20 Burst results for "Dizzy Gillespie"

Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:36 min | 8 months ago

Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

"Shining. Oh hello from wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Manica deemed the first lady of Song. Today's Dreamer was the most popular female jazz singer in the United States. For more than half a century. She went thirteen grammy awards and sold over forty million albums. Her voice was flexible. Wide-ranging accurate and ageless. Let's talk about Ella Fitzgerald Ella. Jane Fitzgerald was born on April twenty fifth nineteen seventeen in Newport News. Virginia to William Fitzgerald and Tempe Henry Ellis parents separated shortly after Ella's birth and she and her mother moved to Yonkers New York where they eventually moved in with Tempe longtime boyfriend. Joseph Dasilva three soon became four LS half-sister Francis was born in Nineteen twenty-three. The family struggled to make ends meet. Both parents worked multiple jobs. L. Occasionally took on work to their apartment was a mixed neighborhood. Where Ella made friends easily? She considered herself more of a Tomboy and often join neighborhood baseball games. Sports Aside Ella enjoy dancing and singing with friends and would perform at lunch and on her way to school in Nineteen. Thirty two ELLAS. Mom Tempe died from serious injury. She received in a car accident. Ella was devastated. She eventually moved in with her aunt Virginia and when her stepfather Joe died shortly thereafter. Ala stepsister. Francis came to live with them. To Ella was in a dark place. She started skipping school and her grades dropped. She got in trouble with the police and was sent to a reform school where she was subject to beatings by her caretakers. Eventually Ella escaped from the reformatory. She was fifteen years old broke and alone during the Great Depression. In nineteen thirty four Islas name was pulled in a weekly drawing the Apollo Theater for a chance to perform and compete an amateur night. Two sisters who the dance in the sisters in the world call the edgewood sisters and they closed the show about I when I saw those ladies. Dan I says no way. I'm going out there and try to dance. Because they stop the show. She was planning to dance but when the Edwards sisters closed the main show. She changed her mind fearing she couldn't compete with their moves. And when I got out there somebody follow up nobody else. What is she going to do? She made a last minute decision to sing and ask the band to play. Hoagy Carmichael Judy. Heavens hurt to me. By the end of the song the crowd demanded an encore and Ella had found her calling one of the people in the band. That night with saxophonist and Arranger Benny Carter wowed by her natural talent. Benny introduced a lot of people. Who could help launch your career? The era of big swing bands was coming to a close in favor of bebop. Ls successfully made the transition using her voice to sound like another horn in the band. She began to experiment with scat singing. Eventually turning it into an art in nineteen thirty eight Ella recorded a version of the nursery. Rhyme a-tisket a task it. A million copies of the album were sold it. Hit number one on the charts and it stayed on the pop charts for seventeen weeks. Ella was suddenly famous her wife. Changed Professionally and personally while on tour with Dizzy Gillespie's band in nineteen forty. Six Ella fell in love with bassist. Ray Brown the two got married and adopted a son Ray. Junior through the two later got divorced. They remained lifelong friends L. O. Worked with all the jazz greats including Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Nat King Cole Dizzy. Gillespie and Benny Goodman from nineteen fifty six to nineteen sixty. Four Ella recorded eight songbooks in which she covered other musicians songs. Including those by Cole Porter Duke. Ellington the Gershwin's Johnny Mercer Irving Berlin and Rodgers and Hart Ella continued to work throughout her life by the nineteen nineties. She had recorded more than two hundred albums she received the Kennedy Center honors the US National Medal of Arts and Francis Commander of Arts and letters award. Thank you and I'm so proud to be in class with all these younger ones coming up. Ain't gonNA leave me behind. I'm learning out a wrap in her later. Life Ella suffer from diabetes. She was hospitalized. Congestive heart failure in nineteen eighty six and for exhaustion in nineteen ninety. Nine hundred ninety three. She had to have both of her legs amputated below the knee due to complications from diabetes. She never fully recovered from the surgery. And on June fifteenth. Nineteen Ninety six at the age of seventy-nine Ella Fitzgerald died at her Beverly Hills. Home fans all over. The world mourned her death. A wreath of white flowers was placed next to her star on the Hollywood walk of fame and the Marquee outside the Hollywood bowl read. Lmu will miss you

Ella Fitzgerald Ella Ella Fitzgerald Ella Hart Ella Dizzy Gillespie Virginia Grammy United States Carmichael Judy Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Francis Jane Fitzgerald Jenny Kaplan Benny Carter Mom Tempe Manica Diabetes Benny Baseball Cole Porter Duke
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KPCC

"And I I have the bathroom I jumped up to go pee I ran out I ran down the aisle and instead of going back to lobby were you supposed to go to the bathroom I was just excited and ran towards stages side door and ran it looking for the bathroom I ran into people walking around and there's damn do I find myself looking there's Dizzy Gillespie standing there holding his horn is magical and to develop put up to the heavens I run up to him in total awe Mr Gillespie I and I'm just I can't speak on to show an odd that it's him and he pulls me in and and kinda like hugs me with his arms from a heads up in his armpit and cuddled up next to him and just kind of holds me there and he's holding his phone in one hand he's holding me any other hand embracing meanest like loving embrace speaking to somebody and it's I'm just in heaven you know I'm sick now and I to this day I remember the feeling of him like the smell of his Cologne is shoot is everything about it and he was so kind so sweet man and anyway keeps talking this guy for a few minutes and then he stops talking guy can looks down to smiles at me patch Mander had walks on stage starts playing night in Tunisia and I'm just forget all about peeing you know and I ran back to my mom and she was just so happy and it was such a beautiful thing yeah and that's this I'm gonna play another piece of music okay this is probably my favorite song by a band that I think you and I both love so we got jazz we got dizzy and then we got leads that plan at what point to those different forms of music start to coalesce in your mind as a way to bridge what you've heard your stepped out playing the bass what led Zeppelin's doing and how you can move in a rock and roll what happens is and meet our boy named how well.

Dizzy Gillespie Mander Tunisia Zeppelin Mr Gillespie one hand
On This Day in History: Bud Powell Was Born

This Day in History Class

04:18 min | 1 year ago

On This Day in History: Bud Powell Was Born

"The Day was September twenty seventh nineteen twenty four URL Rudolph it off. Powell better known as Powell was born in New York City Powell was instrumental in the development of modern jazz music though he died when he was just forty one years old his accomplishments as a jazz soloist greatly contributed to the growth of bebop musical talent ran in Powell's family. His grandfather father and siblings were all musicians. His father was a stride pianist. Stride was a jazz piano style that developed developed as the popularity of ragtime was dying down stride pianist play the melody with the right hand while the left hand alternates between a single. I note and a quarter played an active or more higher. The left hand had to go greater distances on the keyboard often very quickly and improvisation. It was more important than it had previously been when Powell was a child. His father began teaching him classical music at age fifteen he dropped out of Dewitt wit Clinton High School to pursue his passion playing the piano he began playing at clubs in Coney Island and Harlem in the Mid Nineteen Forties Powell met the loneliest monk jazz pianist and composer at Minton's playhouse in Harlem and monk became a mentor to him. Powell became a regular feature at Minton's playhouse known for its role in the development of modern jazz and jam sessions with people like Charlie Parker Dizzy Gillespie and Kenny Clarke how also toward and record it with trumpeter Kuni Williams's orchestra he recorded with Tenor Saxophonist Dexter Gordon and he played on Charlie Parker's Savoy sessions he recorded the five volume the amazing Bud Powell in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties influenced by art tatum Charlie Parker Billie Kyle and thelonious monk how emerged as a leading figure and bebop he found a lot of success as a pianist though black audiences were not initially completely receptive to modern jazz in the nineteen forties still how how faced physical and mental struggles he spent time in a psychiatric hospital from nineteen forty seven to nineteen forty eight after getting in a fight at a Bar at a state hospital. He received electroconvulsive therapy after he was released from the hospital. He was placed in convalescent care. which was it's basically parole how return to music but he spent a lot of time from nineteen fifty one to nineteen fifty-three institutionalized after he was arrested stood on a drug charge in February of Nineteen fifty three the state of New York declared him incompetent and incapable of handling his own money Oscar Goodstein Powell's manager and owner of Berlin nightclub became his committee and began managing money? Good esteem got POW steady steady work but how was still struggling with his mental health. His relationships with his colleagues were deteriorating in the late nineteen fifties after spending more time in the hospital how moved to Paris with al-tv Edwards and he soon began playing in France and touring throughout Europe Edwards and a Fran Dan Frantz these padre looked out for POW while in Europe but he was deeply affected by his alcoholism mental illness and medication in nineteen in sixty three he contracted Berko says back in New York musicians put together a benefit concert to help him with medical expenses in nineteen sixty four or he moved back to the US he continued to play the piano and his return was celebrated though his performances did not get rave reviews so his music suffered as his health declined and he missed some of his performances on July thirty first nineteen sixty six he died died of health complications his pioneering work in bebop continued to influence later musicians like Bill Evans see so Taylor and Horace Silver Silver.

Powell Mid Nineteen Forties Oscar Goodstein Powell Bud Powell Charlie Parker Minton Berko Harlem Europe Coney Island New York Paris Edwards Fran Dan Frantz Dexter Gordon United States Dewitt Clinton High School Billie Kyle Berlin
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Hi Mister music Mr music businesses all over now and I wish it came out to my house and take down that banner you put on my rules I sold that space to doctor shows corn pads as long as it's for a good cause let's take a lack of it's old and I'm a showing for a good cause it is if you want to get on the dinner tonight John mistake rare in choosing the team directly you just surely and she you the who is Tom to call you the way you you things get give you we can make is to is you arrangements by Stan Kenton of Dizzy Gillespie feeling to it yes I think it is the lyrics this song like that you know could in popular really during the game night is all those were the days believe me during a game night well I have to take your word for it I wasn't around.

Tom Stan Kenton Dizzy Gillespie John
Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

"Two. This episode of studio. Three sixty is brought to you by the relentless, which is a new podcast from slate studios and century twenty one real estate. The relentless is about extrordinary people and mindsets. And behaviors that drive them to achieve inspiring things. Join host and doctor of clinical psychology, Julie Gerner she talks to business leaders across industries about what sets them apart and how they view success differently. You'll hear about what they've learned from their successes and failures and how they're continuing to evolve. Listen and subscribe to the relentless today wherever you get your podcasts. This is new three sixteen. I'm courteous. I'm Josh Allen Gonzalez from studio. Three sixty. We're back with another installment of this woman's work. A series of stories from classic Elba, Sundays and studio. Three. Sixty classic album. Sundays is a program of community listening events, founded by Coline, Cosmo Murphy, where fans listened to essential albums uninterrupted on state of the art sound systems for this woman's work were highlighting classic albums by female artists women who have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time lady sings the blues by jazz singer, Billie holiday. It was released in nineteen fifty six to coincide with her autobiography of the same name by this point in her career when she was just in her early forties. Holiday's voice was sounding fragile and warn the toll of a life marked by hardship and addiction. Although the more energetic sound of her earlier records is muted here, holiday still delivers wise and moving performances in this collection of emotional, jazz tunes, many of the songs here became synonymous with her unique sound and persona. Here's colleen. Billie holiday remains one of the greatest jazz, voices of all time and is still easily recognizable to music fans from all generations. She's got them. The musicians and clubs of New York City were integral to the development of jazz in the nineteen forties. Bebop was born in the Big Apple with artists like Charlie Parker bologna, smoke and Dizzy, Gillespie. The nineteen fifties saw the development of hard bop with Sonny Rollins and our Blakey the cool jazz of miles Davis and later, the free jazz of Ornette Coleman, and later John Coltrane explored in downtown, Manhattan venues, like the five spot. But vocal innovator and world-famous Billie holiday with unable to perform these notable. Jaaz clubs in the nineteen fifties as her cabaret card had been revoked due to narcotics charges. So instead, she brought jazz to the mainstream by performing it a major concert venue Carnegie Hall in nineteen fifty six. Nothing. On nothing. She wants said of her style. If I'm going to sing like someone else, then I don't need to sing at all in nineteen fifty eight Frank Sinatra told ebony magazine with few exceptions, every major pop singer in the US during her generation has been touched in some way by her genius. It is Billie holiday who was and still remains the greatest single musical influence on me. She also had a profound impact on contemporary artists, including Jose James, a singer, who is beautifully bridge, the world of jazz, and hip hop for over a decade since the release of his debut album, the dreamer. Ver- dream. Series. In two thousand fifteen chamber quarter tribute album to Billie holiday covering his favorite songs on the album yesterday. I had the blues the music of Billie holiday for the legendary blue note records. When I phoned Billie holiday, it really matched. My teenage angst in a deep way, not in a superficial way. You know, not in like, I'm a loner and against the world. But she showed me that there was a way to feel pain and to transform it into art. You don't have to know anything about our life to feel the kind of pain and tragedy that embodies her music. Holy likewise, British singer. Actress and former cabaret act. Paloma faith rates lady day as one of the most influential artists in her own upbringing on always dry bridge, and this will work out, but lately Acton, just no go. Maybe we'll Noel. Maybe we're not. We got us to relate. How Billy was a unifying force at one of my classic album. Sunday's events might mother and father is taste was always really convicting just the hell relationship, but. But. But this is the one person I listen to in both households. I would say that for me that she was the holy grail of how I wanted to be able to sing. I didn't realize as the young person so of trying to copies the econ- thing that entail sim batches happy. The show mother spray. Track to love. Nah.

Billie Holiday Blakey Slate Studios Julie Gerner Josh Allen Gonzalez New York City Carnegie Hall Elba Frank Sinatra Jose James Ebony Magazine Sonny Rollins Cosmo Murphy Coline Pain United States Ornette Coleman
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"On the bed. We were waiting for their. The air force to attack that was the kind of. But nothing happened. You know, that was that was tough. Yeah. But here you are you're you're you're twelve years old. You've gotta trumpet you join a marching band, you must've progressed then through other things as you're entering your teenage years, not just with a band, your your maybe you're with a combo or something like that. How did you go from that to get hooked on jazz? Much later. I was playing. Cuba music. And then I get an an a scholarship for three years to get in there. Nas Nichols authority of music will stay at a guest getting strictly classical music training on later on. Were they beat ban in Havana? We play maybe give them music pop music related on a journalist talked to me, and I was asking me about it. How much I knew about jazz music. I don't know about then he bay for me. In no record, nineteen forty six forty seven Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. My head down. Yeah. And so began your love affair with the music of busy Gillespie your hook more to. Good. What? That. Right. What does people were?.

Dizzy Gillespie Havana Cuba Charlie Parker twelve years three years
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The wayside. You. Find yourself twenty years later with this impulse to reconnect with that you're the or Rieti you're repressing it though because you don't have time, and you got to pay the bills and all of that. But you finally summon the gumption the courage to pull it out of the closet and start playing again, I think it's if you find passion in that. And you have the audacious nece to then set a goal. Maybe that goal is to be a professional violin player. I mean, that's you know. That's a very ambitious goal. I think it's just as important to. Let me back up like set that goal and then set steppingstone goals along the way towards the cheating that goal. I think it's just as important to sort of place that goal in your unconscious awareness and just fall in love with the impulse that brought it up in the first place, which is that you like playing violent. You doesn't matter. Whether you become a professional violin player or not you are committed to making sure that you make time to engage in that on a daily basis, and and if you're coming from the heart the core, I believe that the universe will show up with a path or opportunities that will direct you if you're adequately anchored in yourself enough to be aware of those as they arise. Beautiful. You just talked about both sides of the brain. Because you said in addition to setting the ultimate outcome and the steps along the way, which would all be using the left ration side of the brain. You've got to put it in the unconscious that you have this dream. You've got to put it in the dream time. Which is the right creative side of the brain. Or at least that is the side of the brain that has a greater access to that unconscious. And and that is how anybody that has ever really succeeded at something really dramatic. Whether it's whether their success was just enjoying the heck out of something or being noted professionally. They've had to put it in both sides because I believe that that's where a lot of people that are more inclined towards let's say spirituality than they are towards formality. The conditions of form. I think that's where they might also lose track because so much is put into that into that right creative side that access to the unconscious that the stepping stones along the way are neglected. So I would say if your goal is to come out of conformity to whatever degree you ought to come out of it. That you need to use. Both of exactly what you were just describing you need to have some stepping stones in an ultimate goal. And you need to activate your dream time brain. So that you you can work with both the measurements and the visions. Most people are better at one than the other. I agree you need both. But it's why musicians need managers. Life for them. Right. And it's why accountants need some kind of muse to counterbalance Dizzy Gillespie. I think it was dizzy was asked if he could read sheet music, and he said, yeah. But not well enough to spoil my style. Right. Yes. So I think. The most successful how healthy combination of those two things. But I really believe that if it is what you're truly meant to be pursuing or engaged in that it shouldn't matter because it is the process and the journey. It is the experience of doing that is far more important than whatever destination. You're you're driving towards so in other words, we put the GPS system in the unconscious and just let it play out in the background..

Dizzy Gillespie twenty years
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on WCPT 820

"This. Once once you tell that, it's Medicaid that's being for two thirds of larger care they immediately go by God. That's my grandfather. That's my sister. That's me. That's it's something that affects everybody, and that word is getting around all of this that you, and I have been fighting there for a long time together. As a matter of getting the word out and continuing to hammer it home until it finally takes as a veteran of television guy who edited ninety seven TV shows by saying the in Greece for peace and the guy who's this. Probably forty million times. I know how long it takes to repeat things over and over and over again before they get into common consciousness. And the same thing is true of retirement security issues that you would I fight all the time. They just have to be repeated and repeated and repeated until they finally take cold and pleased to say that during this election cycle. I think they really. Evidence was shown that these ideas have taken hold are beginning to take hold or the middle of taking hold or they actually have taken hold. And that's why we had a good cycle. Well, that's great. And by the way, having watched you lift your arm like this for so many years. I'm impressed. You don't have a rotator cuff injury because I'm pretty convinced. It's good for people. Usually ask me about is your is the mouth like like doesn't that hurt? So I say, no, I think it's good for your mouth. Actually, maybe Dizzy Gillespie thing. You just have to be built a certain way to be able to do it. I don't know. But okay last question John by this are too though. Okay. Good. Well, good. That's being are the politically more to switch off our last question super important question for you. So I see your tour is called browsers rock and do I party? Do you? Remember when they stopped calling it rock and roll and started calling it rock. I think it was like in the late sixties. And I remember thinking, it's kinda like pretentious. It's like, it's just rock and roll. You don't have to call it rock. I'm not I'm not criticizing your name. I'm just saying when they switched to Toronto. It's like when they started being critics like rock Creighton. Good point might occur. Was a little different I roll party, and then bouncers due out party. Do show was really a doo-wop show in a rock and roll show was really rock and roll show. We have gotten to the point in my performing career, which you know, I do have shows coming up, you know, soon. Now that the election's over. I did nothing during the election at all show. But. The on says got an older and more importantly,.

rotator cuff injury Dizzy Gillespie Greece Toronto John
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lit up this find cities clubs with everyone from Dizzy Gillespie to cannonball Adderley to a guy named. Sh- with whom he recorded this song for kind of blue. Here's Sean Martin in the style of Wynton Kelly on Freddie freeloader. Kelly. Your experience if I ever let Randy Newman's birthday go by uncelebrated send help as far.

Wynton Kelly cannonball Adderley Dizzy Gillespie Randy Newman Sh Sean Martin Freddie
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KOMO

"On social media advocates have to be at least eighteen years of age or older and looking to pursue a career in a social media position pbs is going to run a documentary next month about how the us fought the cold war with jazz the jazz ambassadors it's going to focus on a nineteen fiftyfive program to send american jazz musicians abroad to combat the soviet union's propaganda dizzy gillespie louis armstrong duke ellington benny goodman dave brubeck removing the cultural ambassadors the twist was that the musicians were supposed to push the image of the us as a tolerant nation even as the us was torn apart by racial inequality the jazz ambassadors for air on pbs stations beginning may fourth and i'll be first to apologize the ear worm that will be created by this next story that's when you hear a song you haven't heard in a long time and suddenly you'll be singing it the rest of the weekend brian calvert got one here he's remembering a writer of voice songs most of us can instantly recall it's a great artist that very few know the name but boy talk about creating saturday morning soundtrack for two generations hit o'brien it's important i realize this guy was much more than a saturday morning staple now it is my great pleasure to introduce one of the jazz greats bob dorough case if the voice seems familiar saturday morning cartoons must have been big in your house during the nineteen seventies and eighties and it all started with this magic yes it is semaj during a ted talk in two thousand sixteen bob dorough took a mostly grey haired audience back in time to the moment that changed everything i had this call to have a meeting with the president of a little ad agency my little boys can't memorize the times tables but they sing along with jimi hendrix and the rolling stones bob turned out three is a magic number and a host of other tunes that eventually copy era of executives at abc sunday we're on television the rest as they say is history.

us brian calvert writer bob dorough president jimi hendrix louis armstrong dave brubeck abc eighteen years
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KOMO

"To be at least eighteen years of age or older and looking to pursue a career in a social media position pbs is going to run a documentary next month about how the us fought the cold war with jazz the jazz ambassadors is going to focus on a nineteen fifty five program to send american jazz musicians abroad to combat the soviet union's propaganda dizzy gillespie louis armstrong duke ellington benny goodman dave brubeck were among the cultural ambassadors the twist was that the musicians were supposed to push the image of the us as a tolerant nation even as the us was torn apart by racial inequality the jazz ambassadors for air on pbs stations beginning may fourth be i apologize the ear worm that will be created by this next story you know that's when you hear a song you haven't heard in a long time and suddenly you'll be singing it the rest of the weekend all right brian calvert got one here he's remembering a writer a voice and songs most of us can instantly recall it's a great artist very few know the name but boy talk about creating saturday morning soundtrack for two generations hitter brian it's important i realize this guy was much more than a saturday morning staple it is my great pleasure to introduce one of the jazz greats bob dorough no the voice seems familiar saturday morning cartoons must have been big in your house during the nineteen seventies and eighties and it all started with this is magic yes during a ted talk in two thousand sixteen bob dorough took a mostly grey haired audience back in time to the moment that changed everything i had this call to have a meeting with the president of a little ad agency he said my little boys can't memorize the times tables but they sing along with jimi hendrix and the rolling stones bob turned out three is a magic number and a host of other tombs that eventually caught the ear of executives at abc sunday you're on television and the rest as they say is history.

us brian calvert writer bob dorough president jimi hendrix louis armstrong dave brubeck brian it abc eighteen years
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Right and i was a witness it's did we know he was guilty see the thing is when you know they're guilt veja home kills everybody does all that stuff it'd be very satisfying you know retribution for some people that's what they find it satisfying if i had reasons eight and and did it with my own hands but just like somebody really hurt my child right i want to yeah i could kill you could kill well what they were watched them die but i don't want to i don't want my my country in the business of killing right well we do it in other ways we do well we do it in other ways the to watch guy die in the chair is excruciating and there are three buttons three guys have their fingers on the button when the warden gives the signal so no one guy is known who is responsible but they hit him with four thousand volts and then thirty five hundred volts and then three thousand and what happens is when i watched this it was behind of course a plate glass window as he starts to cook you see the smoke rising from his body and his his net muscles go out like dizzy gillespie's cheeks playing the trumpet and he turns beet red and you watch him slowly cook it it was so distraught and i remember when i left the cook county jail and left the room of execution out in the streets of chicago at twenty six in california where the cook county jail was there were thousands of cars people lined up in the streets all around the jail because the rumor was that when they pushed the buttons you could see the lights dim in the jail these people just showed up.

dizzy gillespie chicago california cook county thirty five hundred volts four thousand volts
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Gold themes he's the man and the man was among those touch a spyders gene don't go g but i stand this guy as much it's the case okay me style two a few rare all this this is ooh ms madison cunningham during the part of shirley bassey from the views on two gold through suri also sang at diamonds are forever i think some other upon deems and then also you have to check out her performance on sungchol big spender another thing i found on of which dumb spotify hole so when i said it was the king's birthday this week are drummer ted poor thought i was talking about max roach and low he's right there's never been a better drummer teddy you learn to match roach so low note for note to celebrate the occasion of his birth what you've got has we'll go back to nineteen fifty six this is would he knew written by dizzy gillespie nice but oh from oh the.

shirley bassey max roach dizzy gillespie madison cunningham ted poor
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ms madison cunningham whom the part of shirley bassey and means onto gold vendors yuri also sang at diamonds are forever i think some other bonn themes and then also you have to check out her performance on sungchol big spender another thing i found on of which deng spotify whole so when i said it was the king's birthday this week are drummer ted poor thought i was talking about max roach and low he's right there's never been a better drummer teddy you've learn max roach so low note for no to celebrate the occasion of his birth what got has we'll go back to nineteen fifty six this is would he knew written by dizzy gillespie nice the poll one from the no but absolutely no two but.

shirley bassey deng max roach dizzy gillespie Ms madison cunningham yuri ted poor
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Ought to be actually i on the route to bridge channel puzzle ruined a wait a minute the rich i should know that up.

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Hey i just heard something great that you that you would just inducted hope this is the right word into the south carolina hall of fame man among other things that was that river in a i think it's fantastic we'll hear from cher cher all right this is that near columbia this eighty six miles north of columbia nor can we place something we let me play at little something with you yes uh on the alum have 'bout on alamo it's a great tune it's one i never play i don't know why i love to play hurting all right how's it you get into that whole say you just got started with was in mariel balls were marion merrel dow zia who belveze one who trent promo code for the what what he was you were in the band together we gm jeff we went february cab that's that's a while ago because they really got into the let thing an and you had shut up our arab abdomen fram led music from eu ongoing teuber next week to you on yet for a fourweek for a television show would you but i mean you were all over you and for sale brazil venezuela and all those places financial cuba was my low and you what you've been there already have been there once a renown only one time i've been what did you bring back anything particular that that struck you fancy that you could could play or the the adding of off from channel pulled on the uh.

columbia jeff venezuela cuba south carolina gm eu brazil fourweek
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Duties guest on piano jazz is the great dizzy gillespie who joined mariam at cartland the 1985 for what was truly one of her favorite programs the name dizzy described the playful personality and adventurous musical style of john burks gillespie what are the most celebrated jazz musicians of the 20th century this time i heard you was a cia still on his place in paris st lucia up towel and he played and he played me that record with alhagar on piano i guess beside the hothouse assault peanuts of both of those things and i was flabbergasted i'd never heard music like that an i'm saying what's the panoply of doing it how does he learn those courts is he what's he doing it it is the most exciting thing that ever happened to me whether you're wherever or new driver we've from whom watson what's new that was newton at plan in uh the music that charlie parker created the style that he created required that from the piano and required new ideas from the drums and also from the base because the the it made guys change the way of new invasion of the way you play and while you play now that require require that people change what they were to where we are hey we that we had you know then we had wanted that what did you have to show any that was piano players like when you first started out did you have to say like gearhead male more your shoulder purebred except malt.

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"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Sunny that's one of the one of the alltime great 2s and i loved it win dizzy gillespie put in that hold news a changes that led to a light on vets well you know i had such a a great time with you a while back when we played this concept together an and um you let me play a song for you and i'm sort of hoping you would let me do that again let it would be an honor may my extreme pleasure well this tune of cross goes way back um and it seems like would be a perfect tune to end the show i'll be seeing you that would be a perfect tune but before we go into red i must tell you what it really it's a joy having you here terry hugh is really might alleged extremely saw at you know i've look forward to this for a long time and once i knew that it was that in the bags who was beat gav second weight so you know it's been a dream of mine well here we are at and you've got to keep in touch and let me know way of playing so i can come in here you and may be hang out something that would be wonderful i'd love to have you in my audience on my stage anywhere you'd like to be all right we'll make a date meanwhile um i guess i uh should remember that you did this in a flat yes yes you have great mirrored yes okay.

dizzy gillespie terry hugh
"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Felonious month with beer at the birth of bebop and nearly 1940's when the emphasis on jay's shifted from big bands too virtual six small groups and the role played months compositions some of them even became famous charlie parker dizzy gillespie but monk remained relatively obscure in nineteen 64 he told radio host david kid he didn't let it get to him the moon was so much have liked there's always something argued by your mind of your time so many things of june lean fielded knows much if i did i would be bitter and monk had a lot to be bitter about he was broke most of his life for years he couldn't play in new york city because the police revoked his cabaret rijkaard his musicians license after he was arrested biographer robin killing felonious was arrested multiple times once for possession of marijuana once for possession of heroin which wasn't even his and once in delaware when he was traveling with a white woman in the please pulled up and stop them that white woman was the baroness panonia could to koenigs water she was a member of the rothschild family james enthusiast she became monks muse and his patron giving him money driving him to gigs and letting him rehearse and record at her home hired by i would like to move to a disc composed not long ago when taro it was named after two this beautiful lady here but known the women in monks life turned up a long in his music ruby my dear as written for former girlfriend he wrote cripple skilled with nilly for his wife wound yeah felonious monk was born in rocky mountain north carolina from his family moved.

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"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"dizzy gillespie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And there's very few musicians who have a sound so original that no one can democrat oh felonious month with beer at the birth of bebop nearly 1940s when the emphasis on jay's shifted from big bernes to virtual six small groups and the old played monks compositions some of them even became famous charlie parker dizzy gillespie but monk remained relatively obscure in nineteen 64 he told radio host david kid he didn't let it get to him the lou the somo's hatton leg there's always something argued by your mind of your term so many things of june infielder knows that much if i did i would be bitter and monkhood a luck to be bitter about he was broke most of his life for years he couldn't play in new york city because the police revoked his cabaret card his musicians license after he was arrested biographer robin killing the longest was arrested multiple times once for possession of marijuana one for possession of heroin which wasn't even his and once in delaware when his traveling with a white woman in the please pulled up and stop them that white woman was the baroness panonia could to koenigs water she was a member of the rothschild family and the jews enthusiast she became monks muse and his patron giving money driving him to gigs and letting him rehearsed and record at her home hi everybody and i would like to brew luke kuhn discomposed not long ago when taro pomona khor was named after this beautiful lady here canonical the women in monks life turned up a lot in his music ruby my dear has written for a former girlfriend he wrote critised you'll with lilley for his wife no burns felonious smoke was born in rocky mountain north carolina from his family moved to new york when.

taro pomona khor rocky mountain koenigs hatton david charlie parker new york north carolina lilley jay luke kuhn rothschild family delaware heroin marijuana robin new york city gillespie