25 Burst results for "Dna Damage"

Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

BrainStuff

05:19 min | 3 months ago

Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

"As I record this, it is August which here in the northern hemisphere means hours of outdoor time under the blazing summer Sun. But even though many of us do wear sunscreen to help prevent sunburn skin cancer and the kind of skin damage that the beauty industry calls premature aging recent researches found that we're not applying that sunscreen is thickly as we should hang its effectiveness by about forty percent. Sunscreen is rated for Sun Protection factor or SPF WITH SPF thirty able to block ninety, seven percent of ultraviolet rays, the higher, the SPF, the greater the protection although even SPF one hundred doesn't block one hundred percent of UV light. The problem according to this recent research out of University College. London is that few of US US enough sunscreen to enjoy those high levels of protection. Lead author entity young explained to US via email that to calculate ratings in the lab. Sunscreen is applied thickness of two milligrams of product per each square centimeter of skin. He said, an average woman has about one point, seven square meters or eighteen point three square feet of skin for a whole body sunscreen she will need about thirty three grams or one point. One fluid ounces with three whole body applications a day that's about one hundred grams or three point four fluid ounces. For reference, a fluid ounces roughly equivalent to a shot glass of sunscreen and a large tube of sunscreen holds eight fluid ounces of product. So a person spending a full day in the Sun should use about half a tube by themself. Are you using that much sunscreen probably not young and his colleagues estimate that our real life application of Sunscreen is closer to about point seven five milligrams per square centimeter at less than forty percent of the recommended thickness as a result or not getting anything close to the ninety seven percent protection promised on a bottle of SPF. Thirty. The good news from young study is that you can get away with using less product with SPF of fifty or higher. They found that even the real world application rate of point seven, five milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter if using SPF, fifty provided considerable DNA protection compared to untreated skin. So does that mean that you should run out and buy the most expensive SPF one hundred or spread your regular SPF thirty as thick as cream cheese on a BAGEL. We also spoke with Ivy Lee a board certified dermatologist based in Pasadena California who explained that you could. But that the best daily Sun Protection Strategy is to keep it realistic. Lee, said I tell my patients to go for the highest SPF possible. That feels good on the skin for daily use. How do you know you're really applying two milligrams per square centimeter? No one knows we don't want to induce anxiety over this we want to build healthy habits. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States and exposure to ultra-violet or UV. Light is a risk factor for all types of cancer including melanoma more than nine thousand, three, hundred Americans die for melanoma every year. UNPROTECTED EXPOSURE TO UV light damages the DNA and skin cells leaving them more susceptible to skin cancer DNA damage can result from either a few severe sunburns or a lifetime of cumulative sun exposure. Incredibly the American, Academy of Dermatology reports that getting just five or more blistering sunburns between the ages of fifteen and twenty will increase your overall melanoma risk by percents. and. Lee says that although skin cancer is less prevalent in people of color exposure to UV, light can also cause premature aging they sunscreen use will slow the appearance of wrinkles and age spots for all skin tones. Healthy sun-protection habits include avoiding sun exposure during the peak between ten am to two PM wearing a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses went outside and full sun, and of course, applying sunscreen on all exposed skin even in overcast conditions. For full coverage, Lee recommends starting the day with a cream or lotion type sunscreen preferably fifteen to thirty minutes before you step outside. Instead of measuring out of full shot glass of product, Lee tells her clients to think of applying sunscreen like a massage or can fully into the skin without missing a spot since body sizes vary and product spread. Differently there's no preset amount that works for everyone. Lease suggests reserving spray or powder type sunscreen for fast reapplication on the go the ideal is to reapply every two hours but lease as a more realistic plan is to reapply around lunchtime if you're going to be out all day. If you're heading out on water sanders snow more frequent applications are required because UV rays reflect off of those surfaces. According to Lee it's a myth that you can't burn the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet. Also, tablets and other hand held devices reflect UV light too. So pick a shady spot if you're going to spend some time in the sun scrolling.

Skin Cancer Ivy Lee United States Premature Aging Sunburn University College London Dna Damage California Pasadena Academy Of Dermatology
CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:07 min | 11 months ago

CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

"Today we're GONNA be talking to Cherie Virago professor of medicine and medical molecular genetics and also director of the stem cell program. I use school of Medicine. He Generals General's GonNa talk to us today about stem cell. Therapy and car T.. Therapy in particular which you may have heard in the news but before we get to that. Let's start with some basics first of all. Welcome to the program program thank you. Can you tell us in general what it means to be not only a professor of medicine but a professor of medical and molecular genetics so medical Michael Molecular Genetics. It's a very broad term It's it's really looking at the molecular basis of disease Not just inherited a disease but Many of the diseases have a molecular basis. Even if they're not directly inherited had he actually look get to the molecular basis. What kind of research technologies are you using? The biggest technology at the moment is Sequencing genes particularly in in terms of Chewers in my area sequencing can cell's genome to identify particular mutations. That could be targetable identifying mutations Sion's that in future could be Way We could design drugs perhaps decided Also there are ways of personalizing Medicine in a way Way We can identify Because not all cancer even the same kind of cancer is not all Homogeneous there's a lot of heterogeneity so if you can identify certain mutations in a person's at cancer cell you may be able to target that specifically perfect for that person's cancer as opposed to all the people with that kind of cancer. So how do you train to do this kind of work so in your career career how what did you do to get to this point. Well I guess there are various ways of getting there the way I got there. I trained actually in Australia Did all my hematology. Aw called you training in Australia. And then I did a PhD. That was more related to stem cell transplantation rather than molecular medicine at the time and then I moved to Ohio state where I stayed there for about six years on faculty and then the opportunity came to lead the transplant program. Ram At Indiana University. So I moved there in two thousand six. So we're talking about treating cancer. Is it all kinds of cancer or specific kinds of cancer. Turner accident well as a stem cell transplant. we're really focusing on hematological. Kansas blood cancers So leukemia multiple myeloma lymphoma. These are the ones that are amenable really to stem cell transplantation. You talk about what the differences are between those three short so It's really the cell of origin or the origin of the cancer so leukemia we're really talking about Cancers of blood stem cells the bone marrow in multiple myeloma. We're really talking about Cancer cells plasma cells which really part of the immune system in lymph falmouth with talking about cancer cells that are also part of the immune system that the less differentiated cells than the Coloma. So what what causes these. What makes someone developed one of those types of cancer? Well that's a really good question and we don't know all the the answers to that but It the it's silly as with other Kansas to I'll just blood cancers there are Hits in the genome of the the cans of the cells that turns them on to become cancerous essentially and so once they become cancerous. They just start growing multiplying without controls trolls. That the gist of it. Or Yeah. That's basically it they. They're able to multiply without control but they're also able to survive better They have a survival advantage compared to their normal counterparts talking about the history of treatment of those types of cancer. Like what do we do. And what are we. What are we got into now? And specifically of course what is stem cell therapy. Happy at the end. Yes so you know historically the we have been treating and we still the do treat These cancers with conventional cytotoxic agents these agents are essentially cellular toxins that cause DNA damage to the cells and as a result they The cells sells died and they because cancer cells tend to divide more frequently or more rapidly than normal cells and these conventional channel cytotoxic target the proliferating cells more than the Doman cells. So we're able to Mo- selectively kill cancer cells. But they are. They also affect normal cells as well as things have evolved We are now able to. We learn more about the genetics of the Kansas. His when now able to design drugs that particularly targets in pathways molecular pathways. That these cancer cells depend on so Treatment has become Less toxic to the to the patient in general so we're trying to target specifically just killing the cancer while not killing other other rapidly or any other kinda cells in the body. So what is then stem cell. Therapy like what. What's the difference between what skyping there and then going all the way to say? We're GONNA do a stem cell. Trance have so in some cases not all Kansas but some Kansas are also amenable to stem cell transplant therapy. And they're really too broadly. Speaking to approach is one where we use. The patient's own stem cells called tolerance stem cell transplantation. And where we use dona cells or allogeneic stem cell transplantation so with autologous transplantation plantation would really reverting back to the classic cytotoxic approach way we give very high doses of chemotherapy to Kill Oh as many cancer cells as possible. One of the side effects of this is that it will also cools a permanent damage to the bone marrow of people without stem cell support report. They would Essentially die of marrow failure so to collect stem cells. I there on stem cells assuming their stem cells not diseased. Then when you can give high dose. Chemotherapy give back stem cells and allow the marrow to recover so I have a couple questions there first of all. How do you get the stem cells? Out So stem cells live predominantly in the bone marrow But they do circulate the blood so you can either collect directly from the bone marrow but more commonly family today in the autologous approach we give growth factors which can move stem cells to circulate more in the blood and then we collect them. I'm by a process called a ferocious. Where basically they are collected a blood donor machine essentially that will collect them from the blood? How do you how do you how are you sure? You're not collecting cancer cells at the same time you do Some of these stem cell products will be contaminated but to some extent by cancer sells but it seems that most relapses after autologous transplantation occur not because of contamination. But because you really the the chemo a high dose chemotherapy that you've given has not killed the last cancer cell in the body. So how are you also assured that the stem cells are not. Can't where's the cancer come from. If it's not coming mm from stem cells as the simpsons or what about the sort of the the. He met a poetic stem cells. That give rise to the sherm tie. He met a point system. MM-HMM SO For example in multiple myeloma these inadequate ext themselves are not cancerous. Okay and in lymphomas Somali. They are not not cancerous. Can you just give us just a brief description of what the poetic system is so the Humana poetic system is essentially all blood forming cells and immune cells so the very primitive stem cells that give give rise to the humanitarian existent. They give rise to white cells red cells platelets as well as the components of the immune in systems such as B. Cells. T. Cells natural killer cells. We're just trying to figure out in my head and where it comes from. Because if if the are the white blood cells coming from the bone marrow in the stem cells though in development I it depends on the Canada Essentially for example if we take multiple well my Lama so the Within the immune system one cancer cell becomes Transform to become malignant and phones a clone in that clone of actually expands and has sub clones of its own and that's really the cancer but that's not arising from a in the actual stem cell of the very primitive stem cell that gives rise to all the blood forming cells in the Merrill.

Cancer T. Cells Kansas Multiple Myeloma Michael Molecular Genetics Australia School Of Medicine Professor Of Medicine Cherie Virago Ram At Indiana University Myeloma Lymphoma Director Ohio Professor Sion
NAD+, Nicotinamide Riboside, and Nicotinamide Mononucleotide with Rhonda Patrick

FoundMyFitness

06:58 min | 1 year ago

NAD+, Nicotinamide Riboside, and Nicotinamide Mononucleotide with Rhonda Patrick

"I'm going to talk about a molecule that has become in recent eight years extremely relevant to the field of aging specifically. I'm referring to any D. plus which I will refer to. As N de for short and some of the related precursor molecules kills Nicotinamide riboside often referred to as an R. and nicotinamide mononucleosis tired often referred to as an these two precursor sir molecules are called an boosters which can both be found as consumer available supplements. Just in case. You've never heard of any. It's probably one of the most important molecules accuweather on the planet so important in fact that without it life would cease to exist to NATO boosters nicotinamide said nicotinamide mono nuclear tied at very high doses. This is an animal. Studies have both been shown to improve the way multiple tissues and cell types age including skeletal and heart muscle brain and stem cells. There have also I've been to preliminary clinical trials in humans showing nicotinamide riboside may raise energy levels in white blood cells. which is pretty darn cool however I still? I think there are many open questions that need to be answered regarding. Ad Boosters and I will touch on some of these concerns in this episode but the possibility that intracellular NASD may be increased from a supplement or several types of supplements is awfully interesting if not downright exciting for one. Simple reason energy levels decrease with age and a decrease in energy eighty levels across a variety of types of tissues is associated with many and naming many hallmarks of aging these hallmarks of aging that are associated with age related plated changes in the pool either directly or indirectly include things. Like loss of Proto. Stasis Might conroe Dysfunction Glucose Intolerance Insulin Insulin Resistance Cellular senescence altered epigenetics and more this is partly because the availability of promotes. DNA repair capacity while its decline is associated associated with the accumulation of DNA damaging reactive oxygen species another reason is because Nada's required for energy production so when energy levels decline as they do with age this results in less energy production in many tissues like the brain immune cells muscle etc.. That means those organs do not work as well as they once insted. During youth. When energy levels were maintained? Any ideas also required for the activation of a very important family of enzymes involved in longevity called Sir Tunes and the complete answer to why energy levels fall with age is still an open question. But there's a few things we do know. As we age chronic inflammation and immune activation two processes that consume NASD tend to go up and with them our need for DNA repair placing an immense demand on our energy pool. Meanwhile while our ability to produce and recycle tends to fall with age we're GONNA cover a lot of ground in this episode but I wanNA start with an overview of any D- Any any deal has a very important role in energy metabolism and can be synthesized in the body from a variety of dietary sources including the amino acid trip to fan which which is in tons of healthy foods like salmon spinach and nuts and the three forms of niacin which is vitamin B.. Three also found in foods like lean meats legumes veggies edges these three forms of vitamin B.. Three include nicotinamide also called Niacin nicotinic acid and nicotinamide riboside they are commonly referred to as Nice in equivalents but dietary sources of energy are not the major source of any D. The major source of energy is through a recycling mechanism that we will discuss later. The reason for that is because our organs require such large quantities of that it would be impossible to consume enough from our diet. So why why do we require such large quantities of any first and foremost energy plays a critical role in energy metabolism critical. Meaning without it. You can't make energy entity participates in back and forth processes of reduction and oxidation often referred to as Reebok's reactions these alternating conversions of NFC's oxidized form which Canady to its reduced form. An Age are crucial for the metabolism of glucose and fatty acids and the formation of ATP. Since both the oxidized is in reduced forms of amd are essential for these linked sets of reactions cells need to maintain massive concentrations of both and a D. and an age basically without these molecules. Not only would we cease to exist but life on our planet would cease to exist and it is also a cofactor for many different important enzymes in this context a cofactor means something that is required for an enzyme to work at has to bind to the enzyme and this activates the enzyme so it can performance function so. Let's talk about a few of these enzymes. Several these NATO required enzymes are inside the Mitochondria and this is another way and participates in the generation of energy aside from itself being a type of energetic currency it also acts as a cofactor for enzymes involved in the production of energy from glucose outside of the minor Qendra this is referred or to as glycolysis many types of cells us look like Hollis's as their primary source of energy. For example. Red Blood cells do not have any medical Andrea so one hundred percent of the energy. They require to perform their function of delivering oxygen and other goodies to other tissues in the body comes from glycolysis and plays a very important role in mitigating DNA. A damage you need repair damage to DNA. That is because any cofactor for one of the most important enzymes involved. In repairing DNA damage called part one the activation of part one requires an enormous amount of any D for example excessive DNA damage in subsequent one activation have been shown to decrease energy levels to twenty to thirty percent of its normal levels. The ability to repair DNA damage is important for longevity. LYMPHOBLASTIC cell lines established from blood samples of humans who were centenarians. One hundred years or older have significantly higher part one activity than cell lines established from younger individuals. That are seventy years old part. One activity has also been correlated with maximum lifespan. In mammals the higher the part one activity the longer lifespan. For example the activity of part one one was measured across multiple Mammalian species and the difference in powerpoint activity between the longest lived mammals tested which were humans and the shortest lived mammals tested. which were rats? It's was fivefold so not too much of a surprise but genomic stability which relies on energy in general and pop ones specifically maybe very important morton longevity is required to activate signaling proteins knowns or two which are highly conserved enzymes play roles in health span and longevity in multiple organisms uh-huh so to ends are linked to the regulation of variety of metabolic processes like the response to stress and the modulation of lifespan. The way they do this is through EPA genetic regulation so twins utilize ad to remove specific chemical structures called seal groups.

Nicotinamide Dna Damage Nasd Glucose Intolerance Mononucleosis Accuweather Reebok Sir Tunes Niacin Nato EPA Nada AMD Hollis Andrea
Bad News: Vaping Nicotine Linked to Lung Cancer in Mice

Dr. Daliah

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Bad News: Vaping Nicotine Linked to Lung Cancer in Mice

"Six saying that he said to me cause cancer apparently exposure to the nicotine from he said vapor causes lung cancer in mice this is a study by the national institutes of health and it's a first to definitively link vaping nicotine to cancer he said vapor causes lung cancer but there's a bladder cancer in mice by damaging the DNA and leading researchers at New York University conclude that baby in is likely very harmful to humans as well well we all knew that but we kind of need to know why when I was telling people they can not good a couple years ago people like why well now we've got something we could say well because you know in mice because his now how carcinogenic it is is a for humans we don't know but this was the first aid to defending the link vaping nicotine cancer meaning rather VP marijuana that's why there's invading nicotine most people that faith usually they picketing and I just got nicotine is carcinogenic in that it will paralyze the cilia the brush border the kindest views things out of the locks so when you get pollutants that can start to cause lung damage if your brush border or silly it isn't working you can't get out your lungs now study by U. S. C. found that he said users develop the same molecular changes and oral tissue that cause cancer cigarette smokers remember there was a study finding that we could be at risk for mouth cancer if we vape now the N. Y. U. study found along the bladder cancer and they found that the DNA damage prevents you from fixing the DNA damage I want to shoes so what they did is they took forty mice expose of the eastern vapor nicotine over fifty four weeks twenty two point five percent of lung cancer fifty seven percent of all pre cancerous lesions in the bladder none of the twenty mice exposed he six smoke without nicotine develop cancer over the four years so they think they have if the vaping liquid didn't have nicotine it seems safer then I could see now most people very you know unless they're just there is a really really try to get off smoking so if the average person's baby nicotine that's a problem so now these results kind of high in the need for more research all right according to see and be seen based on the findings of mice they have to now extrapolate that to humans now we can't take you know people go why are we so slow to get data were always so slow to figure this out well because you can't take much humans and subject them to vaping smoke what they did the mice because if you do cause cancer human that's a no no you're not allowed to hurt people in research when you do research you have to go through a lot of training and you have to you know basically promise that you're not gonna do a study that hurts people so then all you can really do is do observational studies or retrospective studies regal back in time a global this person to this this was a this was really bad I mean that's how we figured out that smoking was bad it took his decades they were like wait a second all these people of lung cancer and they're like is a pollution is a something in the air is that the Russians know was probably smoking and they found the people that didn't smoke doesn't get lung cancer as quickly as those who did it and then they figured out that all those girls are the heart and the good cholesterol because a variety of things so you know it took them some time to figure that out was smoking now the amount of smoke but the mice were exposed to was similar to what a human would inhale if a vape regularly for about three to six years so what they did is they kind of projected that if a or they tried to compare their findings with my eyes were kind of a quake to a human smoking for three to six years they but the mice didn't inhale like humans when you have like I mean they really suck it up the money's were just passive breathing kind of it all and so get away you can't really project what would happen with humans the problem we have though is that if you have millions of people addicted to nicotine and we've made it impossible for them to smoke almost there now we're gonna start making it impossible for them to vape what are we going to do the people that need what we're we're going to ship them to marijuana is probably going to be a go to or people Michael back to cigarettes so you know we need to be very very careful and try to offer other alternatives may be a nicotine patch com I

Nicotine Cancer Six Years Fifty Seven Percent Fifty Four Weeks Five Percent Four Years
'Zombie cells' buildup in your body may play role in aging

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

'Zombie cells' buildup in your body may play role in aging

"Scientists are finding evidence that so called zombie cells play a big role in aging and the health woes that come along with it animal studies. Suggest that killing these cells can treat a wide variety of conditions like cataracts, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease and age read age related loss of muscle zombie cells start out as normal cells in the body, but they encounter a problem like DNA damage, and instead of dying they enter sort of a state of suspended animation that they also pump out substances that can harm the cells

Alzheimer's Disease Dna Damage
Do wireless headphones really increase cancer risk? 250 doctors warn United Nations

Dr. Daliah

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Do wireless headphones really increase cancer risk? 250 doctors warn United Nations

"Air pods and wireless headphones could cause cancer. Now, this comes out of Miami, local ten. Were they say using these wireless headphones like these apple air pods? And the biotechnology come with cancer risks. The scientists have the type of electromagnetic frequency radio waves, the EMS that transmit the data through the devices Cam caused serious health issues apparently two hundred fifty experts signed a United Nations experts. I if they're experts and some big stuff experts signed the United Nations and World Health Organization petition to warn of the danger. WSB? Along with cancer neurological disorders and DNA damage are also late to this of exposure. Why because they can generate heat caused Burs and affects cell growth in humans. Now, the petition claims numerous recent scientific publications have shown that the EMF affects living organisms at levels, well below most international and national guidelines, the scientists say the EMF warnings about possible dangers are not good enough. Okay. This some strong, heavy duty. I mean, when you got experts petitioning, they're not being heard there's been people screaming and yelling about our wireless technology and cell phones, causing cancer. I think it was about he was it in November. I wrote an article on this were there was a study from the national isn't. It's a valve reporting clear evidence that cell phone radiation. Be connected to cancer clear evidence, not oh, we have a suspicion. Not that. Oh, you know, we are looking into this. This is clear evidence. Like, it's done. It's it's there. Tests were performed on mice and rats using much higher levels of radiation that humans are exposed to. But the male rats started to show an increase in brain tumors. They also found an increased risk of cancer of the adrenal glands, and those top the kidneys and produce hormones now that study was performed by. Dr John butcher and colleagues or Booker at the national tech toxicology programme, North Carolina, and they tested radiofrequency radiation used a to g and three g cell phones. And I know everybody's like, okay. We've got five G coming like super fast is five G. Okay. I don't know. I still don't even get how our phone works. I mean, I know where my mom lives, and I keep a nice healthy distance. But man that phone makes it sound like she is right up. Makes the hair on the back of my next. Stand up my mom feels like she has right. They're not only in the room. But in my head. You know, like, I'm hearing voices sort of thing. I don't know how that technology works. They say the minimum amount of radiation. Mice would be considered the maximum amount of radi- radiation at the federal regulators would allow humans so they gave the mice, you know, higher than maximum doses. But they found clear evidence that the radiation

Cancer United Nations WSB Apple Miami Dna Damage World Health Organization North Carolina Dr John Butcher Booker Five G Three G
How Does a 500-Year Experiment Work?

BrainStuff

04:26 min | 1 year ago

How Does a 500-Year Experiment Work?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, you brain stuff Lauren Bogle bomb here. Some types of bacteria are known for their ability to survive extreme conditions from high temperatures to chemical tax to dehydration, but for how long are they really viable in two thousand fourteen a team of scientists dried a collection of bacteria sealed those specimens away in small glass vials and in five hundred years. Some researcher will have the honor of bringing the long-lived study to a close the five century long experiment was conceived by researchers at Scotland's university of Edinburgh who teamed up with German and American scientists in hopes of advancing humankind's understanding of bacteria longevity, a major catch. None of them or their children or great, great grandchildren are likely to be around to see the results in an Email interview. Charles Cockell, one of these scientists involved with the project said the motivation for the experiment was straightforward, quote, most science experiments, work on grant or human life, spans, but nature works over long time periods. We. To create an experiment that was more aligned to the lengths of time of interest for studying microbes for the experiment team members filled eight hundred vials with one of two types of bacteria crocodile says or back Sylla's subtilis, the former is a true survivor, a very primitive bacterium often found an extremely inhospitable environments from hot springs. Desert's the ladder is one of the most studied bacterium in all of science one the can revert to a dormant state s rounding itself with a spore and basically going into hibernation on it. Subjected to environmental changes, the glass vials scientists filled were completely sealed off from air and half of them were shrouded in led to thwart the possible effects of radiation or other potential interferences that could cause DNA damage. For the first quarter century. Scientists will check on the bacteria every other year to see if they're still viable, then the checkup schedule will shift to once every twenty five years until the five hundred year test is over the actual tests are easy simply requiring a basic rehydration process and counting the bacteria colonies, but what's the best way to describe the experiment to people four hundred years into the future instructions were printed on paper and also stored to a flash drive with the explicit request that researchers update the verbiage and technologies when they perform their twenty five year checks. The first analyses were conducted in two thousand sixteen with results published in December of two thousand eighteen the gist after two years of isolation. Bacteria spores demonstrated hardly any decrease in viability. Some of the surviving. Spores were then purposefully exposed to tougher conditions like high salt levels or a space like vacuum. These specimens then showed an increased loss of viability. But what's the best case scenario of such a long term project cockle said there is an ideal outcome as such we wanna learn how quickly microbes die and whatnot battle function describes their death over century timescales. Some 'Bacterial are so durable. That they can remain viable for tens of millions of years provided their preserved in one form or another for example, scientists have revived bacteria immersed in twenty five million year old tree sap and also from the carcasses of creatures like Beatles that were trapped in amber one hundred and thirty five million years ago. Other researchers found the bacteria in New Mexico salt deposits were still viable after two hundred and fifty million years. Today's episode was written by Nathan Chandler and produced by Tyler clay for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics with the future in mind. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Mating matters. Why we do what we do. I'm Dr Wendy, Walsh, psychologist and relationship. Guru. And I've got a new podcast that explores the secret evolutionary motivation for human behavior made matters listening. Subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcast.

Researcher Charles Cockell Lauren Bogle Dna Damage Sylla Dr Wendy Scotland's University Of Edinb Iheartradio Cockle New Mexico Apple Nathan Chandler Walsh Tyler Clay Thirty Five Million Years Twenty Five Million Year Fifty Million Years Five Hundred Years Four Hundred Years Five Hundred Year
"dna damage" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on Novel Targets

"So you're looking for transient activity which sting agonise gonna fall you don't want crowning activity because if you aggregate the inflammatory. The chew on micro environment. That's not a good thing. We played a leading role in shoving that so a very process where. Stimulation of these pathways transient are going to be very good. But you don't want to chronically activate this pathway is because you can get a lethal inflammatory disease, which is very well chronic lies. Now, if we only need burst of sting Acussed to stimulate Nate immune system, we will need to pay attention to the optimal dose and timing. I'm visible moving on the sting pathway may also have an important role to play in understanding of how other concentrates work to point out, some exciting data related to radiation to groups to nice paper showing that the efficacy radiation is mediated through sting sibling to sell induction of radiation and DNA damage. These side of plasma micro nuclear activites thing generate side kinds and without sting in that animal you go greatly reduced efficacy of radiation treatment elimination of the Tuma. So the main way that radiation exerts antechamber facts is through stimulation of DNA damage ins relation of stings signaling to. Ornament, the anti Chuma t cell responses. So in that situation, it's not sell deficits, releasing these engines creating immune response, that's proof stink. But you're getting but stink plays an enormously large role in that. Yes. At least as in the preliminary models, mice that don't have stink didn't respond well to radiation treatment here chemotherapy may function the same way. There's lots of data to show that KEMA therapeutics can generate immune responses that Schumer, and almost certainly that probably plays a role through sting as well. The cost engines coding, DNA damage side of plasma nuclei stimulation of sting and against the nineteen system and cross T cell priming. So really this whole thing of chemotherapy is I mean for P of radiation, causing cell death novas release antigens perverting image, and it was all of that really could be Natan sting related. Yes. That's what the implications are. In fact, I'm going to get enough paper right before you can go home. Now. Great feel forming. My name's Glenn Volva. I'm chair cell biology. The university of Miami school of medicine herald from Great Britain London, and I like studying immunity, if you would like some homework, you can find links to some of Bob a seminal research on novel targets dot com. Biomarkers remain a challenge in cancer. Immunotherapy ACO twenty fifteen when I first spoke with our moment. Genetics president of cancer immunology. It all sounded so easy..

DNA damage inflammatory disease Tuma ACO Schumer president Glenn Volva Great Britain London Acussed Natan university of Miami school of Nate Bob
"dna damage" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"Maybe a little bit more are devices up above twelve hundred nanometers and what we're doing will not go through the skin. It has to go through the water so that our delivery is through a humidifier airstream. And so it's it is, you know, in in some senses, it sort of this kind of indirectly near infrared technology, but it's outside of the range where most of us think of a billion for red. Okay, that makes sense. So basically the only way the body can take it is through basically it's entering to lungs because it's in that humidifier water. Yes. And so the way it gets Ian is through the mucous membrane, it has to touch the water watery surfaces. In the body. So when you inhale it through the nose into the lungs, then all of that is that connection to the water which is essential for what we do. Okay. Because I know I've gotten to try the device before and even have ordered when now to have in my home, and it's basically like a super simple device that I'm gonna keep by my computer and just have it on it is it's not a lot of time, right? There's different levels, but it's not a huge time commitment, especially because you can do it while you're doing something else. Exactly. Net, very calm and both in clinical sent settings or at home where people are combining it with different things. So why do you think I know there's so many different health approaches out there right now in different devices? Why do you think this is the way to go? Do you think this is such an important technology? This technology has absolutely no potential for harm the way it works is just to support the body if the body didn't need that while we wouldn't be aging, if the body didn't need some help. But if it didn't it that it would simply be ignored. And the key here is that it's biophysics not biochemistry, and so we're not adding a pharmaceutical supplement or something that could be too much the body. We are just using bio physical approach to support the body and that that is a really kind of a special technology that has so much potential for benefit without the potential for harm. So fascinating. Are there have you guys done any clinical worker clinical studies around this and kind of see what the data does? Yes, we've done. We've done research on the technology itself, which is is part of that whole product process and then on on human beings and how they respond. We don't look at disease states where a class, one medical device that we're not looking. We're not. Outing specific Zeze were studying the aspects that underlie our health in general. So they're things like DNA damage, oxidative stress, immune response, inflammatory markers, things that that represent health but are not specific diseases. That makes sense. But those are also all measurable crack. There's metrics that you can track for those. Yes, absolutely. And we have them done with double blind placebo controlled university research, looking at those differences so there there, it has to be very verifiable. I love that. I knew that you came from a very well researched background, and I love that you guys have done because I know that's expensive in lengthy process to do. I love that you guys have done that due diligence in it's so rare. I feel like even in the more naturally minded health world to find something that doesn't have any potential for harm, and it also has double blind clinical studies. That's a gold standard that you don't see very often. And I'm curious what, what. Kind of people are you seeing currently use the Novi technology? Where is it being most implemented so far? What we have three areas. The first one in the the one that was most used when we first released, the product was for chronic illness, all chronic illnesses related to oxidative damage. And so that was the biggest area in centers by individuals at home and also in centers or clinics. The next area is one that we love and you also, I think really appreciate it is the the wellness and healthy aging where people are trying to maintain their health, not not recover it after there's already been a lot of damage. And so that's been a really big growing area for us. And also the one that's growing quickly right now is sports performance and really the whole spectrum from weekend warriors to high end professional.

DNA damage mucous membrane Zeze Ian twelve hundred nanometers
"dna damage" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"And so this is one of the reasons that people are very cautious now or hopefully people are cautious now about not overloading on anti-oxidants because if you. Due to many antioxidants, essentially, supplemental anti-oxidants. You can shut down that signaling process in which case you're kind of undermining your health rather than supporting it. That's a great point. I know I've seen the research on that recently in their recommendation to as much as possible to obtain antioxidants from food, and I guess you'd probably agree with that statement in. So before we can go deeper in the science, I feel like we also need to introduce idea of the device that you helped create the Nanno v. So can you walk us through what the process was of figuring out how to create this device? What it does? Yes, it's the scientific research was done by others. Essentially, the biology physics, chemistry, the recognize some of these signaling mechanisms and also the port role that water plays in the in the signaling, and in fact, in all cellular activities. And so there's a number of. Areas of science that at all advanced to the point that we could leverage that information and also the technology advance so that it it become possible to to mimic what the body's doing. Heck, no, logically and twenty years ago that was not possible. And so all these things came together so that we could create a this product, but it involved the the scientific research, the engineering research and development. You know, the product development registrations with different countries and regulatory authorities, quality assurances, Dem's university testing validation research, and so on. So overall, it's a, it's a big end and long process. Got it end. So can you walk us through the scientific mechanism of how the device works? I know from what you said about DNA damage in the aging process that it obviously acts they are. There's a component there. And I will say, having met you in person and the rest of the team, like that's proof enough to me that it works because you guys all look amazing. But I'm curious to really understand the science, you're sure let me I'm to do that. Let me just kind of go through a few key points 'cause they all had built together. The first one is that about ninety nine percent of the molecules in the body are water. So the water plays a really key role, and that's what we leverage in our technology. And then Secondly, we already discussed how the free radicals are oxidative damage or constantly damaging all the cell components, DNA proteins, Mina conference. So on. The next point I think I already made, but just as a reminder, the proteins do all the work in the body. They're called the workforce of the body, everything for movement to fixing any of the oxidative damage, and the proteins are immersed in water. And so in order for them to function, this is this is a new bit in order for them to function. They have to be folded into three dimensional structures, and and it's a complex process where they have to be just the right shape in order to function correctly. And so the interact with the cellular water and and create those three dimensional shapes. Well, of course, the oxidative damage is is hurting those shapes and causing them to unfold. And so that's an ongoing process where we come in is our device helps the proteins to to go through that fool. Ending process by influencing the cellular water. So the water that all proteins are immersed in is a justed slightly by our technology that helps them to fold correctly, then they can function correctly and that is completely up to the body what needs to get done. So all we do is support underneath and then all the repair mechanisms in priorities and, and so on are that's all the status by the body. So none of that natural wisdom is overridden by what we do. That makes sense. So. I have a background in research and science that I feel like this is still even above. My head is such an amazing concept to what is the kind of the bio identical signal from the device that's causing the structuring is in electromagnetic or auditory, or what causes that change. It's actually electromagnetic and it's a specific wavelength. Electromagnetic spectrum. It's at the where citizens at the very high end of the near infrared spectrum. And so that if you think about infrared technologies like lasers or a pulse AM FM so on those technologies are typically six to eight hundred nanometers..

DNA damage product development eight hundred nanometers ninety nine percent twenty years
"dna damage" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"Just all of these things that most of them are ones we associate with aging are all indications of that ongoing process. Got it. Is there any link with DNA damage? Anything like for instance, cancer or chronic disease of any kind? Yeah. All of them really because the DNA is the blueprint the template for the next cell. So if there's DNA damage than the next cell might not be formed perfectly and if they lowly degrade again, that's the aging process. And so the DNA damage is absolutely key, and and keeping it healthy is is essential for the body to replace cells that are also healthy. Got it. And I know that that idea telomeres which maybe you can explain the concept better than I can make had. They're kind of day in the sun recently. There's been a lot of press about them does DNA damage is that affecting the telomeres youth. That's not my area of expertise and it most it, it certainly would. That's a key aspect of it. But the telomeres per se has are not something we've studied directly. We have looked at double strand DNA breaks, which are the complex difficult types of breaks in the DNA, but not telomeres specifically. Got it. That makes sense. And then so even just the act of breathing then damage the DNA. I know my background being in tradition and lifestyle factors. Are there other things I would guess if just breathing things in the air can would also exposure to chemicals in the environment or poor food with that also caused the DNA damage? Absolutely. That's the, it's those exposures that do that accident of stress damage and also weaken your body's ability to repair the damage that does occur. So those are. Key factors, what you eat, what you put on your body and what you're exposed to are really key to reducing the repair, the the damage side of the equation. That make sense. Okay. So is there scientific evidence that the DNA can be repaired is reversible problem? And if so, can you kind of walk us through what that mechanism is by which it can be repaired? Yup. All of those repair processes are taking place by protein activities, and we tend to think of protein is the kind we eat. But in this case, there chains of amino acids that must fold perfectly into three dimensional structures to go out and do their job. Proteins are doing virtually everything in the body are most things in the body, and one of them includes repairing the DNA or other cell components. And so they once they're initiated that go and they fix a rebuild, whatever result components, broken. Okay. I think I'm starting to understand. So I'm also curious, why does the body need help preparing the cells? I guess try to understand aging natural process. Normally the body, this would just happen over time. So he basically saying we now have the technology to be able to reverse something that was previously not technically reversible or does the body have a mechanism to do this as Well? I, I believe that it's only the body that has those mechanisms. The body really needs to repair itself and what we can do technology today is encourage it. Some of the things we do with technology today are maybe not so helpful, but the idea's to support the body to do its own thing where the body already it, all that repairs done naturally and ended it. It's a matter of just supporting that rather than overriding it. Got it. So that would also be inclusive, like you mentioned too healthy diet in lifestyles? Well. In you mentioned, I think a little bit and I found this researching for this podcast. Can you talk about what reactive oxygen species are kind of their role yet? The reactive oxygen species are free radical, and they are the damaging component. And they also in the last maybe twenty to thirty years. It's been recognized that certain reactive oxygen species also have a secondary role or actually very important role that works to trigger repair mechanisms. And so they're little more complicated than we originally thought. And if they have the signaling function, then they amid a specific electro-magnetic wavelength that influences the cell and initiates repair..

DNA damage thirty years
CRISPR Gene Editing Can Cause Risky Collateral DNA Damage

24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

CRISPR Gene Editing Can Cause Risky Collateral DNA Damage

"Thought the findings involved, the safety of the gene editing tool called crisper cast nine it's a molecular scissor that can be used. To cut DNA but the study published today in the, journal nature biotechnology shows that the tool can wreak genetic havoc it found that. Chris Byrd cells can supper dangerous genetic changes and the tool itself may activate genes that, should be silent such as those the cause cancer British researchers say the DNA chaos crisper causes has been seriously underestimated. Alison keys to be guess news stocks were mixed today the Dow was up forty five points NASDAQ down twenty, this is CBS S. news to experience relief from foot and leg cramps theraworx relief get. Theraworx relief today in the. Pain relief file at your, local pharmacy ask your pharmacist. For theraworx relief.

Chris Byrd Alison CBS
"dna damage" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Yeah so the horn medic response is not the the oxidative stress is not an indication of the hormetic response where medic responses response to that stress and so you're totally right that you if you have an active population you must have oxidative stress present because oxidative stress is part of the metabolic stress caused by exercise that induces through or mrs fitness so one of the responses to oxidative stress is adaptations to burn energy more cleanly and you that options burn energy better better and more cleanly right so you may see increased might oh qendra as a result of that oxidative stress but you also see increased antioxidant production increased antioxidant enzyme production and all that stuff so the but the thing is if the oxidative there but the thing is oxidative stress causing fitness is not the same as oxidative stress causing cellular damage and so your question how do you know if it's impacting your if it's damaging your lipids and dna is you can just test for that you can test for lipid proxies if you're lipid brock sides are elevated the oxidative stress is damaging your lipid your cellular lipids there's a test called eight hydroxy to drc guana zine that might be abbreviated in simplified as yeah i think it would usually be abbreviated eight h digi would probably be the the revision but anyway it's an like in the ion panel they they they test that and they labeled the it's under oxidative stress markers which makes it easier but anyway that's that's that's what a marker of oxidative dna damage so i would never look at lipid brock at damaged lipids and damaged dna and say oh that was just because the person's exercising and that's good because the good things that come from the oxidative stress are things like.

dna damage
"dna damage" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Of the strongest you can ever ever take and one of the healthiest products you can take for for reducing oxidative stress and the great thing about a f his anthony is that it actually works against reactive oxygen species that's r o s l s basically these are these are scavengers that go through your body and just 'cause all sorts of of disruption and we know that after it has such a unique chemical structure that it can actually bind to those rsp she's and really make sure that they no longer do the type of damage that they were doing prior to taking the they happen the other thing about astor's anthon is it's it's very unique it actually has two types of ends of its molecule that allows it to go right across the cell membrane so that actually protects your cell membrane kind of like a kind of like a band aid or some type of a bandage from one side of the membrane to the other that really helps to protect you and and it helps to protect the cells the other thing that we know about after dampen is it it it actually works to help limit and detract from dna damage it actually goes the the free radicals that it that it limits those free radicals they attack proteins they attack lipids the attack dna we know that with with his anthony we actually neutralize those affects and we actually helped to prepare for help to repair the dna so that the body can actually repair itself that's the most amazing thing about this formulation the body is doing what it is meant to do and what it does so well when we're young but unfortunately we lose that ability to bounce back as we get older and the first place we see it as in our joints we know it when we get out of bed dead and we feel that twinge well this is the product of designed with that in mind it is backed by eighteen patents it has been clinically demonstrated to have a fantastic results on your joint tissue and we are so happy that purity products is giving away.

astor dna damage
"dna damage" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cancer for example now this is just going to keep the debate alive even further isn't it i think it really actually changes the debate does that because up to this point we've regulated phones and looked at that science as assuming they can't possibly cause cancer because it's the type of radiation is not strong enough to break fans so it can't alter your dna which means it can't give you cancer but now that they're that we're finding this we'd know that it's possible that's what we've come away with it's possible for this cause cancer and sells we just don't know the mechanism and we did they find it's possible to change the dna also they did find some levels of dna damage in the brain that was not considered clear evidence so they're a little unsure about that miss was this was a as you say it's been going on for a while at twenty five million dollar study absolutely it started in the works in nineteen ninety nine where were the people who were opponents of of cell phone technology wellrepresented half the peer review hearing while the nature of the peer review hearing is that the people who are meant to be given the most airtime are the experts there were representatives of groups i think there's a brain tumor association and people were questioning whether or not those peer reviewers should be there and whether or not they were expert enough but from my perspective they were all major players in their fields and did did did the people who are fearful of cell phone radiation come away thinking oh maybe we have a minor victory or maybe we we'd convince some people that this should be studied further especially the peer review group it's hard to say i i wouldn't judge a victory or not but i will say that this definitely adds to the weight of evidence that cell phones are something that need to be scrutinized in the future and also the five g technology which is gonna is transmitting a signal in a much different way than all cell phone towers.

Cancer dna damage twenty five million dollar five g
"dna damage" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Diet because without them you die recommended daily allowances have been set for these vitamins and minerals to ensure that we get atta adequate amounts of them but the way the rda's said is that studies are done in animals where animals or may deficient of certain micronutrient so for example a b vitamin and once the deficiency level causes an animal to die the rda's that couple of standard deviations above that so centrally it's just the rda's are just sort of maintain normal health just to make sure that you know people don't don't have such a deficiency that they get sick and die so that's kind of important to to understand because we don't really know what levels are needed to to prevent and stave off for example diseases of aging but with that said there's a variety of micronutrients that are really important for for disease prevention for example magnesium magnesium is is important mineral it's actually found at the it's at the center of chlorophyll molecule and chlorophyll zweig give plants their green color so magnesium is found in plants leafy green plants and it's a cofactor for enzymes which means basically enzymes in your body or what are running your metabolism they're running a variety of processes and these enzymes require certain cofactors which are you know vitamins and minerals to make sure they run properly and so magnesium is required for for for cofactor that repairs damage to dna and dna damage actually is a precursor to mutations that can lead to cancer to mutations at just exceleron the aging process in general so when you don't get enough magnesium you start to get more and more dna damage as decades sort of pass on you benchley can acquire more more mutations lead to cancer so so that's.

dna damage
"dna damage" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Mm is released into the cell the electron trump's pick on the distance to center and benzon happened men's at happens vase pacific electromagnetic energy is being emitted as electron so that it's a common process and all materials that we know soul news now you put energy removing as moving the electron further to the outside that is called you excite the materia and menu stop to put the energy in the so called exhortation energy that was absorbed is being released again if being omitted and fall off the material specific electromagnetic energy okay so basically if i could interrupt really quickly when when you're talking about reactive oxygen species specifically when it comes to dna repair while you're saying is that the process of the production of eight is causing free radicals and that certain reactive oxygen species in i know reactive oxygen species could be things like nitric oxide or or hydrogen peroxide or hydroxyl radicals or superoxide or all these different socalled antioxidants you know a lot of people think reactive oxygen species are bad many of them act as antioxidants those are essentially mopping up the free radicals mopping up the the cell membrane the dna damage the motto conjugal damage in the protein damage that can occur through normal cellular metabolism and what you're saying is what you're trying to do is create somehow more of these good reactive oxygen species no okay now feel like an idiot thank you okay i'm just kidding go go ahead and explain this.

dna damage
"dna damage" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on WDRC

"So when we think about healthy aging about energy about skin house about muscle strength send oxidative stress you have to realize this there are so many things that unfortunately conspire against us as we age and it's not always easy to fight back we need some help so oxidative stress is it should i'm sure people had heard that term oxidative stress and we're gonna talk a little bit more about antioxidants because i have been on the lookout for quite some time for a truly leading antioxidant and as an antioxidant this asked as anthon it it really just continues to blow me away because as an antioxidant it's actually six thousand times more potent vitamin e it's huge six thousand times more potent than its ability to quench free radicals that's incredible sure uh no some of those oxidation is eubrazil that's the technical term of the voice i got no other means but explain it to us okay so yeah a lot of people here the term antioxidant but you may be wondering what to do antioxidants to really do and i think there is a little bit of a mystery there for some people so basically would antioxidants to is they counter oxidation and oxidation is um i want you to think of it really is the biological equivalent of arresting in the human body so the body rust with age just like the car outside exposed to the elements will rest with age and it is this down this rusting that occurs in our body and it damages our dna damage is our cells or tissues so oxidative stress in our body causes damage throughout our body our cells or tissues our oregon's and really the best way that i can illustrate this with an example is if you think about an apple and you cut that apple and half and then you leave it on on the counter for an hour so what happens when you come back and take a look at that apple mortgage all brawler groups working nobody wants to eat it when it's browning so what does that mean so that happens we look at it we know what happens in a kind of really super guy i don't think i'll wait that apple but what does it mean what's happening with the apple is oxidation the apple the freshcut apple is now exposed to the air.

dna damage oregon apple
"dna damage" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"A quick question has this bell check in you know everybody that trust this you know how he calls us plays how he never really kind of allows his gene players to really kind of go out there and and get in the media they're they're very quiet there there have this super bowl this loss dna damage them enough were were gonna start seeing players jumping ship idled sadness and really done something to new england with about butler about the law about ballot check making some outrageous basically you know wedding some players go and and his caught is it completely now on the line that players started jumping ship here michael i guess one would say that is an open question for me to sit here and give you a definitive answer would be um would be alive because that means i could see the future and i can't i could just read the tea leaves and just know that there are players who may want to win the championship and we'll hear from psalm to say it was a great experience and now one thing that i do know about players is that they talk to each other michael they talk to each other i've i have not met a more gossipy bunch in my life than nfl players and that saying that i i i don't say that the denigrate it all but nfl players coaches the most gossipy people of all time or nfl scouts.

dna damage england butler nfl
"dna damage" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Simply because individual response to everything varies and as i'm sure many of you are aware different types of cultural groups different genetic makeup of groups have different response to alcohol some of us are built with much more of a tolerance others not for example those of southeast asian descent seem to lack the enzymes all they have a faulty enzyme process in breaking down the acetal to hide to ascertain eight which can are off to possibly be used for energy in the body and can prove to be a totally harmless thing um but uh in southeast asians this does not work as well the same thing appears to be the case for african americans that their genetic makeup does not have the robustness of dealing with uh what is needed to break down the alcohol in the body patel went on to say as he commented on the findings of this study are study highlights that not being able to process alcohol effectively can lead to an even higher risk of alcoholrelated dna damage and therefore cancers but it's important to remember that alcohol clearance and dna repair systems are not perfect and alcohol can still cause cancer in different ways even in people whose defence mechanisms are intact in other words there is some in our society who are extremely sensitive to this and we are even a small amount of alcohol taken on a constant basis day off today will produce this kind of damage how much more so of course one who is consuming in high measure and this is always led me to feeling uncomfortable with the promotions that we've been hearing over the last few decades of wine as a great antioxidant there there's an alternative of course you can get the same antioxidant of the research role and other ingredients of the grape from the grape itself from grape juice from cranberry juice pomegranate truce and we can go on down the list there isn't a necessity to taken alcohol and encouraging people to drink wine on.

dna damage
"dna damage" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In the human body so the body rust with age just like the car outside exposed to the elements who arrest with age and where it's this down to thrusting that occurs in our body and it damages our dna damage as our cells or tissues so oxidative stress in our body causes damage throughout our body our cells or tissues our oregon's and really the best way that i can illustrate this with an example is if you think about an apple and you cut that apple in half and then you leave it on on the counter for an hour so what happens when you come back and take a look at that apple brawler groups nobody wants to eat it when it's browning what does that mean so that happens we look at it we know what happens in a kind of guy i don't think elite that apple but what does it mean on it what's happening with the apple is oxidation the apple the freshcut apple is now exposed to the air and it starts to oxidized it starts to break down and it gets soft tickets brown it doesn't taste is a good and that's really what's happening in our body when we're exposed to oxidative stress is it wears us down internally so one way that we know for sure we can reduce this damage or mitigate it is to make sure we have enough antioxidants on board in our system so going back to the apple example if you squeeze some lemon juice which contains vitamin c and antioxidant if you squeezed that on the apple the apple doesn't turn round it doesn't oxidized and the reason again is because the vitamin c and eleven to very powerful antioxidants the vitamin c protects that apple so it doesn't russ you can imagine when we hear that there's a nutrient completely safe and antioxidant out there that six thousand times more potent than vitamin c it's hard for us not to.

dna damage oregon apple
"dna damage" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Cancer is talked about breast cancer val cancer liberic cetera and it also showed how the body tries to defend against the damage it alcohol can do some cancers developed dna damage in stem cells they saved stem cells are supposed to grow they have big growing potential because stem cells can grow into other types of cells and while some damage may occur by chance our finding suggests a drinking alcohol can increase the risk of this damage according to keep patel the professor at the medical research council laboratory of molecular biology he coled the study the world health organisation's international agency for research on cancer classifies alcohol as a group one carcinogen citing coal convincing evidence that a causes cancer in humans so let me repeat this alcohol whether it's beer whether it's wine we were talking about the mediterranean diet suggested a daily glass of wine this according to the world health organization and the study of multiple studies say alcohol doesn't matter how much can alter the dna affecting stem cells and trigger or potentially cancer this is why we are not prepared as a medical um front to recommend daily alcohol now we'll have really get cancer now that members a different strokes who different hopes for some people alcohol will be perfect for the heart and for some people drinking alcohol is not going to be good for them sindi with marijuana for some people marijuana does exactly what it needs to for the pain there anxiety but for further people marijuana doesn't do anything hey it's not that a medicine works it doesn't work on hugh not that alcohol was bad but it is it is a bad for you now study published in 2011 found that alcohol was responsible for four percent of all cancer in britain which equated to twelve thousand eight hundred cases here now some.

Cancer dna damage stem cells patel professor molecular biology marijuana britain hugh four percent
"dna damage" Discussed on The Kevin Rose Show

The Kevin Rose Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on The Kevin Rose Show

"Over and over no i see in as far as like things that were common amongst these people there is not so i think you mentioned yet nazis is there a it's a did in eight kilograms of nazi nestled maybe i got a hand nuts uh every day no beans green beans uh in all kinds of greens based on unseasonal availability rice all different season different areas different of vegetables but uh in most cases the gis grooming the backyard in the garden and that's where they ate the most of the time and it also because that's all day hat what's causing the longevity here is it a lack of animal protein that happens when you eat more things like nuts and fruits and vegetables like that or they're actually while i mean there must be some protective properties to these foods as well it can be proactive win all now that as for olive oil we noise for announcing that there are uh perfect use factors i'll go sacked year which one they are but i think we generalise the effective did these foods have on these different genes ended they have on an inflammation and dna damage dna repair sold that that is the main thing so by having a year so the level of proudly in proteins over a budget source you have these pathways on their alike tore mbk accepted that i describe in the book that are active i'll win need to be but they're not hyperactive all the time and then i think these by it's also where a nourishing right that's that's something that also very scary now that people try to improvise at is that the golf from let's say a high animal diets to a vegan diet without really paying attention to the problems they can go along with it as such as you know vitamin.

dna damage eight kilograms
"dna damage" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Have you guys ever looked at tom mike dna damage our repairing and he sort of challenge like if you radiate like animals that are that are eaten on a timeshare did feeding sort of schedule where they are eating their food being being fed their food within ten hours or so challenge them with really can may leg repair the damage better because they're fasting longer yeah so um security ian clark itself has a huge impact on dna damage repair and realism deva's repair so few years ago we had done a simple experiment that god tie later in national cancer institute website that's a very simple straightforward experiment we all was us we asked a very simple question that is how come humans skin is always exposed to sunlight oh you we'd already is under these many people get skin cancer what the never get had cancer because here follicle the most rapidly dividing cells and so one would expect that they must be most sensitive to release them demos and engage in it it is undamaged dashed who had the too much would start and we'd airline seat so we went back on checked and do the allies that the hair follicles balls and at baseline actually had a very strong security and with them and every evening that security and club bears all the damage dna and make sure that the hair can grow back next day next morning and then we are so what is the real significance into your life so we took the this mice and that it a simple experiment that is in all of whom many bonemarrow transplant experiments my said he'd earlier tailored then that one metal is depleted on one can put the new book meadow ian they'd get he'd idea to to the same extent as humans do that on died actually so by pretty well and if we'd idea at in the morning.

dna damage ian clark cancer ten hours
"dna damage" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"dna damage" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"While it turns out that are natural repair machinery typically end up repairing the damage and then that damaged lesion is excreted in urine where it can be measured and for many years now studies have measured this in urine as a marker of dna damage and so when we looked at it in in shiftworkers what we were finding was that there was decreased levels of this marker actually showing up in the urine of shift workers during their daytime sleep and then they're nighttime work period ask compared to them sleeping at night on their day off and so it turns out that we might be then picking up the negative impacts of shift work on repair of dna damage so that not as much of this damage is actually being excise and excreted in urine so that more of it is likely to be sitting in cells having negative impacts on potentially diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease what was the relationship that you found between melatonin and this marker so what we found was that in individuals that had lower levels of melatonin we'd also find lower levels of this marker in urine and in the current study when we compared night work levels of this marker to night's sleep levels we found that during night work levels of this marker were about eighty percent lower and it looked to be very much attributed to the differences in melatonin between these groups so that the lower levels of melatonin during night work were driving this decrease in the um measures of this marker in urine samples during night work relative to night sleep so what do you think the melatonin is doing to this marker what's actually happening.

dna damage shiftworkers melatonin eighty percent