2 Burst results for "Dixon Patton"

"dixon patton" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

06:07 min | 11 months ago

"dixon patton" Discussed on Native America Calling

"We look at the overall survival. Of the colony that comes from the United states. Over here we call invitational wildfires in 2016, has become one of the biggest sort of days on account of the protests have this also in all these issues. Sure, sure. So there's your podcast, the work Dixon is doing with his arts. You've mentioned some of these huge protests on Australia day. How else are activists working to change these narratives and uplift people stories and culture? And so one of the ways I heard you talking to the historian a bit earlier is sort of mentioned something about change today. That was sort of a progressive or so called sort of progressive idea that came I think around the earth 2000s from the great sort of wing political party, which has support a lot of sort of First Nations issues. Later on in the mid 2000s and the protests from coverage will act as this was abolished a bullish on the day. And one of the reasons why we say this is because what we wanted to do was give people an understanding that hey wait a minute because of all of these things that have happened not just on this day, but if we go and change it to another day, all we're doing is sort of celebrating the genocide of average of playful and other data. And at this point in time, we believe that Australia or the government don't have the right to sort of celebrate because like you've mentioned previously on your show. We haven't entered into a negotiation process for treaty. The story hasn't sort of been honest. And accepted sort of what they've done towards average. It has the most process. But I'm interested because I mean, some of these stories, these experiences that you've shared, that Dixon has shared the history that we've heard from doctor martini. I just wonder could the country of Australia recognize both its colonial past and still be respectful of its Aboriginal populations? Are these two paths just too hard to reconcile? What's your thought on that? Well, I think we might have lost both. So I'm going to go to doctor martini Martin, doctor Martin, did you hear that question I just asked? Oh, yeah, Sean. Well, when Bo gets on the line, you can answer it, but yeah, I mean, one thing I've heard discussed by people who really think about these issues and activists is recognition and celebration aren't necessarily the same thing. And so like we were saying they need to be a real confronting of the true history of the British colonization of Australia before there can be any kind of commemorative day that perhaps brings these two together. What about like an education campaign recognizing the origins of Australia day? And these decisions to create a holiday time to raise awareness of Aboriginal culture and challenges with something like that help yeah, and I mean, I'm not sure what's changed in the Australian curriculum, but I assume sort of among non Indigenous Australians, the majority of the population, of course, in Australia. Assume there is more history told your artist guest talked about. There's more interest in Aboriginal culture and history among the general settler population. But, you know, when I was in school, sort of in the 80s and 90s, there wasn't much. So it's really similar to the curriculum on the east coast definitely in the U.S. that most people don't get a lot of Native American history in the same in Australia. And yes that has to change. And I hope it is changing. Yeah, absolutely. And I know that these arguments to abolish Australia day have gained steam in recent years and it'll be interesting to see going forward if the government will hear these opposition voices, are they merely waiting until the movement loses steam, so we'll definitely want to pay attention to that. I do want to ask quickly if Bo is still on the line if he could share information about how folks can learn more about his podcast. Bow, are you still there? Doesn't look like we have bow. So I'm sorry about that, but I think if you Google name both sphere and I think you'll find some really good information in some great resources. Folks, that's all the time we have for a day's show and an enlightening discussion about Aboriginal peoples and their efforts to redefine Australia day into a more inclusive holiday. I want to thank my guests, doctor Elsbeth, martini, and Bo sporum, also thanks to Dixon Patton. We're back live tomorrow with a show about recognizing and addressing generational trauma on a personal level. We hope you can join us. I'm.

Australia Dixon martini Martin United states Bo Sean Martin east coast Elsbeth Bo sporum Dixon Patton Google martini
"dixon patton" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:31 min | 11 months ago

"dixon patton" Discussed on Native America Calling

"8 four 8. You're listening to Native American calling. We're going to be back right after the break. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st info at freedom lodge dot org who support this show. This is Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. We're learning about Australia day also called invasion day by the country's Aboriginal people. What parallels do you see with Australia's holiday? And those in the U.S. give us a call we want your input. The number as always one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Let's listen to a prerecorded interview by an artist by the name of Dixon Patton. I'm a major Ghanaian man from southeastern Australia. I'm practicing artist and graphic designer. If I'm getting the time zones and everything right, it is Australia day for you right now, right? Yeah, I mean, it's a big day. The general population for our community, though, it's a sad day. It's a day that we don't celebrate, often when the day comes around, I take time off I head up to the river, up to my grandmother's, and I don't want to be around people. And that's due to obviously today that we were colonized and the British came here and it was the beginning of the end of a lot of our languages and cultures. And it feels really slack to our ancestors to celebrate the day. For a long time our communities called four celebration a day that we can all celebrate together. But that hasn't come around yet. And our communities fights for that. If that day ever did come around, I mean, what are some ideas folks have for celebrating it? Would it be with indigenous culture or? Yeah, absolutely. I mean, the stress in a place where there's a lot of interest in Aboriginal culture now. Because of technology and because of Instagram and because of Facebook and policy changes, a lot more people have access to culture. That's the thing we make up 2% of the population. So a lot of people really don't even know any average at all people so they've never had access to culture, but now a lot of corporations and government embedding First Nations first. So seeing things through airlines, often they have acknowledgments to country. So acknowledge the country that you're on. There are over 250 language groups and tribal groups in Australia for people that don't know. So each of those is different country. So when you visit a different country, you acknowledge that country. So that's become almost common practice now. We think governments and corporations and that allows people to learn to share and to understand. I was peeking around at some news from Australia today. You know, also looking at what happened last year in during this time, Australia day. A lot of protests, right? Yeah, well, you know, it was centered around the whole Black Lives Matter movement. The in Australia is that way where a black nation or black community, but we're a united community. A lot of our inspiration has come from we've looked to the U.S. African American community and also the Native American community. There's a lot of alignment safe Fox, traditionally our culture is very similar. And the way that we connect a country connect the land connect to our toy items, connect to our ancestor beans. But then the other side too, it was the way that we traded as a black people. There were a lot of similarities to the African American history as well. So a lot of our freedom fighters back in the day had friends from over there or went over there and brought some of those teachings back. But that fire in the belly as well to stand up for our justice and everyone else. Outside of Victoria is currently embarking on a trading process with the only Commonwealth nation in the world to not have a treaty with its first peoples. So we've been looking to places like the states and other nations as well in how what has worked for their trading process and what hasn't. A lot of our elders we're taking their voices and their counsel, that's going to shape where we go as a nation in the future. A lot of people don't know as well in the constitution. We don't even recognize the name. Yeah, we're not even recorded as being here. It still says terminals, which means empty land. And that clearly wasn't the case. The funny thing that strikes me is we're always saying it's being the oldest continuous culture in the world being not disrupted for 60,000 years. But Australia doesn't celebrate that as much as it should. I've traveled the world a bit and we've gone to other countries like you go to a tower, New Zealand, the first thing that happens when you get off the plane is you see me out of culture everywhere. The language is embedded people learn it in school, but it's only now in the last ten years that you start to see Aboriginal culture embedded. They're starting to put in architecture and starting to put it in markers up in statues up and things like that. And you know a lot of that's been being pushed through a lot of our outer street, now artists, and our storytellers, which is beautiful. But it's only one small step. It's one thing to say pretty artwork, but it's another thing to understand it and know what's important. There was artist Dixon Patton sharing his thoughts, sharing his experiences. In Australia, thinking of Australia day, some of this history, some of this culture. This Australia day, it's mentioned in many calendars here in the U.S. I think as Americans, we can compare it to Thanksgiving or 4th of July. But what is Australia day mean to you? Definitely. This is a very important question, a great question as well. Australia means that the base of this country will push you off of those colonial high sports and sort of ideas that people celebrate today that Australia is a great nation. Australia is a great nation, Australia. As a free country or a celebrate a sort of ideas that have virtual people and to our channel, people go to feel that we get to sort of celebrate because of as Alaska mentioned. We've been here for 60,000 years and that's what celebrated the same sort of historical celebration. And I think one thing is also as to understand is that how long do they actually stay? Because when consequent throughout time has been moved to various different days throughout the year, so as long as celebrating our visual torsion people, in particular, this will people have been protesting that based on a mountain 38 here in Sydney's they had what was called a day of warning and also saw a protest through the streets of Sydney. And Sidney town hall had a gathering of almost around a couple of hundred people. Men, women, elderly people, young children. And I think this signified one of the first gatherings of the world, what was spoken at the sort of gathering was people what to mock that a 150 celebration of Australia, you know, mobile and its approach to mobile and to sort of use this day as a platform to change the sort of livelihoods of average people to have a right to.

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