40 Burst results for "Doctor"

A highlight from Upstream Works transforms United Airlines passenger, agent CX and EX, Podcast

Telecom Reseller

19:26 min | 5 hrs ago

A highlight from Upstream Works transforms United Airlines passenger, agent CX and EX, Podcast

"This is Doug Green and I'm the publisher of Telecom Reseller and I'm very pleased to have with us today Rob McDougall who is the CEO of Upstream Works. Rob, thank you for joining us today. Hey, great to be here, Doug. Good to talk with you again. Well, this is really exciting. I've been enjoying talking with you just before we started our podcast about what's going on in the AR market. And you know, what's exciting to me is we've been doing a series of podcasts the last few weeks where folks have been coming forward and talking about how they've made AI a practical tool for a company or for an organization or for maybe an entire industry. So we're going to be talking about an exciting story today about how Upstream Works has changed United Airlines and also about the idea of operationalizing AI. So we're going to be talking about those topics in a second, but for people that don't know Rob Upstream Works well or maybe know a little bit about you guys, what is Upstream Works? Upstream Works is a software application company. We focus on the agent experience and we provide an agent desktop application that's designed to run either on premise or in cloud so that your infrastructure doesn't matter. Our goal is to make sure that your agents have a consistent interface that they can work with across platforms, across applications, across channels. And these days we've been using the term EX. So what you're doing, it feeds right into that employee experience. Absolutely. We call it AX because we're focused on agents, but that's what it's all about. A happy agent is going to give a better service. We believe that that smile on the agent's face comes across the phone. It's a tough job. It's a tough market. You know, you can't find enough people to do that job today, so you want to keep those employees happy and they're the face of your company to the world. So with that in mind, you have actually taken AI and you're doing something called operationalizing AI. Sorry, that didn't come out so smoothly. So what is operationalizing AI? First, it's a tough word to say. I will give you that. Look at it this way. If I was to ask you, Doug, to go to my office, go to my computer, log in and add yourself into my CRM system or billing system, you wouldn't know what you had to do. You understand my ask, but you don't know where my office is. You don't know how to get into my computer. You don't know what my CRM or HR systems are. You don't know how they work. AI is the same thing. Even with the new generative AI model, is it really good at understanding? I know what the guy's asking, but I don't know how to do it. Operationalizing AI means doing that connectivity between what the AI can do and making it do something actually for your business. So integrating it into your backend systems, providing an interface that an agent can use to view things easily, using it to provide other business value like routing or translations, but making it actually work properly in your complex in silo the contact center. So this is really interesting because what you're telling me is it simplifies things. Well, tremendously. What we saw back in the early days of chat and email is a lot of people would put in chat and email, but they were discreet channels. They didn't integrate with the contact center. It was a bad experience for customers. You had to have specialized agents who got different training because the desktop interfaces were different. The tools were different. Omnichannel has now taken us into a realm where an agent can deal with sort of one set of tools across the different channels, but then you start throwing AI into the mix and it comes up in a different place. So you put in AI and it's got its own interface. So I need special agents to do something over here, or it doesn't actually integrate with the other tools that I have in the contact center. So I've got to make all that stuff work together. And this is what Upstreamworks has been doing for 23 years is being the spider in the middle of the web and taking the applications that are important for your business and help you make those work for the business and for the agents to make their life easier. So it's interesting that you're using a new thing to basically follow your brand story, which has what you're describing sounds like what Upstream is all about. Absolutely. We focus on enterprise contact centers. We don't go for the small contact center. And the reason we focus there is because large enterprises, when they deal with products, what they want is something that's shrink wrapped in out of the box, like Word, and they just put in the disk and it all works, but it's got to work exactly the way they work. And that doesn't exist. So what we have always done is we built a product that is designed to provide all the features out of the box, but have all the configurability and integratability such that I can integrate it into the workflows that the company has and make those work properly in an enterprise environment. And AI is no different. You could look at a manufacturer who's going to say, oh, we'll put in our product and here's our AI. And the company says, well, that's nice, but we use this other AI. That's where Upstream works comes in. And they may use Amazon AI for translations, and they may use Google AI to search their knowledge base, and they use Watson to look up their medical information. They may have different AI applications. Our goal is to make them all work and make it seamless to the agent. So the agent doesn't know there's different AIs happening. It's just there's stuff that shows up and stuff happens. And I'd love to hear a little bit about your product line and offerings right now, but maybe you could tell me that in the context of where you're offering this operationalizing AI service. Well, it comes as an actual part of our product, right? It's right there. It's right there. So one of the components is a desktop component called Virtual Agent Portal. And we spent a lot of time kind of working through what to name this, because we didn't want people to start thinking we're providing AI to them, because we're not an AI provider. But what Virtual Agent Portal allows you to do, it's a kind of an open placeholder, so that if I need to interact between an agent and an AI on the desktop, it can go into Virtual Agent Portal. And I can do things like I can try Amazon, or I could switch it out for Google, because maybe I get a better price. The agent doesn't see the difference. I don't need to retrain them. I'm using a certain AI, and I put in a different training model, and I want to do some A -B testing to see which one's giving me better results. The agent won't see the difference. Virtual Agent Portal handles all that in the background and feeds the information back to management to say, okay, yeah, the new changes are working, so we're going to now use that AI. But it's all about making it transparent to the agent, so they're focused on the customer and my understanding is that with all this, you guys have now developed and are operating with a very big customer. Yeah, somebody we've been having a lot of fun with over the summer is United Airlines. So they're a big Cisco shop. They've got Cisco UCCE. They've got Cisco Webex. And they had this concept that they called Agent on Demand. And what they wanted to be able to do was to provide airline -side services to customers remotely. And with Webex and the Cisco Contact Center product, those things didn't work together. So Cisco brought in Upstream Works, and so we're kind of the glue between all this. So now what happens at United Airlines is, and if you're traveling and you're at United, look around because you're going to see QR codes all over the place. You can shoot the QR code with your phone, and you will get hooked up with a live video call with the United Gate agent. So it's for doing airline -side things. So can't buy my baggage. I got to go change my flight. I want to change my seat. You know, all the stuff that you could go up to the gate to do, there's a big lineup, or you're in the United Club having a drink and you want to do this, you can now do this on your phone remotely. From a customer experience point of view, it's an awesome thing. But what's even better about it is think about gate agents. These are the people who are standing at the gate and they're doing stuff and then you board your flight and then they go back in the back room and they sit around until their next flight. Well, now what they do is they go back in the back room and United has little, I'll call them informal contact centers in every airport. Gate agents leave their post, they go back and they get on the phone and they start dealing with other customers from all over the world. So from United's point of view, they're now getting much better utilization of their staff and they're assisting people at any airport where there's United Airlines. And from the customer's point of view, they just know that, hey, I want to change my seat and I can do it on my phone and talk to a person to do it. So it's a win for the customers and it's an absolute win for United as well because now, you know, I don't have to line up to do this stuff and I can better utilize my agents. It just occurred to me that it's liberating for both sides of that equation. In other words, as you were mentioning from the customer point of view, now I don't have to stand even, you know, it was used to be a problem. I have to find the right line to stand in. That is, you know, we've all had that experience. I can just click on one of these wherever I am in the airport and get help. Yeah, absolutely. You hit the QR code and it's going to ask for your flight number. So you put your flight number in and your passenger name, and then you're going to get to the right person to talk about the right stuff. It doesn't matter what line you're going to get in because it's skills routed to the right person. Wow. And that also means that remote, to your point, remote agents, whether they're at an informal contact center, a little mini one in the back office there behind the gate, or maybe just as in a more, it may be out of a home even, right there, there is help now, you know, late at night, maybe there's no one at the little airport in a smaller center, which United does fly in and out of, maybe you're just talking to someone somewhere else. That smaller center, you could talk to an agent at home, but you could also be talking to an agent who's on shift at O 'Hare in between flights. Right. So that's really, that really is an amazing step forward. And it really, it leverages all the technologies already in place. Yeah. And then, and then they went further because they said, you know what we, cause you can, you can escalate between voice video and chat on the application. You don't have to do video call. You can also just chat with the agent as well. But they've also got translations. So they're using, I believe it's Amazon for doing, there's Google, sorry, they're using Google to do translations, but now I can go on, I can click that QR code, say I'm Spanish. I can type in in Spanish, what the agent sees is coming up in English and they answer in English and the person gets it back in Spanish. And this is a great use of generative AI because that's, I will say a year ago, when you showed translations in a demo, it was anyone spoke the language went, yeah, that doesn't really work. The language was stilted generative AI has, has changed the game on translations because generative AI can translate really well. So that's a very excellent use case for it. This is very exciting because it sort of opens up so many doors that, you know, the, the agent might be in Berlin, the, the, the other, the passenger might be in Mexico city and they're able to talk to each other in their own languages. Yep. And you can do it across industry as well. Think about, you know, you as a person, you go to a drug store and you need to consult with a doctor and they've got a nurse practitioner there who can triage. And then click a QR code and get a video conference going with a doctor who may be at a central site. Now I'm sitting, having a conversation with a medical professional via video that's been queued up. And, you know, on the doctor's side, he's between patients, he logs onto the system and he just starts taking some calls and he can deal with patients. And now I don't have to have doctors everywhere. I can centralize them and I put nurse practitioners around. So there's a lot of healthcare uses for the same type of application. Hey Rob, let's stay with that a second, but in both cases, because, um, do you, do you, I'm going to use maybe the wrong term, but is there a continuity on each case? In other words, let's say, um, I opened up a conversation as a United customer or as a, as a patient and it's concluded, but now I have the same problem maybe four hours later. Will the next person who helps me know about my last conversation? Well, we captured the interaction history of every interaction that happens. So the answer, the quick answer is yes. Um, as a, as an agent or a doctor or a gate agent, uh, you can go back and review the previous recording, um, or the transcript of what's going on, or again, another great use of generative AI. You could also get a summary delivered back to you of what had gone on on that previous call, but that whole contact history is tracked. So every single time Doug Green contacts, they're going to be able to say Doug Green always contacts us and says, we screwed his seat up. He does this every single flight. So maybe he's just pulling our leg. So, you know, it works both ways. And that's really amazing because that's the type of information, you know, old school that, you know, there would be someone around who knew some other people and would say, yeah, look at Doug. And this is, he does that all the time. Here's how to handle it. Now we're able to do this on a, on a, and that must make agent life or the doctor life, whoever's receiving the contact a little bit easier, right? They've, they've got that contextual and historical information. Yeah. We've always believed, I was talking about the elephant never forgets. And I've always believed that as a person contacting a business, there are certain things that I know the business should know those things as well. Most importantly, I know that I called last Thursday about the same thing. The business should know that the agent who picks up my call, this is, you know, this is video or just a voice call, but the agent should know that as well. And that's the important part of interaction history. So regardless of the channel you come in on, the agent has access to that information and they can see what that context is. Cause that's all important to them providing you good service. Rob, you know, I know it's early days and, and, but you know, this was an historic summer for travel. So United you've already flown, if you will, through a challenging time. What's the reaction, what's United telling you and what are customers saying what's happening? Uh, United loves it. Um, all of the airlines are aware of it and are looking and, and want to understand how they've done it. Um, we're getting a lot of inbound, uh, requests coming in from basically all the major airline carriers from very senior people. Um, I think over the Labor Day weekend, it was something like, I don't know, 2 .3 or 2 .8 million passengers went through Chicago O 'Hare airport, uh, and NBC news and Chicago did a section on United and all the travelers and right in the middle of it is, and they have this agent on demand application and they show here's a phone talking to an agent. That's the upstream application right there, which was very cool. So Rob, you know, uh, with this, this, uh, work you're doing with United, I understand they turned to you because they were able to find you as a reliable source for this. So original the agent on demand idea, uh, came from United. Um, and they, they did a proof of concept to say, okay, it kind of works, but it wasn't robust enough for sort of the enterprise you will. Um, and they turned to Cisco who was sort of their trusted communications provider and said, can you do this? And Cisco looked into it and they came back and said, no, we can't get all the bits and pieces, but we can't make them work together. And then somebody inside Cisco who knew upstream, wasn't talk to upstream. And so Cisco came to us and we said, yeah, of course we can do that. So it went back to United said, okay, we have a solution. Um, and we put that into United and they'd been extremely happy with the stability and how well it works. So everything's great. And since then it's, I don't, I mean, maybe it's early to say this, it sounds like it's on its way to becoming an industry standard. Uh, we're getting a ton of inbound interest. People are coming up and saying, you know, we, we, we've heard about the agent on demand. We want to know how it works and how you do it. And, and now we find out that upstream works is kind of the key enabler here. So, yeah, we're getting a lot of inbound demand on it, which is great. Well, uh, I wanted to, uh, conclude our podcast with just about how we can get a hold of products from upstream works. I understand that you're a channel oriented company. So do you have a channel pro program? We have a channel program. Uh, we do not sell directly at all. Uh, we have distribution channels, uh, throughout, uh, Canada, the U S and Europe. Um, we're available, um, on the Amazon platform, we're available on the Cisco platforms. Um, and we are expanding our market. So if there's, you know, if you're one of our resellers, uh, you know, you, you can, you can get at this. Um, if you're new to us and you want to talk with us, you've got some opportunities you want to discuss. Uh, we do have a channel program. We're really easy to deal with. Um, basically we can sign you up and then we'll do all the heavy lifting and until such time as you want to take on as much of the sales training and implementation training as you want to based on your business needs. Sounds like a great way for a channel partner right now or an MSP to win with AI. Absolutely. Absolutely. Well, this is an exciting, ongoing story, Rob. I really hope that we get to do an additional podcast, maybe just about the United application, if you will, or, or that the, what you're doing there and in healthcare and maybe some other industries, learn some more news and do some stuff in the future. But for now, I want to thank you for joining us. Where can we learn more about upstream works? www .upstreamworks .com. Well, I hope everyone takes a visit and takes a second look, but for now, thanks very much for joining me today. Thank you, Doug. It's been really fun.

Rob Mcdougall Doug Doug Green Berlin Cisco ROB Upstream Works United Gate Www .Upstreamworks .Com. Today Amazon 23 Years Last Thursday First 2 .3 Both Cases Upstreamworks Canada Europe United Airlines
Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:05 sec | 3 min ago

Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

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A highlight from Real Estate Market (Crashing)? Price Reduction Scripts & Systems

Real Estate Coaching Radio

14:10 min | 6 hrs ago

A highlight from Real Estate Market (Crashing)? Price Reduction Scripts & Systems

"Welcome to Real Estate Coaching Radio, starring award -winning real estate coaches and number one international bestselling authors, Tim and Julie Harris. This is the number one daily radio show for realtors looking for a no BS, authentic, real time coaching experience. What's really working in today's market, how to generate more leads, make more money, and have more time for what you love in your life. And now your hosts, Tim and Julie Harris. And we are back. Now we're going to be really drilling down over the next five podcasts on pricing listings to sell, but also getting price reductions. There's a lot of technique to the things we're going to be sharing with you guys. A lot of scripts, a lot of systems. It's very important that you use the notes that are below. Obviously we try to, I think almost always put all of our notes, right Julie? In the show description below. So scroll down, all the notes are there and we're going to be really getting into the weeds with all of you so that frankly you can start pricing your listings to sell. If you have listings now that are overpriced, then you can get them repositioned on the market so they correctly reflect the market's expectations. That was a script. Did you write it down? Snuck that in on them, didn't you? I did. And when your hunting expires, as all of you will be doing, you're also going to be knowing how to get the prices adjusted accordingly so the properties will sell. So this week is very intense, really focused on pricing properties to sell because it is going to become very, very tricky in many markets. Now I'm going to start out with a little bit of, we need to I think have a common understanding of the difference between value and price. And I'm reading your notes and I see what you're about to talk about so I think this will fit in perfectly. It's a good intro. Right. Well, we'll see. Back to you. Yeah, exactly. So I was thinking about this last night, how to explain. So Julie and I, when we socialize with people and go to parties and just talk with all of you guys, just run across everyone. People make the mistake constantly of saying there's some sort of or alluding to or believing that there's some sort of big price or value erosion that's going on. Value erosion, not price erosion. Value versus price. That's where I'm going with all this. Because back in 2007, 8, and 9, there was value erosion. The values of the properties actually dropped below what people paid for them. So there's a difference between pricing and value. So get this clear in your head and then I think it'll give your mind room to be open to the thoughts that we're going to be sharing with you in a second. So if you have, like I'll give you an example, Julie and I had, let's say if we had a car for sale and let's say we put the car for sale for 50 grand and even though the market tells us that the car is worth 30 grand, like every single comp, every single thing that's out there is telling us that car is not worth 50, it's worth 30, right? You guys with me so far? And then we eventually, in order to get the car sold, we have to adjust the price down to 30. Did we lose 20 grand or did we just finally price the house correctly? Do you guys get the difference? And so what a lot of people are believing is because they have to price their properties correctly that the properties have lost value. No, they didn't. They lost value maybe in your head, right? They didn't actually lose value. The difference between, so for example, if we'd bought that car for 30 grand, let's say, and we were selling it for 15 grand, then yeah, we lost 15 grand. That's like what was happening in 2007, 2008, 2009, well, mostly seven and eight. The definition of a short sale, you're selling it for less than you owe. Well short sale, you're selling it for less than you owe, or exactly, assuming you owe like you just said. So yeah, so that's the whole moral of the story here. So please don't think this is anything like the previous market, which I'm teeing you up perfectly. Exactly. As we have said, pricing is the hot topic all week because it's a big hairy topic. We'll take a look at the factors causing price reductions, what to do from a listing agent's perspective, as well as what to do when you're representing a buyer. And we're going to dive into some price reduction scripts and give you the confidence you need to navigate the changing market. So let's first take a look at what's happening to prices right now. And no, by saying that, we are not talking about the market crashing. Just as Tim said, the market is not crashing, it is simply normalizing. So here are the facts, hot off the presses. Nationwide, one in every 15 listings had a price reduction in the past 30 days. That's about six and a half of active list, six and a half percent of active listings in the country. However, some markets have seen 50 % of active listings get a price reduction in the past 30 days. So let's compare those two. Nationwide, it averages out to six and a half percent of actives got a price reduction last month. But there are many markets that it's quite a bit more severe. But so what this is, when you see this kind of statistic, we've seen this before. Julie and I have been doing this for decades. And what this is kind of a, I don't even want to, I don't want to be overly critical, but this is essentially sellers who have unrealistic expectations as far as what their homes are worth. We call it aspirational pricing. And frankly, this is evidence of agents that don't know how to actually properly price properties. In other words, they're just taking the listing at an elevated price. Maybe they don't know how to go about setting the price correctly in the first place, or maybe they don't want to, they don't have the skill set being blunt to get the property priced correctly in the first place. So when you see these kinds of widespread statistics and especially something like 6%, which is a pretty meaningful number, honestly, when you see numbers like that, that is essentially the market still adjusting to the new reality. That's the sellers adjusting to the new reality. And that's also the agents having to learn how to adjust to the new reality. And then, you know, doctor filling their sellers, you know, learning how to write exactly this, this type of information. When you see these types of statistics, this is 100 % proof that the market is still very much adjusting. Now, also taking the time, you know, take when you're considering all this, what time of year it is, what's the, you know, what's interest rates are doing. And so these types of things in a cyclically adjusting market, the numbers will go up and down pretty radically pretty fast. So just adjust accordingly. This information is as of two days ago. That's right. Now, the five metro areas with the highest percentage of listings that got price cuts, this is the percentage of listings that had a price reduction. When I give you these stats, these percentages, that doesn't mean they're coming down by that percent. That's just the percent of overall actives that had to have a price reduction. So that's Wenatchee, Washington State, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Carson City, Nevada, and Austin, Round Rock area, and Waco, Texas. Those were all in the 50 to 54 percent of active listings came down. Again, that doesn't mean they came down by 50 percent. It just means half of the actives had a price reduction. Now she took that sort of sampling because obviously price reductions were happening all over the country, but she was using that to show the fact that it's happening in these completely different unrelated markets. That's right. So unlike before, you know, when the market was super hot for several years, kind of the whole country moved about the same way. We were all going rapidly up in price. We all had multiple offers basically on anything. All it had to do was be available. Well, now we're seeing markets kind of stretch apart, and what's happening in the ones I just rattled off is different than, say, Florida, which still is pretty strong. So you have to know your actual market. Now, this is all happening, all these price reductions are all happening at the same time that prices are still up by at least 3 percent this year and are expected to end up averaging about 5 percent higher by year's end. This figure shows you that we are normalizing, not crashing. A crash would not have price increases. Okay, so that's worth, we really need to drill down on that. So listen to what Julie just said, be very, very clear in your head. There were no price increases, there were no value increases that were happening, it was value basically, that were happening during 2007, 2008, quite the opposite, right? Properties in some markets dropped by, you know, 40 plus percent. That is not what we're experiencing. Year over year, what Julie just explained to all of you guys, is that in many markets prices went up, values of properties went up by at least 5 percent. So despite what the headlines and all the click -baity things on all the news channels and all the rest of it are leading you to believe about real estate, guess what? If you own a home, it went up by probably at least 5 percent this year. Exactly. Okay, now, remember, again, we're proving the point that we are adjusting and normalizing, not crashing. Remember this, at $52 trillion, the total value of homes in the U .S. is up, get this, 49 percent since before the pandemic. That truly is insane. Yes, 49 percent. So these price adjustments won't be catastrophic to most sellers. We're a very long way away from short sales, so don't go thinking the sky is falling. Okay, so again, worth drilling down. Prices are up by almost 50 percent in the last... It's since 2019. Now what you're seeing now with the price adjustments or the price reductions essentially that many markets are now experiencing, remember that you still had 5 percent increase in value in the last 12 months. So you're looking at properties in many markets that have increased by at least 50 percent since 2019? Yeah, since pre -pandemic. Okay, so that is a substantial massive increase. Now, the value of those properties, there's no reason to believe, and it's incredibly important you're really clear in your head about this, that the values of the homes are going to somehow regress back into say 2019 values. And I read that sometimes from people that are, I don't want to come off overly negative, but they really piss me off because they don't use any real factual information. No, they're only using their thought that, well, you know, prices were going really high in and 2006 5, and so then there was a crash, and since prices have gone up, there must be a crash. That's not based on any underlying factors. It's just basically, well, that's what it did before, that's what it's going to do now. It's basically yo -yo thinking about, you know, there's going to be another bubble that's going to burst. There's no reason to believe that's true. The same people who've been predicting that since, again, 2019, they've been wrong year after year after year after year, and they're going to continue to be wrong because nothing is the same as it was back in 2007. Well, that's why we're facting them, right? Okay, so look at the runway, though. Okay, so a 49 % increase since pre -pandemic, and you know, the average, and not every single listing is having a price reduction, but when they do, they're still only coming down by less than 5 % on average, so you've got that remaining, you know, 44 % left to go before you're even Steven with 2019. There's just so much runway there. Now, are there isolated instances where people refinanced, took a bunch of equity out, didn't have a very big down payment in the first place, and maybe are behind on payment, and that makes them even very, very, very randomly, literally less than, I think it's like 3 .5 % of the market of closings were even short sales. So along those lines, again, you'll have this memorized because that is what you do. Possibly. We'll see. No, she will. You watch, listeners. So what percent of all home inventory is distressed? almost It's like 4%, but it's less than 4 % overall. Which is a record low for what period of time? Forever. Yeah. Literally forever. It is a record low since they started recording it, I think back in the 80s. You remember when all the - And actually, it's gone down. It was a previous low, and it's actually gotten lower in the past quarter. Remember when all the naysayers were saying, well, when the COVID - Forbearances. Forbearances. There was going to be a foreclosure wave. There's one thing after another, after another, after another. Okay. So the forbearance naysayers, there's going to be this awful backup of foreclosures due to forbearances. Well, they also said there would be a silver tsunami when all the baby boomers just had to sell their houses all of a sudden. And they also thought there would be an Airbnb bust. And now the new thing is, as soon as somebody has to make their student loan payments, well, that means they're going to miss their mortgage payments from one drama to the next, but not based on facts, which we like to sprinkle upon you. Again, the reason that we're so adamant about you guys getting these facts and the reason that we spend so much time on this podcast and our coaching program to make sure you have the actual information is because if you operate with bad information, you're going to then pass that bad information along to your customers. You're then going to, you know, it always comes down to the same thing. If you don't believe that tomorrow is going to be better than today, you're not going to take the actions today that would have made tomorrow better than today. In other words, if you believe the sky is falling, you're sure as hell not going to do what you don't want to do when you don't want to do at the highest level, you're not going to learn to price properties correctly. You're not going to learn how to get prices, you know, lower prices on homes. Why would you bother after all tomorrow? It's going to be, you know, some sort of, you know, locust apocalypse, so you're never actually going to make tomorrow better than today. So that's really the reason that you want to purge from your mind all of these naysayers, all of these snake oil salesmen that are trying to sell you into the belief that there's any sort of anything other than frankly, amazing things that are going to happen in the real estate markets. And here's a little foreshadowing, and we're working on a podcast about this. If you look purely at the demographics of what the United States is experiencing over the next 20, 30 years, it's extraordinary and it's going to do nothing but maybe even increase the demand for housing by something like five to seven X. So that's how many home sales and how much new construction is going to have to be built just to meet demand and it's going to be built and that demand will be met and you are going to be a beneficiary of that provided that you are taking the right steps now to, you know, stay relevant in the real estate. That's right. And provided that you make it through this next three to six months because it is going to be more challenging than you're used to. That's why we're talking about price reductions because we've seen, you know, we've gotten texts, we've seen videos online, we've seen stuff on social media where agents were losing their minds over having to do price reductions, hearing about price reductions, having to ask a seller to come down.

TIM 3 .5 % 2007 Idaho 44 % 50 % 2009 2008 Julie Harris 49 Percent TWO Austin 50 Percent 6% 100 % 4% Nevada Julie Idaho Falls Washington State
Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:00 min | 20 min ago

Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"Rates, and the economy? Interest rates are now at a level that they're probably not going to rise much from here. Bridgewater co -founder Ray Dalio. There are geopolitical changes which are having an effect. Tomorrow morning at 10 Eastern only on Bloomberg Radio and Television. Bloomberg. Context changes day. Nearly one in two US adults have high blood pressure. That's why it's important to self monitor your blood pressure and for easy to remember steps. It starts with a monitor. Be next to talk to your doctor about your blood pressure numbers. Get down with your blood pressure. Self monitoring is power. Visit ManagerBP .org. Brought to you by the Ad Council, American the Heart Association and the American Medical Association in partnership with the Office of Minority Health and Health Resources and Services Administration. You heard the phrase the voice of experience. You're the guy that made the bet with Warren Buffett. I get mic that on my tombstone. There's actually more than one of them. Writing on Star Wars was crazy fun. The voices of experience tell their stories on Masters in Business. When I got hired in 2013,

A highlight from The Guardian Angels  Building a Kingdom of Love with Msgr John Esseff

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

13:43 min | 7 hrs ago

A highlight from The Guardian Angels Building a Kingdom of Love with Msgr John Esseff

"Discerning hearts provides content dedicated to those on the spiritual journey to continue production of these podcasts prayers and more go to discerninghearts .com and click the donate link found there or inside the free discerning hearts app to make your donation thanks and God bless discerninghearts .com presents building a kingdom of love reflections with Monsignor John Assef Monsignor Assef is a priest of the diocese of Scranton Pennsylvania. He has served as a retreat director and confessor to St. Teresa of Calcutta. He continues to offer direction and retreats for the sisters of the missionaries of charity. Monsignor Assef encountered St. Padre Pio who would become a spiritual father to him. He has lived in areas around the world serving in the Pontifical missions a Catholic organization established by Pope St. John Paul II to bring the good news to the world especially to the poor. He continues to serve as a retreat leader and director to bishops priests and sisters seminarians and other religious leaders. Building a kingdom of love reflections with Monsignor John Assef I'm your host Chris McGregor. Angels are so much on my mind today to talk to you about and I would like to begin with the guardian angel. I was very much enamored of my angel as a child. Ever since I can remember my brother and I were roommates and we had in our room you know that picture of guardian angel guiding this child across a bridge and we certainly he and I had so many scrapes as children we have some of them in our book but as two boys growing up and we were so companions because I can't remember being my memories go way back but they they don't go back before my brother because I was only a year and a half old when he came along so I always had this companion and so it's kind of easy for me to believe that I have a companion the angel the guardian angel is given to us from the first moment of our conception the guardian angel is interuterine he is given to you from your mother's womb and from the first moment that that egg fertilizes that is for that seed fertilizes that egg that soul that's blown into that person who now is going to be that's the beginning that's the moment your guardian angel begins to protect you and watch over you so he's with you and assists you in your life in the womb because how many more things are being told to us these days about what happens to the child in the womb it's a whole life in there if you're a single birth if you're you know are you my mother tells the story about that what do they talk about when a child is turned around and I was a breach breath I was going to be a breach birth and what happened to me is I got turned around and there's like all kinds of assistance that goes on within the womb guardian angel is right there assisting you in the birthing you know I think so many times we've it's good for a mother to know that that baby is being watched over and protected how that life is there and how the mother loves that baby from the moment that she knows she's pregnant and so the the baby is being watched over and cared for within the womb and then in the birthing your guardian angel comes with you that that angel stays with you from that moment of conception not only until you die but if you fail to go to paradise that angel reminds people on earth to pray for you so often you know some people who are not yet and may be in purgatory and not yet settled in their in their home forever in heaven that angels work is to go to the people on earth or to others to pray for that soul and I really believe that many of us are reminded oh my grandmother or my uncle so -and -so or having a mass offered for so is really inspired by the angel who comes and asks why don't you have a mass said for your dad why don't you have a mass said for your aunt Tilly so that there's there's that reminder to pray for the dead so until that's also because even in the liturgy itself it says at the death of a person may the angel lead you into paradise may the martyrs receive you on your way so as we go into the eternal city the angels are individually created angels do not multiply like humans so therefore if there are six billion people in this universe and each one of us has a specific guardian angel then there must at least be six billion angels God in making angels we always hear scripturally that there are myriads you know what myriads is millions and billions he just makes them and he creates them individually the least angelic creature is greater than any human creation you know after all man is only half spiritual half of him is material or physical he's half animal half spirit so that our bodily part it's no less beautiful it's a creation that we have feet and arms and legs and and we have a sex to us know that individual creation of my body is a very beautiful creation God has made the the marvel of a human body you know when I go to doctors and see especially if a person becomes ill the functioning of a healthy organ and a body is such a magnificent the eye the complexity of what an ear is or what a face is so what a brain is this is a magnificent each one of us who are human have been given this body creation and we have be given a spirit which is that part of us we are a body soul composite so that when we do die it's not only that the soul goes on to live because that's the part of us that will live eternally that's the part of us that's immortal but so is our body going to be so when the body and we believe that it's going to be raised from the dead we believe in the resurrection of the body so that it will participate in the glory of God in heaven forever or in the damnation in the fires of hell or whatever there is for eternal damnation and torture so we do know that we have any we are not made to die we are made to live eternally and because of Jesus who gives us a new life we are called now to live eternally in heaven he has given us the opportunity of salvation when he died on the cross Jesus saved everyone from the time of the cross back to Adam and Eve but they were not able to enter into glory because of Adam and Eve sin so he by his death on the cross brought salvation to every human being from Adam and Eve down to the year 33 and from the third year 33 to the end of time so that the cross is the salvation of all of mankind the desire of God was to save all of the human family each member of that family has a guardian now I'd love to go over that prayer angel of God my guardian dear to whom God's love commits me here so that God has sent an angel to be with me to watch over me to guard and to assist me to enlighten me to inspire me to guide me so this and we usually like to use the word guard because I think each of us is dealing with a lot of hostility in the world in which we live so there's a protective nature to this friend of ours and be careful watch for yourself and these inspirations that we receive daily and how many times you know driving along there's like an inspiration of why don't you take this street instead of that or that some different you slow down here this is like our guardian protecting us and I I often think how important it is to develop that relationship with our guardian angel to become more familiar I developed a very strong relationship with my guardian angel I think I had it as a child I kind of lost it and then it came back to me very early in my priesthood and I remember meeting a long tradition with Carmelite nuns who said to me why don't you ask your guardian angel its name because your guardian angel has a name it's a particular spirit and if you ask your guardian angel what your name is you would be able to become more familiar because you could call him by name and you could become more dependent on him and ask him and and then develop a closer relationship with him because every guardian angel has a nature it's an angelic nature it is hugely powerful and not incidentally every guardian angel is not the lowest rank of angel you could have a guardian angel from the archangel class you can have an archang you can have an angel that's your guardian from the seraphim or cherubim or Thrones I'll talk about those choirs of angels because they have enormous power each one in gradation and they they come according to the power that was given to them in their nature which is vastly different from each other they are all invisible creatures but they are all creatures made by God who have this nature and it's a particular nature I'm starting off with guardian angels because they're the ones I think that we're most familiar with we'll return to building the kingdom of love with Monsignor John Essip in just a moment did you know that discerning hearts has a free app where you can find all your favorite discerning hearts programming father Timothy Gallagher dr.

Timothy Gallagher Chris Mcgregor Jesus Two Boys Six Billion People Monsignor Discerninghearts .Com Today Adam Each Member Each Scranton Pennsylvania First Moment Earth St. Teresa Calcutta Each One Discerning Hearts Pope St. John Paul Ii EVE
Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:05 sec | 23 min ago

Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Designed to multiply output by tailoring AI to your needs. When you Watson X your agency, you can train, tune and deploy AI all with your trusted data. Let's create the right AI for your agency with Watson X. Learn more at ibm .com slash federal IBM. Let's create dad's doctor says it's time to focus on quality of life and comfort. I'm not sure where to start. I'm glad you called Jessa, we can help. When you reach out to Jessa, our hospice nurse will meet you at home for an assessment that's completely covered by

A highlight from DC11 St. Jerome  The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunson  Discerning Hearts Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

00:58 sec | 2 d ago

A highlight from DC11 St. Jerome The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunson Discerning Hearts Podcast

"Discerninghearts .com presents The Doctors of the Church, the Carerism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. For over 20 years, Dr. Bunsen has been active in the area of Catholic social communications and education, including writing, editing, and teaching on a variety of topics related to church history, the papacy, the saints, and Catholic culture. He is the faculty chair at the Catholic Distance University, a senior fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology, and the author or co -author of over 50 books, including The Encyclopedia of Catholic History and the best -selling biographies of St. Damien of Malachi and St. Kateri Tekakawisa. He also serves as a senior editor for the National Catholic Register and is a senior contributor to EWTN News. The Doctors of the Church, the Carerism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. I'm your host, Chris McGregor.

Chris Mcgregor St. Paul Center For Biblical T Bunsen The Encyclopedia Of Catholic H Over 50 Books Matthew Bunsen Catholic Distance University Over 20 Years Ewtn News Discerninghearts .Com The Doctors Of The Church, The St. Kateri Tekakawisa DR. Catholic Register St. Damien Of National Malachi Catholic
Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:02 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"The one you need now and the partner is the one who can deliver that's why millions of maintenance and repair pros trust granger because we have professional grade supplies for every industry even hard to find products and we have same -day pickup and next day delivery on most orders but most importantly we have an unwavering commitment to help keep you up and running call quick ranger .com or just stop by granger for the ones who get it done The doctor will see you now. But do they really? Do they see you as a

St. Jerome ripl - burst 1

Audio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

St. Jerome ripl - burst 1

"We are going to explore the life and work of a father of the Church, a doctor of the Church, that many people probably have heard of. Most people, most Catholics, most Christians, have heard his name. He lived throughout the fourth and into the early fifth century. When we think of the Vulgate, we think of the Catholic Bible, the official text of scripture in Latin. We think of St. Jerome. So in that sense, he is certainly one of the pivotal figures in the life of the Church, in helping the Church to really integrate the love of scripture, the place of scripture in the Church and in the development of Western Christianity.

Vulgate Early Fifth Century ONE ST. Fourth Christians Catholics Latin Catholic Jerome Western Bible Christianity
Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on Bloomberg Markets

Bloomberg Markets

00:05 sec | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "doctor" discussed on Bloomberg Markets

"The risk takers the game changers and the disruptors those committed to making the world a better place bridge bank has been providing financial solutions to technology and innovation companies from inception to IPO and beyond for over two decades through its national network banking teams and offices bridge bank a division of western alliance bank member fdic bridge bank bold venture wisely nearly one in two U .S. adults have high blood pressure that's why it's important to self monitor your blood pressure and for easy to remember steps it starts with a monitor be next to talk to your doctor about your blood pressure numbers get down with your blood pressure self monitoring is power visit manager

St. Jerome ripl

Audio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

St. Jerome ripl

"We are going to explore the life and work of a father of the Church, a doctor of the Church, that many people probably have heard of. Most people, most Catholics, most Christians, have heard his name. He lived throughout the fourth and into the early fifth century. When we think of the Vulgate, we think of the Catholic Bible, the official text of scripture in Latin. We think of St. Jerome. So in that sense, he is certainly one of the pivotal figures in the life of the Church, in helping the Church to really integrate the love of scripture, the place of scripture in the Church and in the development of Western Christianity.

Vulgate Early Fifth Century ONE ST. Fourth Christians Catholics Latin Catholic Jerome Western Bible Christianity
A highlight from 1243. Should You Trust Pet DNA Tests?

Animal Radio

10:00 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 1243. Should You Trust Pet DNA Tests?

"Celebrating the connection with our pets, this is Animal Radio featuring your dream team, veterinarian Dr. Debbie White and groomer, Joey Vellani. And here are your hosts, Hal Abrams and Judy Francis. Do you know what kind of pet you have? Well, certainly if it's a cat or dog, you probably know the difference. But do you know what kind of breed? Is it a mutt? What is making up the DNA of your dog or your cat? And do you care? A lot of people do. There's about 10 different tests on the market right now where you can send in saliva or cheek spittle, I guess? Yeah, cheek swab. It's actually the epithelial. So it's the cells that you're getting off the cheek, not necessarily the spit. Epithelial? Is that what you said there? I learned so much from you. And they'll tell you if it's what kind of breed it is or if it's made up of several different breeds. You did this, Judy. I think your results came back like lion and elephant. They weren't even dogs. It was so bizarre. She's full grown now. She weighs nine pounds. And it came back all these St. Bernard's, German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois. I thought, really? So that was a cheek swab. And then when I did the blood... Oh, you did a blood test too? I did a blood. It came back Jack Russell, miniature pincher and Maltese. And are you going with that? Oh, definitely. She's definitely Jack Russell. It came out 50 % Jack Russell. And that's what she is. Now, why did you want to know this information? Well, first of all, I didn't want a Jack Russell because I did my research and I know how hyper they are. And I'm not that hyper person. I want a more laid back dog. And so I did my research and got her from a rescue when she was eight weeks old. They said she was a Chihuahua, but there was no Chihuahua in this girl. And I questioned that as she got a little bit older. And I thought, okay, I got to find out. And I wanted to know what she was because people ask, people look at her, and everybody had their guesses. And it's like, I don't know. And I wanted to know what my dog was. But would it be safe to say you didn't want a Jack Russell, but you love your dog? Oh, I would not trade her for the world. I'll keep that little 50 % Jack. So the blood test really made little difference in anything, really, except telling people. Just what it was. It was kind of like bragging rights to know what my dog is and be able to say when people ask. That's basically why I did it. But then again, still, at least I know if there's anything I should look at, you know, with the breeds that she may be predisposed to down the line. You mean like a sickness or a disease? Health? Yeah. If she starts doing something or something happens and I can say, well, that's typical of this breed. So what kind of diseases and sicknesses are typical of, what did you say? Was it Jack Russell? Jack Russell, 50%. And a Min Pin? Well, we can see a lot of things with knees, so we can see patellar luxations. She's had two knee surgeries, two back legs. But that also fits with a lot of other small breeds. But, you know, there can be some host of skin diseases, allergies that we may not have like a specific test for. You know, but there are some conditions in some breeds, like say golden retrievers have a genetic linked with seizures. So if you had a yellow large breed dog and you didn't know what it was and it started developing seizures. And if I knew this dog was a golden retriever, I'd say, wow, you know, sometimes golden retrievers can be very challenging to manage with seizures. And we really have to use every means at our disposal to try to get those seizures under control. So it wouldn't change necessarily, you know, would I treat or not treat, but it might make us say, okay, our expectations are this is going to be a more challenging patient to try to manage. So that's one example. But there's a whole tons of things, you know, cataracts are inherited, heart diseases with certain breeds can be inherited, and kidney problems with cats. There's a type of polycystic kidney disease, a kidney disease in Himalayans and Persian type cats that can cause different problems. So, you know, there's all sorts of things that there are genetic tests for. It doesn't mean your dog or cat will get them. It just may mean they have some genetic tendency or genetic marker for that. So I see these online tests and but you do it in your office there? Do veterinarians offer these tests? Yeah, I mean, not everyone is going to do that. But we we do like that. And it's one is it's kind of the ooh, cool factor, you know, so you can, you know, have a party and people will ask and you can actually have some answer that sounds, you know, like you didn't just make this up. That's one important thing. But I do think it can help guide some decisions on awareness and potentially your pet's health down the road. So I wouldn't say it will make me do something different for a patient as far as putting them to sleep. But I do think it's important information to be armed with to know what you need to worry about to watch for in your pet's life. I agree. And if you can't afford it and somebody asks what kind of dog you have, say snuffle up against it really will throw the middle. It'll be different. So we're going to talk to a lady today, a doctor, Dr. Lisa Moses. She practices pain and palliative care at the Angel Animal Medical Center in Boston. And she says you may not want to bet the farm when you do one of these tests, as sometimes the information may not be accurate. And I wanted to find out about this. How important is it? Are people making decisions with bad information? So we'll have her on the show in just a few minutes to talk about that. Also today, we're going to be talking to the folks over at Smoke Alarm Monitoring. What's this guy's name? It's spelled really weird. Z -S -O -L -T. Zolt. Is that Hungarian? What is that? Sounds like it could be. He says our pets are starting fires. He sells smoke alarms for a living. And he says that our pets are actually, while they're unattended, starting fires in our house. See, I hide the matches. You do? Little delinquents. Oh my goodness. Yes. What do you expect? But first, your calls toll free from the free animal radio app for iPhone and Android. Let's go to Gary. Hey, Gary. How are you? I'm very good, sir. How are you? Very good. Where are you calling from today? You have kind of that southern twang. North Carolina. North Carolina. How is North Carolina today? It's kind of warm. It's not unbearably hot, but it's a warm day. What's going on with the animals? I have the whole team here for you. Okay. Well, I've been listening to your program lately over the last several weeks and was interested in the discussion that I've heard about yeast infections, skin conditions, and the treatments. And then also, there was also somewhat of a separate discussion about the use of human products on animals and how effective they can be, or harmful, or whatever the case may be. And I wanted to tell you about my little guy. I'll give you a little background on him, a little of the tale of the tape. He's approximately eight years old, as far as we know. He's a Yorkie mix, he's a small guy, just a shade under eight pounds, and I found him abandoned out in the country. And he was in pretty bad shape. He was missing hair and had a lot of parasites and skin infections, yeast, and all that. And we've been battling it for nearly three years now, but he's made much improvement, just great improvement. I kind of took it upon myself to use a product that's designed for human females, actually, who might have that kind of affliction, and rubbed it liberally on the elephant skin areas of my dog. And after doing that for three or four days in a row, it really seemed to help clear it up. What do you think of that, Doc? Well, we have to be precise when we talk about different products, because there's some products that actually can have harmful ingredients in them, and some won't hurt, and actually have active ingredients that might be appropriate. So I'm going to back up, because when we talk about elephant skin, and kind of that thickened skin, like for anybody who's not seen this in dogs, it typically is when their skin gets real thick, leathery, they lose the hair in the area, and it actually, from a distance, looks like elephant skin. And that's a combination of what we call hyperpigmentation, so the skin turns dark, and lichenification, which is where the skin becomes thick, and there's extra layers, if you will, that kind of are put on top of the skin. Those things happen from a couple possibilities, and we can see it with allergies, but really with things like yeast and bacterial infections. So it sounds like you're certainly barking up the right tree there, but the cautions I have with some of the female yeast products that are used for vaginal yeast infections, there are some that actually contain anesthetics. A vagus cell, for example, contains an ingredient called benzocaine. And this can be highly - Well, that's actually what I used. I used the generic, but yeah, you're on the right tree there. Okay. Yeah, so actually, benzocaine can cause toxicities in both dogs and cats. So just licking it off their skin, it can actually be toxic to the red blood cells, causes what we call hemoglobinemia. So if it contains that ingredient, I would say, put it back on the shelf and save it for your wife in the household. But there are certainly, say, athlete's foot creams that contain chlorotrimazole, which is an antifungal. In that, we've used that on surface yeast infections. But the reality is, if we've got that kind of change in the skin, most of those pets actually need kind of a two -pronged approach. So the topicals only get you so far, and they really need to be on some kind of oral or systemic therapy. So most of the pets that I have with that kind of skin can take a course of maybe three months to get them improved, controlling the itch, controlling the infection. If they've got yeast or bacteria, then we put them on either an antibiotic or an oral yeast form, like ketoconazole, per se.

Joey Vellani Judy Francis Gary Lisa Moses Today Boston Hal Abrams Three Three Months North Carolina Nine Pounds 50% 50 % iPhone Judy Angel Animal Medical Center Debbie White Two Knee One Example Four Days
A highlight from 129 - Gardeners Never Retire: Overcoming Challenges in Your Senior Years - Duane Pancoast

The Garden Question

09:40 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 129 - Gardeners Never Retire: Overcoming Challenges in Your Senior Years - Duane Pancoast

"The Garden Question is a podcast for people that love designing, building, and growing smarter gardens that work. Listen in as we talk with successful garden designers, builders, and growers, discovering their stories along with how they think, work, and grow. This is your next step in creating a beautiful, year -round, environmentally connected, low -maintenance, and healthy, thriving outdoor space. It doesn't matter if you're a beginner or an expert, there will always be something inspiring when you listen to the Garden Question podcast. Hello, I'm your host, Craig McManus. In this episode, we talk about adapting to various gardening challenges. We explore making tough decisions in gardening throughout the latter seasons of life. Also, having the best attitude toward tough decisions. Mobility restrictions began taking a toll on 84 -year -old Dwayne Pankost. His gardening abilities were changing, but not his knowledge. He began sharing his and other senior gardener's experiences in his blog, The Geriatric Gardener, in February of 2017. After posting bi -monthly adaptive gardening stories, Dwayne decided to compile the best of his post into a self -published book, The Geriatric Gardener. Dwayne feels having the garden information at your fingertips is a benefit for every senior gardener. Dwayne continues to work in the family marketing communication business, which he started in 1985. The firm serves tree, landscape, and lawn care businesses. This has been episode 129, Gardeners Never Retire, Overcoming the Challenges in Your Senior Years, with Dwayne Pankost. Dwayne, why did you decide not to give up on gardening? I didn't really decide to give up on gardening. Old Edge crept up on me. One day when I couldn't get up from kneeling, I decided I was going to have to garden a bit differently. I thus started my second career preaching about adaptive gardening. What is it about gardening that keeps you wanting to go with it, no matter what age you are? I like plants, and plants seem to like me. When I could no longer do outside work, I was fortunate enough to have a mature, mostly woody plant landscape at my home, which I was able to hire out the maintenance work. So, I've concentrated on indoor gardening, especially tillandsia air plants, because they're fun, they're curious, they're easy to maintain. I have about 30 of them, and another 30 of regular soil and pot plants. Would you explain what adaptive gardening is, and how it differs from traditional gardening practices? Sure. Adaptive gardening is simply adapting your garden and your gardening to your changing physical conditions. If your knees hurt, you have to find a way to garden without kneeling, with raised beds, containers. I'm particularly fond of elevated beds, because I like to garden sitting down, and there's a place to put your legs underneath elevated beds. How does adaptive gardening contribute to the well -being and mental health of individuals facing physical limitations or health challenges? As you grow older, your knees wear out, your back wears out, your shoulders wear out, and Adaptive gardening is simply finding ways in which you can continue gardening with minimum pain, minimum disturbance to your health. It may start with just a pair of strap -on knee pads, and then it may go to getting one of these kneelers that you tip it over and it becomes a seat, or one of the other gardening seats that are available online or at some garden stores and home centers, and then going to raise beds, elevated beds and containers, eventually, perhaps concentrating on your indoor gardening. Do you find that it keeps promoting an independent spirit and self -sufficiency by continuing to garden? Oh, it sure does. Some people retire and all they do is sit in front of the television, and they're dead in six months. I'll be 85 in November, so I figure I can thank gardening for some of that longevity because it keeps me busy. I can get up in the morning, and I know I've got something productive to do. How I do it or how anybody does it is adapting is a matter of time management, only working blocks that are comfortable for you, maybe 20 minutes or maybe a half hour, and then take a rest break. If you're working outside, go into a shady spot. I used to go into my garage and sit and watch people walk their dogs up and down the street. Well, while you're there, always have a cooler of nice cold water and drink plenty of it because staying hydrated is very important to your well -being. Dehydration is one of the major causes of falls because people can get lightheaded and their balance goes crazy when they are dehydrated. Falling is one of the things you don't want to do out in the garden. I didn't realize that. I didn't know that dehydration led to dizziness. A doctor told me that I could always tell when I was dehydrated because my balance went wonky. I drank enough water and an hour or so, it was back to normal. Would you tell us about some of the decisions you had to make in your latter years? You said you're 85, but what are some of the decisions you faced going through that time period? First of all was downsizing and this can be a trauma for some people. I thought it was going to be for my late wife because she liked our house and I didn't like our house because it was a money pit from the day we moved in. It was a half -acre lot with a two -story colonial on it. It was great for raising our four sons because they had plenty of grass to play ball and do kid stuff. When walking the stairs became difficult for both of us, she was the one who decided, I think we ought to downsize. So we built a house that is about the same size as a two -story, but one story on a quarter -acre lot. One of the things I tell people, if you're going to downsize, bring something from your old garden with you. Dig up some plants that you especially liked in your old garden that may have a story. That goes with it or something with the family. I happened to bring a ginkgo tree. It was about four or five inches caliper and 15 or 20 feet tall. I didn't just dig it up and put it in the back seat of the car and bring it over. I had a client who had a big tree spade and he moved it for me. Downsizing is the first decision. I used to do my grass. I timed it, not by the clock. I did the back and one side, and then I would sit down and rest for 20 minutes or so, drink a bottle of water. Then I'd go out and do the front and the other side, and then sit down for a while before I'd go on to the next gardening job. I was convinced at a certain point that I ought to hire a lawn cutting service, which I did. When I found that I couldn't get up from a kneeling position, that's when I hired the lawn care service to also do things like weeding and trimming my shrubs. I have a tree and landscape client. He does stuff like the heavy pruning, any tree climbing, because he has a pre -care division. It wasn't a matter of whether I was going to quit gardening or not quit gardening. It was a matter of how I was going to do the gardening and still have a relatively painless life. This was at the old house. No, the new house. You were cutting the grass at your new house? Yeah. Oh, okay. Well, you talked about the pain. What do you suggest to continue gardening when your knees do start causing you trouble? I suggest, first of all, anybody of any age, go get a pair of strap -on knee pads. A lot of gardeners get the cheapest ones, and they complain that the strap goes around the bend of the knee, go to the next quality up, and it'll have a strap that goes above the knee bend and another strap that goes below it. Look into one of these kneelers or combination kneeler bench or something to sit on. If you're younger, use the knee pads to help prevent or put off the knee problems. Knees, for some reason, they just calcify. You get arthritis. I asked my orthopedic doctor, what causes it? He said, wear it out. I said to him, maybe it's too much genuflecting in church. And without missing a beat, he said, well, come on over to the Episcopal Church. We don't do that.

Craig Mcmanus Dwayne Pankost 15 Dwayne February Of 2017 20 Minutes 1985 One Story Two -Story November 85 Both 20 Feet Five Inches Second Career Six Months Gardeners Never Retire Half -Acre About 30 One Side
A highlight from Embracing Change with Anne Tumlinson- CR100

Career Relaunch

03:47 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Embracing Change with Anne Tumlinson- CR100

"I could make a big mistake, make a bad decision, and it will affect a lot of people. I can only just do the best that I can. Showing up is everything. Consistency is everything. Welcome to the Career Relaunch Podcast. For the past seven years, we've shared the personal stories of people from around the world who have decided to reinvent their careers. My name is Joseph Liu, and I believe clarity, confidence, and courage allow you to make brave changes that bring you more career fulfillment. In each episode, I feature people who have boldly stepped off the beaten path to relaunch their careers. We talk through the setbacks and successes of their personal journeys to help you understand what it takes to relaunch your own career. Today, for this special 100th episode, the very first guest I ever interviewed for this show is returning to talk about how things have gone for her in her personal and professional life since we first spoke in 2016. Afterwards, during today's Mental Fuel, I'll summarize my top takeaways about managing the dynamics of career change I've learned from all the guests on this show. Ideas of where you could take your career typically emerge in subtle ways. You could read something or hear something or feel something one day that plants a seed in your head about a project, initiative, or path that kind of sparks your interest. Now, in most cases, you may just dismiss the idea and refocus on the things already filling your time like your day job, work projects, or life demands. But in some cases, the idea kind of just hangs around like a shadow and nags you until one day you feel like you just have to address it. And if you don't, it just keeps bugging you or even haunting you until you do. For me, the idea to create this podcast emerged about seven years ago after I started to see that while my clients on the cusp of making a career change do benefit from how -to advice, expert guidance, or prescriptive tutorials, what they really want and often lack is companionship and inspiration to sort of normalize the idea of following an unconventional career path but also to amass the emotional motivation to make a brave change. So in 2016, I decided to record a few conversations with people willing to share their honest perspectives about how they change careers to see if listeners would find something helpful in these stories. Ninety -nine episodes, seven seasons, and nearly half a million downloads across 170 countries later, we've now arrived at the 100th episode of this podcast. And I thought, who better to invite to be our guest today than the very first person I ever interviewed for the show, Ann Tomlinson, who's kindly agreed to join us again to share an update on how things have been going for her since her episode aired in September 2016 when this show first launched. Ann and I first met way back in 2002 in Washington, DC. She was the first manager I had at a consulting firm I joined a couple months after I dropped out of medical school, which was my first experience with changing career paths myself. At the time, I was feeling confused about what to do next, questioning my place in the professional world and experiencing one of the lowest points in my life. As someone who had been set on becoming a doctor, I was actually a bit skeptical about working at a for -profit company, but Ann had a direct role in helping me realize that you could actually do a lot of good in many different sectors when I was in the midst of trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life instead of medicine.

Ann Tomlinson ANN September 2016 Joseph Liu 2016 Washington, Dc Each Episode Seven Seasons Today Ninety -Nine Episodes 100Th Episode 2002 First Guest First First Experience First Manager 170 Countries First Person Mental Fuel
A highlight from Rising Auto Theft Rates: Urban Consequences and Solutions

The Financial Guys

22:19 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Rising Auto Theft Rates: Urban Consequences and Solutions

"Well, you see how easy this is now. Now you look at how they move money around and how the in your face money laundering folks, this is what this is. This is corruption and fraud. Some of the Bidens are great at the money laundering part. They got 20 shell corporations, but guess who's getting the guess who's going to be controlling the funding to rebuild Ukraine. We pay to destroy it. And guess what? The Hillary Clinton Foundation gets paid the rebuild Welcome right. to the podcast. We are in the same studio today, which is kind of nice. So thanks again for downloading. If you're just listening, if you're watching or watching the clips, uh, thanks for watching as well. And just for a quick mention, so I don't forget, if you haven't downloaded our app yet, I'm noticing we're getting a lot of downloads and the cool thing is when the morning Mike's program is going Monday, Wednesday, Friday, I'm the, seeing the view count go up and up and up, which is awesome. So I know we're only, you know, we're still in the dozens. I'd like to get into the hundreds and eventually thousands, um, but it's a cool program. If you haven't listened to it, it's a quick 15 minutes to quick by morning, run down three days a week of the top five topics, three minutes each. Do a great job. They do an awesome job when we're, when we fill in the stuff. We screw the whole thing up. Yes. Yeah. We, we blow the whole, the whole, uh, the schedule, but, um, but they do awesome and they're funny. I love it. It's a quick, you know, down and dirty 15 minutes, top five items of the day. And now you get your day started off on the, uh, they, you know, I think on the right foot, they were saying this week, like, Oh, it's so negative all the time, but I think they're hilarious. They take the negative stuff that's going on, but of course the negative stuff isn't the news. Yeah. Yeah. That's what we're seeing. I mean, carjackings again, Rochester had another, you know, record night. I mean, it's incredible how that was going on. And so it's amazing is, is like the Democrats just sit around and watch this happen in every city and every city. It's insane. Yeah. I sent you an article earlier this morning about Philadelphia. Let's see. I can find it. It's, uh, not that it's anything out of, you know, anything that we don't know about, but let's see here. Philadelphia swarmed by alleged juvenile. Come on, come on. Juvenile looters targeting the Apple store, Lulu lemon and footlocker. Yeah. So, cause they're starving. They're starving. They just, just need a little piece of ham and some Turkey. They need clothes and food. That's, that's only fair. I mean, they, you know, and once again, I know we've all heard this joke, but footlocker is not missing one pair of working boots. No, no, all the Nike's, all the Nike. Yeah. Well, some of those Nike's, I mean, Oh my God. Crazy. You know, talking about like, you know, thousands of dollars for a pair of, thousands, thousands of dollars. I was talking to my daughter and she said to one, one of her friends has a, as a pair of shoes were $1 ,200. I'll never forget the most expensive pair of shoes I ever bought. We were just starting a business. This was like 30 years ago now. Right. Crazy to think. And I remember somebody told me that maybe my dad was like, you got to have a decent pair of shoes. Right. And so I went up and I bought a pair of Justin and Murphy's. They're like 120 bucks at the time. Yeah. The most money I have ever spent on a pair of shoes. Now boots, I've spent more money on since because boots are more expensive, you know, hunting boots. Well, there's a purpose to them. I still don't spend more money on shoes. Like I'm wearing like Skechers or like $40. Like some of these Nike's $500. You can't tell me you're running faster. It's different when you're going to go out and buy a pair of like waders or something. You're going to use them. First of all, you're going to use them for the next 30 years. Right. And there's a purpose to them, right? Like, okay, they're more expensive, but I can walk through the water with them. Right. But if I bought like, if I had five, 600 hour pairs of shoes, I'd be afraid to leave the house. I wouldn't, I wouldn't get off the carpeting. Well, they're targeting the Apple store here, Glenn, because they'll buy jobs. And that's the only way to get a job is to make sure you've got an Apple iPhone. So it'll be like Chicago. We talked about this the other week with, with, uh, with Mike Speraza, Chicago is now forced to open or, or just talking about opening, you know, a, a government run grocery store in the inner city because they've all that. Well, they're going to, so they're going to, they're going to, the plan is to fight the communism with more kind of communism, right? That's going to work really well. But could you imagine how inefficient, first of all, Walmart's pulled out, Costco's pulled out, all the stores have pulled out because now target, have you heard targets now closing stores across the country? So target is now going through and discussing all the stores across the country, liberal target, liberal target. They put a black lives matter that they ripped down the smash of the window. I thought that'd be some sort of a shield or that we're just going to put up this, uh, this plywood and we're going to spray black lives matter on it. Hashtag hashtag BLM. And we'll be safe as they rip it out and use that same plywood to smash the window with. It's pathetic. There'll be nothing left in these inner cities. The problem is when it starts to spill over into the, into the, Oh yeah. This is, this is where it gets ugly. Well, they want it. That's what they want. That's, that's why people like, uh, the governor of New York, uh, you know, Kathy, the ice queen, Kathy Hochul is, is, you know, they first tried the push for section eight housing in the suburbs because that was only fair. Yeah. Now they couldn't get that through because the people in the suburbs are like, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. Now they're busing in illegal immigrants in the middle of the night. And I tell you something, if these Democrats like Mark Poland cars were proud of what they were doing, they would have a welcoming party at noon at noon, high noon. They'd have a press conference welcoming our newest community members off the bus so that the whole community could see these family units that are getting off. You got the husband, the wives, the two kids, you know, the things that we see in our country, right? No, it's not happening. They're bringing them in at two o 'clock in the morning. So nobody sees, they're all, they're all 23 year old males, right? Or 18 to 25 year old males. Some of which are from the Congo. I don't know about the, uh, you know, the, some of the social norms in the Congo, but I'm just thinking that maybe they're a little bit different than the Western world. I don't know. I'm just thinking maybe not. Maybe they're exactly like us. I don't know. But they're exactly like us. Why would they want to come here? Why are they aspiring to come here? I don't know. Anyway, it's a fentanyl fentanyl up again, by the way, there was another report. I think it was on a Fox news. Well, good for the Republicans. I mean, at least part of them, I should say good for the five or six Republicans that are the extreme right wing, according to the media, that's holding this garbage up. No, shut the government down, shut it down, shut it down until there's no more money. Take the money, go into Ukraine and send it to Texas, which they did right to the border, which they didn't do last time. Right. Kept it open. That's what do you need? What do you need? We're out of control. The founding fathers gave the power of the purse to Congress and the, and the Pentagon, the Pentagon goes, yeah, you know what? We're just going to exempt Ukraine funding from the budget. So ha ha. We just went over 33 trillion. If you go online and look at the clock, it's moving fast, right? So we're on our way to 34 or 35. Can you even see the numbers anymore? They just blur blur now. So, so fast. Oh no. And, and good news, by the way, we're refinancing this debt at 5 % now, not at 1 % or zero like we were doing. Yeah. It makes a lot of sense. Yeah. It'd be great. Yeah. The fence talk about keeping rates higher for longer. I don't know. They're not going to be able to do that. They'll be cutting interest rates by next year. Mark by where? And the number one reason I say that is because when you talk to every economist, I say, that's not going to happen. And they are typically wrong. So if you take the, it's like saying betting against the casino, it's like saying, you know what? I don't think MGM is going to make money in the sporting books next year. Ma, they're going to figure out a way to make money. They'll rechange the lines, right? Well, you, all you need to do is look at it and get a bunch of economists in a room and ask them where they think the market's going to be and then do just the opposite and you would be way better. Yeah. Pretty much that's usually the way to go. No doubt about it. So the, the, the, the Pelosi, we were talking earlier about the Pelosi stock trader. Yeah. You can follow online. Now, some of these folks, we did the game show game last week. We talked about the, uh, the net worth. I picked the poor ones too. They were like 23, 21, you know, $20 million. Some of these folks are amazing. I mean, really just, you know, the wizards of smart on some of these are just really, timing is impeccable up here. This is somebody who is selling some software that I'll track it, which you can, you, you've pointed out, you can get it for free online, but, but the, the numbers are really astonishing. This Democrat Senator sold her Aspen vacation home for $25 million. That was just after she sold her Lake Tahoe vacation house for $36 million. Well, by the way, why, why do they own these big $25, $36 million homes? Well, a big, big part of it is because the taxation of it, right? So a Feinstein who's telling you your ordinary income tax rates are too low. She's shifting that to a capital asset, which is going to create a capital gain in the future or no gain. Or no gain. I mean, they're 10, 10 31. This is why when Donald Trump looked at Hillary Clinton right in the eye and said, you will not get rid of the carry interest deduction and you know it because all of your, I use it, of course, all of her bigger donors donate money to Hillary Clinton. And this is exactly the truth, right? They will never get rid of some of these things. Like they talked about, we're going to get rid of the 10 31 exchanges. Yaha. Yeah. Uh huh. Yeah. So the big developer strokes a giant check to the, to the Democrats off the table. Let's listen to her success though. Amazing. A Senator sold her Aspen vacation home for $25 million just after she sold her Lake Tahoe vacation house for $36 million. Only two years earlier, Diane Feinstein has been a member of the political scene for 32 years and her salary is only $130 ,000 per 130 grand a year. Now it's more now. That's a little bit dated, but it's up, it's up to probably 180 now. But, but listen to this. First of all, if it was up to 580, you're not buying $23 million homes, $36 million homes. No, no, we're going to put in multiple homes. We're going to, we're going to put the Paul Pelosi onto our research committee. You make a million dollars a year. First of all, most of, most business owners that make that kind of money, they didn't make it throughout their whole life, right? They didn't start making a million dollars at 20 years old. They started making a million dollars at 50 years old and it took 30 years to get to that point. Right? So my point is, you're not at a million dollars a year at age 50. If you did it the right way, the hard way, and you did it yourself, you're still not affording a $23 million home, right? Multiple ones. Yeah. Multiple, multiple. Right. Those aren't even her primary residence. Those are her vacation homes. She lives in, she lives in California. Listen to this though. And it's, it's all of them. It's all of them now. This is a, this is from Nancy Pelosi, stock trader. Uh, this is a tweet, uh, a Twitter feed. You can follow Pelosi tracker is what it's supposed to track or underline or something like that. You'll find it. Anyway, uh, three weeks ago, sitting politician bet against the U S economy so far. He's been right. Tom Carper bought $45 ,000 of PSQ and inverse ETF on the tech sector on eight 23, August 23rd. Since then he's plus 3 % while the market is negative 4%. Go figure. Wow. Go figure. Man, these guys are so good. Yeah. And they're not by, they're, I mean, these are, that's some pretty technical strategy. You started getting into options strategies and stuff. I mean, yeah. Yeah. These guys have become very, very slick. It's not just about buying a, you see, it used to be, okay, I'm going to buy X, Y, Z. Then I'm going to vote for or against something. You know, I'm going to short the stock and then I'm going to vote against them for both that, that, that. So the stock goes down or I'm going to vote for something, knowing that it will benefit the company. The stock will go up and in a sense front running. No, they're, they're in the options strategies now. They're in the market. Yeah. They're doing butterfly spreads. Yeah. Crazy stuff going. They're very sophisticated. They shouldn't be allowed to two things. When you go into Congress, I, you know, I would love to have a Congress person run on or present around the following platform, right? Number one, term limits, term limits, top of the list. Number two, though, while you're in Congress for the eight years, or wherever we allow you to serve 10 years, 12 years, whatever it is, you could not invest in a stock market at all. All your investments are frozen or your choices, a model, some kind of a model liquidated go to cash, or you could buy the fidelity balance to counter. You could buy the, you could buy the T -rope price, you know, target retire, whatever, you know, or you go to goes into a blind something or other where you have no idea. Right. It just goes into what you picked a one through five tolerance for risk and somebody else invest. Maybe it's just broad indexing. Maybe that's it. Right. Something that doesn't allow this kind of garbage to go on where, you know, they buy, you know, Tesla stock and then approve a huge, you know, oh, we're going to, guess what? We're going to build a, you know, for government funded battery stations all the country. Of course, Elon comes out and goes, we already got those, you idiots. I did that like four years ago, you morons. Amazing what Elon can do and what the, what the government can. Going back to target for just a second, not to digress, but I found WGRZ, thankfully came up with a list of the, uh, the target stores that will be closing, Mike, the full list of locations all in, all in Republican run. You'll be shocked. Yeah. Yeah. Right in the, uh, the thriving, the, uh, you know, thriving, the Minneapolis, uh, location, the retailer said the decision, the close was really difficult. I wonder if that was after half. That was the one they put the BLM on. Yeah. Oh, that was the one they put the sign on that said, please don't burn our store down. We love you. I hashtag BLM lit it on fire. Yeah, that's right. Yeah. Uh, let's see. I'm shocked though. I wouldn't, I'm surprised you wouldn't stay. I mean, you know, like just collecting, you love them. You love, you support them. This is what you supported. Remember you, you, you raised money, you gave money. Yeah. And guess what they did with that money. They agitators hired to whip up people in the community to smash and burn down your store. You idiots. So there you go. There you go. Nice, nice work. What else do you think, Mike? Uh, New York city's East Harlem neighborhood. That's going to be one that's goes down. I wonder why. Chicago, San Francisco for sure. San Fran. Yeah. San Fran. Uh, by the way, before I forget San Fran, Democrat San Francisco mayor, announces plan to require drug testing, which is good in an effort to, if you're going to receive homeless benefits. Right. But the funny thing was in this same passage, they're going to Texas to try to recruit police officers. The funny thing is is that the people they sent from San Francisco to try to recruit people. They didn't come back. They defected like North Koreans. Some of them got jobs. They get over the wall. They come out, they get over the wall. It was hilarious. No, they didn't go back. Well, the other five stores, Mike, three in Portland, Oregon and two in Seattle, five, three in Portland. They're pulling out of Portland together. All of these inner cities folks will be food deserts. You're going to hear that term. It'll be business deserts. It'll be nothing. Well, business deserts, nothing left, but there'll be, but target, don't forget target. Does target sell food? Yeah. Well, yeah. They sell food. Yeah. For sure. Yeah. Well, I don't go on target. So Walmart I know does Costco for sure. Costco is a food store. I don't think target is as big as Walmart as far as like fresh fruit, but definitely frozen food, all that kind of stuff. You know, aisles of pop and water and chips and right, right, right. And all that kind of stuff. But you can definitely frozen food. You can buy bulk frozen food there. So, so there's going to be food deserts, all over the place, business deserts, whatever you want to call them. You know, it's amazing because you know, the, there's no policing. And the sad thing is that is the problem. It's not, there's no policing. I shouldn't say that. Excuse me. No, you're policing your asses off. I get it. There's no ability. There's no prosecution. There's no bill. You guys are arresting people, putting them in and they go right back on the street. They're getting, they're getting appearance tickets. It's a joke. Your point is no, there is no policing anymore because of the system, the Democrats put together where the police officers aren't going to bother. If you're a police officer and you know that somebody is going to be this, this carjacking or whatever is robbery. And you know that there's a potential, you're going to get an altercation where you're in New York state. There's two police officers that have been brought up on charges recently with almost a hundred percent chance that if you do catch that person, that person will be right back. Yeah. A hundred percent. Why would you bother? Why would you bother? You're not going to put your life in line. No way. You want to go home to see your wife and kids too, and your mother or your husband or whatever. You want to be able to spend your Christmas with your family. Why would you do that? And they know that, right? The Democrats know that. This is, you can't be this stupid. I mean, who allows these people to go right back on the streets and say, this is a good idea without correcting this right away. You can say, okay, bail reform. Our intentions were one thing, but when you look at the fact that in New York state, we are now breaking records in towns like Rochester and Buffalo for the most amount of vehicles being stolen. We can say, okay, look at bail reform, put it in place. It clearly did not work. It's been a total disaster. These towns have turned to shit. We absolutely need to go back in the other direction. They're not doing that. They don't care. They want to, and they're doubling down, tripling down on it, tripling down. We invited this liberal on, you actually were on the show with him and he said, things are actually safer since bail reform. That's what his argument was. His argument was, and by the way, his argument was if we have even less police officers, cities like Buffalo will get safer. Well the thought was less police officers, less arrests. Less arrests means less crime. Dude, you got the whole thing backwards, bro. And not only that, but now we know that, right? Now we know, now you can, I mean, literally auto thefts are up 360 % in Rochester. They're not up 3%. You can say, well, you know, in Buffalo and we're in second place. And they can't play, they can't play in COVID. They're trying to like, well, it was a lockdown. People were at pent up, whatever. Remember that was the, that was the reason for the rioting and the ballooning and burning like, well, people had a lot of pent up. We probably should have locked them down. That was a little bit of the reason for the increase in suicides. You guys, you guys increased suicides because you locked kids in their homes, but it wasn't the reason that they went and decided to steal Nike sneakers from a footlocker. So check this out. Speaking of COVID, this is huge. This is, I don't know if you saw this or not, but this is absolutely ginormously huge. Dr. Fauci was smuggled into CIA headquarters without a record of entry where he participated in the analysis to influence the agency's COVID -19 investigation according to the house select subcommittee on the coronavirus pandemic. Did he need to do much with these left -wing CIA agents? Probably not. No, no, no. That's what they're smuggling him in for. Well they smuggled him in because they didn't want anybody to know that he was part of the PSYOP operation, which was hydroxychloric. By the way, the I think it was a Mayo clinic and some other hospitals now have come out as well as the CDC and said hydroxychloroquine, yes, indeed is an effective treatment for COVID. Oh, by the way, ivermectin also an effective treatment. The CDC now approving that. Now mind you, we're going to keep in mind that if there was any other treatments that couldn't get the emergency use authorization for these vaccines that clearly don't work. Amazingly, I'm still seeing people online go signing off my sixth booster on our way for the sixth shot, proud to get our sixth shot. How about how about one the other day, local left -wing nut job got her sixth booster shot, six shot and she still got COVID and then she said, well, I was so good hiding and it got all my shots and then I went to a concert and I got it at this concert. Well, first of all, you don't know that, but second of all, if you have six shots and you six shots and you still got COVID and you actually think that was a good idea, you don't need a vaccination. You need a mental, you need a mental check. I tell you, I know people during the during the COVID, the height of the COVID that were older, some of our clients actually that were prescribed by a doctor a hydroxy quirk when they were taking it once a week as a as a preventative measure. Yeah. And they, to this day have never had COVID. Yeah. And it's, it's, I mean, so it, but the sad thing is again, you know, we couldn't, it's all about the money now. And that's, you know, when people talk about the evils of capitalism, you're seeing some of that. Now, capitalism is the best thing on the planet, right? As far as, you know, lifting the masses out of poverty and creating amazing amounts of wealth. But the problem is this isn't, this isn't capitalism. What's going on. This is cronyism is what's going on. It is, Hey, look at, I will give you these government dollars. You're going to get this patent. You're going to get this. Unholy marriage between business and government. Mark my word. We were talking about Feinstein selling 25, $30 million homes. This Fauci will be on the board of Pfizer. He'll be on the board of Moderna. He's going to get shares of those companies. He will be blessed with with with millions and millions of dollars. His family watch and see, we'll be talking if we're, if you and I are fortunate enough to be around 20, 30 years from now, we'll be talking about the Fauci trust and watch and monitor that trust and see how big that family trust. Well, you see how easy this is now. You look at how they move money around and how the in your face money laundering folks. This is what this is. This is corruption and fraud. Some of the Bidens are great at the money laundering part. They got 20 shell corporation, but guess who's getting the, guess who's going to be controlling the funding to rebuild Ukraine. We pay to destroy it. And guess what? The Hillary Clinton foundation gets paid to rebuild it. Right. And guess who's going to get the contracts to rebuild. Oh, that'll be probably one of the Biden family members or somebody else's politically connected. Right. Remember it was, it was a Joe Biden's brother who got the contract, the multi -billion dollar contract to rebuild Iraq. No building experience, never been a contractor, right? No idea. Right. This is why these projects cost 500 times what they're supposed to cost. This is why when money comes into Buffalo, for example, $25 million to build homes, five get built. And you were, wait a minute, five, are these $5 million homes in the East side? Each of those homes would have been built for a quarter million dollars or less. And yet where did the rest of the money go? And the, the answer is never, we don't know. We don't know. We can't account for it. Or we'd have no idea. Or I mean, how many times have we've seen that in so many places that whether right down the local level or God forbid at the federal level between, you know, Iraq and others. I was telling you last week on the radio, I was reading an article about the grants that were coming into the city of Buffalo to plant trees. And I thought, okay, wow, like this could be sweet. Okay. You know, like I'm a big tree guy. I love trees. I plant trees every year. I do think, okay, that's one way to, first of all, I think it's one way to make a community look great. When you, when you drive around, let's say North Buffalo, all the streets are all tree. They look beautiful. You drive around the East side, it looks like shit, right? So, okay. You're going to take some of my tax money and you're going to directly plant trees. Okay. It's a win for the environment. It looks nice. It's going to bring things together. I'm like, well, where's the catch? This is a government agency. Where are they going to screw it up? You read through and you find out that they're paying $1 ,000 a tree. Now you and I both know that if they're saying it's $1 ,000 a tree, by the time it's done, it'll be two to $3 ,000 a tree. Now you, you're talking about $13 million worth of trees. You and I just planted trees. Every year we plant a few trees around our office, you know, three, four in the spring, three, four in the fall, just so they can start to grow and work their way in. And then, you know, plant more. We pay $250 a tree, plant it. Right.

Nancy Pelosi Diane Feinstein Mike Speraza Mike $5 Million Kathy Hochul Joe Biden $1 ,000 California Portland Kathy $1 ,200 Tom Carper $23 Million Costco Five 10 Years Donald Trump $40 CDC
Success Works Best When We Define It for Ourselves

Recipes for Success

03:47 min | 6 d ago

Success Works Best When We Define It for Ourselves

"Hi everyone and you're very welcome back to another episode of Recipes for Success with me your host, Heather Thompson. Today's episode is a little bit different, this is a solo cast episode so it will just be me and I'll be talking about how we define success. So what you can expect from these solo episodes is I'll be kind of pulling on some of the fundamental elements of success and also very much from what I've talked about with my guests in terms of how they've defined success, elements that have helped them in their success, maybe barriers or challenges to it. So it's really just kind of giving you more language, more understanding, more awareness about how you can build your own personal success because that's the really important message that I hope you're getting from the conversation so far is that success works best when we define it for ourselves. So let's start there today, like what is success, how do we define it? Well I think there's a lot of very like traditional kind of conventional stereotypes of that. I think if I was to maybe name a few it would probably be being 10 like losing weight that's often seen as success, security, you know it's particularly in Ireland in previous eras you know the secure job, the teacher, the pension, the civil service, money and so basically like the more money the better it doesn't matter how you get that money or the impact that it has and status you know titles, certain professions are seen as being you know kind of better than others whether that's law or being a doctor so they're kind of like and they're all related I suppose to the norms of society like what success is seen like and how people know really what box to put you in so if you're of a certain status, you drive a certain car then I can make an assumption I suppose about the lifestyle that you lead. What I hope you're getting from the people that I'm talking to is that you don't need to just define success that way and not that there's anything inherently wrong with any of that if that's how you choose to live your life but the important part is that you are understanding what success looks like for you and you're not living by someone else's definition and that you're doing it very consciously and very intentionally so you want to be living your life basically like you don't want to be living someone else's so what else could success be? Well I think some of the themes that we've saw in season one, health, happiness, working less, healing journeys, gratitude, connection, the sort of lifestyle that you're having, more freedom, maybe you have a house by the sea, it's all about people kind of understanding like following their dreams right like it's about people kind of understanding what it is that they want and then going after that not just kind of doing what was expected of them, what they've maybe fell into, what they decided to do you know after school which I think when you think about it like making the decision at 18 or 19 that we think we need to live by for you know the 50 years that we need to work is a little bit mad so it's kind of it's funny why you were so scared to change when actually it's probably way more logical to think that of course over your working life what you enjoy doing and what gives you fulfillment and kind of normalizing the concept of having like a second or third career

Heather Thompson 50 Years Ireland 10 Second Today Recipes For Success With Third Career 18 Season One 19
A highlight from Dennis & Julie: Exciting versus Enduring

Dennis Prager Podcasts

21:43 min | Last week

A highlight from Dennis & Julie: Exciting versus Enduring

"Hey everybody, Dennis Prager with Julie Hartman, Dennis and Julie. One of my favorite hour and 12 minutes of the week. Me too. Isn't that amazing? Yes. And what's also amazing is that we actually do probably three or four Dennis and Julie's a week that are not recorded because we talk on the phone so often. And sometimes, I don't know if you think this, sometimes when we're done speaking, I'm like, wish that were recorded. Really? Yes. That's an interesting point. But you know what's also great? We are very personal on this show. There's really, I can't think of many things that we talk about privately that we wouldn't talk about publicly. I think people understand that. That's why that guy called me and I've talked about this a lot, said, I have a great word for you Dennis, transparent, because I decided early on in my career that as unnatural as it seems, because people obviously hide parts of their lives from others, I thought I'm going to hide as little as possible. That's why people say to me more often than any other things when strangers meet me, you know, I feel like I really know you and I'm sorry and I say, you do. I can attest to that as someone who knows you off the air as well as on the air, listeners really do know you. It's also just easier being transparent because I can imagine that it's difficult to have to think, oh, did I say that? Should I say this? That's right. It's just kind of your default. It's like it's easier to be faithful than have an affair. Aside from all the moral issues and the hurt of my spouse, all of that stuff, putting aside that they're all real. A major reason not to have an affair is because of the amount of hiding you have to do and lying. It is not possible to have an affair and not become a serial liar. Well, one lie begets another lie, which begets another. It has to. I mean, if you say I was at the doctor's and they say, how was it? And then you go, yeah, let's say your wife runs into the doctor. You know, like it just it's this tangled web of of deceit that's I can imagine difficult to keep up. You know, in that regard, it's amazing how our conversations just developed. So I'm going to say something that will strike people at the outset as odd at best and maybe even bad at worst. So when I meet somebody who's having an affair, because people open up to me, in most instances, my first reaction, I may know more and change my reaction, is I feel bad for them. I obviously feel bad for the spouse, that's a given. But my sense is, and by the way, I believed this when I was your age, well before I was ever married. I sensed that most people who have an affair, it is not because they're bad. And oh my God, I can't believe I'm saying this to you. One of my favorite Bible commentaries is by Richard Elliot Friedman. He is a brilliant scholar, University of California, San Diego now. I think he's at the University of Georgia, a major biblical scholar. And if I say that, you can believe me because I know my Bible. And he's written a commentary on the Torah, which I love. I love it. And obviously I'm writing my own. So I refer to his. Under adultery, in other words, the commandment, thou shalt commit adultery. He wrote, I wish I had the entire, I could find it, but we don't have breaks during Dennis and Julie, but I would like to read it exactly. But he wrote, and I just read this to my synagogue this past Sabbath, I read his line about this. That good people commit adultery, and he italicized good. And I thought that this guy's human. And I've been faithful, so I have no self -interest in this. But to assume that everybody who commits adultery is evil is beyond simplistic. You commit murder, okay, if that's not evil, you could say, well, you could say a good person could commit evil, could commit murder. It's a bit of a stretch. It could happen, but generally speaking, that's not true. But anyway, good people who commit adultery, and by good, I mean the non -serial adulterers people who just go from affair to affair, I have no defense of as a human being. You mean like a one -time thing? Yes, or fell in love. If somebody falls in love with somebody else while married, it usually means there's a lot problematic in the marriage. People in love with their spouse don't fall in love with another spouse. Okay, this is such a good topic, and I want to pause and say what we always say. We had no idea that we were going to discuss this. I love that about this show. It just blossoms. Because it's real. It's real, and it's incredibly spontaneous. Okay, a lot of questions. This is where I'm going to evoke the, what do you call your radio show, the Human Laboratory? This is where this is particularly useful. So most people who tell you about their infidelity, I'm assuming most of them are male? Or is it even? Yes, that's correct. What would you say the percentage is? Of those who tell me? Yes. It's high. It's 75%. Male? Yeah. Okay. And usually, do they tell you that they're unhappy in their marriage? Yeah. And what is the most cited reason for the unhappiness? They don't feel loved by their spouse. Loved in what way? You're tough. I'm not trying to be tough. She is tough. All right. Maybe, okay. You don't want to go there. No, no. There's nowhere I don't want to go. Anyway, even if I don't want to go, I go there. That's true. So, okay. For the record, generally speaking, a man who feels sexually fulfilled with his wife is going to stay faithful. This is so foreign to women that they just have to take my word for it. That's not how women think. Women do not have affairs because they're not sexually fulfilled by their husband. Some might, I fully acknowledge, but they don't feel emotionally fulfilled. That's much more a woman's reason, and I have just as much sympathy for her as for him. It's not, all I'm saying is, and I don't even remember how we got on this, but it's amazing that we did. How did we? Yeah. It's funny. I usually remember the genesis of a subject, but all I'm saying is when I meet people, my first reaction is not, wow, that's evil. If I met a murderer, yeah, or not even a murderer. Frankly, doctors who give hormone blockers to 10 -year -olds are doing evil. I have much more contempt for them than for somebody who had an affair. Okay, so let me ask you this. Let's say you got a call from a guy who was five years into his marriage. He has three or two young children, and he calls you and he goes, Dennis, I am not happy in my marriage. It's not awful, but I'm not happy, and I have my eyes on another woman. What do I do? Do I stay in my marriage that's unhappy, or do I leave because I'm unhappy? I'd say do everything possible to make yourself happy in your marriage, which by the way involves obviously working it through with your wife, but it also involves working it through with yourself. So, I'm a guy's guy. I'm male as as they come. So, men really relate to me. Happily, a lot of women do too, but it's not the same thing. Male -male is not the same as female -male. Okay, so I understand men really well, and I explain men to women. So, both sexes have to adopt the Prager notion of not having too many expectations. I think it's fair to say, nobody says this, because sex is ironic. We have a sexually drenched society, and yet people never talk honestly about it. That is very well said. It's mind -boggling. It's mind -boggling. You're so right, and people get upset when you talk about it. That's right, because I'm honest. So here is something I would say to men, guys, just know you are not going to have the sexual life you fantasized in the vast majority of cases. It's just the way it works. You mean when you get married? Yeah, when you get married. I'm sorry, that's right. I wasn't clear. Yes, when you get married. And therefore, you enjoy what you have. Now, obviously, I'm not going to give it a time factor limit. It's different when you're 25 than when you're 55 or 75. All of that is real. But I remember when I was in high school thinking, wow, to be married, you have this woman anytime you want. Oh, gosh. Such a male thought. Exactly. This was worth the entire broadcast. My comment and your reaction? I think I represent all women. Yes, exactly. Watching and listening. And I represent all men. That's the point. So that was my fantasy in high school. Oh, my God, it must be the greatest possible situation being married. She's there whenever you want her. So men… I just looked at the camera. So men have to understand it's not going to be that way. Are there exceptions? I'm talking in general, of course, there are exceptions to every rule in life. So I really ought to, if I had the time, I would write an advice book to men. Oh, you really should. Who is it? George Gilder wrote that man book? That man book? Sexual Suicide and the Naked Nomad. He deeply influenced me. So, men need to understand… By the way, we all need to understand… I don't know what women's fantasies are about marriage. Her fantasies are not likely to be fully realized either. So it's best probably not to have fantasy… I don't care if you have fantasies, it's fine to have a fantasy life, but in the sense of directing you in your emotional reaction is not a good idea. And in your reality, it can't direct your reality too much. That's right. So I have told men, I'll tell you where I feel for men. And that is, if they're married to a woman, I'm just talking the sexual arena now. If they're married to a woman who doesn't take care of herself physically, that's given the power of looks in the human species, it's the female that attracts the male. I know there are gorgeous men who attract women, but most men are not gorgeous. What attracts women to men is not that they're gorgeous. they're Certainly when reached by age of 30, a high school girl is going to go, Oh God, is he gorgeous? Oh God, you know, that's fine, it's part of life. But one of the biggest ways you show you love your husband is by taking care of yourself physically, trying to look good. And the proof is you tried to look good when you dated. Why did you stop trying once you got married? That's not fair to him. You're right, and it's not fair when men have B .O. and also don't take care of themselves, which I know you recognize. No, of course, but that's not the same thing. The B .O. holds for both, but looking gorgeous or as gorgeous as you can, I mean, looking cute. In peacocks, the male attracts the female. In humans, the female attracts the male. It's just the way it works. And if she succeeds in doing it, he gets aroused and they make the next generation. That is how human sexuality works. I really love what you said a few minutes ago about we live in this over sexualized society that also gets so upset when people like you and me talk about sexual matters, not to overhype our importance, but people who are brave enough to talk about sex within with a Judeo -Christian good values worldview are so valuable. I don't understand. Yeah, but a lot of them do, but they're not real. A lot of the religious people who talk about sexual matters are not rooted in the real world. So what is an example? Masturbation. Wow, welcome to Dennis and Julie. But the proof is nobody feels that they can talk about it. Yes, that's true. I mean, I debated a guy, very religious guy, seen by hundreds of thousands of people on the internet. He said, masturbation is evil. And he's speaking from a religious point of view. Evil? I said, I looked at him and I said, evil? I mean, if he says it's a sin, fine. Every religion has a whole list of sins. But evil? And I challenged him. I said, are you serious? It's evil? I mean, child molestation is evil. Genocide is evil. I know. Masturbation is the charge. Of course it does. So religious, you're right about the Judeo -Christian values perspective. Unfortunately, a lot of religious people have made religion look silly and people have therefore rejected it. You know, you're right. I think a lot of people point to something like that and go, that's just, that's too far for me. It's too far, exactly. It's difficult, the job of being religious, because you obviously want to promote good values, but you also want to be real and recognize that there are certain thoughts and proclivities and actions that a lot of human beings partake in. And so it's about mitigating the, I was going to say mitigating the harm of those, but allowing them to happen as long as they don't go too far or as long as they're not harmful. Yeah, that's right. So people should read a book by an Orthodox rabbi, Shmueli Boteach, who's a well -known rabbi, B -O -T -E -A -C -H, in English, Boteach, but it's pronounced Boteach, and it's called Kosher Sex. It's a great book. That's a good title. Great title. And whole his thesis is, you keep sex within a marriage, but within a marriage, do whatever the hell you want, providing the other person agrees, obviously. And, you know, as raunchy as it may sound to the outsider, if you two agree to it, the only restriction is that it's not with another. You know, God, of course, I forgot my train of thought. I just I really marvel at how real this is. And sometimes when you make these comments, I think, God, he is gutsy. He really goes there. You know, I am gutsy. I want to tell you, this is very revealing about me. People will take it for what it's worth. I decided very early in my life, if I want to do good in this world, that's all I've ever wanted to do. I will not shy away from putting myself out there and knowing I'm going to get slapped. And that's the reason I do it. It's not fun to talk about masturbation, but I know how many people are traumatized by the message you're doing evil. And it makes religion and God look bad, and I don't like that. Mm hmm. And here's the thing, also, it's uncomfortable to acknowledge, but it's the truth. People do the like I mean, this is the whole point of the conversation. People do these things. What are we going to pretend like they don't exist? We have to deal with them. And I think it's cowardly to run away. Look, I have told you, Dennis, that I grew up in a house that didn't talk about these matters. And I'm grateful, actually, because I think there are certain boundaries that ought to be respected. And I there's a time and a place to discuss things like this, but we do have that forum to do it. And I don't understand I don't understand when people deny reality. We are seeing the harm in the United States today of denying reality, including in the sexual arena. I mean, that's this whole hookup culture thing by by contorting reality to make women believe that they want sex as much as men is harming women. Plain and simple it is. Is it uncomfortable to acknowledge the reality of males extreme sexual proclivities? Yes, but we have to because we're seeing the consequences when we don't. So I applaud you. And I do think sometimes I'm like, wow, he he's really going there. He's gutsy. But but people need a good role model for these matters. Well, you don't make a good world if you're not gutsy. True. You can't build a good world on cowardice. And it's so hypocritical because people people have sex. People do these things. And I don't I don't I dislike the people that that are on some kind of moral high ground when they talk about this stuff. It's like, please, you do it to your human being. Don't act like you don't partake in these things that you decry. Right. And some of them probably don't. But my question is, are they better human beings in general? You know, I talked I said to you what Richard Elliott Friedman said, that a lot of people who commit adultery are good people. It's because it's it's weakness more than anything or or something else. I'm not talking about serial adulterers.

George Gilder Shmueli Boteach Julie Hartman Richard Elliot Friedman Dennis Dennis Prager Julie United States Five Years 75% Richard Elliott Friedman TWO 75 25 55 12 Minutes Three ONE First Reaction Both
A highlight from John Amanchukwu (Encore)

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:35 min | Last week

A highlight from John Amanchukwu (Encore)

"Welcome to the Eric Metaxas Show. We'll get you from point A to point B. But if you're looking for point C, well, buddy, you're on your own. But if you wait right here, in just about two minutes, the bus to point C will be coming right by. And now, here's your Ralph Kramden of the Airways, Eric Metaxas. Hey there, folks. Welcome to the show. We have a guest on who, man, I don't even know how to start. First of all, I'll try to pronounce his name correctly. John Amanchukwu. I got John correct. I think I got Amanchukwu correct. John Amanchukwu is someone I've come to admire tremendously. He's in North Carolina. He is he's been a pastor for years. He is a brave voice in the midst of the madness, one of the bravest voices. And it's my privilege to have him as my guest for this hour. John, welcome. Hey, thank you so much, Dr. Eric, for having me on your show. You can't call me Dr. Eric because I'm not a doctor, but you can call me whatever you want. Could you call me the Commodore or Admiral? I'd prefer I really prefer that. But no, seriously, you you have been such a brave voice and people have seen you, you know, probably on Instagram reels or whatever. Tell my audience, because this is it's always better when my guest tells the story. But you've been a brave voice speaking out against the. What would be a nice term for it, satanic lunacy of. Profoundly sexual material being given to children in our schools, very tough for most of us to believe that this is happening, but it has been happening. You've been exposing it and you've been bravely speaking against it. So let's just start, John, with how did you get involved in this? At what point did you say I'm going to step up and start confronting these crazy abusers? Because that's what they are, abusers of our children. How did that start for you? Well, I've been involved in this kind of work for the past 20 years. I joined a church in college called Upper Room Church for God in Christ. I joined at the age of 19. And the senior pastor is Bishop Patrick Langwood and senior. And he says that our church is a cause driven church. You know, we believe that there is a cause in Christ. There's a cause in the marketplace for us to bring our biblical world view to it, to engage the culture and to fight against evil and wickedness. Isaiah 520 says, woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness. And so we've just been on the front lines on the abortion clinic issue, fighting against fatherlessness and the black community. And now even with this indoctrination in the public school system, now, some people call it indoctrination and some people call it grooming. But I like to call it mental rape. That's the best way for me to define what has taken place in the public school system. I call it mental rape because it assaults the soul. It stains the brain and it robs children of their innocence. When you put pornographic material in a library and make it accessible for kids, K through 12, a child is going to pick that book up. And I went out to Asheville and spoke about a book entitled It's Perfectly Normal. That book is for kids 10 and up. It's hardcore porn. It's not soft porn. It's hardcore porn. That book gives Hugh Hefner a run for his money. When you open the book, it depicts images of heterosexual sex and homosexual sex. Why do 10 year olds need to see and learn how you should have lesbian sex at the age of 10? That's disgusting. That's evil. It's mental rape. There's an assault taking place upon children, and there's a critical point that's being left out of the equation. And that's the church. The church is not engaging. We need some modern day Karl Barth. We need some modern day Martin Niemol. We need some people who are willing to engage the culture and tell the church, listen, we are not supposed to be co -opted by the state. The state is not supposed to run the church. And when we go into a public school, we have this thing called parental choice. Some call it rights, but I call it parental choice. I call it parental choice because our rights come from God as parents. But choice parents have had the choice and the knowledge of being able to assess and know what's going on in the public school system and to have the freedom and the liberty to push back when there is an assault upon their children. Well, listen, everything you say, I mean, I agree with it violently. I am in churches effectively preaching what you just said in a little different way. But what basically this is called, what you are advocating for is called the technical term is Christianity. This is called Christian faith. If you do not do what what you're describing, if you're not pushing back, if you're not being salt and light in the culture, if you're not being a warrior for truth and speaking against evil, then you are not living out your Christian faith. But there are many, many churches and you and I know about that that do not do this. They don't get involved in this. They say we don't want to be divisive. These are the same people that would say, you know, we don't care if there's slavery happening, as long as it's not happening in my church. That's right. It's complete hypocrisy. And as Christians, we are called to step up. And I keep saying that the Lord has allowed it to get this bad to wake up those who are still sleeping, because what you just described is very tough for me and most people, even to hear that children would be exposed to this absolutely evil stuff. What do you call it if you don't call it evil? This is evil for children to be exposed to these kinds of things. And it's shameful that they're just a handful of brave souls like you speaking against it.

Ralph Kramden Martin Niemol John Hugh Hefner Eric Metaxas Karl Barth John Amanchukwu North Carolina 10 Year Asheville Amanchukwu Point A Upper Room Church Point C 12 Bishop Point B. About Two Minutes First Isaiah
A highlight from 50 Year Old Rapper Krayzie Bone Fighting For His Life In ICU...

DerrickTalk

03:51 min | Last week

A highlight from 50 Year Old Rapper Krayzie Bone Fighting For His Life In ICU...

"Spotify for Podcasters has revolutionized the world of podcasting by allowing the novice and seasoned podcaster to create a podcast painlessly and in real time. No cost, no hassle, and you can even record from the comfort of your own PC or phone. That's right, and the Q &A polls allow real -time interaction between the host and his audience. What are you waiting for? Download Spotify for Podcasters now and make your voice heard on sites like Spotify, iHeartRadio, Deezer and more. Prayers go out to Crazy Bone. He is a member of the infamous hip -hop trio Bone Thugs and Harmony, and of course everyone pretty much I would assume you probably know who Bone Thugs and Harmony is. They've been responsible for such hits as Crossroads, First of the Month. I mean, man, you know, if you are a 90s baby, you probably definitely have heard of Bone Thugs and Harmony, Crazy Bone, Busy Bone. I've actually seen them in concerts, so the guys were absolutely amazing on stage. I think I saw him at Chop Suey here in Seattle. But anyway, Crazy Bone is going through a medical emergency. It's not looking good. He is actually fighting for his life. According to sources, he checked himself into a Los Angeles hospital after he was coughing up a lot of blood. So he checks himself into a hospital, and obviously there's some type of bleeding going on with one of the arteries in his lungs, and doctors have been unsuccessful in stopping that bleeding. So they are attempting a second surgery after the first one was unsuccessful. So, they are attempting a second surgery to try to stop the bleeding, and he is on a ventilator. He is having to have assisted breathing, so it does not look good for Crazy Bone. Fifty years of age, just a bad situation. So we are praying for his recovery. I have not heard any updates, except the fact that they are performing a second surgery and the family is being very, very quiet about his medical condition. Obviously, the only ones that really know what's going on with Crazy Bone is probably family members at this point, but we are praying for a speedy recovery. Obviously, I think it's pronounced sarcoidosis, sarcoidosis. I think this is the disease, it's kind of like an inflammatory disease that attacks the lymph nodes, the lungs, the eyes, the brains, pretty much any organ in the body. For some people, they kick it. It's not a problem, but for some people, obviously, like anything, it can be very detrimental to their health. Bernie Mac, famous comedian, he passed away from sarcoidosis. So it's definitely something that can be fatal if not treated properly, if not caught early. We are praying for Crazy Bone, that he makes a speedy recovery. This obviously is very, very bad news. People like LeBron James, other celebrities are reaching out to extend their prayers. Definitely, we are asking that the audience members here on Convo Over Cigars pray for Crazy Bone, that he makes a speedy recovery after this medical emergency. You guys have been locked in to another edition of Convo Over Cigars on a Monday. I'm your host, Derrick Andre Flemming. It's a rainy one in Seattle. Everybody be blessed.

Lebron James Bernie Mac Derrick Andre Flemming Seattle Fifty Years Los Angeles Second Surgery Monday First One Bone Thugs And Harmony Crossroads Convo Over Cigars First Of The Month Chop Suey 90S Deezer Spotify Bone Spotify For Podcasters One Of
A highlight from How Reyna Noriegas Year of Responsibility Ushered In a Year of Rebirth

Latina to Latina

06:29 min | Last week

A highlight from How Reyna Noriegas Year of Responsibility Ushered In a Year of Rebirth

"Ladies, gentlemen, welcome to the colorful world of Skittles. Skittles brings you a jolt of five fruity flavors in every bite, giving you the chance to taste the rainbow like never before. Break free from the ordinary day -to -day with the help of Skittles chewy candy. Skittles is a must in my candy jar, movie snack, even my secret to an afternoon pick -me -up. And I don't even care who knows it. Add a splash of joy to your day with Skittles. There's nothing better than fruity fun that tickles your taste buds. Taste the rainbow. If you have seen Reyna Noriega's colorful and vibrant artwork grace the covers of Science It might be hard to believe that she almost forwent a career in the arts completely. We talk about what pulled her back, the year of responsibility that gave way to the year of rebirth, and her powerful message about ignoring the rush and the trends in the service of building something meant to last. Reyna, I am such a fan. Thank you so much for doing this. Thank you so much for having me, Alicia. All right. So you and I both have Cuban dads. Your mom is Bahamian. You grew up in Miami. How does the Caribbean then show up in your home? It's everywhere to the point where I'm spoiled and I didn't realize that not everyone lives like this. You know, from the meals to just the presence of just joy and music and how all of that is kind of like ingrained in how we interact, how we celebrate. It was such a vibrant upbringing. As an Afro -Caribbean Latina, I don't need to ask if you saw representations of yourself in the media because you and I grew up consuming the same media. We know how few and far between that was. And I think the damage that does is hard to quantify. What happens to a kid when you don't see yourself reflected back at you? Yeah, I sometimes mention like this cognitive dissonance that existed within me that I thought that my blackness came from my Bahamian mother when my abuelo is Afro -Cuban from Havana. You know, so like I'm seeing it. I'm seeing Celia Cruz and I'm seeing my family and it's not clicking. Well did you talk about race in your house? Not, I mean, I think there were definitely conversations, but not really with identity. I know that my abuela was very proud of her husband and that she had chosen to marry a black Cuban, probably against what was the norm at that time and what was accepted. And so that was vocalized, but they always joke with me. Like as a kid, I would say that I'm light black. Like that was my terminology. And so it's just like, you figure it out along the way. Reina, you go to FIU, you get a bachelor of arts in psychology, you minor in visual arts and English. What was the plan at that point? The plan was to figure it out and make my family proud. I discovered that I loved art and I was good at art in high school, but up until that point, I was just a scholar. So I was getting the highest test scores and the highest grades. When I made the decision to apply to colleges for visual arts, I was really happy about that. And I thought, you know, like, this is so fun. This is so great. And I chickened out during my orientation when they, yeah, FIU announced that they were doing a psychology pre -med track. And obviously it's every parent's dream to have a child that's a doctor. It wasn't forced on me, but it was definitely something that I was aware of. Like that would make my parents proud if I was a doctor. And I think the mind is really cool. I could do this. So I approached psychology for that reason, because it was like, if I ever decide that I want to do pre -med, I could do this. I don't want to cut people open. So this is a good way to still do both. And then I was like, you know, art, art is not a sure thing anyways, so I'll just keep it as a minor and I'll have it just in case. That's not how it panned out. It's only a few years after chickening out, taking the safer, more secure path that you really end up pulled back into the arts. What is it that happens in 2017 that you're able to commit yourself fully to a life in the arts? I think I saw throughout college that, you know, obviously as a psych major, I was supposed to do internships and all types of things to complement that. But every time an internship would come up for the arts, like that's what I was pulled towards. And so I did our Basel internships and things like that. And it just, I felt so free and I felt so much joy there and I felt so much possibility that it kept calling to me. And after I graduated in 2015, I got the opportunity to be a high school art teacher. And that was just supposed to be like a buffer period until I got my master's in behavioral psychology and figured out what direction I wanted to take. And all of that. And it just like, it really reinvigorated my love for the arts and the possibilities. And over time I experimented with different materials. When I became an art teacher, the courses were digital drawing base. And so that is where I learned illustration. I had not tried illustration before that, but I had to learn really quickly for my students and to appear like I knew what I was talking about. And so it was a great kind of like push. Like I didn't have time to say like, oh, I like this. I don't like this. I'm scared of this. It was like, you're teaching high school kids digital art and they expect you to know it. So you can go in there as a very young teacher and look like you don't know what you're talking about, or you can go in there confidently. Like, you know everything about it. And so it was pretty much like overnight. I had to teach myself Adobe Illustrator and some other like drawing apps that I could go through with my students. And yeah, it evolved from there.

Celia Cruz Alicia Miami 2017 2015 Reina Reyna Reyna Noriega Havana FIU Afro -Cuban Both English Caribbean Five Fruity Flavors Illustrator Cuban Afro -Caribbean Latina Basel Black
A highlight from MARKETS DAILY: Featured Story |  What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years

CoinDesk Podcast Network

04:17 min | Last week

A highlight from MARKETS DAILY: Featured Story | What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years

"This episode of Markets Daily is sponsored by Kraken. Hello, this is Markets Daily from Coindesk. I'm Noa Latcheson here with your weekend story. On today's show, we're taking a look at how crypto fund management has changed over the past few years and how it is different from traditional fund management. Just a reminder, Coindesk is a news source and does not provide investment advice. Today's featured story is by Jeff Dorman, Chief Investment Officer at ARCA, titled What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years. Jeff Dorman, Chief Investment Officer at ARCA, says crypto funds still need to find a balance between adopting professional Wall Street practices and taking advantage of crypto's unique opportunities. I've been running a crypto fund for 1 ,825 days. ARCA just achieved a major milestone, reaching a five -year track record of managing outside capital in our liquid hedge fund. Five years in any other industry may not seem like a long time frame, but in crypto we often joke that one crypto year is equivalent to five normal years, and with 24 -sevenths trading hours, it's not untrue. During these past five years, I have seen many of our peers come and go, leaving a bit of survivorship bias as it pertains to crypto asset management. As Chief Investment Officer overseeing this fund, as well as three others under the ARCA umbrellas, I experienced firsthand the evolution of this industry through good times, bad times, and constant innovation. The five -year anniversary provided a natural timestamp to reflect upon what I learned about managing money and about the industry. Here are five of the most important takeaways from managing a crypto portfolio for the last five years. In short, investing in these markets is very challenging. 1. Tweak assumptions and risk models. This perhaps goes without saying to any person who has invested in this market, but this is not an easy asset class to invest in. For starters, the frequent booms and busts creates a false sense of liquidity and an oft -inaccurate depiction of expected beta and returns. All risk models, expected loss provisions, and sizing parameters are based on historical data and correlations, which change incredibly quickly. There is a reason why most funds in this space are early -stage venture funds, where many of these real -time market -related issues are not relevant. For those like ourselves who manage liquid funds, it is a constant game of tweaking assumptions and risk models. 2. Interpretation over speed. Contrary to popular belief, just because crypto markets trade 24 -sevenths globally does not necessitate 24 -sevenths trading coverage. Overtrading every tick is costly in any asset class, and the additional hours of crypto trading often try to lure you into more activity. But the reality is that the fragmented, global investing landscape actually gives you more time to react to news and information. While there will always be bots and algorithms that react immediately to news, much like after -hours equities trading post -earnings, these initial knee -jerk reactions are often wrong. And since one -third of the world is sleeping at any given time, it often takes days for the true market reaction to play out. A correct interpretation of information is much more important than the speed with which you react. 3. Careful documentation is crucial. On the flip side, the 24 -7 workday does lead to difficulties not seen in traditional markets. In TradFi, even your worst day week eventually comes to an end, giving you ample time to reset and think through decisions, while markets are closed without price gyrations clouding or influencing your thought process. In crypto, these natural resets often don't exist. Take the events of Terra Luna, for example. The entire unwind of a $30 billion ecosystem happened within three days, with continuous trading and new information flow over this 72 -hour period. We made decisions during this stretch that in retrospect would not have been made with more of a grace period, and we have since learned how to better implement risk management during a future period like this. In hospitals, mistakes don't often occur because doctors are overworked or tired, but rather because of improper handoffs to the next doctor, who lacks that full set of information, because the previous doctor failed to document fully. Crypto asset management requires similar knowledge handoffs and documentation.

Jeff Dorman Noa Latcheson Five Arca 1 ,825 Days Five -Year Five Years 72 -Hour $30 Billion One -Third Today Kraken Five Normal Years Coindesk Markets Daily Wall Street 24 Three Days Three Others
A highlight from  Featured Story |  What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

04:17 min | Last week

A highlight from Featured Story | What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years

"This episode of Markets Daily is sponsored by Kraken. Hello, this is Markets Daily from Coindesk. I'm Noa Latcheson here with your weekend story. On today's show, we're taking a look at how crypto fund management has changed over the past few years and how it is different from traditional fund management. Just a reminder, Coindesk is a news source and does not provide investment advice. Today's featured story is by Jeff Dorman, Chief Investment Officer at ARCA, titled What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years. Jeff Dorman, Chief Investment Officer at ARCA, says crypto funds still need to find a balance between adopting professional Wall Street practices and taking advantage of crypto's unique opportunities. I've been running a crypto fund for 1 ,825 days. ARCA just achieved a major milestone, reaching a five -year track record of managing outside capital in our liquid hedge fund. Five years in any other industry may not seem like a long time frame, but in crypto we often joke that one crypto year is equivalent to five normal years, and with 24 -sevenths trading hours, it's not untrue. During these past five years, I have seen many of our peers come and go, leaving a bit of survivorship bias as it pertains to crypto asset management. As Chief Investment Officer overseeing this fund, as well as three others under the ARCA umbrellas, I experienced firsthand the evolution of this industry through good times, bad times, and constant innovation. The five -year anniversary provided a natural timestamp to reflect upon what I learned about managing money and about the industry. Here are five of the most important takeaways from managing a crypto portfolio for the last five years. In short, investing in these markets is very challenging. 1. Tweak assumptions and risk models. This perhaps goes without saying to any person who has invested in this market, but this is not an easy asset class to invest in. For starters, the frequent booms and busts creates a false sense of liquidity and an oft -inaccurate depiction of expected beta and returns. All risk models, expected loss provisions, and sizing parameters are based on historical data and correlations, which change incredibly quickly. There is a reason why most funds in this space are early -stage venture funds, where many of these real -time market -related issues are not relevant. For those like ourselves who manage liquid funds, it is a constant game of tweaking assumptions and risk models. 2. Interpretation over speed. Contrary to popular belief, just because crypto markets trade 24 -sevenths globally does not necessitate 24 -sevenths trading coverage. Overtrading every tick is costly in any asset class, and the additional hours of crypto trading often try to lure you into more activity. But the reality is that the fragmented, global investing landscape actually gives you more time to react to news and information. While there will always be bots and algorithms that react immediately to news, much like after -hours equities trading post -earnings, these initial knee -jerk reactions are often wrong. And since one -third of the world is sleeping at any given time, it often takes days for the true market reaction to play out. A correct interpretation of information is much more important than the speed with which you react. 3. Careful documentation is crucial. On the flip side, the 24 -7 workday does lead to difficulties not seen in traditional markets. In TradFi, even your worst day week eventually comes to an end, giving you ample time to reset and think through decisions, while markets are closed without price gyrations clouding or influencing your thought process. In crypto, these natural resets often don't exist. Take the events of Terra Luna, for example. The entire unwind of a $30 billion ecosystem happened within three days, with continuous trading and new information flow over this 72 -hour period. We made decisions during this stretch that in retrospect would not have been made with more of a grace period, and we have since learned how to better implement risk management during a future period like this. In hospitals, mistakes don't often occur because doctors are overworked or tired, but rather because of improper handoffs to the next doctor, who lacks that full set of information, because the previous doctor failed to document fully. Crypto asset management requires similar knowledge handoffs and documentation.

Jeff Dorman Noa Latcheson Five Arca 1 ,825 Days Five -Year Five Years 72 -Hour $30 Billion One -Third Today Kraken Five Normal Years Coindesk Markets Daily Wall Street 24 Three Days Three Others
A highlight from How the Crypto Investing Landscape Has Changed

The Breakdown

15:07 min | Last week

A highlight from How the Crypto Investing Landscape Has Changed

"Welcome back to The Breakdown with me, NLW. It's a daily podcast on macro, Bitcoin, and the big picture power shifts remaking our world. What's going on, guys? It is Sunday, September 24. And that means it's time for Long Read Sunday. Before we get into that, however, if you are enjoying The Breakdown, please go subscribe to it, give it a rating, give it a review. Or if you want to dive deeper into the conversation, come join us on the Breakers Discord. You can find a link in the show notes or go to bit .ly slash breakdown pod. Hello, friends. Welcome back to Long Read Sunday. Today we are getting into a topic that relates to maybe one of the biggest themes that we're watching right now, which is capital fun flows and the institutional engagement with the cryptosphere. Now, our piece today comes from Jeff Dorman, the CIO of ARCA, who has some really interesting insights to share about the time that he has been running his fund. The piece is called What I Learned Managing a Crypto Fund for Five Years. And because I am recording my sixth podcast of the day, I am going to enlist a little help from AI me, but I will be back as regular old NLW with some wrap up thoughts at the end. I've been running a crypto fund for one thousand eight hundred and twenty five days. ARCA just achieved a major milestone, reaching a five year track record of managing outside capital in our liquid hedge fund. Five years in any other industry may not seem like a long time frame, but in crypto, we often joke that one crypto year is equivalent to five normal years. And with twenty four seven trading hours, it's not untrue. During these past five years, I have seen many of our peers come and go, leaving a bit of survivorship bias as it pertains to crypto asset management. As chief investment officer overseeing this fund, as well as three others under the ARCA umbrellas, I experienced firsthand the evolution of this industry through good times, bad times and constant innovation. The five year anniversary provided a natural timestamp to reflect upon what I learned about managing money and about the industry. Here are five of the most important takeaways from managing a crypto portfolio for the last five years. In short, investing in these markets is very challenging. One tweak assumptions and risk models. This perhaps goes without saying to any person who has invested in this market, but this is not an easy asset class to invest in. For starters, the frequent booms and busts creates a false sense of liquidity and an often accurate depiction of expected beta and returns. All risk models, expected loss provisions and sizing parameters are based on historical data and correlations, which change incredibly quickly. There is a reason why most funds in this space are early stage venture funds, where many of these real time market related issues are not relevant. For those like ourselves who manage liquid funds, it is a constant game of tweaking assumptions and risk models to interpretation over speed. Contrary to popular belief, just because crypto markets trade 24 seven globally does not necessitate 24 seven trading coverage. Overtrading every tick is costly in any asset class, and the additional hours of crypto trading often try to lure you into more activity. But the reality is that the fragmented global investing landscape actually gives you more time to react to news and information. While there will always be bots and algorithms that react immediately to news, much like after hours equities trading post earnings, these initial knee jerk reactions are often wrong. And since one third of the world is sleeping at any given time, it often takes days for the true market reaction to play out. A correct interpretation of information is much more important than the speed with which you react. Three, careful documentation is crucial. On the flip side, the 24 seven workday does lead to difficulties not seen in traditional markets. In TradFi, even your worst day week eventually comes to an end, giving you ample time to reset and think through decisions while markets are closed without price gyrations clouding or influencing your thought process. In crypto, these natural resets often don't exist. Take the events of Terra Luna, for example. The entire unwind of a 30 billion dollar ecosystem happened within three days, with continuous trading and new information flow over the 72 hour period. We made decisions during this stretch that in retrospect would not have been made with more of a grace period. And we have since learned how to better implement risk management during a future period like this. In hospitals, mistakes don't often occur because doctors are overworked or tired, but rather because of improper handoffs to the next doctor who lacks that full set of information because the previous doctor failed to document fully. Crypto asset management requires similar knowledge, handoffs and documentation for balance between short and long. In debt and equity markets, quiet periods of time, summer holidays often lead to slow grinds higher in price. It is expensive to stay short and dividends and coupons continue to accumulate, adding more buy interest to the market. The opposite is true in digital assets, since the majority of crypto projects accrue value through network activity, slower periods of time tend to slow momentum of an asset. And since most assets have no distribution of cash flows, the cost to short is minimal. As such, negative price action tends to be more prevalent when markets are slow, leading to difficult decisions with regard to hedging and long exposure. As a result, active management continues to trump passive indexes. Rules based passive index strategies simply cannot keep pace with the innovation and changes to these markets. Similarly, these indexes can't take advantage of the volatility, which creates quite a bit of alpha. Over time, this will likely change as the market matures, but we're not there yet. Building a good team is fundamental for success and incredibly challenging. I've worked for seven different financial firms over the past 25 years. I've seen thousands of resumes and have interviewed hundreds of people. I've worked personally in just about every financial department, banking, trading, research, sales, business development. If a TradFi Wall Street firm asked me for a candidate, I could find them one pretty easily that best fits their needs. Five, hire people passionate about the industry. But what are the best attributes and qualifications for a research analyst in crypto? What makes the best trade ops person? Who is best suited to handle investor relations? These are still not easy questions to answer in crypto. During the first few years of our fund, we took what we could get, which is to say, whoever wanted a job. The pay sucked, the hours were long, and the future was very uncertain. Anyone who wanted a job in this industry in 2018 shared a true passion for blockchain success and was willing to learn any part of the job necessary to succeed. Most people who joined this industry pre -2020 are still working in this industry, and their job responsibilities evolve in real time. But in 2021, I could have handpicked any person I wanted from every major bank, brokerage, and hedge fund, who all had zero crypto experience but saw big money ahead. The resumes were pouring in. Many of these employees didn't work out. In 2023, we're back to the passionate souls who will do anything to work in this industry. Six, everyone wears multiple hats. This is a very hands -on business where research analysts have to test functionality of applications, challenge status quo financial modeling, and network live with other industry veterans at conferences. Traders have to navigate back and forth from US macro to Asian currency markets to crypto -specific on -chain wallet movements depending on the current correlation du jour. Back office employees have to test new service providers every three weeks to keep up with changing regulation, best practices, and LP demands while navigating constant bankruptcies, closures, and hack attempts. The common denominator seems to be a real willingness to test new theses. If you give 10 equity analysts the same inputs, they will give you largely the same answer and will present the same homogenous modeling techniques to arrive at this answer. If you give 10 crypto analysts and traders the same inputs, they will most likely give you 10 different answers using entirely different analyses. That's refreshing and often leads to outsized alpha, but also creates challenges when it comes to creating a repeatable formula for success. Seven, trade ops is the most important department. When I worked at credit and equity funds, the back office was overlooked. They were usually young kids eager to move into a real trading role as soon as they could. The job was basic blocking and tackling. Make sure trades settled, make sure your brokerage statement was accurate, and make sure the fund admins did their job. Compliance teams were there simply because they had to be. We all knew the rules, we obeyed them, and if there was any doubt, we checked with compliance but knew the answer would be, don't do it. We should be so lucky in crypto. Trade operations is the single most important job in crypto. You have to touch the assets every single day and a single mistake could cost the firm millions of dollars. As a result, not only do these need to be the most trustworthy people in the firm, but they need to build redundancies that can still operate even if they themselves vanish. Getting into a trade ops role is more glamorous than getting out of trade ops, and those who build their careers in this subset of the fund business end up learning the most about blockchain. Similarly, compliance is not an afterthought in crypto. Unlike in TradFi, it cannot be assumed that your employees know the rules, as most come from completely different backgrounds than Wall Street. Constant education and monitoring is a must. Further, a compliance officer can't just read the rules and assume compliance since there are few clear rules to follow, despite Gary Gensler telling us otherwise. To do your best as both a fiduciary and a law -abiding company is a Herculean effort. 8. The sell side is getting better. In traditional finance, the sell side offers a pretty valuable role. They underwrite new transactions, create novel financing ideas, advise companies on how best to participate in the capital markets, facilitate trading in existing securities, write research on new and existing securities, and pass along market color between participants. Both full -service investment banks and niche broker -dealers exist, but regardless of whether you use a one -stop shop or piecemeal the services with multiple firms, the services themselves are all covered. While the sell side is getting better in crypto, it is still incredibly fragmented and many of these services still do not exist. As a result, fund managers are often on an island, forced to manufacture its own deals, structure its own financings, and do its own research from scratch. Written research from OTC trading shops has greatly increased in volume and improved in quality, providing a necessary channel check on the state of the markets. But the trading itself continues to be very exchange -based, black box, and therefore lacks natural axes between investors. Trading color about flows and activity has improved, but there are fewer market participants to glean information from. There is still no full -service investment bank, and in fact, true investment banking services for underwriting and advisory of token launches is probably the biggest white space going forward. I'm constantly shocked at how few well -known Wall Street capital markets tools are utilized within crypto. Most token launches are doomed from the start. From low float, high fully diluted valuation, FDV token launches, to direct listings at insane prices, to poorly written tokenomics, token issuers, who are often developers and lack financial knowledge, continue to have to come to market without the assistance of those who know how to do this best, which subsequently leads to worse investment opportunities for asset managers. Some service providers are getting a lot better, like Custody Solutions, OTC Trading, and Options Liquidity. Still, others are getting worse, like fund admins and auditors, who in the wake of FTX are pulling back from these offerings. On the tech and research side, it's amazing that Bloomberg's crypto services continue to be irrelevant. The coverage list, their index, and all functionality is still from 2017 and does not take into account how much this industry has grown and evolved. Fortunately, newcomers like Nansen, Masari, Glassnode, Dune Analytics, Telegram, and others have innovated fast enough to take this corner, and we are grateful for these companies. It is entirely possible to run a crypto fund in 2023 without ever logging into a Bloomberg terminal. Overall, fund management is still challenged by the lack of sell -side tools. As the sell -side improves, so will the number and breadth of funds. 9. The investor base is getting smarter. When we began our fund five years ago, we knew the educational journey for prospective LPs would be slow. We were learning constantly as we invested and doing our best to educate interested investors in real time, but it was not practical to expect anyone who wasn't focused full -time on this industry to keep pace. Questions from prospective LPs tended to focus more on how we invest versus what we invest in, and there was definitely a bit of a leap of faith by investors. Fast forward to today and the script has completely flipped. LPs are getting much smarter about the asset class and the investment universe, thereby asking better questions. In some cases, the LPs now know more than we do as they are exposed to different areas of the industry that may not be in our everyday focus. That said, the amount of bad information that continues to flow effortlessly through the media and influencer accounts continues to reach LPs as well, often surprising us in regard to certain topics of interest that we deem irrelevant, but our investors believe are topical. As investors start to become more digital asset savvy, they want far more control over investments and specificity has increased. Asset managers in this space have launched highly specialized funds based on investor demand, including DeFi focused funds, NFT funds, etc. Many asset managers, including ARCA, have started creating funds of one inch that allow for more specificity, but provide the professional team to manage the investments. In 2018, if you asked us, we would recommend going with a professional investor, but as information is more readily available and UI UX of projects get better, we encourage retail investors to research and invest. However, to generate alpha where information asymmetry exists, it's still valuable to have professional fund managers who can take advantage of the 24 -7 news cycle, market volatility, and a murky regulatory environment. Overall, running a fund in this new and innovative space has been incredibly rewarding and we look forward to the next five years. Fund managers will continue to straddle the line between becoming more TradFi -like and adopting best practices of Wall Street, versus finding ways to take advantage of crypto -only opportunities, yield farming, airdrops, testing new applications. The most important factor for success in the digital asset space is faith in the future. We have to believe we are at the frontier of building a new financial system that has the capacity to transform society. While we fully expect bumps in the road and pushback from incumbents benefiting from the status quo, we know that as long as we continue to move forward, fight for the necessary changes, and adapt as needed, this industry will succeed. Okay guys, back to regular old non -AI NLW. The thing that stands out to me after reading that article, as trite and as cliche as it sounds, is just the how early we are theme once again. Every cycle it feels like we see it as the mass flow of new institutions into the space and to some extent it's true. We obviously got a lot more market participants from the traditional sector last time around than we had before. It feels, however, now that we're inching ever closer to a period in which those traditional actors aren't just tourists, but are long -term participants in the space. Certainly right now you have an interesting jockeying for position where the Blackrocks and Fidelities and Franklin Templeton's of the world are laying the foundation for what seems like a much more proactive end -to -end from the beginning of the cycle on through whatever happens after kind of approach. I've said before and I'll say it again that I think Blackrock's ETF application will mark a significant pivot inflection point of this cycle when we look back at it historically. I think we will see it as a firewall that stopped whatever further slide might have happened and reinforced for market participants that crypto, despite being as down as it was in every sense of the word, was going to come back. And so I think about Jeff's next five years running a fund and how different they'll look. The different participants that will make up the market. The different ways in which people will engage. It's pretty hard to imagine from where we are, but it's certainly interesting to think about. Anyways friends, that is going to do it for today's Long Read. I hope you are having a wonderful fall weekend wherever you are. Until next time, be safe and take care of each other.

Jeff Dorman 2017 Gary Gensler Arca 2018 Five One Thousand Nansen Glassnode Dune Analytics 2023 2021 Bloomberg Three SIX United States Five Year Jeff Sixth Podcast
"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

"He's like. Oh this is amazing. The best crying to overseas. Which i talking never have every right moving on on the surface the tatas has landed. Captain cognis lays dead on the ground and mother tries to resuscitate him mothra shocked when jack comes back to life but the doctor doesn't seem surprised he tells jack off for saying hello to martha. Because even a heller is flooding job. Yes yes and hobo. Jack's very pleased to see the doctor doctors. The doctors very cool very cool about the whole thing of a. It's an interesting that matha gets a little bit more a vinification about travelling with the doctor that it can get left behind like i. Don't i would hide. That would wake her up. Jack recognizes the doctor even though he's regenerated and says that the doctor abandoned him on the game station in the year two hundred one hundred he asked about rose tyler who is listed as dead but the doctor gleefully tells him that she's alive and stuck in another dimension as very pleased about it isn't it and you can just say martha going bloody rose. She's yeah i did love that relationship with them author and yeah mama is in love with the doctor but the delta is still goes on and on and on about rose rebounding shit but also. He's told him multiple times. This means nothing. I'm not in love with you. But then he gives her other he says you know you can make make guay annoys me. That's how i get you to do the podcast. Look you're in my house. go egg go all right. I'll step back yard captain. Jack used his vortex manipulator to travel to earth twentieth century to meet up with the doctor but he overshot it and end up in eighteen. Sixty nine were ends up working for torchwood. The spinoff show martha finds out. Rose was blind turns out even time loads prefer long. The doctor is sick of the two of them. Blogging a very specific reference for a few years in the two thousands. Yes that would be talking talking. Or youtube or podcast. Your or podcasting podcasting. The annoying hubby that lives forever. You to stop linked did you. To stop spamming my email. They discover a city in the mountainous gorge. But there's no inhabitants. They worry that there's no one left until they see the human being hunted down by the future kind that catch up with the human jet strikes the future kind by shooting up into the air. Yeah i always done some z. Yeah yes. I'm shower so nine nine shootings in the all the time terry messy. Yes the future kinds around them as they rushed to the silo. A refugee camp with our remaining humans are hiding out. The gods waste a bunch of bullets shooting at the ground instead of killing. If you future kinds yeah. What was that to shoot the people. You're like well scared of about getting eaten by. We know why because the bbc didn't want to see a bunch of people get shot to death but yeah it makes no sense in the context of the episode. Yeah but also how is it. Some of us became the future. Con- some assistance like normal. Jim jones i guess. Some of us wanted to and comedy. That's the only way to do it. Go the refugees alike..

Captain cognis martha matha Jack jack guay rose tyler terry messy Rose youtube bbc Jim jones
"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

"She doesn't even like jello. He's like what about he'd be. Are i know. I know in some episodes sarah jane like he initially starts being like. Oh she'll be fine but eventually he's like actually she's been gone for quite a while in this episode. He's like well fuck taylor. I've trusted him anyway. The entertainment is a little person. Just being a little basically would you find for the thirteenth century in the eighties respectively. Yeah chart the king cole's for a loot and strums at a sick rift with a song about crushing his with. Jesus chameleons just like all right. Now's time for me to take over this. It up to eleven did like for dole's face of the ways like why is the kid you take loot. Hey it was all of our faces in this scene for someone go. Hey the king doesn't play. But i just wanted to write a song and chuck it in there and then afterwards someone should have been like plo. Free fly survey. Did say dude dude. Yes. i'm sitting there thinking archaic. So there's no point to this or so they needed to fill some spice. Okay iva are now now. We're going to have a sword. Thought you could have dirty deeds That would like Like thunderstruck on cello. Have you seen that. this favorite. What is to destroy the bedroom. Call my goodness for further entertainment. The iron maiden is brought out to be used on sir. Geoffrey the doctor once again calls for leniency but ends up a sword fight with sergio's and one point says yields lunges for the doctor and almost hits the king he asked. I saw that also the job to seems to fall a lot. The sewed fighting. I kept thinking if he wins. It'll just be really. I mean it looks like the masters better with the so order than the doctor. And i love the wooden sound. That the swords make when they clash against his mazing. She's a couple of rule is hitting the job if you at reenacted that is one of the most painful sword fights i've ever worked well. It certainly wasn't as good as the one in the princess bride well. They're very proud. Of the fact. That i had no stunt actors it was it was literally peter davison and anthony. Antony ainsley yeah. I thought it was doing that. Actual sword fight. That were very proud of that fact. And it's like yeah anyone could do that fucking solidify. I could do that sort five. But they did. Go up the stairs and downstairs on the that little tiny pieces late it was just you know what we can have a ton and we'll be able to see them. Go up it's we need to pat out it's like they have everything and probably filmed like a ten minutes on fire and there were like we'll just add more sword fight if we don't have enough in this episode. I was fully expected like the cost to come out the other side. Okay well that's set designer poured through the fields and they go through the town and they come back up and they're like fuck you still fighting a bridge four steps up stanford heaven bridge in..

fuck taylor sarah jane dole plo cole chuck Antony ainsley Geoffrey sergio peter davison anthony
"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

07:41 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

"Shot shots of the party is if that was the stakes like bono. I on the goes ted. No-one kids view diamond. You take that back. That was not a shady. Potty that was the most awesome party with ted foot toge- people waiting for clock the clock that huge potty. Where it's like. We're about to change the way you look at time nothing gets me moisture thinking that you is to look at at news. Give it one out of ten one tot because we have attracted traffic jam. What's calls the trump cha chicken chicken's. That's what they did. And i'm like that's creative. Pretty outta five. What would you like to hang on. I just wanted to. Would you think gunned every one of those chickens i wanted. I would've. I would have done it better than anyone could have. As lucky chicken. It gets booed naked. Mixed the highway linking. Yeah linear show. Also i bam bedroom all shoot myself shoot my hey hey july combined review yes please. I will give it to one as well. One poll maganga It can fuck off bec. I'm going to be controversial five. You giving it five minutes right best movie. I've seen the movie of all time. One of my favorite podcasts. That i listen to develop a thought that. Watch your neighborhood watching andy. For w h is an american podcasts. Cohabit this mind. I review shitty movies and i think you have to be truly good shitty movie to now that you're not shady Sierra these thought it was a really busy but was really shitty on giving it three stars. Actually you should watch it to see how truly dreadful and that's why look at the big three aren't gonna give a two out of five. Yeah i feel like it is very sincere but also it's hardly because there's a bunch of people be like us shovel bunch of shit in there. Assist like it's like a blues. Let's that was confused. Saga famous on they. Motherhood statement for the movie was fish sheet in home. A gun is correct. Yes yeah the the. It's funny talk about but it's not it's not right. Move by standards. It's just insane anyway. It just shows what took another decade to get excited. Yeah can you imagine the series going to be like. Let's do a whole series up to the movie gangs. How do you think that went missing. Be any minute now is is a sincere effort that they originated editing team was like harry make only. This is the blueprint footage off. They come in and go. Hi chris when you're editing that can you just pop together a trial attorney for us that he could just get that app to crystal. It's this is how you doing trauma this summer. Doing okay. duck little squirrel and the movies in the reflection of guns. The wrong person. Hey how you doing it your gun man. And then the chickens all right christianity plug. The anyway festival called the big boys company. Look up the anyway festival website. It's a it's a comedy show with long. It's going to be very funny. That obviously come see. Any big fork shows the squid onto the end of may. And then we're having a A month or so break. And and then also i'd like to plug my girlfriend. Show taylor. She's hogwash anyway festival so go see that. Oh our podcast. Oh i would like to apply to l. bronco livelihood watching with ben good stead ding to die. While i'm talking not sorry. Oh actually wasn't me. It was adam. He's a peak number three blue drink. Dan i like to plug ease fucking done flute. Now fucking bitch. That's battle right. Bixia vulnerable little finished. Your fish keep plugging finish names. O i'd like to plug which she plugged watching. That dick was actually quite enjoy. Really do total weather scraping a way out not with this is a new thing available to us that will be eh. It's actually a fabulous a- also plug on friday nights you can catch me on. Uh doing if you want to count good again. I recommend anyone. Hey a on out. I next time guys get off. You can catch. The hosts on facebook at nikisch comedy. And adam is given comedian defoe. Wh's haters on facebook twitter. Instagram and youtube. The podcast is available on pod. Bain apple podcasts spotify stitcher and many more nikita also house neighborhood watching with becca. Nick looking at the weird and wacky neighbors just over the back fence available where all podcasts are. Adam regularly works with big folk theatre in brisbane. You can find him in some of the online shows on the big four youtube channel and also has sketches in the. Get it in your podcast. If you enjoyed defoe w hite. Please consider jumping onto our patriotic and donating. We release episodes early. And for as little as five dollars a month we released many episodes in between our normal episodes. Defoe w. h. Is part of the nerd incident which can be found at the nerd. Infinite dot com. This has been a production of the new and the sound of dragons spitting fire and stuff. What why are you looking at me like that..

Adam chris five minutes youtube three stars two facebook brisbane twitter Instagram one taylor One poll Dan spotify friday nights ten adam l. bronco Infinite dot com
"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

"Fucking ended.

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Gave me coffee and hot. We're talking about stuff. We're talking about here in next up everywhere. So doctor who torchwood the surgeon adventures. Big finish audios and more all kinds of books. I find news news weather podcasts. For southgate media group including. We'll hey the forementioned ghost with the twin peaks podcasts that i do or all things twin peaks david lynch and currently. We are about to talk. There are third and final episode of the really obscure nineteen ninety-two. Abc cup series on the air that features a lot of twin peaks actors was executive produced by mark. Frost and david lynch does. This has been a really trippy. Blast from the past for yours. Truly a lot of these episodes. I haven't watched for twenty five years or so. It's been a serious trap. And i'm really enjoying it really enjoyed talking about. I hope everybody else's well and drugs. Like zan says where he taught adult beverages. We talk adult conversation and we drink and watch movies and there our favorite movies and we want to share with you guys so we encourage you to watch them along with us and we have a ball doing that. We just recently discussed for double seventh episode. We discussed goldfinger from the sean connery. James bond era and then coming up by his request. We're going to be discussing forbidden planet where we go back to the nineteen fifties of sci-fi classic that features leslie nielsen decades before the naked gun films and or airplane and this is something that i have not seen in its entirety so that is educating me a little bit in this regard. You're really gonna love it charles. It's a great film. It not just a classic. I mean it really stands up is good film. You're going to have a good time. And then after that i'm gonna turn the tables on her and we're discussing movies. She hasn't seen so we'll see how that goes right. But i'm not going to rehearse the polarity of jerk. I'm going to reverse the player to the drug cinema new. Yes exactly how it works. And then lastly but certainly not least the fan of zone podcasts. They do a dj. Nick whom you've heard here next up everywhere. Where right now. We're talking the cellular the winter soldier. We just did the second episode of that and this is so far. Been another great series from marvel cinematic universe where this time you know. What's more captain america centric. And i'm really enjoying this. Because as far as i'm concerned captain america is the best superhero film trilogy. That's out there. What are the things. We talked about during the zone. Podcast we try to compare contrast in as far as i'm concerned. Yeah all three kept. American movies were solid which you cannot say that about a lot of superhero movies in their various trilogies. How a lot of phone with that. We're going to keep talking that for about four episodes and then we'll see what we talk about next as we discussed more comical. Tv on the tatum's podcasts. And hopefully we'll get jesse jackson back on there. Because you know we miss you jesse. Thank you charles. i appreciate it. We'll be too long before you grace our presence once again so everybody thank you so much for listening out there everyone here thank you so much for what i thought was a really fun. Discussion about the three doctors absolutely. I hope everyone as much as i did. Because i had a ball with with all three of you. Yeah i just want to say thanks to holly in zan we always love having you guys on the podcast..

twenty five years jesse jackson holly third leslie nielsen southgate jesse second episode double seventh episode mark charles Nick decades Abc cup three doctors twin peaks James zan about four episodes ninety
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Get out of the exile but he does get out of the exile anyway. so i'll it all works out at the end but The only thing i would say on this one is that like it. I i kinda mad at jon pertwee for saying. Oh there's too many other people besides me in this show right. I would have liked to have seen at least one companion with every doctor right with harlan susan. Yeah without the heart doctor. It kind of made sense because okay. He's trapped in that time. Mattie but trout yet have had a companion to read in something like of even like susan could've been could've showed up and said grandfather. I you know i. I picked up on your brainwaves. Something something right at least a companion for every doctor that was that was empire in the chargers at the time so bad. That was a little disappointing. I mean it would've kind of jam packed with three but understand one companion would would've been well remember. I talked about that originally with their plan. Have jamie there and all it would have done is really taking taken away from benton's lines in the story so they could have done at least one companion right true that's true yep or it would have been interesting if they kept benton and then had benton and jamie kind of duke it out over a little bit. I would have gone that long door owners. Personally all yeah. Maybe just a little bit of the friendly rivalry for joe's attention right you know. Both of them are trained to pull her chair out at the same time. Like that. Either gentlemanly gentlemanly competition for the hand of the lady. That would've been cute. Little interesting bit of trivia was that didn't share. was that jumper. Twee guess kept getting called up by patrick trout and during the filming of this because pertwee would always try to position. Stephen thorne out of the way so that the camera would be on him. Gosh in like what are you doing like you have to have the months during the shot all of this shattner esque little bit rama that it's not necessarily little bit little bit. Try not to speak. Ill of jon pertwee but i'm just saying.

Stephen thorne susan three patrick trout jamie benton jon pertwee Mattie Both one companion joe at least one companion harlan susan too many every rama
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Of all the people of all the other time lords and your their society that they need the doctor to stop boga so they have to kind of like okay. We're going to help the doctor and they see that the third doctor needs help so they so they got did it. We have to like or rasa david in this case. We're bringing in another doctor to help the third doctor so cheese. You like rap but we need exactly. Yeah it's like you. We totally totally Killed whether you you're incarnations exiled you but if you could do a solid help us with this omega problem thing we'd be really appreciative. Okay well looks like you need some help. So here's another doctor. It looks like oh you two aren't really getting along with one another. So here's an here's an attempt at another doctor only go sideways. In the first doctor it gets trapped in that time eddie it can only advise them but ultimately they decide well. Hey we'll just use the last of our power to to project you into the antimatter universe. So you can advise the one last time so yeah. They had to kind of eat some crow. Here's e. They dismissed the doctor. They've hated the doctor for being renegade that that abandoned their society and it's stolen tartus ran away and here they have you know they have to rely on him and that that sure that really eats at them as a result great stuff. It makes for a fun episode. I really like see the time of their black and white uniforms in this story. Yeah the they don't get the funny hats with a big ass collars Till till the. Tom baker erazo. You know i kind of like. This is very sleek in stark black and white. It's very interesting. The these uniforms aided right. Yeah that's so that's so ostentatious as Later years in that regard. Yeah when he calls when he says they're a damn man a clown who do just wait. Wait you where do you see the robes. You're going to be wearing later on right paraphrase. Colin baker is just waiting in the wings. Going way to get a load of me. You've seen nothing yet. Heck yet know. Exactly exactly or quote eric roberts master in the tv movie. I always dress for the occasion..

rasa david Colin baker two third doctor first doctor Tom baker erazo eric roberts master one last time eddie
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Him off. It's just like wow. That's i can. I like it was. He was the victim of an accident. You know the fact of creating this. This revolutionary solar engineering process that he fell victim to it and got shunted into the anti matter universe and nobody looked for him right. They just thought he was dead. Though was it. Yeah this. I mean for him to be. You know to have that built up that long understandable but then this is like okay. Timers are just like oh okay. He's alive We need to nip the hud and the time lords nat is devious. What they become in later years so it was kind of refreshing to see this. You know the other shoe is going to drop right. They weren't this period. They weren't as horrible as they eventually. Become. right still pretty arrogant though. Yeah like jesse pointed out the other thoughts about these the over at the time lords ali. I think i'm good. Okay yeah i i personally for me i. I love omega villain. I think he's a very compelling villain. I think like zan pointed out you know. He's he's got an interesting story. He's you know this this time were. That was a solid engineer. A scientist so it in the process of creating this amazing thing. This big revolutionary thing for time lord society so that they could become time lords that He fell victim to it. And you know it which also makes him like zan. Set it very tragic figure and stephen thorne plays so well you know yes. He's a little over the top theatrical. But like i said i think you need that for this type of character especially when you're dealing with someone who we eventually find out is nothing laughed but will that's all that's all that's there. I mean you know inside that mask those rose. You lift up a mass. There's literally nothing. All it is is just his sheer force of well holding his consciousness together. Everything else has been completely destroyed. So it's that strength. The will that hatred for the time lords that enables him to continue to exist and not disperse so very unique villain in that regard. And so i find it really compelling and yes he's all about revenge against the time lords. I'll get. I'll get them back for the way they treated me. So i'll steal are the power and You know and and they will be able to do anything about it. The all they eventually still a powerful universe as a result so So i could get back to the to the main universe but But the time lords you know the kind of have to kind of have to eat a little crow. They they they talk a lot of crap about the doctor. They put him on trial. They they like we talked about. They took one of his lives forced into regenerates cinnamon exile on twentieth century earth of all times and forced him to to live out his existence. There so but you know they realized that.

twentieth century stephen thorne zan one jesse earth ali omega
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"It is I thought this was a very interesting villain And it does show the the extreme that the time lords Set themselves up the the idea that they can. I mean the very name time lords as in they control everything Shows their arrogance at shows there by yes and then to see as much as i love having gala free exists than i did not like the latest decision temporarily to show there wasn't a gala frame. The latest series. I you know. I like them. They're if nothing else just as a reminder to the doctor of what he ran away from. And i know it's not all of them. I i love when you see a decent time lord in the classic who ramona's that they are yes while they may be very confident and very or not not all over this area and i also think it's interesting that as often as they've had to go to the doctor to save their bacon. They resent him that they've had to do that. And you see this very early right that they call on him. They don't know what else to do. They get the this three versus the doctor within their almost angry that they had to do that. And because he ause rebel almost yes it. Yes it exactly. That's perfectly said charles. It you know tasks he tasks we're we're back to rathikant just like yes exactly Lead to rapid con. So in. I thought it was a great reveal that just his will or his actual desire. He's his body doesn't exist anymore and really the only way they can release him is through You know the undiscovered country if we're gonna keep it in star trek themes and you a star trek podcast. We keep talking star trek. Yes so eight. It just was a really well done and I also thought of you know this latest twist with a new series about how much of what the doctor been led to believe is all facts and you know now about re generations in discovering time travel. Is this necessarily true. So great villain. Great epic for a tenth anniversary You know it lived up to the expectations in any a a really good villain that you didn't need a lot of Other smaller creatures or necessarily it's just a weird bubble blah things for that. Yeah i forgotten about this. And i called loyd's nate bind anybody else of those squish toys. That human the webbing they could just squeeze and you get the bubbles and then when you let go a little bit and it also like how it it almost looks like A a elementary key kid like went crazy at the art shop to decorate an color. It like oh look. See what i did. And it's like oh that looks weird but okay wait to go you know junior but yes i i love the villains and i thought it was really well done holly how about you. What are your thoughts. All nato was really interesting. I mean for him to have that much will to set that up and i do we ever find out kind of what the time lords did take.

tenth anniversary charles three loyd star trek ramona nato eight holly
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"You didn't have any other choice especially win. You know omega you know. Essentially put the the entire universe at stake or everything right so so i kind of liked the that that knew she was. She was trying to reassure the doctor and she kind of you know she's she's apathetic enough to pick up on the fact that you know even her. I mean for lack of a better word her her role model her idol. Here you know needs of words of comfort. And i like the fact that joe is there to provide that for him so right. She's she's pretty into like i said she's. She is a little bit maternal within as well but also a little bit of a little sister tagging along so she's i think she's a very complex character definitely more than i gave her credit for the for her first episode. I think she's underestimated as a companion definitely is yes. She actually a lot a lot of people especially a lot of who wins they dismiss her is like oh she's the kooky one of the gogo booze but right and she felt like even to the doctor. She felt like a downgrade from liz. She yeah she felt like that to me too. Because i you know i love liz liz to after watching what did you say. I was so disappointed when she loved so disappointed. And then you know after watching you sort of get there's more here to her than just handing. Somebody test tubes stroking his ego right. She's she has much more to offer. And i think that's definitely a testament to her character. That she she's given this assistant job to this egotistical alien but then she really makes a lot out of what she's able to do because she is very intuitive when it when it comes to him essentially you know the third doctor joe is what a great i think doctor companion pairings throughout greater whose history you know it's more injury it's very much iconic like you know the the fourth doctor and sarah jane or You know the second doctor doctor. Those doctrine ace so yes. Yeah so So i i really like it and like the relationship have because obviously you know when they when the doctor joe i were met at one another entirely autobahns there. Is you know especially with the doctor. There's a lot more friction there. But over time over the through the episodes he he's come to rely on her and sees her potential any. You know the former really great friendship with one another. I really liked that right. And when she leaves to get married he's really he's really upset he's and you can tell not because he's going to have to get his own test jobs but because he's clearly her yes he's he's going to go on my own phone calls to what the hell is this. Where's my coffee. We're the tea lady. Go what happened to her to worry. Closer dirty where's harley. that's one of my favorite episodes. I love that so in the brigadier in sergey better they always this this great sometimes comic relief deal and they just get along. I think that the brigadier we talked about how inflexible he is..

sarah jane harley first episode liz liz liz fourth doctor second doctor one of my favorite episodes joe third doctor gogo
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"I mean how are we gonna talk about. This was really really neat Every time i see joe. I think of her appearances on the sarah jane adventures and so i see the doctor. Yeah that it was. I see the You know. I wonder if thing what did they want. A companion at this time And you know you guys talked about just to hand test tubes until the doctor is buried So it was cool to see her. And sarah jane doing more than that and showing that she did have this experience that we could do I it just it. It there is no there is no excess characters in the story there was no i think. Excess story lines You know it's four chapters but it's it moved quickly and everyone had i think of fairly significant role in it so just a really good model so it was great to see the three companions. I i understand why technically you know. The the who've and fan boys are gonna they're not companions but i know exactly what you're saying charles. They are integral but yes eight year. Old exactly a great. Yeah yeah i would i. There's a couple of joe moments that really liked. I liked Joe when they're kind of in the cell together you know on on on the you know the planet oba and the doctors are like you know talking about the you know the over guys will and whatnot and joe is the only one who brings up. Well hey you know your time lord like omega in fact you're like you know both of you are the same time lord surely you're will as i is powerful enough as his right and at least powerful enough to get you know a door and get out of here and so i i kinda like the fact that joe was feature more as the out of the box thinker that thinking of things that even doctors and even even the doctors didn't think of the doctors two doctors kind of look at each other like. Hey you're right when we do that and You know they they her Suggestion in rain with it and it worked so so i liked that i liked that it also like the fact that at the end of the story when the third doctors kind of like a little depressed over. You know essentially sending omega to to be killed you know to to his demise and joke picks up on the doctor's remorse a little bit and you know she's like well you don't you you don't have to feel guilty..

Joe charles sarah jane three companions four chapters eight year two doctors both third doctors joe one omega
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"I don't know the brigadier is the perfect military man because he's very interested in regimentation and protocol and following things by the book. And i i love him when he was like. Oh this is just a beach. Probably miles from london yet. No you're way farther than miles from london. Where he just sorta can't wrap his head around the fact that there's something that that unit can't figure out that unit can't fix that he does when he opens up the door and he's like whoa. It's like it's like it's like beetlejuice. They try to leave the house. And it's weird sand worms beetlejuice. It reminded me of that a lot. Where is the brigadier dead and trying to leave. His house. can't escape the sandwich so brigadier just seems to have a really hard time accepting that the doctor knows what he's talking about and he has a hard time accepting the doctors explanations even when it's right there in front of him and i just sometimes wonder how long is a brigadier gonna have to work with the doctor before he realizes that when he's doing something with the doctor something crazy that he can't understand and that unit can't explain or fix is going to happen he gets better does get better but even at the end of this episode where he says okay. We'll we're back at unit headquarters. You should probably take a full inventory and make sure nothing's missing and bitten says missing. Where are we going to say that it went which is great line. I thought we're going to say that. Went the breeders like oh so the brigadier just cracks me up this. Because he's he's been with dr for long enough that he should be about as accepting as benton as but he just. He has a hard more rigid military. Mind i think than bentley does. His entire life has been a to point. B will eventually lead you to point see whereas with the doctor. Sometimes you start. It would see and then go to point a. And then sometimes you go to point q and miss all of the steps between and it just seems like the brigadier all in all the imperial the empirical evidence that he's presented with can't get his head around that and i think that's the brigadier is the perfect example of a straight man when it comes to science fiction that there's always that guy that you know but but that's not how things are like. Well obviously they are. Open the door. Look around you surrounded by christmas tree ornament monsters..

london bentley christmas
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Joe's very loyal and like when she was hired by the brigadier to work with the doctor he said but she's not a scientist and the brigadier said well. Liz told me that pretty much. All you need is someone to agree with you. All the time test tubes tubes so which was which was kind of durable when the brigadier citizen or anything we can do for your. Hey that still silicon rod. The city stirs his coffee with it. Yeah yeah so But but. That's that's joe joe. Is there to support doctor. Whatever way she needs to. So i i find. Joe is she. She's very. She's very endearing in that sense but i do think she puts herself in payroll more than she needs to because she's just doesn't want to leave the doctor behind so she's almost. She's a mixture of a little sister and a big sister where she wants to protect the doctor but she's also tagging along even when she probably shouldn't so i always thought that was very endearing about joe's character. There's much loyalty protectiveness gets the better over a lot of ways. Sometimes yes i. Sometimes i think she does. Maybe put herself in peril when she doesn't need to but again that helps advance the story. Sometimes so i completely understand why your characters. But i i did. I did kind of like fit sort of thirty crush. Bitten seemed to have on her in this episode. I thought that was. I thought that was kind of adorable in. I know joe. Mary's another guy but that would have been kinda cute. Two of them had history. Mega other right. Yeah they had some history but if they you know sort of you know getting thrown together with work they may be. I don't know but not to work. Romance has never worked out. This work wrote those workplace. Romances does doomed so benton was adorable though because when he sees patrick troughton he's like. Oh my gosh. it's my old friend. The doctor he's just excited to see his old friend again and they just went right into reminiscing about old times. And because benton batter traveling incarnation of a doctor. It's not terribly jarring for him to understand that that's the doctor. Because he's been through regeneration. You seem to different doctors so well. I saw this new one show up. What's how weird is it that you would come back. I don't know you guys do your doctor thing. Whatever so he's more accepting of it than the brigadier is very accepting everything about the doctor especially like we are talking about where he goes into. The charges are and the doctor says. Aren't you going to say at benton that it's bigger on the inside and he's like yeah. I pretty much thought that was obvious. Right there's no way to say out loud because everybody sees it could region. It's probably better reactions. I think to to that question right like everybody walks in and sort of accepts it. And he's like it it it. I was in college. And i'd be in class with someone that i felt. Would sort of interrupt the class to ask for clarification of something that was understood by the rest of us. And it's like if somebody is using a term with you and not defining it the assumption is that you know the term also so if everybody walks into the tartus and makes no comment about the fact that it's inside that's just an accepted fact that you're just gonna have to accept as well making comments about this just irrelevant and extraneous and s and agree..

Joe Liz Two benton patrick troughton joe benton batter Mary Bitten them
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Well you know if you're if british i kind of what he's on the monitor screen in the tartus. It's going to look a little different but a shut. The f thought. They should've interspersed that with some direct camera cuts exactly where where it's just the doctor talking to the audience. Yeah right right right where you see where you see. Then look at him where they hear him say oh hey chops they turn around and they say oh it's me again and then you would cut to just a talking head of william hartnell with healthy without a backer visual background noise of having filming that monitor right. I mean obviously you know. We don't know what happened with the production about or why they felt they needed to do this but but it is interesting why they didn't like i said you know interspersed those with some direct shots like you were talking about it. Yeah i don't think it detracted to the point where. I was distracted from it. I just at first. I thought this would have been nice. They did it this way. And then i i just don well. Let's kind of you know quarterbacking this thing like fifty years matter so yeah exactly so Yeah i mean. I love the interaction between these characters. I love is one of the things. I really loved. And you kind of touched upon this little bit was The deference at the second doctor has for the first doctor you know he makes this content very interesting comment. You know what. I it was to To benefit or the brigadier. i can't remember which. But he says that You know he's paraphrasing here. But he said something along the lines of you know like i've always respected his opinions you right and that reminded me a lot of tenant davison where he says. I just have to say. I love being you hear. It reminded me a lot of a lot of that. But i just love the difference. Because it's like. Hey her no was the originator. He's he's going to be the alpha no matter what anybody does. He's i because you would have show without him. Let's face act now you would not so So it's kind of nice. I thought it was nice. At least they acknowledged that a little bit. You know even as a throwaway line but it but it stood out to me. at least. they're really appreciate it. Takes me to that. you know he does. He does have respect for his his original self and he'd also does no. I should probably listen to him. He is me right. But but yeah i just. I love their chemistry. I love their interactions with one another This is the first time that you know what the second doctor in the third doctor that you kind of established the fact that they don't get along with each other in soviet kind of carries through to like i said these later multi doctor stories where the doctors don't get along with each other.

william hartnell fifty years first doctor third doctor second doctor soviet one first time things first british
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Yeah are you sure. Are you sure that you and here are the same intelligence. I'm just like i mean 'cause the war doctor events this like their me yoga's throwing some shade on the second doctor so right anything else about these doctors that you really enjoy talking or enjoyed watching just trying to finally putting aside whatever differences ahead with each other to work together. It was good. Yeah it's always fun to watch right all right. Then how about you like. I said before. I really like how seeing all three of them put together really shows you that. The doctor is kind of egotistical megalomaniac with a superiority complex. And i know i say i know that sounds bad when i say. But you're not really you know putting a good light on him. I'm just saying. I mean in the nicest possible most veering way that i can't use a lovely. He's a lovely man but he really does. He's video which we we know. Because we know what's gonna happen. I mean we know how he he gets in trouble for his ways and thinking that he can he's above every he's a laws so we know that he's he's a little bit into himself so i really liked that and i loved how bringing on three of the doctors together shows you how subtle the differences can be in the performers but how different the doctor can be and how unique each actor can make the doctor and i really love that. Because that's something about doctor who that is very necessary for the audience to get on board with for the show to be successful the idea of regeneration in it. Not just not only regenerates you physically but it regenerates a personality a little bit. You still have your core person and you still have most of your memories scrambled in your regeneration process but every regeneration brings a new thing to the personality and it makes them more individuals makes them definitely more individuals even though they are the an individual version of being right and having the three doctors together really shows you back about how their time they can be similar times. They can be very different. And then you have things where we do. Get at gerry aunt in this. And so you're like yes louis c. You you were. You're reminded of each actors idiosyncrasies with the character and as sad as it is.

louis second doctor each actor gerry three doctors each actors three of the doctors three each yoga
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"It's a very low bar to over. Overtake or at least at least superman lex luther in. Let's just put it that way. Yes te yes it does have that lori web plays arthur alice mr olis' and climate polit. I wanted to mention because he plays the chancellor. What are the head time. Lords that are introducing the story but he actually appeared as a time lord in the war games presuming. It's the exact same time. Lord what they wanted. The three time lords that was responsible for war forcing the second doctor to generate into third doctor. Jon pertwee in that story and now here he is in charge of the whole deal trivia so the script was originally supposed to feature all three doctors equally. But of course william hartnell was too ill to be able to play the full role as envisioned in sadly hurdle died two years later after the story. Nine hundred seventy five at the age of sixty seven so it's kind of disturbing that we've heard note died sixteen years after my current age. So her for that right little another reminder of mortality that seems to be permeating the conversation today. I guess at least before we started the production team plan for frazier hines to reprise the role of jamie mckernan alongside the second doctor and interestingly also have a romance with joe however frazer hines was not available due to his work on the soap opera at the time dale firm and much of the role that it was originally intended for javy was reassigned to sergeant benton. So i'm sure. Jeff levine was happy that he got a few extra lines in this story. Exactly i was. I was thinking the same thing rank. Okay well you know at least for one pleasant see i got more scenes. I got right lines out of it. Yeah so it's next band available. In this case it was sergeant benton right to try to the idea of jamie appearing though the production team even tried to write a cameo for him in the last scene calling the second doctor back to his own time line but even that was scrapped because of frazer hines entail commitments. At least try to get him but it'll work out sadly then turns up really quick cameo later on in the five doctors so little disappointing but at least it got to be in the two doctors with Patrick troughton in baker. Aero interestingly enough. Also wendy padbury is character zoe harriet. you know jamie's fellow companion for the second doctor was also considered a return..

Jeff levine jamie mckernan william hartnell five doctors two doctors javy zoe harriet jamie Patrick troughton second doctor lex luther third doctor sixty seven joe three doctors wendy padbury benton arthur alice mr olis' Jon pertwee today
"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"doctor" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Wonderful friend. And someone who. I delight in spending wednesday evenings with jesse jackson. How're you doing jesse. I am great charles. I am so excited for three reasons. One our two guests companions are rockin. Who've ian love talking to and third. I adore this this so yeah. I'm really looking forward to talking about this. One all right so without further ado. That's introduce our wonderful special guest companion so returning from well. Hey goes to the twin peaks podcast and drunks cinema. My wonderful co host on both of those programs and wonderful friend and just someone who i also enjoy talking to zan sprouse doing. I'm doing good charles. I still have the glue in my hair sixty last night. Because it's been to austin from it to take a shower and fine. Least i'm actually. You're not just not just on a video motor. So i mean i am technically but i i'm actually i'm actually talking to you mealtime so i definitely appreciate that skype permitting. Of course right forbidding. Of course yes skype the skype the boss skype is The ancient god that imposes. Its will on us when it comes so we apparently we need to do a sacrifice. Also joining us from the fibers fingers podcasts. Once again one of our favorite e-mailers and also favorite special guest companions holly mack. How're you doing holly doing good. Doing good can't complain excited to talk about this episode. I like jesse enjoyed it immensely. Excellent so what we're doing here episode to five we're discussing. The three doctors would have my personal phase from the jumper twee era way back way back from one thousand nine hundred seventy three. This was the first season ten written by bob. Baker and dave martin the creators of canine. So hurry for all you. Canine fans and they previously wrote the story. The clause of xhosa and went on to write stories like the centauri experiment the hand of fear. Which was surgeon's last story on doctor who at least regular story the invisible enemy which introduced canine and the armageddon factor. The last chapter in the key to time saga from tom. Baker's run in this was directed by lennie main and of course stars jump pertwee as the third doctor in katy manning as joke grant so before we get into anything else i got to know. Obviously it sounds like jesse enjoyed watching this..

jesse jackson charles dave martin lennie holly mack One both two guests third holly jesse twin peaks tom. Baker wednesday evenings third doctor one sixty last night katy manning skype