20 Burst results for "Dmitri Shostakovich"

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"This is Seattle Morning News. They've Ross with Colleen O'Brien, Chris Kelvin. And here's Rachel Bell, because an amazing thing has happened Bookstores, which were decimated by Amazon, and I'm making a comeback because of Ah Cove it. Is that what you found? That's right. It took a pandemic to get people reading again yet, eh? This article was in The Wall Street Journal. And the question that was asked is Can books compete with Netflix in the Sir, was yes. So in August 2020 year over year sales of print books in the U. S were up 13% compared to last year, And it seems like what people are saying is, you know, I'm tired of looking at screens. I'm working from home. So I'm on zoom talking with my friends. I'm reading the news because I'm worried about things like the election, So I don't want to watch TV and movies as much as I did. I want to just look at a book. I don't know why that should be because actually, I don't think I am working. Any less for for being stuck at home here. If anything, I feel like among call all the time. And you have I'm trying to count of 1234567 books in September. Um, books in September alone? Yeah, just cause it's so convenient to have it right there. And you go. You can go from work right to the reading chair. That I you know, I read in three lines like like, like people get used to in Seattle, But I have also binge watched Bleep Creek on Netflix, too, so Well, you're just not sleeping. You're just consuming No 24 hours a day. I'm also I'm also sleeping because I kind of taking a nap, so I don't Maybe it Maybe the commute sucked up more time than I really thought. Another thing that they credit is indeed bookstores during all this because those were the guys that were, you know, not doing very well. But small independent bookstores have been doing a lot of cool things. First of all, a lot of free shipping, which I know is true here in Seattle at my favorite all cookbook bookstore book Larder and Fremont, which is an amazing shop if you love food. They've since stop that, but for you know, at least six months free shipping and then a lot of these in the bookstores are just doing these cool deals, so I'll give you a couple of examples. There is AH bookstore in Tulsa, Oklahoma, called Magic City Books. And if you give him 55 bucks for their literary care package You fill out a form that you say what kind of type a book that you like to read. And then they will send you a surprise package that they've custom picked based on your taste. And then another bookstore. This is the novel neighbor in Webster Groves. Oh, my gosh! I feel like such a dum dum, What is M o misery? Ok, thank you s Oh, They will send you this mystery box as well. But you get like special other goodies in there that are kind of themed with the books that you pick. Oh, I like this one at Kramer Books and afterwards Cafe in Washington D c. You can order if you order a book on Postmates. You can also order food from them so you could get a delivery love like a grilled cheese sandwich and a novel at the same time. So you said you read a ton of books. What would be if people are listening in there like I want to be a smart as Dave Ross's like ever. You're Bill Gates releases his topics. What? What is one of your I don't know what their top picks but the ones that haven't read planet Funny. That was Ken Jennings book. Geography of Genius. Democracy In one Booker last David let he worked for the Obama administration. I speed read, Marry trumps book on. Ah, the Kindle. Now you're just bragging, Julian. Well as in skin Julian Barnes. Noise of Time, which is about Dmitri Shostakovich, which was surprisingly interesting. Steve Martin wrote a book called Object of Beauty about the Art World, which I also that was fascinating. I loved his bookshop girl, which came out now like 15 years. Yeah, well, that's the first Steve Art book I read the other Einstein about his wife, who apparently actually invented the theory of relativity. So there you go. I'm coping. Well, I guess you sure are. I will say my favorite is one. That's a lot of people's favorite. So I almost feel like so basic pumpkin spice latte for loving it. But where the crawdad sing by Delia Owens is worth all the hype. I couldn't put it down. Actually, I forced myself to put it down because I didn't want it to go so quickly. So I started reading to other books so I could prolong it. And so I'm still finishing The diary of Anne Frank, which I picked up which I highly recommend re reading while in quarantine because it really puts things into perspective. Rachel Bell. Thank you, Rachel. Thanks, Dave 8 54. And that's traffic time Brought to you by Harvard Stone Credit Union, Chris Sullivan. Well, we've finally got rid of all the slowing to deal with on the highway 18 corridor as you made your way in and through the Auburn area after a long term of fatality investigation. At the wrapped up about about an hour ago. Finally, and so no real issues left in Auburn. With the exception of the North bound 167 drivers, you work your way past. Highway 18 up past a long term crash we had at the north at 15 Street Northwest, thereby emerald down, so we're improving. Their however, rented to Bellevue was still looking at about a 20 minute delay. 35 minutes Still very heavy through the S curves today at this point, as you work your way north found on 405 looking at the I five drive out of the north End. Still about 30 minutes. Remember to Seattle or Bellevue, but it's back down to freeway speeds. Most of the way federal way to Seattle, Still looking at an elevated 40 minute drive with 25 of those minutes. Getting you from South Center into downtown Already a real time traffic on the threes. I'm Chris Sullivan Harbor Stone Credit Union has services for the everyday needs ofyour business. It's business banking That isn't business as usual..

Seattle Dave Ross Rachel Bell Netflix Chris Sullivan Auburn Seattle Morning News Julian Barnes Ah Cove Bellevue The Wall Street Journal Amazon Kramer Books Webster Groves Dmitri Shostakovich Rachel Bill Gates Ken Jennings Steve Martin
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin. RHAPSODY in blue. The name that IRA Gershwin suggested to his brother. George is perfect for a piece of classical music. That uses Jazz George. Gershwin wrote a lot of classical music that uses jazz. Jazz the word blue refers to changing some of the notes of musical scale to blur the lines between major. And Minor. George Gershwin wasn't the only classical composer to put jazz his music. He wasn't even the first. French composer Darius Milhaud Love Jazz. He used different kinds of in different pieces. Neo wrote leboeuf's your Twat French. For the Hawks on the roof under the influence of a trip to Brazil then he studied American jazz and started using it to a lot of European composers were intrigued by American jazz, Maurice rebel, but composer who wouldn't let Gershwin study with him because he didn't want to corrupt, his music wrote a piano concerto. That sounded a lot like Gershwin. Russian composers got into the to when the Soviet Union held an official competition to raise the level of jazz in the country. Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his first jazz. After they organized an official. Soviet state jazz orchestra. Shostakovich wrote another jazz suite Russian composer eager. Stravinsky love jazz to his Ebony. Concerto is for clarinet and jazz band. Stravinsky wrote it for Woody Herman and his thundering herd. The clarinet soloist on that recording is Benny. Goodman and American musician, who back and forth between popular and classical music, just like George Gershwin another American. Who did that was Leonard Bernstein. This is from his ballet fancy free. In addition to classical composers who put jazz into their music, there are jazz composers who wrote for the Symphony Orchestra one of the greatest jazz musicians ever was Edward Kennedy Ellington better known as Duke. Duke Ellington composed pieces for the concert hall and the Ballet Stage including this one three black kings..

George Gershwin Dmitri Shostakovich Edward Kennedy Ellington Naomi Lewin Darius Milhaud Soviet Union Leonard Bernstein official Stravinsky Symphony Orchestra Ebony Maurice rebel Benny Woody Herman Neo Hawks Brazil Goodman leboeuf
The History Of Jazz in Classical Music

Classics for Kids

03:58 min | 3 months ago

The History Of Jazz in Classical Music

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin. RHAPSODY in blue. The name that IRA Gershwin suggested to his brother. George is perfect for a piece of classical music. That uses Jazz George. Gershwin wrote a lot of classical music that uses jazz. Jazz the word blue refers to changing some of the notes of musical scale to blur the lines between major. And Minor. George Gershwin wasn't the only classical composer to put jazz his music. He wasn't even the first. French composer Darius Milhaud Love Jazz. He used different kinds of in different pieces. Neo wrote leboeuf's your Twat French. For the Hawks on the roof under the influence of a trip to Brazil then he studied American jazz and started using it to a lot of European composers were intrigued by American jazz, Maurice rebel, but composer who wouldn't let Gershwin study with him because he didn't want to corrupt, his music wrote a piano concerto. That sounded a lot like Gershwin. Russian composers got into the to when the Soviet Union held an official competition to raise the level of jazz in the country. Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his first jazz. After they organized an official. Soviet state jazz orchestra. Shostakovich wrote another jazz suite Russian composer eager. Stravinsky love jazz to his Ebony. Concerto is for clarinet and jazz band. Stravinsky wrote it for Woody Herman and his thundering herd. The clarinet soloist on that recording is Benny. Goodman and American musician, who back and forth between popular and classical music, just like George Gershwin another American. Who did that was Leonard Bernstein. This is from his ballet fancy free. In addition to classical composers who put jazz into their music, there are jazz composers who wrote for the Symphony Orchestra one of the greatest jazz musicians ever was Edward Kennedy Ellington better known as Duke.

George Gershwin Dmitri Shostakovich Naomi Lewin Darius Milhaud Soviet Union Edward Kennedy Ellington Leonard Bernstein Official Stravinsky Symphony Orchestra Ebony Goodman Maurice Rebel Woody Herman Benny NEO Hawks Brazil Leboeuf
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 7 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:07 min | 8 months ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I may owe me Lewin. Finale is the English pronunciation of an Italian word that spelled F. I N. A. L. E. It means the end of something. You've probably heard the expression ram finale. Hello Finale is don't come much grander than the end of Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony unless of course you add singers to the end of symphony the way. Beethoven did and his nine not all composers. Were that emphatic. About Ending Symphony frontiers of Haydn wrote one of the quietest symphony finales ever. In Haydn's Farewell Symphony. The players leave the stage one by one at the end. There are only two violinists left. Here's a finale that Dmitri Shostakovich had some real fun with at the end of Shostakovich's piano concerto number one which is really a concerto for piano and trumpet. It sounds like the two instruments are in a race to the finish. Not all finale. Come at the very end of the peace when you go to a play. Something big usually happens right before intermission so that you can't wait to come back and see how it all turns out that happens in operas to some of the best finales are in the middle like the end of act. Two of Mozart's four act opera. The marriage of Figaro at the beginning of this finale two characters the count and Countess who are married tweet other are having an argument then the Countess's maids is Emma joins into help. The Countess do battle with her husband. One of the wonderful things about this. Finale is that you can always tell who's fighting with whom characters who agree with each other saying together. The finale has gone from duet to people singing to a trio. Three people singing then the guy says Anna wants to marry shows up. He's the one who's marriage. The opera is about Figaro's it's now a quartet four singers and the argument is three against one. The count is the one grumbling while the other three gang up on him but wait. There's more the V to arrive making quintet of singers is someone on the counts side. Antonio the Gardener God. Figaro manages to explain away. What's bothering on Tonio. So he leaves but then three characters on the count side show up. And by the end of the Finale Mozart has taken what started out as a duet and turned it into a Septet seven singers four against three.

Figaro Dmitri Shostakovich Haydn Tonio Countess Lewin Tchaikovsky Mozart Beethoven Antonio Anna Emma
Gioachino Rossini: Famous Finales

Classics for Kids

04:56 min | 8 months ago

Gioachino Rossini: Famous Finales

"Finale is the English pronunciation of an Italian word that spelled F. I N. A. L. E. It means the end of something. You've probably heard the expression ram finale. Hello Finale is don't come much grander than the end of Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony unless of course you add singers to the end of symphony the way. Beethoven did and his nine not all composers. Were that emphatic. About Ending Symphony frontiers of Haydn wrote one of the quietest symphony finales ever. In Haydn's Farewell Symphony. The players leave the stage one by one at the end. There are only two violinists left. Here's a finale that Dmitri Shostakovich had some real fun with at the end of Shostakovich's piano concerto number one which is really a concerto for piano and trumpet. It sounds like the two instruments are in a race to the finish. Not all finale. Come at the very end of the peace when you go to a play. Something big usually happens right before intermission so that you can't wait to come back and see how it all turns out that happens in operas to some of the best finales are in the middle like the end of act. Two of Mozart's four act opera. The marriage of Figaro at the beginning of this finale two characters the count and Countess who are married tweet other are having an argument then the Countess's maids is Emma joins into help. The Countess do battle with her husband. One of the wonderful things about this. Finale is that you can always tell who's fighting with whom characters who agree with each other saying together. The finale has gone from duet to people singing to a trio. Three people singing then the guy says Anna wants to marry shows up. He's the one who's marriage. The opera is about Figaro's it's now a quartet four singers and the argument is three against one. The count is the one grumbling while the other three gang up on him but wait. There's more the V to arrive making quintet of singers is someone on the counts side. Antonio the Gardener God. Figaro manages to explain away. What's bothering on Tonio. So he leaves but then three characters on the count side show up. And by the end of the Finale Mozart has taken what started out as a duet and turned it into a Septet seven singers four against three

Figaro Haydn Dmitri Shostakovich Tonio Tchaikovsky Countess Mozart Beethoven Anna Emma Antonio
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:10 min | 10 months ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"The musical kind of sweet is spelled S. U. I t. e. from the French expression on sweet which means to follow in order French composers wrote the first sweet so they named them. The earliest sweets were made up of a series of dances that followed each other in a particular order fast. Then slow then fast. Then slow you get the picture It's pretty soon word. Got Around Europe about French. Suites and composers in other other countries started writing them Johann Sebastian. Bach who was German wrote four of the most famous suites for orchestra in a Bach. Also wrote suites for Solo Instruments. So low keyboard wasn't that unusual. Lots of composers did that but backwards sweets for other unaccompanied companied instruments like cello After a while the idea of a sweet changed instead of a collection of dance pieces a sweet turned into a collection of any pieces that had something in common. For example music. Music from a play could be grouped into sweet like Edvard Grieg's music for peer Gin Arrange bits of a ballet or opera for performance at an orchestra concert. You get a sweet like the one from Carmen. By George say you can also group music from several different ballets into who was sweet. That's what Dmitri Shostakovich did in some sweets are made up of folksongs William Grant still like to use tunes from North and South America. The the other sweets are musical descriptions of a particular place. Ferdie grow painted a musical picture of the Grand Canyon onion for a little girl named Dali Gabrielle. Foray composed imposed sweet about her toys and Edward Elgar rounded up a bunch of pieces. He wrote as a kid into two suites that he called Wand of youth by the time Sergei Prokofiev got into the picture. There were also sweets. made out of film scores. PROKOFIEV's lieutenant. TJ sweet follows the plot of a movie for which he wrote the music. Yeah to hear the story of Lieutenant J. Tune in next week to classics for kids. I'm Ame Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim. Lander at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classic. Spur Kids.

Sergei Prokofiev Lander Spur Kids Edvard Grieg Dmitri Shostakovich Lieutenant J. Tune Solo Instruments Edward Elgar Johann Sebastian Bach Ame Lewin Europe Dali Gabrielle Grand Canyon South America Cincinnati Tim George William Grant
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:03 min | 10 months ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Here & Now

"And I think that's something to watch and shadow foreign policies. Jim Wa thank you so much. Happy New Year Upping New Year. It's the beginning of New Year so why not delve deep into the festive overture by Soviet era composer. Dmitri Shostakovich. It sounds like so much much fun. Right becomes triumphant part but it was probably for Shostakovich anything but let's explore that tension with our classical music opinionated friend Hoffner governor who joins us from New York. Hi Fran Hi there and you write in your article at your twenty sixteen article about this. which will post it here now dot? Org Shostakovich is very much. Your boy your guy your nervous little guy. Why why nervous? I tend to prefer classical and romantic era music but just to Kovic is probably the most modern composer. I feel a lot of affection for and his life was riddled with troubles by the Soviet state and and he was sort of did. His art made his music in constant terror of being defamed by the government by Stalin and the Soviet state in the Communist and by the way we just want to take a second to recommend author. Mt Anderson's incredible book about Shostakovich in Leningrad Leningrad under siege His Book Doc was symphony for the city of the dead. It's incredible and in fact here's a little bit of Shostakovich's seventh symphony that you read about in that book and so Fran Hoffner. He's writing at a time when he's under siege. There's a nervousness as you say this is why you have this kind of affection that tumbler.

Dmitri Shostakovich Fran Hoffner Leningrad Leningrad Jim Wa New York Stalin Mt Anderson Kovic
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 10 months ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Jim wells joins us to talk about that new warning from North Korea the storming of the US embassy in Baghdad that's led to more troops being sent back to Iraq this president trump last night we had some great warriors come out and do a fantastic job with their with their instantaneously are we more secure also will scan the horizon and check the rear view mirror with presidential historian Douglas Brinkley and the music of Soviet era composer Dmitri Shostakovich news first live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein protesters outside the US embassy in Baghdad are withdrawing after second day of demonstrations they're protesting Sunday's U. S. airstrikes on Iranian backed Shia militias in Iraq U. S. Aronian tensions are already high Iran's president says the US should be accountable for damages he says Washington is inflicted on around through sanctions NPR's Peter Kenyon reports president Hasan Rouhani told an audience in northwestern Iran that US sanctions are a conspiracy aimed at making around surrender he added quote we respect your nation but we oppose your government due to its bad deeds president trump we impose punitive sanctions on Iran in twenty eighteen not long after he pulled the U. S. out of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement with Iran figures from around central bank and the International Monetary Fund show the sanctions caused oil exports to plummet and plunge the Iranian economy into recession Kenyon NPR news it's double Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu says he will ask parliament to grant him immunity from prosecution he stands accused of bribery and other corruption but claims the charges are politically motivated the request is expected to delay his trial until after national elections in March democratic presidential candidate who compete booted judge can no longer be referred to as mayor Pete his term as mayor of south bend Indiana ends this hour as his successor is sworn in at the same time his presidential campaign is reporting donations have been pouring in here's an peers Danielle Kurtz Leben bush's campaign reported a strong showing in the fourth quarter bringing in twenty four point seven million dollars that's up from nineteen point two million in the third quarter the totals come as democratic candidates fight over fundraising tactics bridges has been criticized for holding high dollar fundraising events a campaign Memel highlighted that his average donation last quarter was roughly thirty three dollars it did not say how much money he has on hand to going into twenty twenty polls show bridges in a tight race to win the Iowa caucuses despite the fact that he pulls fourth nationally among Democrats according to the real clear politics polling average Daniel Kurtz Levon NPR news des Moines China's leader xi Jim paying as welcome the new year with a speech suggesting Beijing's political relationship with Hong Kong should be a model for Taiwan but as NPR's Emily Fang reports Taiwan's leader is rejecting the notion one country two systems is the model of governance for how China rules Hong Kong and hopes to rule ten one in which region can retain certain liberties and his near speech shooting pain to clear to to model was quote feasible achievable and supported by the people but Taiwan's president tying when pushed back saying such a model was a failure and quote not feasible NPR's Emily Feng in Beijing this is NPR bush fires in.

North Korea Jim wells
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 11 months ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"By the Friday deadline unseasonably heavy rain in southern India has led to a loss of lives at least fifteen people left their dead in the southern state of Tamil Nadu buried under a wool that collapsed in the city of crime the toll schools and colleges have been closed in the state capital Chennai a number of other districts because of the torrential rain but as well as opposition need a horn guide does says an investigation is underway into allegations that a group of opposition lawmakers off with the support to a businessman linked to the government of president Nicolas Maduro is the guy does head to the Venezuelan Congress said that nine M. P.'s would be suspended local media outlets they wrote letters to support a businessman accused of corruption involving a State Bank food distribution program when god does has he suspects they receive money in return around twenty five thousand Italians have joined a protest against the right wing Likud party in Milan in the latest demonstration by a new political movement known as the sardines they gathered in pouring rain outside Milan's cathedral to denounce the policies of the league leader Matteo salvini many had images of the fish attached to that umbrellas one woman explained why she was that yeah whatever is in fact he was so ill you all called you place the people not represented by this government I hate this environment I hate racism and I shouldn't say this but I'm against the league a Constanze what's going on right now and I love the fact that we're now these young people in the square protesting number two detectives investigating the disappearance of a Royal Navy sailor more than thirty years ago a traveling to Gibraltar to search for his body police have been investigating with the Simon parks was killed by fellow sailor and crimson he was later convicted of murdering two men the lovely and bone conduction Maris yen since is died instant pages back age seventy six he long suffered from heart problems over the past two decades he was often rated as the world's best conductor winning popular and critical acclaim for his interpretations of Beethoven Tchaikovsky and Molla chose Howland looks back at his life Dmitri Shostakovich one of the composers matters young since became most identified with yes is was born in **** occupied Rica in hiding because his mother was Jewish she was a singer and his father a conductor and he later.

Simon parks Matteo salvini Likud Dmitri Shostakovich Howland Molla Beethoven Tchaikovsky India Gibraltar Royal Navy Milan M. P. Venezuelan Congress Nicolas Maduro president Chennai thirty years
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"In the fall of nineteen forty one the Russian countryside was on fire. The German army was marching across the Soviet Union at an alarming rate and villagers were torching. Their own towns and farms to prevent them from being taken. The troops that were bound for Moscow were relentless intent on reaching the Russian capital, but Joseph Stalin, the Soviet leader wasn't about to surrender his city to Hitler. Stalin had a plan if the German forces were to capture Moscow, the city's most prize buildings were read to blow the Kremlin cathedrals the fanciest hotels and the Bolshoi theatre. The theater is as grand as you can imagine towering columns on the outside all velvet chandeliers on the inside. If Hitler made it to Moscow and wanted to celebrate his victory by going to performance at the Bolshoi the Russians were ready for him. They lined the orchestra pit of the theatre with explosives booby, trapping, the building and in an image. I can't shake ballerinas and circus performers were trained to dance on stage while holding grenades to kill whoever. They could if they got the chance lever a composer and a member of the Soviet secret police he had a very specific assignment. If Moscow fell if the German swept in if he could get close enough. He was to kill Hitler. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaped classical music, the heartbreaks betrayals, and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything. There are many dark inspirations at work in classical. One of the darkest is more. For thousands of years. More has brought music bands playing troops marched drummers and Pfeiffer right on the frontlines music is used to rally spirits build national pride and to mourn the fallen. Some of the most powerful pieces come from composers reflecting on war from Tchaikovsky's eighteen twelve overture to Britain's war requiem. In this episode. We dive into World War Two were music became a weapon for the Soviets as they fought the Germans and sometimes as they fought themselves. There was lead Nipper the composer turned would be assassin. He never had the fire that shot. Those ballerinas never pulled the grenade pins that plan at the Bolshoi was never forced into action, but in another Soviet city. Also squarely in the path of the marching Germans. There was a composer who did harness his music in the darkest moments of war. This is the story of the Mitri Shostakovich and the siege of money grad. Dmitri Shostakovich grew up in political chaos. He watched the fall of the last czar, the rise of communism and the formation of the Soviet Union. He lived in Saint Petersburg, petrograd and Leningrad all without moving the Russian city changed names and regimes around him by the time. He was ten he was writing political music like the funeral March for the victims of the revolution. And the only kept going from there his first symphony debuted when he was nineteen. And it wasn't just played Leningrad played in Chicago and Philadelphia to in the west his early music is steeped in Russian pride choruses that praise Lenin communist songs at the end of the symphonies. And

Moscow Hitler Soviet Union Bolshoi theatre Dmitri Shostakovich Joseph Stalin Saint Petersburg Nipper German army Jade Simmons Pfeiffer petrograd Tchaikovsky Lenin Britain Philadelphia Chicago
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on 600 WREC

"This monster the Soviet killer. Listen follow on the iheartradio app. For today. We've got some sunshine a high temperature in the low to mid seventies. And then for tonight that low drops down into the low fifties Saturday mostly sunny high in the upper seventies low seventies on Sunday then on Monday, mostly sunny, a high near eighty currently we've got fifty six degrees. Your Memphis morning news time is seven thirty to ten on six hundred W R E C ninety two point one FM and the I heart radio app. Thank you for joining us. Andrew bell joins us. Just a couple of moments on Memphis morning news from ninety one F C also Meghan Nichols. From the Memphis business journal time now for this day in history, though, April the twenty six on this date in fifteen fourteen ca parkas makes his first observations of Saturn. I don't know. I don't know how good the telescope was. But he was able to at least pick out a few of the rings. And that having this day in fifteen fourteen in sixteen seven Jamestown expedition makes its first landing in America at a place named KP. Henry and what would become Virginia, but they quickly departed for a better site. We moved forward to on this date in nineteen twelve on April. The twenty six the first home run ever hit Fenway park. Hugh, Bradley for the Boston Red Sox socked one out of the park on this date in nineteen twelve on this date in nineteen thirty one Lou Gehrig hits a home run. But it's called out for passing a runner. This mistake cost him the American League home run crown he tied with Babe Ruth in nineteen thirty one. So that little mistake makes him a bit of a footnote in history. Nineteen thirty six Dmitri Shostakovich, although I'm not a huge music buff. I love saying the word Shostakovich nineteen thirty six Dmitri Shostakovich completes. His fourth symphony on this date in nineteen fifty four Jonas Saux anti polio. Vaccine begins nationwide. Do a test of that nationwide on this date in nineteen fifty. Eighty four on this date in nineteen sixty one. Well, what happened on April twenty six? Roger mayors hits the first of his sixty one home runs on the state in that record breaking year of nineteen sixty one in nineteen eighty two Argentina surrenders to Great Britain on South Georgia island near the Falkland islands and also on this date. Bizarre. Rod Stewart is mugged and gunman steals. His fifty thousand dollar Porsche on this date in nineteen eighty six the world's worst nuclear disaster. The fourth reactor at Chernobyl power station in the Soviet Union explodes. Thirty one die and radioactive contamination. Basically just ruins that city. Now, people go back for kind of an interesting tourism as they go look and see how things were on the day that that reactor having it's as if time stood still with all of the decay. They're near chur noble in nineteen eighty nine. Mike Tyson gets a speeding ticket for drag racing his Lamborghini in Albany, New York and then in nineteen ninety three on this date on April the twenty sixth in. NBC announces that Conan O'Brien will replace David Letterman. The rest is history on the state, April twenty six and hope you're having a good day. If you're having a birthday, we wish you a very happy birthday. It's big weekend. Beautiful weather and huge game. Coming up tomorrow night. Autozone park. Joining us on the program is our friend and sporting director for Memphis ninety one F C, Andrew del made. How you doing? Bonington doing? Well. Thank you. It's it's this is a big game for a couple of reasons. One you've got a club coming in that as well established that you know, better than probably any organization in the in the US L. But also you've got a team coming off of some rest here. And we're.

Memphis Dmitri Shostakovich Andrew bell Fenway park Memphis business journal iheartradio US Autozone park Soviet Union Jamestown Babe Ruth Rod Stewart Lou Gehrig Meghan Nichols Jonas Saux Boston Red Sox W R E C American League Mike Tyson Virginia
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

SF Ballet Blog

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

"The first even though they're having fun there sarcasm in the first move and second movement is expressing the fear in a way that Shostakovich with his wife felt living in those times third movement is in between those times like the before danger and then living through trying to go through the motions of Petitjean life living in an environment. That's not very safe and then the fourth movement is reality. Is You wake up and find your best friend is not living in his apartment anymore and nobody he can find where he is. Just a Kovic lost a lot of very dear friends that were also musicians so the fourth movement is very symbolic for the military loss sadness fear all of those qualities and fifth movement is a collaboration and kind of highlighting everything that king previously bringing everything to ahead and looking for hope. There's a little section that he used to call at the C. and you'll see the dancers doing movements that kind of represent waves and that's <hes> the hope that the Russian people felt at that time that perhaps beyond where we live over there over the C.. There'll be a hope one day that we can together. They hold hands in they sway together we can move forward forward and find our way as a people and then within symphony number nine. There's a one principal male dancer that represents he said this the angel it's the part of our cells as human beings that hold onto hope even when there's tragedy and difficulty and he's the representation of better way of a hopeful way of a light at the end of the tunnel in our lives so he weaves in and out of the ballet and everything is symbolic. Everything is abstract but if it's done well there's a lot of symbolism and a lot of deep meaning behind what's happening physically and it is physically very challenging stamina wiser dancers don't stop in terms of what to look for here notice the distinctions between the leading dancers. The first couple you mean isn't actually the main couple of the ballet but instead of kind of archetypical goal perfect Soviet pair dancing steps loosely inspired by Russian folk dance. It's the second couple who are perhaps Shostakovich in his wife and then there's a third leading man watch for him. He's a bit of ambiguous figure. I'm curious what you guys think he's up to. The second ballet in the evening is the most narrative and biographical of the three works at shift in perspective tied to the music itself slots to cope with his chambers. Symphony was a very personal piece for the composer so so here's how Martin West describes it Chamber symphony which started life as a quartet eight quartet and he wrote this in. I think he was nine hundred sixty in three days which is actually mind boggling to me that you could even written down in three days. Let alone composed it in all the way through that Bali is four very important notes Shostakovich D. E. Flat C. B. Goes hit over and over again. Those notes long story translated translated into German become D. S. H.. which in Germany's Dmitri Shostakovich the first letters of his name so if a hmos autobiographical you use the many many times in his in his output eighth quarterback Texas where he use it perhaps the most most insistently and he dedicated to the victims of fashion fascism and war but really for him it was not a biographical thing and he quotes in that particular quartet for tat many pieces which were very important to him? There was a quote from the Opera Lady Macbeth of McCain's which was the work which was denounced by by the authorities which made him have to start writing a little while nearly nearly got killed for it and towards the end ballet the peace and he worked with First Symphony which is the piece that put him on international stardom when he was eighteen years zolt and decreasing the cello concerto all sorts of little things all there but he said himself he thought of as summing-up of his life and I understand that he intended to commit suicide after he wouldn't it but luckily he didn't he hit lesson to the ten fifteen years after that so Romanski took these autobiographical underpinnings in the music and created a ballet that traces the outline of Shostakovich's three great love of affairs his I love Tatyana Glencoe his wife Navarre who was the mother of his children and who died in nineteen fifty four and his third wife Irina Supense Guy who is just twenty seven when she married the fifty six year old Shostakovich in nineteen sixty two Nancy Rafi a few more details about this Bali in the ballet. There's three principal women and they represent the three loves of Shostakovich's life the youngest love that he had which was I love puppy. Beloved that woman through six years never proposed to her. She waited for him to propose he was too shy as a young boy to actually do that and he lost her he she went with another man and he was devastated by that. He had a a couple of other not so great relationships until he met the woman that he did actually have a family with and she was the fortress of his life. He was able to get through all of the challenges that the political situation at the time time put him through with this woman who really was the backbone of the whole household and then he lost her suddenly and his life was broken. I remember Alexi telling me that the very first thing that came out of shift to co voyages mouth when he lost his wife was who's going to take the children to school. She was that much of a foundation for him so he he was devastated for went through a major depression after that loss and later Garon as a as an older man in his sixties he met another woman which was his last wife that was a very mature very grounding relationship and she was the woman that saw him through the last of his days and she still alive and she actually came to a bts premiere of the Shostakovich evening. It was a great honor to have her in the audience and have her presence their positions in the center of the evening. This bally's seems to hold the evenings heart the three women and the central man is artists seem in some way a reference to George Balanchine Seminal Ballet Apollo which also revolves around a man and three women written or rather a god three muses choreographed in nineteen twenty eight after leaving the Soviet Union. There's a way in which Apollo and even maybe balancing himself offer a counterpoint to this work and she shostakovich artist messed Shostakovich artists who stayed way balancing Stravinsky are the artists who laughed so here watch for a moment toward the end of the ballet when as an Apollo the central figure seems to transcend his humanity and become perhaps not quite a god but an immortal artist finally the final section of the ballet concerto number one is perhaps the most abstract and visually arresting of the three the dancers clad in gray and revolutionary red had and a series of Soviet. Ask objects hang from the ceiling. There's no real story to follow here but there is a theatricality and I kind of anxiety that Rask's just below the ballet's athletic playful surface yet. This Bali wasn't always intended to be quite what it is so. Let's hear Nancy Rafi talk about how this piece came about. It actually is funny. How this ballet came about? We were supposed to use symphony number one and we got in the studio and it wasn't working. Nothing was coming out. uh-huh dancers couldn't follow the music Lexi with stuck. Just was one of those moments nightmare moments for an artist where nothing was working so that weakened. I went to my mom's nursing home. WHO's ballet panicked and there is like mom helped? Let me count this out because we're having so much trouble in the studio Monday. Morning came Alexia figured out that counts we're going to be able to like figure this section on he goes no. I scratched it all like we're not using that different choreography different music piano concerto the number one and we took that music he used the choreography he started with symphony number. One put it to piano concerto number one and everything just snowballed it just went it just flowed and that's what we came up with with tonight. It's dancing to the music concerto number. One is one of Shostakovich's earliest compositions concerto number one for a piano trumpet in strings written in Nineteen thirty three and Britain in nineteen thirty three is the oldest of the three pieces used in Romanski Shostakovich trilogy it quotes from a variety of other composers music including Beethoven's a Posse Nada which you might have heard earlier this season as part of Kaleidoscope or program to and Martin West here will tell us a little bit more about this piece of music and then the Hanukkah show nearly on these life and as I said before it's a madcap brilliant combination of all sorts of things he voted for himself so that he go around and playing paying it. No He's so get out and get get to perform. Actually it's interesting people's call it is called Concert Piano Trumpet and strings and originally when he voted he he meant to be trumpet Concerto and then he added the piano part so he could play and then he wrote so much of the part that it became the shelter and in fact although it's now called Conservative trumpetings really the trump is part of the ORQUESTA. It has a few solos but nothing really huge. I don't think it's my personal opinion. This ballet has a sense of nostalgia to it kind of Camaraderie `sensitive fun and humor but also a kind of yearning for lost world. It's purely abstract an extremely sculpture all with the individual dancers creating shapes with their bodies and also the full group coming together to create large scale visual pictures. This kind of shaping of space is one of the things monkeys really known for and it's on high display here here in concerto number one and that is the Shostakovich trilogy and it is the end of our twenty nineteen season <hes> this ballet is one of those that rather exceeds words so I really do hope you can all come yet Romanski. He's truly a master at work and at the height of his powers so the campus event this year of course if you do miss it you can catch it in London at the end of May were airframe out the sets and costumes as soon as the curtain comes down on May twelve so we can open our toward a Sadler's dealers wells on May twenty ninth with this valley for more on that checkout are popular meet the artists podcast..

Dmitri Shostakovich Shostakovich principal Romanski Shostakovich Nancy Rafi Martin West Petitjean Kovic Symphony Bali Germany Texas Soviet Union Romanski First Symphony ORQUESTA George Balanchine Alexi Garon
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Me of. Just t- for two and two or just me for you. And you for me a love. So here's no friends relations on weekends. We won't have known that we challenge. And. And start to kick for you to take all of. Bye. Well. Start. Ella and Basie appear to be having tea for two on the cover of the famous. Verve record from nineteen sixty three sixty four one of the great collaborations has talking about basically taking a little reprieve not reprieve from the verve years and the little sidecar trip on roulette records, which was the source of the easy going es in it instrumental count Basie orchestra tea for two Ella and Basie together and the song itself took a little side road or aside route when it became a bit of classical music rearranged by Dmitri Shostakovich as what we know is Tahiti trot. Of course, it was originally from no net. Humans the composer of the melody and the nineteen twenty seven orchestration by Shostakovich became a sensation on its own. Here is NAT king Cole taking t- for two for a dumpy..

Dmitri Shostakovich Basie Ella Cole
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"Kart tournaments. For me. Definitely the most memorable experience has been playing side by side with some the most prestigious fresh musicians in the country. It was around the second day. They had coaches sit inside though, extre play side by side with us. And that was really intense. It's really moving to see all of the musicians so invested in devoted to the. Music are thought the most absolutely amazing experience. So far was the first rehearsal with the entire orchestra. Just the first few notes of the Mahler and getting to hear the entire group. Play was just absolutely stunning. It's it's like, it's really beautiful thing. We have all these people coming from all over the place. Young people given this opportunity like share our experiences emotional backgrounds to create this one really beautiful piece of music. And it's it's really it's really inspiring every time that I that. I take part in that. And now we're going to let the N Y O USA take break as we hear one of the most beloved pieces of chamber music played by some of its members. The Scherzer from the piano quintet by Dmitri Shostakovich sort of short ride in cranky machine when you say Andrew. We're going to have members of the orchestra to play this. They are violinists Evan Hansen. Andrew Kim Kayla. Cabrera is our list and Isabel one plays the cello in this piece. I'll have the pleasure of joining these guys at the piano, Andrew from old, tappan New Jersey is at the Mike with me. This is really exciting piece. I know it's particularly satisfying for you. Personally. What am I speaking about? Well, I I had my experience with Shostakovich when I first touched the Shostakovich violin concerto last summer, and I would say that was my first time having genuine and individual relationship with the composer himself in that. I didn't know that. There was such a small disparity between the stereotypical prim and proper and elegant class communiqu and what I would describe Shostakovich as rock and roll. And who doesn't love good. Enroll and I think that head banging no matter where it's from. It's still had banging. Guess hand. I'm excited to lose. Some more bow hairs today. I'll try and break stringer to myself. You almost didn't get to the point where you could engage with the violent and shred on Shostakovich because you almost quit playing in the fifth grade if you wouldn't mind sharing with us what happened there. Yeah. That's kind of a heavy heavy topic. But I think it's more or less how I was raised and educated with the violent discipline. My relationship with violin only include lessons, if teachers and me practicing by myself in my room, and because of that kind of daily monotonous procedures I didn't have room to experience community, you know. And I think community is the most important aspect of music because you're able to collaborate with everyone and just you know. Enjoy yourself while other people enjoy themselves as well. And I didn't know that until I got into Juilliard pre college. And I actually saw for the first time while there's other kids who like the violin just as much as I do. And they all understand that we all don't like the practice, but we have to do that. Anyway, and given that kind of mutual understanding with every single person despite their differences and differences in backgrounds and such. I learned to appreciate violence so much more. Well, we're glad we're getting this together. So let's go shred. Let's play this wonderfully fun piece Scherzer from Shostakovich's piano quintet in g minor. Scherzer from by festival played by members of national USA. Evan Joe Hansen. Andrew, Kim, violins Kayla Cabrera viola and Isabel one cello. I was piano. Now, we're gonna speak to another one of these fine players are villas to Kayla Kayla is from Crete, Illinois probably their Kayla really funded together with you great job. This is not your first time to the orchestra. And why oh you this year, you are touring to Mexico Ecuador and Colombia, but you've gone with him in the past where to last year, I had the honour of joining NY USA on their tour of Europe. But stops in Amsterdam Copenhagen and Prague. I think I especially loved Amsterdam because that was a city I've always wanted to visit so very lucky a magical place, and there's something that you really appreciate about the whole and YO experience. Right. Well, we get three weeks here during the residency and followed by an international. Tour working with Princeton players from the top orchestras working with famous conductors sullaway playing great countries. And it's all free for everyone who gets can't beat raising unbeatable killer you a late starter..

Andrew Kim Kayla Dmitri Shostakovich Evan Joe Hansen Kayla Kayla Kayla Cabrera Scherzer Isabel Amsterdam Princeton Mahler Amsterdam Copenhagen N Y O USA Europe stringer NY USA tappan New Jersey Illinois Mike Crete
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So interesting is both spare and lush at the same time. Yeah. It's a beautiful way of putting. And I love that. What you just did? Allison is precisely what I want to encourage people to be empowered to deal with this book. Because so often people say to me, I love it. But I'm not quite sure how I'm supposed to react to it. I don't know if I got the time analogy, right? Am I listening in the right way? And I want to say there's no right way to listen, if you're human, and you have is it's yours, and how you respond is. Absolutely valid which of course is not to take away from people who really go deep and have much more intellectual understanding of it. But the way that you just responded is beautiful way of putting it and that was Gusta homes for people who want to go to the Google machine and November features in year. Okay. Quick preview of next week. We want to give too much away while you know, as you mentioned it is midterms and one of my great beliefs and it's backed up by quite hard neuroscience. Is that music can really rewire out brain chemistry is a really just go to a fundamental part of who we are. I've never been a human society that hasn't made music, and I think that music can play a great part in also helping to quell anxiety, helping to censor us for those of us if any of you out there like me, and you can't quite got the hang of say, meditation or yoga on a daily basis, perhaps this might actually have a really deep impact on on. How you are how you be. And so I thought next week in the wake of the midterms of some people will be happy. Some people may not be there's a piece of music by Dmitri Shostakovich who suffered under the repressive regime of Stalin. He was in and out of favor. He had a very very checkered personal and artistic life living under that ceramic over, gene. So just in case we needed a little perspective. We might think let's go. Spare thought fishers to coach and you can hear him next week? That is a good tease well done my dear Comey, Burton hill, creative director of arts and music at WNYC can pick up her book year of wonder now, we're going to continue.

Allison Stalin Dmitri Shostakovich Google Comey Gusta Burton hill director
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's so interesting is both spare and lush at the same time. Yeah. It's a beautiful way of putting in. And I love that. What you just did? Allison is precisely what I want to encourage people to be empowered to deal with this book. Because so often people say to me, you know, I love it. But I'm not quite sure how I'm supposed to react to it. I don't know how the time analogy, right? Am I listening in the right way? And I want to say there's no right way. Listen, if you're human, and you have is it's yours, and how you respond is. Absolutely valid which of course is not to take away from people who really go deep and have much more intellectual understanding of it. But the way that you just respond. It is beautiful way of putting it and that was a Gusta homes for people who want to go to the Google machine. November features in year. Okay. Quick preview of next week. We only give too much away while you know, as you mentioned there is mid midterms and one of my great beliefs, and it's backed up by quite hard neuroscience, is that music can really rewire out brain chemistry as I say, really just go to fundamental part of who we are. There's never been a human society that hasn't made music, and I think that music can play a great part in also helping to quell anxiety helping to censor us. You know for those of us if any of you out there like me, and you can't quite got the hang of say, meditation or yoga on a daily basis, perhaps this might actually have a really deep impact on on. How you are you be? And so I thought next week in the wake of the midterms of some people will be happy. Some people may not be there's a piece of music by Dmitri Shostakovich who suffered under the repressive regime of Stalin. He was in and out of favour. He had a very very checkered personal and artistic life living under that too radical regime. So. Just in case we needed a little perspective. We might think let's go time's up spare thought ficials to coach and you can hear him next week. That is a good tease. Well done my dear Comey, Burton hill, creative director of arts music at WNYC can pick up her book year of wonder now, we're gonna continue the classical music Bain and learn some more about.

Allison Stalin Dmitri Shostakovich Google Gusta Comey ficials Burton hill Bain director
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Comes to talk. John. This is the John Batchelor show. David Reid's, suite story filled with anecdotes has for me. The revelation of the conference for peace at the Waldorf Astoria March twenty-fifth nineteen forty nine in which all of the usual suspects now show up Irving. How is there? Elizabeth Hardwick running around Robert lull. Norman Mailer shows up Shostakovich for some reason does a star turn on stage. I still don't understand this. However, they're all their argue about world peace and the Soviet San how we've taken this hard turn. Remember Wallace didn't want the Cold War. And he was advocating that under his presidency, which would have happened. If FDR had not removed him as vice president and put an Harry Truman that nobody knew who nobody knew remember. FDR didn't tell about the bomb. Remember that Jimmy burns? They secretary of state. I did tell him in any event we come to this conference of the Waldorf and David the first time I read this which was right at the end. I started because I looked it up. And I started your book from there. And then went back to the beginning. I was certain you made all this up Marlon Brando. Norman Mailer good heavens. Arthur Miller Dmitri Shostakovich Leonard Bernstein. They're all there. It's a fascination and outside the the Catholic League against communism. In the American are are are parading around with signs. I guess Philip Roth's inside protesting. It's an incredible experience to read this chapter. I.

Dmitri Shostakovich Leonard Be Norman Mailer John Batchelor David Reid Jimmy burns FDR Wallace Marlon Brando Philip Roth Elizabeth Hardwick Robert lull Harry Truman Soviet San Irving vice president Arthur Miller Catholic League twenty-fifth
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on KNSS

"This is Mark Laycock director of orchestras at Wichita state university. Binding you to the first concert of the season by the WVU Symphonie Thursday September twentieth at seven thirty pm in Miller concert hall feature faculty artist Andrea. Principal. Oboe the Wichita symphony in the hauntingly beautiful oboe frontier by Eugene Goossens orchestra will also perform the thrilling I simply by Dmitri Shostakovich composed when he was just nineteen years old the piece became an international sensation. For more information contact the w fine arts box office nine seven eight three two three three. And we're glad Entercom cares. Have you ever spent a night on organic cotton sheets? If you have you've probably never slept better. Hi, I'm Scott Tannen, founder of Boll and branch. We make the softest most comfortable one hundred percent organic cotton sheets. You will ever sleep on? You can't buy sheets in store only on our website because we only sell them online at bollandbranch dot com. Our sheets cost less than half of designer brands and are twice the quality. You won't believe how comfortable one hundred percent organic cotton sheets can feel until you try bollandbranch hundreds of thousands of Americans love bollandbranch sheets, including three US presidents. Don't just take my word for it. Sleep on our sheets risk free for a month. If they're not the most comfortable. So you've ever slept on you can send them back for a refund. Plus if you order right now, we'll give you fifty dollars off your first set of sheets, plus free shipping at bollandbranch dot com. Promo code linens. Spelled B O L L, andbranch dot com. Promo code linens. Bollandbranch dot com, promo code linens..

Dmitri Shostakovich Wichita state university Miller concert hall Mark Laycock Wichita WVU Eugene Goossens Scott Tannen Principal Andrea US director Entercom Boll founder one hundred percent nineteen years fifty dollars
"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"dmitri shostakovich" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"I read it about seven years ago i would say an f l in love with it straightaway i think it's one of the best magical realism novels i've read and it has a man that talks to cats so what's not like it does make me feel like i've been a lot of cultural signifies a lot of space and a lot of description good risk description of cities and places yeah it it's i think it really makes you feel like you're that when you read it it's bonkers basically is awfully anchors and it's a very fun to read my name is ruin skelton willis and i'm the managing editorial director of vintage and i try to make the trains run on time that's what i do so i manage the process of producing the books from beginning to end to make sure we can publish when we want to i picked the noise of time by julian barnes and it is set in russia and is unconcerned the life of dmitri shostakovich and his relationship with stalin and the totalitarian regime well i i read it i had to sit on my hands while it was in manuscript and then i read it i in proof because i try to be an extra pair values on particular major books and i knew this one would be also i was very interested in i mean i'm interested in classical music anyway so i was very interested in the shostakovich aspects of the novel and i didn't know a lot about shostakovich but i wanted to get to know him better and i hadn't realized until i read it that the actually this was a perfect a way to do this and as a result of regional book i am immediately booked myself a ticket to see lady macbeth admit cents at english national pro i think it's the second time it's been performed in english and it was completely mesmerizing and all of the and a now i would really like to say it in russian actually the russian that is covered in the book doesn't exist anymore but it did exist and was very frightening place to be and we wanted to good reasons to go to russia would be because it's not like that will which obviously is very good thing but it you know it doesn't do as any harm to be reminded about what's particularly in the communist regime in this case in how to tally cherian regimes work and what they do to people and had humanizing now and also shows how i mean in this case shostakovich how he works through that and still manages to be creative which was very important of the book i mean how the mine faced with what he was faced with with stalin's regime how we managed to be creative anti the party line when he had to is amazing and it really miles to that because i hadn't realized quite because i never thought about it before i mean you know i know that to terry totalitarianism and i did history at school but it's not till you actually get down to the nitty gritty and how people live a more you know knowing in the beginning of the book the setting of the beginning of the book is very telling and is haunting because shostakovich right at the beginning of the book is standing by the left with his suitcase in his apartment block because he knows he will be taken away to be questioned and he knows that he may not come back again he he does come back but he has a very strange relationship with the the big house with stalin and and that that is the premise of the book and it's how he manages it but knowing it was it feels like or julian bond is imagining this and so we date night this is exactly what just garbage felt light we can imagine the his he felt like when you wake up in the morning what had his first when he went he had an american tour his latte go visit america with lots of russian minders amways questions and had tied the party line even though he obviously didn't want to you how'd you do with that and this book as you exactly how you do with that and is very impressive and in my opinion is doing bonds best work with most pace i'm jay channel i'm the editorial director for crime and thriller publishing at harvey'll soccer the book is called watching you and it's by a swedish article on a doll set in sweden stockholm specifically on it as written in lots.