom. Doctor Fritz, thank you very much pleasure to be here. I'm actually a member of the veterans for smart power, but not their leader. But I'm very proud to have any number of veterans here that it worked with the US global leadership coalition to bring veterans into play for the work that US global coalition does. All right. Thank you. Eric, eric. I know that you're a veteran. So we just take some time. Tell us about your military service. Sure. Well, I I served twenty years active duty and reserve in the United States navy actually commissioned at the university of Michigan back in the eighties. I deployed for Gulf war one. Then also deployed twice more post nine eleven. The last time was two thousand eight deployed attached to the US army's eighteenth therefore Baghdad Iraq for your which was credited to end one's career. I assure you. I've got a long number of experiences with countries across the world through the navy and that as I came back and shifted into the reserves. I also started to get back into academia. So I've done a second bachelor's degree to more masters degrees, and then it will PHD psychology education. So I currently teach fulltime at university of Michigan. But I also devote a lot of my spare time to volunteer efforts around veterans share of the veterans community action team region nine which is a six county fishing where we're trying to coordinate the efforts, so everyone who's helping veterans of those counties in a number of other areas. So I try to be very active across veterans face. But what do you do with all of this spare time that you have? Eric. Exactly. Poetry, but it should go. Get it with a page out. It's great. I think really though, it's great. I mean, I think as you learn in in the military that service to others is is really tremendously powerful thing in terms of realizing your full potential getting a sense of purpose and living a really happy lives. So I found that once I retired from the military. I really missed that feeling of belonging feeling of tribe. And so I've tried to recreate that with several different volunteer groups. And then also I just find it staying active with veterans and doing things like working with the US Boba leadership coalition, the smart way to and after the other veterans scrape feeling now veterans for smart power. You know, that's a part of the US leadership coalition. You're gonna start out by telling us about the leadership coalition coalition is basically a large assemblage. Oh, individuals who believe strongly that the sort of sock power component of US political involvement is so critically important to augment and protect us. In the military Porsche of because it'd be sort of, you know, the military in war is sort of politics by other means the best part, you know, anybody who's in the military will tell you the best part is really that. She that you don't have to you know, if you really doing your job, you don't go to war, right? You don't want that? That's the worst case scenario. It's far better to solve those problems diplomatically to get that influence in a political sense coalition building and through service through the types of work that the US Chelsea tends to support the global leadership coalition basically works together to influence lawmakers to provide information to advocate of the behalf of the budgets for things like USA ID. The State Department that basically all these projects where US influence is projected at a non-military way in a very positive way, the reflects so well on the nation has this sort of outside the sex based on the dollar for dollar which better to have a guy building a bridge that guy, you know, blowing up a rich absolutely this marine vet skipped coryell on frontlines of freedom. And we're discussing the smart use of power with Eric Fritz? Okay. Well, now, Eric a what does veterans for smart power do? So essentially, we're a loose coalition of veterans that have been selected sort of supervised by the US Chelsea. So we are is sort of a volunteer artillery, perhaps so veterans who feel very strongly about the Bishop ios TLC. And so we would assist them pretty much any way that they could come up with for us to be productive. So we will go along on visits to legislators we will participate in round tables and and other events where that mission of USGS's aligned with whatever's going on there. So if there's an opportunity for us to get our voice it and play in a way that helps the vestige of the of the global leadership Bush. That's what we do. Anybody from me liquor retiree with younger student veterans. We have Vietnamese veterans anybody who wants to be involved in that process and contribute their stories. So that they can sort of put the face 'cause if you're talking to a legislator, and there's the US Chelsea right there. Then there's someone like me, for example, it was actually in Iraq. And actually saw some of the effects of kind of the software interventions I can speak to that in a very visceral way. And I think that's helpful. So Eric how exactly does that work? You know in from practical aspect of someone call you up and say, hey, we need Eric. We need you to go talk to you know, senators so and. And then I would get a call from some of my friends show, Danny there's any number of folks. And they would say, hey, we're going to go visit this legislator. What we're going to go. Visit this person is campaigning to maybe become a Senator and we want to kind of get on their radar wanna make them aware of these issues. So make sure they have the information that they need if they're ever exciting to vote on somebody. Legislation about this. I'm we want them to be aware. So I'm sort of a an advocacy kind of thing participate in that sort of visit. So do you work at the state level are the national level? Are you active in all fifty states? So the US is active across the nation. Absolutely. Obviously, the actress some of their strongest working in DC at this point. That's a that's not anything, that's really my direct oversight. So my my involvement is really just with the local teams in all of my work had so far has been in the state of Michigan avenue that would be that way the future I've met entirely with US-based has representatives and senators or perspective members. Awesome, Eric, how does it impact? Our interaction with our close allies are are clear enemies the rest of the world. Maybe even the Middle East. All of these countries where you can have US investment that showing up in a positive way. Then that can't help it be benefit. I was always struck you know, in Iraq. I was able to get involved with a small volunteer project that wasn't directly funded by the State Department. But there were individuals who were sort of the Genesis of the idea we're working on it down in the green zone. And we were we were looking at trying to restart boy scouts and girl scouts actor girl guys to call it. So the boy scouts and girl guides the disadvantaged in Iraq under Saddam, but now that they were free of him. They wanted to restart this. There was a green zone council downtown Baghdad that was working on this. If you tried to help them try to convoy down there at help them with it. But we got shot at and it was right logistically, it was like it was like this is a great effort. It's very noble, but this is not wise. And so then we realize maybe we should try and do something back closer to our base is over the next six to twelve months, we managed to convince that Iraqi special general to give us a portion of his face, and we were able to create a smooth. An area of is sort of an abandoned junk area, we smooth it out at created like a five acre camp, the security wall and living quarters and a little a basketball court gym sets. And you know, we got. Back out to create this sort of functioning Campbell. We're having weekly meetings where we have a hundred kits for the local one hundred. Iraqi us boys and girls were coming in having these wonderful for our meetings with interacting with all of these u s and coalition service members, and it was such a wonderful experience of this idea of how it was just four hours out of the week could have outsized impact. And I think of all those hundreds of children as as the years go forward with whatever anybody tells them about, you know, the war the US or whatever else at least they have all those hours to know they had a positive interaction right with the the face their America. And I thought that was wonderful. It sounds like you believe in that old adage an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Yeah. Well, that's really is. I mean, that's another way of saying what's being talked about here. Because you're the the budget for these software initiatives is such a tiny fraction less than one percent. I think of the budget for everything with the State Department and all these ages stew for the actual thing that we're really focusing on. It is. A fraction of a percent. And then the benefit you get from that is really outside in terms of the US, and you can look at where we did best instability in different countries in the Middle East of show that you know, there's there's fewer families trying to leave. And you're trying to migrate. There's murders in greater stability in those countries. What weeks we invest they're? So it's such a good investment. Right. That's the big twist that USGS he makes his basically to make sure that folks come in and say, oh your budget's tight. We were gonna put a square cut this unnecessary stuff. So let's just cut this budget. And that really realizing that it's it's not that simple. You cut that you're gonna pay later. So right, right. Well, Erick there's more to discuss about the smart use of power, this is marine vet skip coryell in frontlines of freedom troops. It's push up time. I want you to do one hundred and three pushups, that's how many the Colonel does every single day,.

US Dr Eric Fritz Iraq State Department Michigan US army USGS Chelsea Baghdad Middle East coryell navy university of Michigan Senator Porsche basketball DC Boba
"doctor fritz" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

"Hello and welcome to table manners. With a slight twist. You probably can hear sirens in the background. Maybe the steam of a what they called it. The manholes we are in New York City, baby. Stop looking at me. Like a moment. I'm trying to make it for the solitaire's really weird. You sound like extra from Pretty Woman. Two. The beginning. Yeah. Well continue. But okay. Well, I was trying to make New York what better place to come the New York City where I've eaten many beautiful meal. Basically, thanks to Benko who we used to send me all around the restaurants in New Yorker, meet and eat and eat and everything would be panned. Forget about the song we writing it was about what where we were going to go for dinner, or what takeout get so have so many fun food memories of Neil. We've got some really exciting guests coming up on this series from different walks of life and professions. And I'm so intrigued to know what their favorite spots in New York are first up. We have the fantastic Zachary Quinto, yet can't wait to meet him. He's been on Broadway. He's been in films. She was in a film with my sister is how I got to know sacree, he was in the very very popular at heroes asylum, the serial killer, he's most famous for being the young Mr. spoke. Yes. Okay. Well, he's saying the new misled he's hugely. No his youngest book 'cause I've gone back in time. I didn't Trekkie I'm not. But, but that's what I know. He's famous for we have kindly been given the apartment of my friends who has lots of gadgets, and gizmos and tables and chairs so we've got one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven atolls and the massive teddy bear at least four pianos and about twenty keyboards, and no tables and chairs that's what teddy. What's the menu? Today. You very favorite my favorite chicken. Yes. Slight twist to put my slant on it. What's your slant? Mixed up the dried fruits rather than just prunes put as well. Fathy? Yep. With pesto rice lovely and a solid new made the dressing. Yeah. I've kind of done radiant doing accurate in my things at the moment. Mustard ash. Asche Dijon mustard wine vinegar oil salt and pepper, Honey. And then -alex who's been also flown over putting bay is here in New York breaking hearts left right and center you see partly having heartbreaking. Not sure he's made coke nut Macarena danton chocolate. He did just needs the far long. Okay. By trying to Mark wave melts. Doctor Fritz dip in and I was really worried who can have to evacuate this whole bills. Exactly couldn't take coming and take billions. Xactly contain. Thank you so much for being here for having me such dulcet tones why it's just fruity his voice freely. Yeah. I feel like you could have the voice that you could play King Live without voice. You know what? I mean that would be great love that Glenda Jackson's currently the anchor King Lear here New York. Your women. Yeah. Yes. Gee that she say. She's as ING choice in London. Go for it's a new production of different director samples. Here. Yes. To play mind wasn't the production. She didn't learn all women. Yeah. Okay. Is Sure. not all women. But there are other nontraditional other like, you know, women playing male roles, but the she's doing it here and there little young as well sounds. All the time..

New York City Zachary Quinto Glenda Jackson Benko Mr. Macarena danton Neil King Lear Doctor Fritz sacree director London
"doctor fritz" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on KNSS

"Now, it's time for money planning j and s s with Don and Justin Baxter Baxter and associates back stern associates time. Well, spent money well invested. Good morning folks is Don Baxter with the money planning along with Justin Baxter. Hey, hey, good morning. It's another Sunday. We're on the on the air. It's right. What's up, Justin? Well, you know, not a lot. We're back on a roll. Now, more or less act to the real world. Of course, we did go to Austin Austin, Texas that was a good time. It was a great time. And and a lot of good information there we? What are the processes we go through we help people with their planning of their portfolios and people say, well, what are you doing for your money? Well, on average we spend about fifty visits year with. Investment planners. Are are they representatives investment people? Fifty fifty meetings a year on average in Wichita, they come to see us, and then we're also invited to places like New York City, Austin, California. Newport, Denver to visit with Janice. Jazz Henderson jazz. Bought Henderson, by the way, if you're not familiar for particular company's name, it's very possible. They may have changed. I know they do that. We did we used to business. You know, Janice refunds Janice means they saw. Yeah. It's a mythological. Yeah. Maybe some something great. But Roman got to be faced is to have kind of a bilateral face one looking back in one looking forward. So it's the connotation of let's look at see what happened in the past. But also keep our eye on on the future. Yeah. And so you hear a lot of good information from these places and we formulate that to to try and help our clients to the best. We can. Yeah. And a lot of these. Fund managers or, you know, product sponsors right now, they, you know, they want to produce a lot of content to get out to advisors or people who are reading a lot about the the stock markets and what's happening in the global economy. A lot of the content. That's being pushed out right now is predictions for twenty nineteen which is kind of interesting. We heard a speaker. Mr. Fritz who was with Invesco. For years and years and years now, he's out consulting is only on CNBC and Bloomberg and another other ones. He had he has his list of things one of things. I thought was really interesting with his presentation, though, he he said one of the important things that we planners have to do for clients is control expectations. And so he made up a little slide forces real complicated. Once so say, you have a sixty forty portfolio, and if you have sixty percent in equity type investments and they're predicting a fairly slow growth for two thousand nineteen steady growth is slow growth. They're thinking so say you get eight percent total return on that. That portion that's in the market. And then you have the portion that's not in the market. Well today in the old days back when I started in a business interest rates were higher, and and bonds were paying a lot higher than you could even get a money market at one point paying eighteen percent. But today interest rates are very very low and most. Bond funds are producing zero to negative returns and some maybe slightly positive. So he has pie chart showing sixty percent of the portfolio making eight forty percents of the portfolio making zero and your average return on that four point eight, and that's you know, before expenses, even sure you know, and so. When people say, well, the market's up twelve percent, and I only was up eight you got you got to think about well was your we one hundred percent in the market as in the S and P five hundred which maybe large companies, and if you're not, and you shouldn't be then you're you can't look at that and say, well, that's what I should average. What you really do what we do. And we put together a portfolio for clients. And we we compare their existing portfolio to our proposed portfolio. We use the benchmarks that most. Match what they're actually investing in. So if it's if it's small companies were comparing small company at large companies, we apparently large companies, and that way, you get a more true benchmark to look at to compare to try and beat. Yeah. But what you gotta do is expect returns that are going to be more of a blended average of things to come. And it's funny too. Because. Mr. Fritz was saying he's probably a doctor probably say doctor Fritz, I dunno. Sure. But anyway, he was saying that modern portfolio is now picked up steam, again, it's kind of like Warren Buffett at times modern portfolio, which has been around since the fifties. But they couldn't they couldn't prove that that it worked until later on. Because the guy won a Nobel prize for ultimately. But it's been around since the fifties. Is probably your best approach for investing. And with that, you have a variety of things in your portfolio. And what that does it it it takes out the peaks. But it also takes out the valleys. What are we hearing in terms of twenty nineteen predictions? I mean every year we look at a lot of these, you know, experts so to speak, and they don't always get it. Right. A lot of times they'll they'll have very conservative projections for the year two thousand seventeen a lot of them did not predict what what would happen there. None of them really predicted what happened in twenty eighteen which is a negative return. Because what happened at the end of the year this year, we have, you know, equity strategist such as Morgan Stanley's, Mike Wilson who sees the S and P five hundred essentially going sideways and ending twenty nineteen at around twenty seven fifty. And on the bullish side. We have credit sweets as Jonathan Golub who sees multiple expansions sending the SNP to thirty three fifty. That's pretty. That would be on the aggressive side. The the end at the end of the day. We just don't know what's going to happen. And we can't necessarily time the market either. I mean, if we look at why market timing doesn't work. It's really it's not just an opinion. It's it's looking at the numbers. They've been trying to time the market since since before you and I were born Justin. Yeah. You know, the markets are over one hundred years old, and if anyone could ever figure out a fool proof plan to time the market, frankly, if it worked for a while won't work forever anyway, because the market would adjust to those new dynamics. Yep. But we've seen times when it's worked for a little bit. But I've never seen one. It's worked for more than a couple of one or two cycles. Yeah. And there are a couple reasons this can do real harm to a portfolio's value over time, and they are such as ad hoc market timing which involves selling when many others are selling or the market would be declining and prices are down as for buying. It involves reentering the market after others have piled back in and driven up the market price. So if you taken this to extremes, this can become sort of a buy sell low approach that's going to decimate your portfolio value over. Time. And if we look at for instance, investors who missed the return days, let's say they had a time where they said I've got to get out. I've got to move a large percentage of my portfolio. Let's say in decaf or or something, and then you miss those really high return days if we look at what happened on Christmas Eve, we saw a very low day a hard day for the markets. What happened on twelve twenty six the day after Christmas the markets were back on and it was a thousand point rally for the Dow so that, you know, we see that happen overtime help it happens over and over again having more. And invariably. And if you think it's not going to happen. That's when you you know, when when you don't think the market's going to go down in the key polling on that goes back to the theory of. Rebalancing and asset allocation modern portfolio theory having having a plan in place. To take advantage of games. Because if you take advantage of gains when the markets are at a high, which we did some of that in two thousand seventeen when the markets go low again, you have some dry powder to invest. But you know, no one knows the future. If we only knew we'd all be rich had that playbook that, you know, biff loss go back to the future. Yeah. That'd be great. Yeah. You could we can all be. We all be rich. Yeah. Well, an entering the an exiting the market both can involve transaction fees. And if it's taxable accounts, you could see taxable capital gains are generated as well. So you gotta be careful if you're one of those people that gets real sort of jumpy with the markets. There's also more sophisticated and deliberate market timing decisions. There are things like flexible allocation funds, which can sort of well be flexible in terms of how much equity versus fixed income they have inside the funds, but they've also done rather poorly. Yeah. If you look if you look at them over time, they have the. Very few times exceeded other benchmarks one of the things that you'll find that. Most your 4._0._1._K's is the some of the things they added recently is you'll have if you're you say you want to have a a target date from which moves to more and more conservative assets as you get closer to your age a retirement, also, you'll see allocation funds like you just mentioned flexible allocation funds that move try out guests the market to more conservative things as time marches on you know, market timing would be a worthwhile strategy if it outperformed a longer term strategy, but the evidence shows that this isn't the case there's been studies by multiple people. There's one by vanguard and that has analyzed the performance of both professional and individual investors who pursued market timing strategies and found that no group was able to outperform using market timing. We're coming up to a quick break on today's show, but stay tuned in some later segments. We're going to discuss more from the outlook of twenty nineteen. What is that going to look like what to focus on Ralph so going to discuss how interest rates affect the stock markets and also do government shutdowns affect the stock.

Justin Baxter Baxter doctor Fritz Don Baxter Janice Austin Austin Texas Warren Buffett Henderson Newport Nobel prize Roman Wichita Jonathan Golub New York City
"doctor fritz" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on Overdue

"You got that right. Make you got that right? Or is it Mickey? Is Michael Michael's his name because never? Well, the reason that it matters is because I think the street toughs name might be Mikko the street. That's right. The street megi. 'cause they both had these like the names of characters from newsies a Mickey and one of them is like one of the might be Mickey. I think you've gotta evil camera. We're gonna beat them up and take us camera. They're walking walking evil game, right? They actually perfectly fit the descriptions of the two thugs from what's the movie with Bette midler the witches. Hocus pocus pocus that was on TV. Oh, it's like their exact. It was Laura, you're, I'm sure Laura washed it and had said all the words to all the sheep spiraled of big smile at me when that came on. Hocus pocus. So the book ends with a little a little shot of the two cities hooks. Going into the house and being like all they didn't even see us when we followed them here. They're trying to keep that camera from us. Well, we'll show them and it ends with them taking a photo, but you don't see what it is, and it's not followed up on and says, she's dig- in. It is just saying, no. And I actually researching. I realize I did read, say cheese. And again, you read the second one, but I didn't know I got it in a book fair. It was vailable you miss all this important information. I don't. You know, what are you gonna do. This is a fun book. It doesn't. Nobody gets hurt too bad except the Bagai which owns reliable. Literally dies. Yeah, died like he didn't. I you do petty theft. I don't think getting murdered by cameras is your come up and snow? That's true. I do just want to share a couple of things from the back of this book. So we talked about the fright gallery. There's a short interview with RL Stein where they ask him a couple of questions about playing pranks like scary pranks on each other as kids, and then they ask mad scientists seemed to turn up in your books from time to time who or what inspired doctor. Fritz Fredericks. Are there more evil inventors that we should be on the lookout for? And our Elstein says, I don't want to give away any secrets, but let me say that there are some very scary scientists coming up in the next Horley books, including one who who is hiss sterile. That's a hint like. Thank man snake. I don't wanna give away secrets. Go give you a hint and then there's all maybe it's just it's like algorithm. Oh yeah, maybe as like a political thriller, then there's a whole section called haunted machines that is about various stories of haunted televisions and sewing machines, and that the word poltergeist comes from the German for rumble and ghost. And then it just says the word rumble ghost exclamation point on Bogo st- and then you can guess my name here. Rumble goes and ends with with that in mind, keep an eye on all of your appliances at home. Is that fridge growling to the microwave? Just burp was your toaster where you left it after breakfast this morning, did the coffee machine just spit it you while none of these kitchen appliances has ever reportedly been possessed accursed. There's always a, I sometimes. My fridge is ice maker does make spooky sound. Yeah. The book ends. That's a scarier thing to tell a kid than anything in this book, whether your fridge might be on your entire kitchen could be out to get you. What's the modern day version of Stacy's died?.

Mickey Michael Michael Laura RL Stein Bette midler Elstein Fritz Fredericks theft Stacy
"doctor fritz" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"What it does is we can actually take a urine sample from new pre. We drive the frequencies inter system to allow your body to unhinge and pull out things like heavy metals, plastics herbicides, pesticides, we can, then it's a twenty four minute program. We can then take another urine sample from you after symbo samples over to a lab, the lab will tell us there are more toxic in the second sample than there is in the first apple. So we've actually proven that it does pull toxic out of the system, the variety of machines, variety of programs. On that machine can do this. One of my other favorite devices is a is a laser device. Dr. Vivere has this fascinating machine where we can use this topically and if some shoes can also do intravenously intravenously putting late into the system, it's picked up by the red blood cells in my blood cells in traverse of the entire body, thereby enhancing the quality of the red blood cells. You can also do topically. As we spoke about earlier, you can use red light. You can use green light, blue light. You can use infrared light that has deeper penetration, and all the does is allows the cells to communicate with each other better. It's not using LED. That's what I was going to ask you about. Because I right now here in my office. I have these Juve lights that are there red and near-infrared LED lights, but this is different. Yes. And so the depth of penetration of LED lights are not as wonderful as some people would lead you to believe LED lights. They had a wide dispersion field, but they don't. The depth of penetration isn't outstanding. When you look at it from from the German perspective, they are very precise, very poignant, and it is pointing a finger directly at one specific frequency and driving that frequency into the system using lasers. So it's like dropping pebble in his still pond, you get a point of impact, but then you get a ripple effect. That's the way that they choose to do it as opposed to the dispersion field. With a poor penetration, they would rather have a deeper penatta. Ration- and get a ripple effect from there, and we'll. What's happening when you do that, what what effectively going after the depth of penetration to heal tissue from an inflammatory perspective, it has drastic, so there's a dream for like a soft tissue injury. Yes, but they've also done these studies on on stroke cases, post stroke cases, and the research on this actually quite astounding where they've taken two groups of people that have had similar like strokes. The first group, they put a crown of twelve fiber optic leads into the skull topically on top of the skull in various positions. The second group they do not do these treatments for the first group responded walking faster, talking faster and responding so much quicker than group to the Doni difference was doing this treatment. And so because the depth of penetration of these infrared lights penetrates through the thickness of the skull, you actually get it moving into the brain and helping the brain to regenerate just as we were speaking to when. Talking about how cells communicate with each other. It's done through light. That light is a beautiful carrier of information. If we can drive that information that carry information and we can put healing frequencies into that carrier then week that resulted impact that we're going to have to that south up. You're touching is so much more dressed. It is so much more healthy than we otherwise would have. What's that form of laser called? Vivere w. e. b. e. r. leaving laser vivere so it spelled Weaver, but you pronounce it vivere 'cause you have your cool German accent. Okay, cool. I'll find links for more information to all these treatments and even a couple of things you've already mentioned so far like the book on bio regulatory medicine doctor, Fritz.

Vivere w. e. b. e. r. soft tissue injury apple Doni Fritz Weaver twenty four minute
"doctor fritz" Discussed on Dreamland

Dreamland

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on Dreamland

"We're talking to Marla freeze, and just as we were, we briefly left the air for the free dream Landers we were going to resume with her where she reports that she had some interesting adventures shall we return to that remarkable country Marla. Well, the psychic surgery aspect of having any kind of altered state where someone could put their fingers or hands into your body and take and remove something was very fascinating to me. Of course, I was still still very sceptical. I hadn't even embraced the fact that I was a medium by the time that all happen, and we went down to a place called lar defray the we and the spirit of this doctor Fritz it World War Two World War. One surgeon came into the embodiment of of this man who was. Walking through the the gurneys where we were all laying down to about eight of us at a time. And James was right to my left, and the man turned his back, and I could almost tell passively here what he was saying to James, and he turned to me and I never saw a mouth move, but I heard the word heart and sinus, and then he reached underneath my shirt and right by my belly button and I felt this lights, it wasn't like a knife or anything because I've never had a nice that I was aware of life me while I was awake and conscious. But it felt as though his hand had gone inside of my abdomen and as quickly as I felt that I heard this sort of vacuum seal and flirt sort of. And a slur at the end like. And that was over and he turned and put something in a pan and he walked onto the next person. Well, I thought, oh, what was that and felt cool. And I looked down and my shirt where he had actually sort of operated on was wet and moist with something. So when we were all finished, we went down into this room and all of us had had some sort of psychic surgery. Each person has some sort of, you know, pink stuff on their shirt for their heads. And I'm thinking where the chicken gizzard, you know, I'm looking for the chicken Kizer the stuff that he must've squeezed in order for that to happen. But I listed at my shirt Whitley and there was a far from the top of my belly button up to the bottom of my breast bone, and it looked fresh almost the color of in a racer and almost the same size and something that happened to me. And for the next couple of days felt like anybody walked in front of me, it was. There was a poll sticking out of my stomach and when they walked through, I could feel it. It was as though that third shocker had been opened and I literally had to go home after that trip, knowing feeling seeing things that I've never experienced before I was picking up medical information with someone that was standing right in front of me. It was so disturbing discombobulating that I went home and had to work with an energy healer to shut it down. In clinical very powerful stuff, and you know, and we, we all think of in the west, you see the word psychic surgery and you think exactly that you think chicken gizzards, but that's not what happened at all. Is it not now now, how do you feel about psychic surgery now? Well, I I haven't gone back down to Brazil, but you know, there are the John's of God who who are become very popular. I don't necessarily know what I think it's more like what I feel around it is that there's something very powerful that happened. And of course, belief is part of the whole experience. I didn't go down there believing that I needed psychic surgery, but I do understand that what happened to me 'cause it's really all about our own personal experiences. You know what happened to me was powerful and it transformed something inside. My body and outside of my body. So I was realizing that we have these energy systems that get get helped in some way or opened in some way and that that that core area inside the body that third shock raw, that identity area where the egos is very powerful place..

James Landers Brazil John
"doctor fritz" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"By 20 percent off a screen by hapal left pictures drivel due to peripheral rightsize ought to lean ford right corner doctor fritz a little disappointed the baltic clears the davison dr nonsense delays it up thank you know good for the right side rebound down at the corner collision and it's last cut knocked out of bounds by lean ford had a foul on ford is he and iraq mata converged on the loose eight first on the team ford picks up the foul michigan basketball from right to left wolverines by 20 simpson to abdurrachman matthews on the left wing rain from wagner of answers on the bounce top of the key to simpson on the right side crosses over davidson to the foul line pitch up his drew a one out a curling naturally the final excreting knocked away by davidson picked up our robinson eight to go the shot clock boxer leftwing gives up three thrives in back it out growth arriving to treat adult guardrail less miller ted turner i guess they're going to look at that one i dunno was necessary i think that has clearly good certainly look good of their checking it right now to see if he got the shot off in time the scored 51 28 michigan the lead replaced during may vacuous volcano lean ford leaves he has three versatile fouls wisconsin basketball trailing fifty one to 28 on the right side davison as the ball kicked out of bounds by symphonies davison was proud to get it reverse.

ford basketball wagner davidson robinson davison iraq michigan abdurrachman matthews simpson ted turner 20 percent
"doctor fritz" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"And and the neglect of the institution it sounds a lot like american he identifies the stated emphatically and simply that if a nation is to continue to enjoy the freedom and prosperity that is the end result of a people who are motivated and influence and tree supposition new world view is deep in the judeo faith sh if that begins to wayne and if it begins to become a diminishing influence upon the hot and the mine excuse me of the citizenry of that nation than that nation to will fall from his greatness and the flounder in the ashes of history as another nation that failed to remember that there is a god in heaven and if he be forgotten diminished or dave scott it then no wall you heard me use luke clichy i heard the late doctor fritz samson use many years ago when he preached one of our city revivals are locked gate abok in dog and a high fence and in the midst of that a lot dade and baaken dog and a half inch euverte me said before was a beautiful tree a beautiful tree and this tree was surrounded by lot gaede a barking dog and a high fence to protect that beautiful tree and as the preaches so eloquently uh brought us into and captured us with his description of that tree in how beautiful it was an how for years he admired did when he drove by on one occasion on driving by and it manner again anticipating looking upon the tree he noticed the gate was open otto over the dog was but the gate was open even with the high fence did gate was open and the tree the beautiful majestic tree that he talked about so eloquently in those sermons that beautiful tree was being cut down the tree with a lot gate the barking dog and the high fence was being cut down naturally the inquire rewards what's going on why is the beautiful tree that's majestic in his post it appearance and got tracked of to the extended caught my attention repeatedly driving by why is the tree being cooked down well the report from those who were taking the tree down was checked they're the termites have gotten to it to whatever was it was a disease that took up hole of the beautiful tree with all the lac de witt all.

dave scott luke clichy fritz samson otto wayne baaken lac de witt
"doctor fritz" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on WDRC

"Person over the age of sagged who needs assistance with activities of daily living are you their primary caregiver if so you may qualify for compensation for your tireless committed jair juniper home care is pleased to offer a family caregiving program which will train you provide nursing support twenty four seven office overview and even pay you see how you may qualify for compensation for taking care of a loved one end inside girono home learn more at juniper home care tom or call them at eight six zero five two three one four one eight juniper obamacare family caregiving program he caused the best which are givers our family should've her home dot com must be 65 on or eligible for medicaid and live in the same hogg hi i'm dr richard fichman six generations of my family have lived in the syria and i've always been driven provide the very best technology regardless of what it costs us that coupled with compassionate individualized care provides a state of the art facility that small and friendly two very different than a hospital you won't feel like a number you feel at home i think i tell comfortable out of really large vision center just because it would be more impersonal there's too many people involved doctor fritz frigel was right there when they ran you know tapped me on the shoulder told me everything was going to be okay latte to worry and it was and everybody was great um explained everything thoroughly so i felt very comfortable being here call.

juniper syria obamacare people dr richard
"doctor fritz" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Jeff schwartz that's me a your thoughts alignment de gravy 32 that's danny green as eleven year mlb picture all right dodgers astros in the world series danny emailed me a couple of days ago war preparing for this show to get some ideas rolling in daily knows about my hatred for the godhra admitting us angelis so i should love the daughters right but my dad grew up in the bear is our group niners and giants fan central giants fan and i feel that growing up in la actually hardening me to the dodgers because all my my friends are dodger fans and until 2010 i had nothing to brag about an mi doctor fritz stilltalkedabout 88 even though they were barely good board and so this world series i rooting hard for the astros and and this brings up a point of good buddy michael cuba who works for espn does or call triple for them other sec game of the week he he broke apart about sec phantom se football fare them he said we love to hate more than we love to love and i definitely think that's the case with me the dodgers it's almost worse if the dodgers win a world series than the giants winning a world series with that makes sense the is there a team danny that you feel that way about in any sport or or visa going all be you'll you can talk about your baseball rival that's lobby you'll you will know miami's erred who's a miami two three have a rival do the photos loud florist date probably the biggest rival but i would say nfl i hate the new england page the it why i don't i don't be dopey the guy because they win championships you're upset you don't like them now i i don't know what it is i just don't like they're they're the demeanor built bella check is obviously one of the greatest coaches in nfl history right but i.

Jeff schwartz astros dodgers fritz stilltalkedabout world series espn giants miami new england page danny green mlb angelis la michael cuba nfl eleven year
"doctor fritz" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"doctor fritz" Discussed on TechStuff

"For a long time everyone just had access to their local affiliate stations so they didn't have access to things that were playing and other other regions other markets here in atlanta you could pick up chicago stations occasionally and you could see the chicago version of the same stuff that you would get with an atlanta based version but after the the widespread use of cable we start seeing these nationwide network that were the same across the entire united states that was only made possible through cable tv but i again i covered that in a previous episodes were not really going to focus on that today now in the late nineteen thirties going back pretty far doctor fritz fisher of the swiss federal institute of technology dreamed up a way to project television images on a much larger screen so instead of just having a little twelve inch screen that you stare at this would be a projector that could take tv signals and projected across a much wider viewing area and in fact the first working projection tv gutted start in europe in the nineteen thirties now before explain more i should say the doctor fisher wasn't the only person working on this goal lots of people were trying to create projection televisions including ones who had been working on something before doctor fisher got started some even at a few working models but most of them were producing very dim pictures so you can see them easily projected on a screen so all i say doctor fisher invented the projection television that's really an over simplification lots of people invented similar devices and that seems to be the case with technology as a whole whenever we say so and so invented something there are almost always needs to be an asterisk after that statement so that you can clarify other people were working on this to it's just one incarnation ended up being superior to the others.

atlanta nationwide network united states europe doctor fisher chicago swiss federal institute of tec twelve inch